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Yosemite Valley, California USA


Trip Report
My first solo, aka really long navel gazing trip report - Prow
Tuesday February 7, 2012 6:24pm
I posted this up on mountainproject during the summer, but reckoned people here might be interested. Which really is a stretch of the imagination as the damn thing is so long even I'm not interested anymore. Also its kind of embarrassing, but I haven't changed it, mostly because it stands as a kind of time capsule for my extremely over-excited self when I first got down.










Day 1

Woke up, got caffeinated, finished packing. Plan was to head to the lodge for a breakfast sandwich then onto the first shuttle bus of the morning at 7. I had some food then got on bus. Neil was waiting for me on bus. Turned out I’d forgotten my headtorch in camp. Not the most auspicious of beginnings. I’m slightly less of a disaster when I’m concentrating – hopefully.

Hiked to the base in the early morning light for the last time. Listening to Eddie Vedder’s Into the Wild soundtrack was excellent. Felt very intimidated, and unsure as to what I was doing up there. Got to the base and despite the route being empty all week while I was hiking loads it was jammers that morning. One fast party was on pitch 2, and another soloist was about to start up. I had a bit of haulbag repacking to do so I happily got in line and nervously chatted to the other parties at the base of the cliff. Lead the first pitch via the JoJo variation, nice easy C1 but with a long splitter crack. I had to conserve and back clean aggressively to save enough cams even with triple sets. I got to the first anchor and fixed the ropes, then it was time to abseil back down to take out the gear.

Once at the base I double checked the piggy was ready to fly, then jumared back up the rope. Back at the anchor I hauled the bag, which involved serious inverted hauling just to get moving. Too late I realized that since I did the variation start my bag was over in a corner that wasn’t in line with the route. It cut loose across the face and smacked into the wall with some force. That could easily have burst all my water bottles and called an end to the trip before the first pitch was done, but luckily all water remained contained and I eventually got the bag up to the anchor. A bit of belay organisation then it was time to start the second pitch. I was worried about this one as it was given C2+ in the guide, making it harder than anything else I’d ever led. It went fine though, with one tricky slime move to get into the corner, then small gear up to the copperheads. I’d heard about all the heads on the route, and was scared of them. I’d read on the internet that singing to yourself helps, and the song that came to mind was “Down to the River to Pray” from the O Brother Where Art Thou soundtrack.

As I balanced up on one mashed in bit of metal with a frayed wire after another I felt strangely calm. Though scary the fall potential was completely safe, and after 3 heads and one free move a bomber cam was reached. Easily up to the anchors and one more pitch down. It is possible to link 2 and 3 with a 60m rope, but since my lead line was only 50m I stopped at the chains under the roof. Fixed the line then returned to the tiny ledge at the top of pitch 1. Another party was there and much hilarity ensued as I tried to put up Colin’s portaledge at a shared anchor. Eventually portaledge got set up, and me and the other team’s belayer chilled on the ledge and talked American politics while I ate cold spaghetti and meatballs. It didn’t taste too bad on night 1. They finished fixing and rapped back down, leaving me alone on the portaledge with my thoughts. I was pleased to have gotten pitch 2 over with, but the enormity of the whole thing was weighing on me. Took Neil’s advice and didn’t worry about any of the other days, just tomorrow. Restless night’s sleep getting used to the movement of the portaledge.

High – Just being on the wall
Low – Thinking the mini waterfall was someone pissing on me
Fail of the day – Not looking at where my bag was in relation to where I would haul from
Number of tie in points at night – 1



Day 2

The party from the previous night passed me before breakfast. I brought along 6 cans of Starbucks’ espresso in a can so had a nice morning coffee and a smoke before starting work. Felt like I was really on a big wall, despite being only one pitch up. Jumared up my fixed line and organised the rack to lead pitch 3.

Jugging my fixed lines early in the morning, just me and my shadow.
Jugging my fixed lines early in the morning, just me and my shadow.
Credit: Jane Gallwey


Pretty straightforward stuff, though I managed to cluster myself at the end big time by z clipping and leaving my aiders behind. Ah well. Decided to haul in one pitch as my haul line at least was 60m.

