70 meter ropes MANDATORY???? WTF???

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locker

Social climber
state of Kumbaya...
Dec 11, 2012 - 10:10am PT

"Cause another 30 feet of rope is just so hard to coil"...



CORRECT!!!...


if you have ever humped your rack and stuff a long way uphill you would not make such a dumb statement."...


INCORRECT!!!
...




;-)






EDITED:

Happie wrote...



"Wojtek?"...

as in Wren???...

FRUMY

Trad climber
SHERMAN OAKS,CA
Dec 11, 2012 - 11:13am PT
Why don't we all start packing 140m ropes.

There are no ropes on a ship (boat). You learn your ropes on a ship, but there are no ropes on a ship. There are lines, there are sheets, and many other thing made out of rope, but there are no ropes.

There are good reasons for 60m to be the standard in climbing.



TFSTFU

Trad climber
Utah
Dec 11, 2012 - 11:18am PT
Wtf is a 60 mm or 140 mm rope there Mr. technicality?
Chinchen

climber
Way out there....
Dec 11, 2012 - 11:20am PT
Guy, stay away from the Eastside. It sucks balls here. Pine Creek is choss and the longer nature of the climbs makes them harder......and that is no fun.
I will ask Austin, but I am pretty sure 3 hour arete was put up on lead. But really , who cares when you are repeating it?

JFMR is a great route, the belay stations are all at logical points, Tai does however tend to put up idiotproof routes....


Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Dec 11, 2012 - 11:20am PT
80 is the new 70
RP3

Big Wall climber
El Portal/Chapel Hill
Dec 11, 2012 - 11:24am PT
Man....even a 70 wont even allow you to get off of Outer Limits 1st pitch. This is BS. They should have put in the anchor lower so we can just use a 60!

Just kidding. I guess I fail to see the problem. If a pitch is too long to lower off of, just get a longer rope or bring a 2nd. I feel like this DEFINITELY goes under the "1st world problems" category
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 11, 2012 - 11:43am PT
Thank you all for your well thought out answers.

This is a FIRST WORLD problem cause it involves climbing I reckon.

I’ll go with Nick’s advice, bite the bullet, and pay a ton for an extra-long cord that will still will require me to lug a second cord when I go to the Needles or the Valley or who knows where.

I still think that the numbers of injury’s will increase from stupid belay, drop mistakes.

Call me old if you will, but I can now relate to Chuck Willts.

End of Rant.
pa

climber
Dec 11, 2012 - 12:04pm PT
Since Pine Creek is part of the subject, a side note about Bighorn sheep seems to be in order:

From the north end of the Wheeler crest to the end of Pine Cr. road, at the level of the first band of cliffs, is critical Bighorn sheep WINTER habitat. When they are disturbed by people and dogs, they are forced to move up, which puts them into avalanche zone.
Obviously, this is particularly true after storms.
This adds to the dangers they face, including starvation and mountain lion attacks. Yes, it's rough out there...

Officials of the Bighorn Sheep Foundation and Fish and Game are monitoring closely climber impact. There is a very real possibility of closing off the area.
Every effort should be made by climbers at this time, to reduce the amount of disturbance to the sheep.
The numbers will be the deciding factor, because a few occasional climbers will not cause significant impact, but a steady influx, especially if accompanied by dogs, will have consequences.
Avoid going there after storms and restrain your dogs, (or, better yet, don't bring them).
If we want to avoid government intervention, please be considerate.
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Dec 11, 2012 - 12:11pm PT
even a 70 wont even allow you to get off of Outer Limits 1st pitch.

Not true at all. 70 will get you down from that climb.


70m is very nice to have for cragging in Indian creek, linking pitches on alpine climbs/walls/whatever, longer rappells, etc etc. Lots of advantages. Whoever says it sucks because it weights a tad more should lose some weight. Especially for Pine Creek- the crag is whole 5 minutes of casual walking from the car.
Silver

Gym climber
Dec 11, 2012 - 12:21pm PT
70 meter ropes are so last year I'm using an 73 meter rope now. All my routes are 36.45 meters.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Dec 11, 2012 - 12:26pm PT
70 meters is so yesterday. We've been using them for sport cragging (including Pine Creek) for years.

