Nose Rack 1979

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Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Original Post - Jun 26, 2008 - 07:56pm PT


I just got a scanner so I'm dedicating myself to scanning the four thousand climbing slides I have.

In September of 1979 Max Jones and I climbed the Nose on El Cap. We had it figured that if we were to haul very small bags (we hauled two packs, each smaller than the pack you probably hike your gear around to the local crags), we would be able to belay a second and haul at the same time, since we both wanted to climb every pitch, even the aid.
We had seven quarts of water, a down jacket and half bag each, two and a half ropes and all the gear you see here.

3 full sets of Friends (yup, a 1 a 2 and a 3!) and one #4. 10 Friends in all.
13 nuts,
6 quick draws and three or four 2 foot slings.
16 extra carabiners
Five pitons, one hammer,
two-3-step aid slings
and one set of Gibbs ascenders.
Waist bands, no leg loops.

We started up the route at about 5:30am with no pitches fixed and climbed casually to El Cap Tower using no more aid than the pendulums into Dolt corner and the Stove Legs.
We spent a night on ELC and the next day free climbed all but the bolt ladder to Boot Flake, the King Swing, about half of the Great Roof and the Super Crack above Camp 5.
After the Great Roof I clipped the aid slings onto the haul line and dropped them down to Max. If we had to use a pin, we would haul that and the hammer up from the anchor and then drop it down the haul line at the end of the pitch.
On some pitches, the second would simply solo the pitch while the leader hauled, often, when the second did get a belay, it was a very impersonal and loose belay.
We climbed to Camp 6 that day.
The next day we climbed to the top, using a bit of aid on the Changing Corners pitch and then only the bolts on the last pitch.

All in all we did the route in 2.5 days, both climbers climbed the whole route and we climbed as much of it free as had ever been climbed at that time
khanom

Trad climber
eestsyde
Jun 26, 2008 - 07:57pm PT
Wow! That's very cool to see.
yo

climber
I drink your milkshake!
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:00pm PT
Pretty light duty throwing in that #4, hehe.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:01pm PT
wow... that's the way to do it!

I wonder if Gary Carpenter will read this, I can put that exact rack together out of my gear box... including the vintage Friends...
..now if we were only as good as you guys were!
yo

climber
I drink your milkshake!
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:04pm PT
I'm still studying this. Seven quarts of water!

What's funny is, if more people tried to gear up this way now, they'd all top out instead of bailing off Sickle with their 300 pounds of shyte. There's progress for ya.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:06pm PT
Mark,

Cool!

How did you belay the second so that you could switch your hands between that and hauling? Did you belay the second on a Sticht plate or a Munter hitch?

2 1/2 ropes - what was the half rope for?
Jaybro

Social climber
wuz real!
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:06pm PT
if you miss anything I'll loan it to you Ed, though you'd have to settle for a Forest™ hammer. how hard could they have been? it was '79?

They were The Man!
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 26, 2008 - 08:10pm PT
We belayed with a Stich plate on the anchor.
The half rope was to lower out the bag.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:13pm PT
> We belayed with a Stich plate on the anchor.

Cool - I think the current version would be a GriGri. Then maybe leg hauling with a miniTraxion would cover the hauling without having to lug a second set of ascenders.

Here is what I worked out a few years ago, to try to emulate your method:

http://www.stanford.edu/~clint/yos/haul1h1f/



I've only tried this once - on Astroman, and I couldn't keep up with my partner following, so I ended up arm hauling and the usual forearm cramps resulted later.

Did you leg haul, or use your arms?
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 26, 2008 - 08:16pm PT
leg haul. the whole deal pivoted on the bags being that light.
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, Ca.
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:16pm PT
Inspirational and Bad Ass!!!

I like that.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:23pm PT
So the Gibbs ascender must have been on your foot for the leg haul - yeah - that would make it a 1:1 haul and thus faster! (Mine is a messy/slow 2:1). So I need a second miniTraxion (for my foot) for a better modern version!

See the separate thread, hauling on free climbs:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=627024
GhoulweJ

Trad climber
Sacramento, CA
Jun 26, 2008 - 08:35pm PT
Oh yeah, I just read Chongos Big Wall book and you did it all wrong.... Light weight ROOKIE!
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 26, 2008 - 08:40pm PT
I think we did mostly the foot thing since we had only waistbands. We would clip a sling to one of the Gibbs and pump it off with a leg, you know, the classic setup.