I wasn’t really thinking about what I was doing at this point, as it was my first proper hauling experience while soloing. Abbed down the haul line, while taking out gear on the lead line. When I got to the mid anchor I cleaned it, let go of the lead line and continued down the haul line to the anchor. Once there I very nearly sent the bag off into space without leaving myself attached to any rope, which would have left me stranded on the anchor. Luckily I caught my mistake, and tied the haul line off short and myself into the end of the haul line. This was followed by me walking the bag across the slabby ledge, and then having to jug the weighted haul line. Scary stuff as I was worried that me squirming around on the line would dislodge the bag from its perch, sending me and the bag swinging off into space. More singing ensued and I reached the anchor and hauled. This brought me and my entire sh#t show up to pitch 3, Anchorage Ledge, which was where I would spend the night.

Chilling on Anchorage
Chilling on Anchorage
Credit: Jane Gallwey

I was a bit freaked by the amount of near f*#kups I’d had that morning, so decided to chill on Anchorage for a bit and watch the parties above me. It was really brought home to me that when you’re soloing there’s no one there to catch your f*#k ups for you, and though the route and techniques I was using were pretty safe any lapses in concentration could be dangerous. From that point on I went a wee bit slower, working through in my head exactly what was going to happen for each task and triple checking everything.

After my mental rest I started up pitch 4, which had thankfully gone into the shade at 2pm. An easy bolt ladder to some tricky cams to some more heads. I placed a bomber cam, clipped the first head, then leaned over to the next one. I didn’t have a hammer chisel or heads with me, so I’d been advised to not bounce test or clip as gear any of the heads I found. After the second head there was a blank section with some mystery cord hanging down. With no other options I clipped it and scurried up singing loudly. Once at the top of the mystery tat I saw that it was in fact a tiny copperhead with a broken wire that the tat had been hitched to the swedge of. Lovely. Moving swiftly (for aid climbing that is) on I got to the anchor and a sigh of relief.

What lay at the end of the mystery tat.
What lay at the end of the mystery tat.
Credit: Jane Gallwey

Rope fixed and back down for more cold ravioli nomms. Set up the ledge again (getting slightly better) and settled in for the night. Tried to think of what fraction of the route I’d done but less than ¼ seemed depressing so I stopped that line of thought. Read a bit of my dragon themed fantasy epic then sleep.

High – Getting off that copperhead
Low – The ravioli
Fail of the day – The whole haul line fiasco
Number of tie in points at night – 2


Day 3

Looking back I think this was the day I had been most worried about, as I had more work to do and had to lead both the pitch with the crucial missing fixed head, and the crux “Hooks and Heads” pitch 6. After the now usual morning coffee and smoke on the ledge I got working. First things first had to jumar to the top of my fixed line and then haul the bag.

Fixed lines in the morning.
Fixed lines in the morning.
Credit: Jane Gallwey

That done I set off up pitch 5, cheat stick (portaledge pole with a biner duct taped to it) at the ready. The other soloist had bailed the previous day because of the missing head on 5, and I had no desire to join him because of one stupid move. Some slightly tricky stuff up to the bolt ladder, which had an 8ft gap between bolts at the missing bit. Screw that. I unashamedly cheat sticked past it, and continued up the reachy bolt ladder. The Cheatomatron 2000 (portaledge pole) didn’t make another appearance for the rest of the route, though the Miniextension 1000 (nut-key) certainly helped on the remainder of the bolt ladder. I’m 5’9” and I certainly wouldn’t have wanted to be any shorter for those bolts. Up to the anchor, back down to the bags, then up to the anchor again for more hauling.

Credit: Jane Gallwey

No rest for the wicked. Forced a cliff bar down then off to lead pitch 6. I thought this was the trickiest pitch on the route. All the gear I placed seemed pretty good, though sometimes it took a bit of time to work it out. Another party had got behind me at this point, so I hurried singing to the anchor across many more heads interspersed with a few old and new bolts. I cleaned the pitch on rappel as I wanted to let the party behind me start leading as fast as they could. The other climbers were super nice, shared a very hanging belay with an awesome lady called Janice who’d climbed a load of badass El Cap routes. We chilled then lowered out the pigs together, joking about how they were dancing. They also took some pictures which was cool.