You can cut them into thirds when their toast and they make good gym lead ropes.

The only down side is that coiling them fatigues my old wasting arms.

Fletcher

Trad climber
The rock doesn't care what I think
Dec 11, 2012 - 12:43pm PT
I recently bought a 60m meter rope on one of those one-off at a time deal sites (yeah, it was stored next to the battery acid department). So the thing shows up and I'm thinking, "fuk, this dog is heavy!" It was a beefy 10.5, but still. Then I look at the tag and it's a 70m! I get in touch with the battery disposal department and they tell me they ran out of 60s (must have been all of you geezers here snapping them up), so they just sent me a 70. I appreciated the thought, but....

One of the times for me where more was less. I might use a 70 for certain things, but my plans for this rope did not include me lugging it around in that state. So I cut 10m off and was done with it!

> There are no ropes on a ship (boat). You learn your ropes on a ship, but there
> are no ropes on a ship. There are lines, there are sheets, and many other thing
> made out of rope, but there are no ropes.

Sort of. My grandfather was in the Coast Guard in WWII and he always had a couple of power boats at his home on Cape Cod. He was always giving me sh#t for calling a "line" a "rope." But there are ropes on boats. As he reminded me a bazillion times, a rope is an inch or thicker in diameter. Anything less is a line.

Now somebody is going to go look up the definitive net reference and prove me wrong. And that my grandpa was full of it. But that's ok, I already know that he was! :-)

Eric
locker

Social climber
state of Kumbaya...
Dec 11, 2012 - 12:45pm PT


ROFL!!!...

"I get in touch with the battery disposal department"...

Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Dec 11, 2012 - 12:50pm PT
The only down side is that coiling them fatigues my old wasting arms.

Convicted from his own mouth - the CE requirement is use of a certified rope receptacle, due to the hazards that coiled ropes present.
RP3

Big Wall climber
El Portal/Chapel Hill
Dec 11, 2012 - 02:36pm PT
Yeah Vitaliy, I stand corrected...

But a 60 won't...right? I remember being there once with a rope that was too short, and I have never owned anything shorter than a 60. My point was that many classics need either a longer rope or two ropes and this is not solely an issue brought up by long modern sport climbs.

Cheers,
Roger
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Dec 11, 2012 - 03:07pm PT
But a 60 won't...right? I remember being there once with a rope that was too short, and I have never owned anything shorter than a 60. My point was that many classics need either a longer rope or two ropes and this is not solely an issue brought up by long modern sport climbs.

Lol, tough question. When I led it, I was unable to get down with a 60. Friend connected our other rope to the end of one I was on. But last weekend I was at the same crag and a couple was able to get down with stretch on something they claimed was a 60M. I would use a 70 though :)
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Dec 11, 2012 - 03:11pm PT
Wow, poor Guyzo. Quite the shitstorm unleashed upon him for a simple observation/grouse. Like that never happens on this site.

Personally, my current rope is OLD and when I get around to finally replacing this winter, it'll be a 70. Sure they're heavier, but skinny. It'll still weigh less than my old 10.5 x 60 m.
ladyscarlett

Trad climber
SF Bay Area, California
Dec 11, 2012 - 03:16pm PT
as a being with short arms and legs...i can definitely feel the difference between coiling a 60 and a 70. Actually takes me a measurably longer time to get it all neat. Feels heavier too, which totally slows me down on the approach and decsent.

This is all because I'm a weakling newb trying to train up, so I'll always take the rope. Hopefully the 80 will get popular and I can start training for realzzz!

after all, how else can I keep up my 'sherpa' image to keep the tourons from asking me inane questions?

heheh

cheers

LS
msiddens

Trad climber
Dec 11, 2012 - 03:16pm PT
different strokes.........personally I love the single 70 to get down but then again more bolts and all that.
philo

Trad climber
Is that light the end of the tunnel or a train?
Dec 11, 2012 - 03:44pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#277818
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