We'd be climbing along, the belayer wouldn't be paying much attention and there would be a fifty foot loop of rope hanging down from our waists. We'd yell "Hey, belay!" The belayer would haul up the rope, pay attention for a while but then you'd start getting a big ol loop again. On the harder pitches we'd pay attention of course.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder Colorado
Jun 26, 2008 - 09:22pm PT
cool stuff Mark.
looking forward to more!
nick d

Trad climber
nm
Jun 26, 2008 - 09:36pm PT
Wow! What a couple of studs!

As for the comment about how carrying more gear makes everyone back off now, well I'm guessing they would only be backing off SOONER with a rack like you guys used!

Thanks for sharing, now I must be off to my "hopelessly inadequate" therapy session. LOL!
hobo_dan

Social climber
Minnesota
Jun 26, 2008 - 09:41pm PT
Stout!
You guys were flying
Zander

Trad climber
Berkeley
Jun 26, 2008 - 11:33pm PT
Awesome thread!
Landgolier

climber
the flatness
Jun 26, 2008 - 11:54pm PT
Bad A$$$$$$!

Light is right, but man, 7 quarts? That would get me to about noon on the second day. I guess we've all conditioned ourselves to drink and pee more nowadays, but still, I often carry 3 quarts to the crag and kill another 2 when I get back to the car.

You guys remember what you carried for food?
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 27, 2008 - 12:00am PT
I think we had peanut butter sandwiches. We certainly didn't haul any canned food up there. Probably some granola bars.

It was hot too! We hung out on Dolt Tower waiting for the sun to go around the corner. We climbed up to ELC only to find a guy and a chick on their fourth day on the climb with six gallons of water! We asked if we might refresh a couple of our water bottles and they said, no, that they might take a few more days to get to the top. We had to respect that.
The next day we climbed to Camp 6 and sat there in the sun, eyeing the quart of water each of us had left.
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jun 27, 2008 - 12:00am PT
Wow! That's a small rack!

Baby pigs. Any hammock?

Sheesh! Awesome!
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 27, 2008 - 12:07am PT
A pig? No hammocks, of course not.

Here is a shot of Max a little bit below camp 6. That pack is the size of a medium/small average everyday cargging pack. We had two of them. They were specially made for us by Victor Marcus who owned Strawberry Mountain Company.

duncan

Trad climber
London, UK
Jun 27, 2008 - 02:35am PT
Nose Rack 1981



Pretty similar to Mark's:

11 Friends (2 x number 4 - not as confident on the wider stuff)
6 nuts on rope
1 set Rocks
1 set RPs
 quick-draws (quick draws hadn't reached the UK)
24 free 'biners
2 pairs of aiders
2 pairs of Petzl ascenders

Troll haulbag - backpack size - about 70 litres?

I think this was a fairly typical rack for the time, I don't recall that we were especially trying to shave the grams. We didn't have much else we could have taken. Gear was more expensive in 1981, relative to the cost of beer.

We made a 2 bivi ascent, second man jugging and not at free as Mark and Max of course.

Simon (in yellow) has climbed 5.14 and did the Bob Graham Round two weeks ago in 22 hours 30 minutes. I had a strong partner!
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jun 27, 2008 - 08:44am PT
Mark
Pig is slang for a haulbag.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 27, 2008 - 08:57am PT


Maybe 2-3 pitches above Camp 6?
It looks like the 5.8 section near the end of p31 in the 1982 Meyers topo. (But I could be wrong)

Beautiful spot.
Edge

Trad climber
New Durham, NH
Jun 27, 2008 - 08:58am PT
Mark, I climbed for a decade in a Strawberry Mountain swami belt, including using it on the Regular Route on Half Dome.

I still have the Mountain Magazine article "Art of the States" that inspired me to push myself to my personal limits; the fact that you and Max were from NH made me realize that anything was possible.

Cheers!
MisterE

Social climber
My Inner Nut
Jun 27, 2008 - 09:38am PT
Thanks for a great thread, Mark. Looking forward to more scans 'n stories!

Erik Wolfe
Tony Puppo

climber
Bishop
Jun 27, 2008 - 10:30am PT
Hey Mark, I was that guy with a chick, Janet Wilts. You guts were flying. It was super hot and we really wanted to give y'all some water and in the end we topped out, 6.5 days not too bad we thought. Didn't you break your wrist swinging into a corner down low?
Cheers,
Tony
Dave Johnson

Mountain climber
Sacramento, CA
Jun 27, 2008 - 10:39am PT
Just think how much faster you would have climbed if you guys had a thermos of Hood River Coffee; probably would have been the 3rd or 4th NIAD!
Jingy

Social climber
Flatland, Ca
Jun 27, 2008 - 10:43am PT
Just bass Add!
Roman

Trad climber
Boston
Jun 27, 2008 - 10:46am PT
Absolutely unbelievable. Just too cool and very inspirational.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 27, 2008 - 11:07am PT
Tony, That's so funny! after all these years... I don't think I broke it but it bothered me for quite a while after that.