As I lowered out mine I remembered just too late that my second jumar was in it. Had to inefficiently gri-gri jug up. At that point in the day that was not needed. Hauled the bags to the anchor, waved goodbye to Janice and Jason and released their pig. They turned out to be the last people I saw until I go back down on Monday.

Pigs about to dance/tangle
Pigs about to dance/tangle
Credit: Jane Gallwey

Looking back up at pitch 6.
Looking back up at pitch 6.
Credit: Jane Gallwey

chilling at pitch 5 hanging belay
chilling at pitch 5 hanging belay
Credit: Jane Gallwey

Janice and Jason aka last human beings encountered
Janice and Jason aka last human beings encountered
Credit: Jane Gallwey

Jumaring sans jumar
Jumaring sans jumar
Credit: Jane Gallwey

The last pitch had led me off the headwall and round a corner slightly, which was nice as the exposure on the smooth blank wall had been wearing at me slightly. The top of pitch 6 was a tiny ledge, but I eventually declustered my stuff enough to get the ledge up and collapse to sleep. I jumared 3 pitches, abseiled 2 pitches, hauled 3 pitches and lead 2 pitches. I was wrecked. Knocked a bit of food back then passed out.

Belay cluster
Belay cluster
Credit: Jane Gallwey

High – Getting pitch 6 done and enjoying every minute of it
Low – Trying to set up camp
Fail of the day – Leaving the jumar in the haulbag
Number of tie in points at night – 2



Day 4

Woke up feeling really sore but happy, as I figured I’d broken the back of the hard leading and was for the first time genuinely thinking I might actually make it. I wanted to chill for ages in the ledge as I felt really tired, but I consoled myself with lots of potential rest at Tapir Terrace above if I got there in good time. Got a shuffle on and set off up the Strange Dihedral pitch. Bit of tricky stuff here and there but pretty mellow, or possibly I was just getting used to being scared.

Good morning belay cluster
Good morning belay cluster
Credit: Jane Gallwey

Decided to climb on and link the next one once I got to the anchor as the topo claimed 50m ropes would reach. There was meant to be a scary tension traverse off a beak on this pitch, but my worries were unfounded as it turned out to be an exposed walk along a ledge next to a bomber nut. Fine. Up some more straightforward aid to the mandatory free near the top. This is a bit wandery however, and I placed a piece of gear not in line with the anchors. Thus I ran out of rope, while runout about 5m from the anchors. However my problem solving skills were much improved by this point and I immediately realised that since I was using the continuous loop system I could just put a clove hitch on the haul line, take the gri-gri off and continue safely to the anchors. Triple checked my logic to make sure I didn’t do something silly, and then continued without incident to the top.

Fixed the haul line, went back down that to the last piece on the lead line, removed it then back up to the anchor to fix the lead line which now just about reached. Abbed down yadda yadda, released bag, jugged back up and hauled. It was 2pm by the time I’d finished my day’s jobs and was at Tapir with all my stuff. Debated about fixing another pitch that evening, allowing me to top out the next day if I was fast, but decided I had a metric shitload of food and water left so stuck to the plan and read my book and rested in the ledge for the remainder of the day.

Ledge home
Ledge home
Credit: Jane Gallwey

I knew I hadn’t eaten enough the past few days (approx. 500 calories a day) so tried to mentally trick myself into thinking that eating the whole can of cold Dinty Moore beef stew was an essential task that needed to be done. Didn’t work, was retching before half the can was gone. The only daily task I didn’t complete. The long evening on the ledge by myself with nothing really to do took its toll on me mentally, and I started to get worried about all sorts of silly things. Hard to get to sleep that night.


