Stupid Questions about Aid Climbing

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Messages 21 - 40 of total 162 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 26, 2012 - 01:37pm PT
Thank you Dr. F and Mark. Very helpful answers. Those guys must of worn real stiff boots for standing high in the aiders for so long.
Is there a book to read about evolution of dirty aid and what is accepted in today's world of aid on international stage?
Grippa

Trad climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Oct 26, 2012 - 01:37pm PT
For me it was all about customizing my fifi length to my height and leg length. Once I had that dialed being stable in the 2nd step is super easy, and allows me to reach the spaciest bolt ladders I've encountered (prow included).

Like chris mac said in once of his aid articles, "no fooling around...get up in those aiders fast!". practice this mantra while leading and you'll get faster super quick.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Oct 26, 2012 - 01:38pm PT
Ron also has some ballast above his belt buckle that keeps him in balance.
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Oct 26, 2012 - 01:39pm PT
Jeremy, yeah, on a good day... I'm starting to shrink already, I used to be 5'2.75" but now I'm really 5'1.875" at best!

I can relate! I was 5'5" but now it's about 1/2" shorter -- and shrinking. I learned early that I had to get into the highest steps possible in my aid slings (See how old school I am? None of this aiders stuff.) Unlike you, Mark, my arms are short, though, so I use an extension arm, consisting of an old-style Chouinard Cliffhanger in an old-style Yosemite Hammer to make particularly reachy clips.

Incidentally, Robbins (who was not particularly tall himself) was quite proud of the bolt ladders he put in on Tis-sa-ack and The Prow, and bragged about them in his write-ups of their first ascents. Also, on The Prow, there were occasional marginal aid placements between a few of the bolts.

John
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 26, 2012 - 01:42pm PT
Like chris mac said in once of his aid articles, "no fooling around...get up in those aiders fast!". practice this mantra while leading and you'll get faster super quick.

+1
efficiency helps a lot. I saw a lot of improvement in the speed 1st to 2nd wall. On my first wall I did not see how it was possible at all to do more than 4 pitches of aid per day lol. Walls are interesting in a way.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Oct 26, 2012 - 01:44pm PT
Keep that wall urge under control Vitaliy....you seem destined for the mountains.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Oct 26, 2012 - 01:48pm PT
maybe he just need beta for routes like the Harvard on Mt Hunington..??
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
the crowd MUST BE MOCKED...Mocked I tell you.
Oct 26, 2012 - 01:48pm PT
V,

Have you ever heard of "Tee'ing" off?

Ron O. has a clean climbing video floating around that shows this technique in action.

I suspect there is a video on youtube.

If you cross one foot in front of the other in your top step, it stabilizes the stance.

It doesn't work for overhanging, as far as I know, but it really does help on vertical to less than vertical.

m_jones

Trad climber
Carson City, NV
Oct 26, 2012 - 01:49pm PT
Yes I wondered that as well. Last year on South Seas the bolt ladders seriously worked me. I was aghast at how much actually! had totally forgotten about the total body strength required to top step on a 95 degree wall.

I found this year that clipping my chest harness to my harness helped me top step easier plus from climbing a bit this summer had regained some of the core strength specific to climbing.

We joked that you pretty much had to climb full time just to be fit enough to climb occasionally!

Still - remarkable on the first ascents the work required to drill!

Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 26, 2012 - 01:49pm PT
Keep that wall urge under control Vitaliy....you seem destined for the mountains.

It would be nice to combine mountains, ability to free climb harder terrain (than i can now), and wall skills. Than I can finally complete that Latok climb! ;)

Have you ever heard of "Tee'ing" off?

no
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Oct 26, 2012 - 01:52pm PT
You're the man...that puppy (Latok) needs some closure!
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 26, 2012 - 01:55pm PT
for now im jk about Latok of course...I am sure it will be done by someone before I get enough skills/balls to go there.
How hard does one need to climb to give it a realistic attempt? That ridge is beautiful.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Oct 26, 2012 - 02:00pm PT
The skills must be there but TENACITY is the word....oh, and throw in a little luck.
Who knows, it might still be there for you....it has been 34 years- who would've thunk.
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Oct 26, 2012 - 02:10pm PT
Talk about speed, I heard those two rocked Wet Denim yesterday!


I was told The Reticent has extremely reachy ladders. Brother A said he could barely reach 'em at all, and he's no shorty. Gerby had a technique, I suppose.


cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
Oct 26, 2012 - 02:14pm PT
It could all be explained by the use of balance placements. These are intermediate placements, only able to hold a few pounds, so you can pull yourself in one direction or the other, or to pull you into the wall. Tiny copperheads (hooks too) are excellent for this. Yanking the head when cleaning will often destroy the small flake that was used, making it all a mystery to a later party.
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 26, 2012 - 02:25pm PT
had to bump Latok thread since it is mentioned. But seriously, how hard would the rock ratings feel? Would one have to lead at least solid 5.11/wi5 before thinking of going there?

this move ya do where ya step high way up in your top step - and ya sort of leverage with your fifi or a quickdraw and ya pop way up
done that a few times. Hard to do if terrain is even slightly overhanging.
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Oct 26, 2012 - 02:28pm PT
Yup… Gerberding, Middendorf, etc.

But I’m not buying any of this 15 or 30 minutes to place a bolt or a rivet on a ladder. No way, especially if placing rivets of any sort. Should be maybe 5 minutes per rivet, 10 minutes max if you are lazy and slow and are placing longer 1/4” bolts. If you are quick, a machine-head rivet might take about 2 or 3 minutes to place. High-speed steel drill bits have been around forever; it’s not exactly new technology.

Mark, go check out the 4th pitch ladder on Cataclysmic Megasheer on the S. Face of HD. ; )

Another reason why the scars are so close together on Serenity is that once a placement became so scarred and ‘boxed-out’, it became more difficult to use. So, climbers resorted to using a much thinner pin in a new placement, which of course, suffered the same fate as the older placements. With time, the crack was basically turned into a line of square holes.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Oct 26, 2012 - 02:33pm PT
thinking back here. To a seam i did up on the pinncale at eagle lake.

How does it fell VM? Each placement was SHIYTE , and NO CONFIDENCE was had as you attempt to step up on a rurp or a knife blade driven about an inch or less in and tied off. No bounce test, as what your standing on is NO GOOD either. Talus awaits below. You may find yourself uttering a small short prayer to whomever may be listening. thats how it can feel...;-)
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Oct 26, 2012 - 02:37pm PT
It's not so much the difficulty of individual moves Vitaliy. We were all on the cutting edge of climbing for that era. You need to be able to summon up something near your A game each and every day. You need to be able to stay alert and focused even when desperately tired or dealing with atrocious weather and conditions. We had to make 85 single anchor raps in bad weather, while tired and with no food....and, not have one of them fail.
The more time you spend in the mountains, the more obstacles you overcome, the more ready you will be for such a climb.
It's not about the parts; rock and ice climbing ability, experience, endurance, ability to suffer, ambition, tenacity, strategic planning, focus....it's about the sum of the parts, and, most importantly, your PARTNERS.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Oct 26, 2012 - 02:40pm PT
Ron...it was a compliment, you always amaze me!
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