That story is: I had belayed at the very top of Sickle ledge, Max swung over and climbed up to Dolt Hole, not placing any gear at all. I lowered out the bag, Max hauled it and then took up the rope. I unclipped from the anchor and yelled up to Max "I think I'll just slide over". Max said "are you sure?" I let go and was immediately "sliding" way faster than I wanted to and crashed into the corner. I really jambed my wrist but at the anchor I just wrapped it real tight with some tape and continued on.
We passed some guys there in Dolt Hole, we passed them so fast that they got bummed out and rapped off!

Tony, do you remember those four BASE jumpers that next morning?

Max is from Nevada, I'm the New Hampshire boy.
Roger Breedlove

climber
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Jun 27, 2008 - 01:55pm PT
Nice thread Mark. I still don't understand how everyone managed to get by on so little water. I think everyone used the two quarts per day rule.

The few times I have become fatigued due to dehydration never happened on a long climb. Good thing, too.
Jimmy S

climber
Granite State
Jun 27, 2008 - 03:53pm PT
Very cool Mark.
"Long Hard and Free" was inspirational to me and my buddies in the 80's. I really liked the Free as can be mind set. Start at the bottom, go to the top. Free as much as possible. "No need to get crazy about it". Get that scanner cranking!
Jim Surette
North Conway
Tony Puppo

climber
Bishop
Jun 27, 2008 - 03:56pm PT
Yeah the base jumpers scared the hell out of us. They opened up just above us and I remember saying to them you guys are crazy and their reply of "no you guys are the crazy ones!"
Double D

climber
Jun 27, 2008 - 06:43pm PT
Sweet post Mark. No jumars? Ho Man!
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jun 27, 2008 - 07:53pm PT
Thanks for the story, and pictures - very nice! Was it your first ascent of the Nose?
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder Colorado
Jun 27, 2008 - 08:07pm PT
RE:

"They were specially made for us by Victor Marcus who owned Strawberry Mountain Company"

any historical information for us, Mark?

Strawberry was cool :)
le_bruce

climber
Oakland: what's not to love?
Jun 28, 2008 - 02:03am PT
What a great thread - hard to wrap the mind around the information you're giving us. Way out there!

Somewhere buried on this site is a pic that Chris Mac posted of the rack Caldwell used on the Nose the day he freed it and the Salathe. That was an anemic rack, but if we strike the pins, yours may be smaller.

Seven quarts of water is a pittance!


Edit:

From Chris Mac: http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=114312&msg=117379#msg117379

Caldwell's rack:

1 each really small cams
2 each .75"- 2.5" (small blue camalot to gold gold camalot)
1 # 3 (the blue camalot)
1 # 4 (the gray camalot)
1 # 6 (the really big green camalot)

4 stoppers (but i dont think he placed a single one)

8 draws

6 long slings

1 60m 10mm rope


And another rack McNamara used on a speed ascent of the Nose: http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=119120&msg=119120#msg119120

PS: here was our rack

8 stoppers
1 purple/blue alien
1 green alien
1 yellow alien
1 yellow/red alien
2 red aliens
2 orange aliens
2 red camlots (#1)
1 gold camalot (#2)
1 blue camalot (#3)
1 gray camalot (#4)



I take more than all of these combined when I go up single pitch climbs.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 28, 2008 - 03:29am PT
The rack quoted above for Tommy is for Freerider, not for the Nose or Salathe'. No way would Tommy take a #6 up the Nose!
midarockjock

climber
USA
Jun 28, 2008 - 01:28pm PT
Clint Cummins,

I don't understand the loop on the carbiner? That
does not provide a mechanical advantage.