High – Chilling on Tapir, seemed like a football field by that point
Low – The stew
Fail of the day – Running out of rope
Number of tie in points at night – 3



Day 5

Slow start as I knew there wasn’t that much work to be done now that the hauling was over. I had pitch 9 to lead, and after reading about an accident on that pitch I was quite scared. Took it really slow though and it was fine, lots of micro nuts. At the top of 9 was a big psychological relief, as I knew it was only C1 to the top from there. Provided I kept my head good there was no reason I couldn’t make it. Back down to the anchor then jugged back up, bringing a gallon of water clipped to my harness to drink on the push for the top the next day. Pitch 10 was great, bomber C1 then some free climbing, which felt really fun despite the enormous amount of crap hanging off me, the lack of climbing shoes and the catchy gri-gri.

There appeared to be some kind of major rescue going on that day, as a helicopter flew over me several times. At one point I was stopped trying to work out a tricky mantelshelf move when I reckoned I just had to do it in case I appeared stuck and needing a rescue. Got to the anchors and rapped back down, initially in the gully I had just came up. Halfway down it seemed like my rope was out of line, so I thought I’d jug back up just a little bit to flick it onto a slab. It wouldn’t flick so I ended up going all the way back to the anchors, to go back down a better line. Didn’t turn out to be a better line, so had to go back up again to get back over to where I originally was. About the most faffing about I did the whole climb. Ended up rapping down the original way, leaving all my lower gear to keep the rope in line so I wouldn’t miss the belay. I was thirsty but didn’t drink any of the water as it was “summit water”.

Back down the second rope to the Tapir camp. Looked at the time and saw it was only half 1. Had a brief moment of madness when I decided I was sick of being up there, and would blast to the top that day. Got halfway up re jumaring the rope, before I decided it was folly to rush and possibly do something dangerous. Downjumared back to the ledge because in my haste I’d forgotten the gri-gri. Probably for the best. The constant helicopters and lack of company were starting to get to me, and I was well rested enough to not savour another afternoon on the ledge. Nought else to do though so settled in. Was starting to feel really nervous about the descent at this point, being convinced something would go terrible wrong and I’d end up stuck or worse. Couldn’t sleep so spent hours going over scenarios and practicing knots in the dark. This was probably the lowest point of the whole week. Heard a wet thump in the night and saw a frog had jumped from god knows where onto my water bottle. I carefully moved him off the ledge, and had a bit of a chat to him.

High – When the dragons came to murder the bad knights and save the princess
Low – Trying (and failing) to remember how to do a retrievable single rope abseil with tag line
Fail of the day – Trying to direction my rope abseiling on pitch 10
Number of tie in points at night – 4 (two daisys, end of rope and bight of rope)

Back at Tapir after fixing
Back at Tapir after fixing
Credit: Jane Gallwey



Day 6

Summit day! Zoomed back up the first fixed line, went to grab my water and promptly fumbled it off the edge. Damn. It wasn’t that far back to Tapir for more, but I’d covered the ground of pitch 9 seven times by that point and just couldn’t bring myself to go back down. Jugged up pitch 10 trailing all my ropes. Reracked and organised then set off up 11. In the low psyche of the night before I’d debated whether or not to do the last pitch, as it looked loose and crap and like a rope stuck incident waiting to happen. Got the top of 11 though and I was determined that after 6 days I was going to sit on the damn top.

Nearly there, I can see the top!
Nearly there, I can see the top!
Credit: Jane Gallwey

But first back down and back up 11 to get my ropes and gear. Set off up 12 and after 10m of clip and go fixed gear I was suddenly on the top. There was clearly more easy scrambling to get to the pine tree that walk off parties use to belay on, but it was flat and sandy with lots of trees and space to walk around which made it a good enough summit for me.

Just pulling over the top
Just pulling over the top
Credit: Jane Gallwey

I found a nice rock perch, had a top out cigarette, took a few photos then it was time for thirsty Jane to get back down. I down aided pitch 12 to avoid stuck ropes. Back at the anchor I was starting to get really thirsty. I left my first (of many) bits of descent gear on one of the anchor bolts and started to abseil. Back at the belay 10 I prayed the ropes wouldn’t stick. Phew. One down.


