Nose Rack 1979

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Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 28, 2008 - 04:52pm PT
As far as the Strawberry Mt. pack goes, Victor was a good friend of ours. We were always siting around inventing things for him to sew. We used to drag a pack up just about everything we ever did. At the beginning, it was your typical day pack that would get worn out and useless after just a few climbs. This first pack we designed, the one in the photo, was triple layer codura but it was reversible. It was a pack on the outside but a small haul bag on the inside. We would hike to the base, pull the thing inside out, stuff our gear, cameras, clothes, food, water, descent shoes in it and drag it up the climb. It was great.
Victor made one for Max that had loops on the bottom so you could clip another pack on to it.
We used to call those pack the "Grade V Pack.
We also though up the Mini Traxion thing, we just never knew where to get it manufactured.

It was our second ascent of the Nose together. The first route Max and I ever did together was the Nose in the spring of 1976.
therapist

Trad climber
Woodbridge, CA
Jun 28, 2008 - 05:45pm PT
Yes, the water thing was absurd. I remember, the unwritten rule was 1.5 quarts per person per day. It was as if you weren't allowed to take more or you would never make the route. Surprising any of us made any of them. I remember being on the Chouinard/Herbert on Sentinal on a hot mid-July day savoring the few swigs of hot water I had remaining for the day. It tasted like nector. We dove headlong into the stream on the descent and water has never tasted so good to this day.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 28, 2008 - 06:16pm PT
I don't know why we went with only 7 quarts. I'm sure we planned on being on it only 2.5 days but even then the water seems a little light. That might been as much that fit into our packs and 3 gallons (a more realistic amount) simply might just been too heavy.
I don't know, we survived.

We did the East Ledges descent and dumped our packs and walked right into the river, submerged like frogs, with only the tops of our heads and eyes above water. There was a family having a picnic right there and they asked us what we had just climbed. We told them and they offered us a glass of lemonade. We drank it in one gulp and they offered us more. The woman looked at us, looked at the pitcher and just gave us the whole pitcher. We polished it off in a couple of gulps and thanked them. The guy then asked if we wanted a beer! It was a Bud or a Schlitz or a Coors but we downed them in about three gulps! It was just about the best beer I've ever tasted!

Paulina

Trad climber
Jun 28, 2008 - 08:35pm PT
Wow, thank you! Inspirational.
Captain...or Skully

Big Wall climber
Yonder
Jun 29, 2008 - 12:35am PT
These are The Nose climbers....
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jun 29, 2008 - 01:16am PT
Thanks, Mark - a nice story.

H.W. Tilman, in his voluminous travels and writings, had a category of event called "memorable bathes". He went swimming in some quite interesting places, but most were memorable for the relief they brought.

It sounds like you had a memorable bathe in the Merced that afternoon. One of the great sybaritic pleasures of climbing - a cool swim and drink after a hot day on the rock.

Perhaps we should have a memorable bathes thread. Very seasonal, too.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 29, 2008 - 05:39am PT
midarockjock,

> I don't understand the loop on the carbiner? That does not provide a mechanical advantage.

Right, it does not provide a mechanical advantage. The extra loop of rope through the left biner makes it easier to hold the haul rope fixed at that biner with one hand, so the foot pulley would work on the loop in the haul rope.

However, this setup was not as good as Mark's setup (with the two Gibbs ascenders), because the foot pulley/loop with its 2:1 system, is too slow.

It might try it with a miniTraxion instead of a foot pulley, and without the extra loop in the left biner. Then one hand up high might still work to advance the miniTraxion on the haul rope. The alternative seems to be using your hand below the miniTraxion to hold the rope tight so the foot can lift the miniTraxion up the rope. I presume Mark did something like that to work the Gibbs with his foot/leg.
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Jun 29, 2008 - 10:37am PT
Clint Cummins,
Is this method in the Chongo Book?

Edit: the chongo joke was already made.
What do you call that block on the biner Clint. Kind of knot???

Edit: Wow the water thing is getting me thinking. i.e. I love logistics!!!! 1 gallon per person per a day on ElCapitan, Right? Unless, you are doing alot of freeclimbing. Then do you bring more? or less water?

Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 29, 2008 - 10:55am PT
1 gallon per man per day is too much. A five day route would be ten gallons of water which would weigh 83 pounds!
Even today, in my advanced old age, I'd go with 1/2 gallon per man per day and then include a fruit drink per man per day.
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Jun 29, 2008 - 11:39am PT
That's funny, We did take 86 lbs. of water up the Nose......still don't know how we did it?

Edit: with your calculations it would be 86 lbs and then some.

And we even got to leave some for team Hubers. At the top. Pretty rad summer!!!!
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 29, 2008 - 11:56am PT
Isn't water 8.33 pounds per gallon?

I'm sorry, but in this day and age, with all the advances in gear and all the knowledge of the route, I simply can't see how anyone can spend five days on the Nose. To me, at the very least, you should be able to on-sight and ramble up 5.10a consistently as a minimum before going up there.
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Jun 29, 2008 - 12:01pm PT
Mark,
We haul the pine line. Drag the pig to the bottom of the second pitch. I haul the second pitch and Sarah get's the pig around the poor dead Tree. As Sarah starts up the Third pitch, I notice some red goo ozzing out of one of the new holes in the pig. Sarah looks down at me and gives me this look....isn't it a little early to be having dinner?
Karl Baba

Trad climber
Yosemite, Ca
Jun 29, 2008 - 12:15pm PT
Also did the Nose in 1981 and like the other 1981 party, didn't bring pins. Was it done clean regularly 2 years earlier?

Seems like that was the time when folks were starting to make the pin-free choice more often but not always

peace

Karl
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 29, 2008 - 08:50pm PT
I think we made three pin placements.
TomLambert

Social climber
Yosemite, CA
Jul 3, 2008 - 04:24pm PT
>> I think everyone used the two quarts per day rule.

The other day (at the Yuji and Hans event) I overheard Tom Frost interviewing with the media and he was saying they budgetted one quart per person per day for the second ascent of the Nose and counted on ten days. When things started looking good and they thought they'd be off quicker, they upped the allowance to 1.5 per person per day and finished with a couple of extra gallons.

My old partner's brother (Steve Zajchowski) went out to Yosemite during the 1970s at some point and I always remembered taht they climbed by the 1.5 quarts per person per day rule. I remember him saying they had a quart to split during the day, and then they both got a full quart of their own to rehydrate with at night (I think that's how they did it). Not sure what they climbed.

A little aside, before the 1950s, standard advice from Olympic marathoners was not to drink during the race.

Why do we modern folks need so damn much water? I can easily down a gallon a day in hot weather.
purplesage

Trad climber
Bend, OR
Jul 3, 2008 - 05:47pm PT
I did the Nose in 79 and as I recall we made just a few pin placements getting up to Sickle but none above that. I think they were 3/4" angles that fit right in the scar and didn't even need to be hammered. We only had a couple Friends, a 3 and a 4, not quite the rack Mark has in the photo. We planned on 2 quarts per day per person and had some left over after a 2 1/2 day ascent. The best thing was the route was almost empty. The worst thing was getting pissed on by some friends on the Shield!
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 3, 2008 - 05:54pm PT
Some friends did it in autumn 1976 and placed only one pin - hand placed, I think. There may have been more fixed pins in it at that time.
Dr. Rock

Ice climber
Castle Rock
Jul 3, 2008 - 06:04pm PT
If you lose 10 lbs of water, easier to climb.
You can drink when your dead.
Red ooze, hope it was not wine.
midarockjock

climber
USA
Jul 3, 2008 - 06:04pm PT
Clint Cummins,

I'm not bumping the thread. I came across these.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=623002&msg=623454#msg623454

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=623002&msg=623529#msg623529
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Jul 3, 2008 - 09:23pm PT
Mark Hudson,
Thanks for starting this thread. Very cool. The transition of thinking Free instead of Aid was a cool time in climbing. And way before my time.

I guess I chimed in because we climbed the nose with a similar rock minus the pins. But I wanted to try to free alot of it, onsight free as can be. (didn't come close to Happening) So, we brought way to much stuff.

Dr. Rock,
The red ooze was a can of spegattios. And the pounds of liquid would have been 90lbs+++ (3 bottles of wine).

Chris.
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