I did not like "-> stitch plates?" due to rope twist
when used for rappel so I did stay with a figure 8
for both belays and rappels.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 28, 2008 - 04:52pm PT
As far as the Strawberry Mt. pack goes, Victor was a good friend of ours. We were always siting around inventing things for him to sew. We used to drag a pack up just about everything we ever did. At the beginning, it was your typical day pack that would get worn out and useless after just a few climbs. This first pack we designed, the one in the photo, was triple layer codura but it was reversible. It was a pack on the outside but a small haul bag on the inside. We would hike to the base, pull the thing inside out, stuff our gear, cameras, clothes, food, water, descent shoes in it and drag it up the climb. It was great.
Victor made one for Max that had loops on the bottom so you could clip another pack on to it.
We used to call those pack the "Grade V Pack.
We also though up the Mini Traxion thing, we just never knew where to get it manufactured.

It was our second ascent of the Nose together. The first route Max and I ever did together was the Nose in the spring of 1976.
therapist

Trad climber
Woodbridge, CA
Jun 28, 2008 - 05:45pm PT
Yes, the water thing was absurd. I remember, the unwritten rule was 1.5 quarts per person per day. It was as if you weren't allowed to take more or you would never make the route. Surprising any of us made any of them. I remember being on the Chouinard/Herbert on Sentinal on a hot mid-July day savoring the few swigs of hot water I had remaining for the day. It tasted like nector. We dove headlong into the stream on the descent and water has never tasted so good to this day.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 28, 2008 - 06:16pm PT
I don't know why we went with only 7 quarts. I'm sure we planned on being on it only 2.5 days but even then the water seems a little light. That might been as much that fit into our packs and 3 gallons (a more realistic amount) simply might just been too heavy.
I don't know, we survived.

We did the East Ledges descent and dumped our packs and walked right into the river, submerged like frogs, with only the tops of our heads and eyes above water. There was a family having a picnic right there and they asked us what we had just climbed. We told them and they offered us a glass of lemonade. We drank it in one gulp and they offered us more. The woman looked at us, looked at the pitcher and just gave us the whole pitcher. We polished it off in a couple of gulps and thanked them. The guy then asked if we wanted a beer! It was a Bud or a Schlitz or a Coors but we downed them in about three gulps! It was just about the best beer I've ever tasted!

Paulina

Trad climber
Jun 28, 2008 - 08:35pm PT
Wow, thank you! Inspirational.
Captain...or Skully

Big Wall climber
Yonder
Jun 29, 2008 - 12:35am PT
These are The Nose climbers....
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jun 29, 2008 - 01:16am PT
Thanks, Mark - a nice story.

H.W. Tilman, in his voluminous travels and writings, had a category of event called "memorable bathes". He went swimming in some quite interesting places, but most were memorable for the relief they brought.

It sounds like you had a memorable bathe in the Merced that afternoon. One of the great sybaritic pleasures of climbing - a cool swim and drink after a hot day on the rock.

Perhaps we should have a memorable bathes thread. Very seasonal, too.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 29, 2008 - 05:39am PT
midarockjock,

> I don't understand the loop on the carbiner? That does not provide a mechanical advantage.

Right, it does not provide a mechanical advantage. The extra loop of rope through the left biner makes it easier to hold the haul rope fixed at that biner with one hand, so the foot pulley would work on the loop in the haul rope.

However, this setup was not as good as Mark's setup (with the two Gibbs ascenders), because the foot pulley/loop with its 2:1 system, is too slow.

It might try it with a miniTraxion instead of a foot pulley, and without the extra loop in the left biner. Then one hand up high might still work to advance the miniTraxion on the haul rope. The alternative seems to be using your hand below the miniTraxion to hold the rope tight so the foot can lift the miniTraxion up the rope. I presume Mark did something like that to work the Gibbs with his foot/leg.
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Jun 29, 2008 - 10:37am PT
Clint Cummins,
Is this method in the Chongo Book?

Edit: the chongo joke was already made.
What do you call that block on the biner Clint. Kind of knot???

Edit: Wow the water thing is getting me thinking. i.e. I love logistics!!!! 1 gallon per person per a day on ElCapitan, Right? Unless, you are doing alot of freeclimbing. Then do you bring more? or less water?

Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 29, 2008 - 10:55am PT
1 gallon per man per day is too much. A five day route would be ten gallons of water which would weigh 83 pounds!
Even today, in my advanced old age, I'd go with 1/2 gallon per man per day and then include a fruit drink per man per day.
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Jun 29, 2008 - 11:39am PT
That's funny, We did take 86 lbs. of water up the Nose......still don't know how we did it?

Edit: with your calculations it would be 86 lbs and then some.

And we even got to leave some for team Hubers. At the top. Pretty rad summer!!!!
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 29, 2008 - 11:56am PT
Isn't water 8.33 pounds per gallon?