Started down 10 and decided to leave my big blue camalot with the broken trigger wire as a directional. Talked through it out load as I clipped it, but somehow still managed to clip it to the wrong rope. A heat exhausted prussic and belay device ascent of the rope later I was back at the piece and fixed it. Back down and thankfully ropes pulled despite the famous haulbag (and rope) eating flake. Just one more to the ledge. Went fine, and got some much needed water. I’d told myself if I was back before 2 I’d start down that day, it being 11.30 I was in good shape time wise.

Packed up camp, said goodbye to Tapir Terrace, clipped the still pretty heavy haulbag onto my belay loop and started down. In retrospect I think it was lucky that I clipped the cam wrong up higher, because as miserable as it was I was able to get back up the rope and fix it and it ensured that I didn’t do it again with the haulbag on me. I seriously doubt if I’d have been able to reascend the rope with that much weight on me. I left loads of biners on the pitch as I was worried I’d swing out of the Strange Dihedral and end up lost in space. I felt better after each successful abseil, as I was getting closer to the ground each time. I got braver too (and sick of leaving biners) so by the final traversing abseil on the flat headwall I only left one, pendulumming across the wall with the pig daisy chain outstretched to get over to the anchors.

After that it was a straight shot to the ground. I got down at 2pm, left the rack and ropes and took off down the trail with the haulbag. I knew 4pm here was midnight back home, and I wanted to get down in time to call my Dad. All the way up the wall I’d been imagining calling him and telling him that I’d actually done it.

High – Sittin on the top
Low – Setting off down the first piggy rappel
Fail of the day – Either the water fumble or the directional clip, both were pretty special

In the end...

On the walk out I was striding along although I was tired and the haulbag was packed badly and cutting into my back. It suddenly dawned on me that before I went up I had wanted to find out if I was the kind of person who was able to solo a wall or not. While up there I’d realised that once you start you’re on your own, with nobody to do any of it for you and whether you like it or not you become that kind of person, no matter how stupid and scared you feel. Every job is your job and every job just has to get done.

By day 6 I was sure I would never solo a wall again, though after less than 24hrs on the ground I’m already planning the next one. As I post this 2 weeks later, sitting in a coffee shop in New York I really think I was as happy as I've ever been in my life, sitting up on my ledge on my own, blood blisters, permanent low level scared, Dinty Moore stew and all...

Even though I did all the actual uppy downy bits myself, I couldn’t have done this on my own. Big thanks to Sonia, John and Colin for the essential gear loans from ledges to aliens and pretty much everything in between, Greg for selling me gear for a quarter of its worth, Paul for telling me I could do it, the good people of mountainproject for advice, Janice and Jason for reminding me to have fun up there and Neil for coffee/dinner/pig carrying/good advice and headtorch retrieval.

All the best,
Jane

Awesome last ground meal which Neil made, served on cardboard as I had...
Awesome last ground meal which Neil made, served on cardboard as I had no plates.
Credit: Jane Gallwey
Sonia - supplier of most of the cams and most of the pre-wall psyche.
Sonia - supplier of most of the cams and most of the pre-wall psyche.
Credit: Jane Gallwey

Mini-Summit Tree
Mini-Summit Tree
Credit: Jane Gallwey



  Trip Report Views: 4,279
Jane Gallwey
About the Author
Jane Gallwey is the slowest big wall climber in Ireland.

Comments
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Comment on this Trip Report
socialclimber

climber
CA
  Feb 7, 2012 - 06:35pm PT
That was excellent!

Charles
Levy

Big Wall climber
So Cal
  Feb 7, 2012 - 06:41pm PT
Nice job! Well done & the story was nice too.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
  Feb 7, 2012 - 06:43pm PT
Nice one. "By day 6 I was sure I would never solo a wall again, though after less than 24hrs on the ground I’m already planning the next one"...yep, pretty much my std reaction after a wall. What's next?
nutjob

Sport climber
Almost to Hollywood, Baby!
  Feb 7, 2012 - 07:01pm PT
I read the whole thing! Nice write up to capture the amount of effort involved and all the little stuff.

