DNA ancestry tests

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Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Original Post - Aug 5, 2018 - 07:02pm PT
Has any of this crowd done this or are interested in the technology? I haven't had the test but my brother and his son have recently. Interesting to say the least, especially as the technology progresses. I am a mutt as my parents have told me.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 5, 2018 - 07:05pm PT
I'd jump on it if only they had Martian DNA in their files.

Without that, I'd just get a "Sorry, but our tests were inconclusive" response.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 5, 2018 - 07:08pm PT
La Femme just ordered it. She wants to know if she’s Neandertal or Cro-Magnon.
Boy, howdy, but I’m not sayin’ nuthin’!
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 5, 2018 - 07:14pm PT
That's funny. My brother sent me the results. They break it down into regions and general and more specific groupings with percentages. At the end there is a percentage of "unassigned". His son has five times more of that alien monkey lizard stuff than he has. What could that mean?
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 5, 2018 - 07:21pm PT
Right?
tooth

Trad climber
B.C.
Aug 5, 2018 - 07:29pm PT
I like how handy of a tool it is for your government.
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Aug 5, 2018 - 08:04pm PT
I'm keeping my DNA to myself. Sending it out to some lab feels like a setup for the ultimate form of identity theft.

Besides I know where my parents came from, and I know that many generations preceded them in those cold towns north of Trondheim.
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
Wilds of New Mexico
Aug 5, 2018 - 08:13pm PT
My sister did it. I was hoping for some wild card result but it came back as about at white as possible- like 99% northern U.K. There was 1% sort of Swiss so that explains my punctuality and alpine climbing.
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 5, 2018 - 08:27pm PT
At his point I think it is really easy to read into this whatever fear you hold dear. Dna only goes so far in saying who you really are after the day is done.
Jan

Mountain climber
Colorado & Nepal
Aug 5, 2018 - 09:03pm PT
My hobby is genealogy so I have done DNA tests and paid for several cousins and even strangers to take them. If you have a common last name and your family has been in America since colonial days, that's the only way to find out who you belong to.

The autosomal tests that give ethnic percentages are the cheapest and will help you locate cousins. They'll also tell you if you have neanderthal or denisova genes. In fact, I am 1.6 % neanderthal which is a higher than normal percentage, so fear not reilly, we gals hide it pretty well.

If you want to know your deep ancestry then you need to take the more expensive haplogroup tests for Y-chromosome or mitochondrial DNA. My ancestors mostly came from England but some had Viking DNA. They got to England through conquest, which explains a lot about their pioneer adventures in the Old West once they got to America.

In fact, thanks to DNA and finding my proper lineages, I learned more about my family's psychology than I ever did through counseling. The sins of the fathers are visited sometimes unto the 7th generation just like scripture says. Of course many interesting secrets and scandals are uncovered along the way, sometimes just from the U.S. census.

As for the government getting the results, if they want your DNA they'll get it one way or another.
Fritz

Social climber
Choss Creek, ID
Aug 5, 2018 - 09:12pm PT
I find it interesting that the law enforcement folks have jumped on the DNA testing data-bases & are using them to investigate "cold-cases" of murders where they have DNA from the unknown thug.

It turns out that if you are that thug & one of your relatives has a DNA ancestry test, you are likely going to jail.

I dont have a problem with that, & in fact, I think it's great.

It's a whole new world out here folks.
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 5, 2018 - 09:41pm PT
Thank you for that reply Jan. Genealogy has been a hobby for my brother too and he did the haplogroup tests. I just find it fascinating. His studies already found some surprising twists even before the Dna tests.

It's a whole new world out here folks.