I'm sorry, but in this day and age, with all the advances in gear and all the knowledge of the route, I simply can't see how anyone can spend five days on the Nose. To me, at the very least, you should be able to on-sight and ramble up 5.10a consistently as a minimum before going up there.
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Jun 29, 2008 - 12:01pm PT
Mark,
We haul the pine line. Drag the pig to the bottom of the second pitch. I haul the second pitch and Sarah get's the pig around the poor dead Tree. As Sarah starts up the Third pitch, I notice some red goo ozzing out of one of the new holes in the pig. Sarah looks down at me and gives me this look....isn't it a little early to be having dinner?
Karl Baba

Trad climber
Yosemite, Ca
Jun 29, 2008 - 12:15pm PT
Also did the Nose in 1981 and like the other 1981 party, didn't bring pins. Was it done clean regularly 2 years earlier?

Seems like that was the time when folks were starting to make the pin-free choice more often but not always

peace

Karl
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 29, 2008 - 08:50pm PT
I think we made three pin placements.
TomLambert

Social climber
Yosemite, CA
Jul 3, 2008 - 04:24pm PT
>> I think everyone used the two quarts per day rule.

The other day (at the Yuji and Hans event) I overheard Tom Frost interviewing with the media and he was saying they budgetted one quart per person per day for the second ascent of the Nose and counted on ten days. When things started looking good and they thought they'd be off quicker, they upped the allowance to 1.5 per person per day and finished with a couple of extra gallons.

My old partner's brother (Steve Zajchowski) went out to Yosemite during the 1970s at some point and I always remembered taht they climbed by the 1.5 quarts per person per day rule. I remember him saying they had a quart to split during the day, and then they both got a full quart of their own to rehydrate with at night (I think that's how they did it). Not sure what they climbed.

A little aside, before the 1950s, standard advice from Olympic marathoners was not to drink during the race.

Why do we modern folks need so damn much water? I can easily down a gallon a day in hot weather.
purplesage

Trad climber
Bend, OR
Jul 3, 2008 - 05:47pm PT
I did the Nose in 79 and as I recall we made just a few pin placements getting up to Sickle but none above that. I think they were 3/4" angles that fit right in the scar and didn't even need to be hammered. We only had a couple Friends, a 3 and a 4, not quite the rack Mark has in the photo. We planned on 2 quarts per day per person and had some left over after a 2 1/2 day ascent. The best thing was the route was almost empty. The worst thing was getting pissed on by some friends on the Shield!
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 3, 2008 - 05:54pm PT
Some friends did it in autumn 1976 and placed only one pin - hand placed, I think. There may have been more fixed pins in it at that time.
Dr. Rock

Ice climber
Castle Rock
Jul 3, 2008 - 06:04pm PT
If you lose 10 lbs of water, easier to climb.
You can drink when your dead.
Red ooze, hope it was not wine.
midarockjock

climber
USA
Jul 3, 2008 - 06:04pm PT
Clint Cummins,

I'm not bumping the thread. I came across these.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=623002&msg=623454#msg623454

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=623002&msg=623529#msg623529
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Jul 3, 2008 - 09:23pm PT
Mark Hudson,
Thanks for starting this thread. Very cool. The transition of thinking Free instead of Aid was a cool time in climbing. And way before my time.

I guess I chimed in because we climbed the nose with a similar rock minus the pins. But I wanted to try to free alot of it, onsight free as can be. (didn't come close to Happening) So, we brought way to much stuff.

Dr. Rock,
The red ooze was a can of spegattios. And the pounds of liquid would have been 90lbs+++ (3 bottles of wine).

Chris.
F10 Climber F11 Drinker

Trad climber
road to recovery
Aug 7, 2008 - 06:31pm PT
Our 1975 rack,



I think all the pins slowed us down, plus the homemade haulbag had big holes in it my the end of p 1. Only to be a whippersnapper once again!

The photo reminds me of one of Robbins Nose rack photo's minus the nuts
dogtown

climber
Where I once was,I think?
Aug 7, 2008 - 06:52pm PT
More Photos Please !
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Aug 7, 2008 - 08:29pm PT
Mark
I'm still impressed as hell.
You guys are unbelievable.
Wow!
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Oakville, Ontario, Canada, eh?
Aug 7, 2008 - 09:14pm PT
I guess you guys didn't take any solar-powered showers, then?

Great thread! Keep 'em coming. What?! Only four thousand slides? Thought you guys did lots of climbing?

When are you coming back for another go at the Big Stone? See you in the fall?

Cheers,
Pete
Fishy

climber
Aug 8, 2008 - 04:08am PT
Clint - you said a couple of times that your leg hauling system is a 2:1 - actually it is a 1:2 (foot goes down 1', bag comes up 2').

This system is often used in racing sail boats, and would make hauling faster (if you have the leg power).

Did you find it just too cumbersome? Is that the main disadvantage?

Thanks,

Pete.
MZiebell

Social climber
Prescott, AZ
Aug 8, 2008 - 03:04pm PT
bump!
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Feb 12, 2009 - 01:05am PT
Dragging it out of the archives.
I love it!
The year after Lesher and I did a clean "hammerless" ascent.
It was a great adventure, all the way around.
rdh

climber
Feb 12, 2009 - 02:29pm PT
BFD. Gagner and I did the Nose in June 1979 with a double hex rack and double stopper rack. No friends or pins.
Incidentally Gagner didn't sh#t for the entire route (2 1/2 days) but exploded on top.
wbw

climber
'cross the great divide
Feb 12, 2009 - 02:42pm PT
Mr. Hudon, (That seems to be the only way I can address you after all the years of inspiration you have provided, even though you're probably not much older than I.) I have a question about scanning that photo.

You seem to have scanned the slide into digital format without everything being blue. I got a slide scanner for Christmas, and just can't get the color of the digital slide to be true to the color of the original slides. Do you have any recommendations about that?

Thanks.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 12, 2009 - 02:42pm PT
That was nice of him not to sh#t.

wbw, You have to play with the white balance on your scanner. On my scanner software I'm able to choose between Echtachrome and Kodachrome. Echtachrome will be way blue. It might be worth it to buy the scanner controls from these guys: http://www.hamrick.com/ It might give you way more control over your scanner than you have right now.

BTW, no Mr. please, I'm just a regular ol dirtbag like anyone else.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Feb 12, 2009 - 03:38pm PT
Mark...er...regular ol' dirtbag,

Glad you found your old thread here. After, the shameless self thread bumpers thread, I decided to seek out a few from other folks to bump!

We may need to get back to you on that slide scanner expertise.
An old friend and I were just talking about getting a slide scanner as that would "bump" up our contributions quite a bit.
Thanks!
MisterE

Trad climber
One Place or Another
Feb 25, 2009 - 02:15pm PT
Old school rack bump
Gagner

climber
Boulder
Feb 25, 2009 - 02:45pm PT
Boy - this thread brings back memories.

Rick Harlan and I did the Nose in May 1979. Our tactic was to go fast, and light, and for some reason we didn't have any Friends yet - we were probably too poor. We didn't have any pins or hammer, just two sets of stoppers and hexes. I still remember doing dicey, weird stacks on Boot Flake and on the pitch above the Glowering Spot - both of which are wicked parallel. We were pretty much aiding and not freeing too much.

Also we only took two ropes - I'm not sure why. On the 4th class pitch below Camp 4 we just dropped the haul bag, even though the belays are horizontal to each other, since we didn't have a rope to lower the bag out - ha, ha - got a few holes in the bag on that one, but I think the water bottles survived somehow.

The bummer was the three European climbers (2 guys and a gal) who were in front of us trying to jug with a pack, and moving exceedingly slow; and they wouldn't let us pass. Because of this we bivied on the 4th class ledge below Camp 4 the first night (we had fixed to Sickle) and then at Camp 6 the second night with the next pitch fixed. We were off early the next day. I still think we could have easily done the route in two days if we hadn't gotten hung up behind this slower party.

And to think the Nasal Passage is crowded now....

Paul
Ihateplastic

Trad climber
Lake Oswego, Oregon
Feb 25, 2009 - 06:00pm PT
Mark, going back to the first gear pic... I've seen bigger racks on the Nutcracker! Way to get to the minimum and make it work!
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Mar 29, 2009 - 07:22pm PT
Bump it up.
More climbing
More satisfying!
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Apr 2, 2009 - 12:58pm PT
Bump Mark's story up there again--great adventure!!!!
MisterE

Trad climber
One Step Beyond!
Apr 8, 2009 - 11:43am PT
This is the goods
Oso Flaco

Gym climber
Atascadero, CA
Jun 22, 2014 - 08:35am PT
Planning on doing The Nose on July 4th weekend this year. Thanks for the inspiration to go light, however, that amount of water sounds absurd. What happened? Seems like everyone is soft now compared to the past era...or maybe just better equipped and wiser from hearing stories like this.
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