Indeed! I may not be able to keep up but I certainly won't fight it.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 5, 2018 - 09:50pm PT
hey there say, wayno and susan...

susan-- as to this quote of yours:

I learned more about my family's psychology than I ever did through counseling. The sins of the fathers are visited sometimes unto the 7th generation just like scripture says.

yep, i can see how that can help... and, yep, there is a reason, by it is
said, up the the 7th generation-- though we may not fully understand that... very interesting, for sure, though...

and, say, wayno...

my twin buddies, recently, did a DNA thing, and they did so, as, their
mom (when alive) was convinced they were identical twins... (which of course, are not truely 100% identical, as, they are individuals) but-- the doc, wayyy back then, 66 years ago, said they were fraternal...
*don't know why he said that... ?

well, the DNA showed that they were identical, as much as, identical twins are, as compared to fraternal...

they are mirrow twins, too... which is more rare (so we have heard, anyways, that is) ... but, they DO nearly look identical, however, due to age, they are showing more differences, little by little, that close family and friends, can tell...

plus, one had an eye, injured by a drunk driver... so there goes the 'twin magic' of 'being identical' right there, :(


great gals... they enjoyed learning what they did...
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 5, 2018 - 09:54pm PT
hey there say, ksolem... as to your quote, too:

Aug 5, 2018 - 08:04pm PT
I'm keeping my DNA to myself. Sending it out to some lab feels like a setup for the ultimate form of identity theft.

yeah, me too... as, i am not sure what all folks would do with it...

we know the basics of our background, but, one side of the family, it
stops -- so that side, we do not know, 'what is back there' ...

however, on that 'chapman' side... our grampa was darker... and,
the 'mongolian' spot, (birthmark that fades, as of three years old) is
in our family, for me and one brother... so:

that mystery spot, is enough for me, to help fill-in, something, as to the
darker pigment, on the unknown side of the family...


better than doing DNA ... :))
BBA

Social climber
Aug 5, 2018 - 09:56pm PT
I had a couple of tests because grandsons asked where are we from which got me curious. Turns out I made a 9,000 mile trek in 35,000 years from somewhere in Kenya to the Rhine River Valley in Bavaria. I traveled slowly so I could turn white along the way. It is food for the imagination. Yours truly, Haplogroup R-M269
zBrown

Ice climber
Aug 5, 2018 - 10:03pm PT
I'm with Ksolem

For me, Finland all the way back to 1700's (traced by my cousin) and Shetland Islands

What more do I need to know

Health wise is another story

But how protected is your info

HIPAA????


Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 5, 2018 - 10:21pm PT
So I asked my brother how different would my test be than his. He said something about less than 1% different. His son's test was 2.3% "unavailable". This makes me wonder. How much different am I than my brother as compared to a chimpanzee, Dna percentage wise and does this really mean much?

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 5, 2018 - 10:50pm PT
How much different am I than my brother as compared to a chimpanzee, Dna percentage wise and does this really mean much?

Wayno, assuming you’ve posited a largely rhetorical question the obvious reply, at least to an unbiased observer who in no way would impugn yer mother, is

how much do you want to know about yer childhood milkman?
ShawnInPaso

climber
Paso Robles, CA
Aug 5, 2018 - 11:41pm PT
Hey Wayno -

I'd suggest listening to this podcast before spittin' in a tube.
http://radio.seti.org/episodes/identity-crisis

Here are the main points (that I can recall):

1. Of the dozen or so companies that conduct DNA tests for personal use, all twelve will have different results from the same sample of DNA.
2. The results are only as good as their individual database.
3. Their databases are only populated by their customers (some small, some larger, etc.).
4. Some countries of origin don't seem to make it into the databases. Consequently, some results are patently wrong (e.g. someone clearly is born in Japan from Japanese parents and their result shows them to be Chinese.
5. The percentages are bogus and a bad attempt at trying to appear accurate (e.g. 49.5 percent this, 34.3. percent that).

It is a great podcast, check it out.


zBrown

Ice climber
Aug 6, 2018 - 07:16am PT



Of the dozen or so companies that conduct DNA tests for personal use, all twelve will have different results from the same sample of DNA.

I guessed as much. Maybe I need to listen up, but I'm curious how different the results are.


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