I've never done any real wall climb (though I've slept en route more than a few times). But this is the first thing I read that made me feel some inner urge to hang out all by my lonesome.on a ledge high off the ground. It'll have to wait for some years for kids to grow up though.
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
  Feb 7, 2012 - 07:01pm PT
Jane,

Your experiences on the Prow are far more important as a character building exercise than you realize at present.

Exploits such as this will strengthen your character for perhaps greater challenges in the future--some not related to climbing.

Strange looking at the pictures; (which were great), I realize that my memory is piss poor. I did the second ascent of this route, back in the day of nested pins, instead of cams. I got hit by 2 storms, zippered an entire A4 pitch etc. Fond memories!
I posted a thread on this a few years ago while in a nostalgic mood.
You might get a kick out of reading it.

Keep up the fight.

Cheers, Steve
Branscomb

Trad climber
Lander, WY
  Feb 7, 2012 - 07:29pm PT
Stout work, lady!

I did this with a Brit I'd met in C4 in 1979. It was one of the better walls I ever climbed, so exposed.

I've never soloed a wall, so think it' pretty darned cool what you did.

Be safe; have fun....................the best.
Studly

Trad climber
WA
  Feb 7, 2012 - 07:53pm PT
Impressive!
Zander

climber
  Feb 7, 2012 - 07:55pm PT
All right! Good Report. Thanks,
Zander
Russ Walling

Social climber
from Poofters Froth, Wyoming
  Feb 7, 2012 - 08:01pm PT
Very good TR! Nice work!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Outside the Asylum
  Feb 7, 2012 - 08:27pm PT
Thanks - a good effort, and fine report.

ps When did you do the climb?
A5scott

Trad climber
Chicago
  Feb 7, 2012 - 08:15pm PT
great report! I'm glad you didn't strand yourself by letting go of both ropes! I'm sure the next wall solo you will be dialed in. or have you already done another?

thanks for posting

scott
murcy

Gym climber
sanfrancisco
  Feb 7, 2012 - 08:25pm PT
Sweet report. The ungazed navel is not worth having.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
  Feb 7, 2012 - 09:12pm PT
NICE-When you can laugh at yourself you are light years ahead. Enjoyed the TR, thank you.
Dirka

Trad climber
Hustle City
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:10pm PT
Bump!
mctwisted

Trad climber
e.p.
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:10pm PT
great job, excellent t.r.
klk

Trad climber
cali
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:14pm PT
nice. you sure look like a galway. lol
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:15pm PT
Great report with all the problem solving and analysis. Way to stick it out and send!

Sorry I missed meeting you, catch you next time, eh?
eKat

Trad climber
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:15pm PT
YAY.

ThanksForPostinUp!
sullly

Gym climber
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:18pm PT
How cool is it that you did this and are Irish too?!
Kalimon

Social climber
Ridgway, CO
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:21pm PT
Waaay to go!
Radish

Trad climber
SeKi, California
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:25pm PT
Very Inspiring! Thank You.
Ezra Ellis

Trad climber
North wet, and Da souf
  Feb 7, 2012 - 10:29pm PT
Very Nice Job Jane, looks like you learned a lot.
Thanks for sharing and making the immense effort of writing the whole thing up!!!
-ez
OlympicMtnBoy

climber
Seattle
  Feb 7, 2012 - 11:38pm PT
Nice TR, way to stick out all the little glitches and continue incrementally up!
spyork

Trad climber
Tunneling out of prison
  Feb 7, 2012 - 11:38pm PT
Thanks for the TR. Pretty cool.

I always bring a small stove. Can't stand cold Spagettios.
jogill

climber
Colorado
  Feb 7, 2012 - 11:47pm PT
Good adventure, young lady!
Fluoride

Trad climber
West Los Angeles, CA/Joshua Tree
  Feb 8, 2012 - 12:01am PT
Damn Jane, good for you! I read the whole TR, loved it and loved the pics.

Great to see ladies sending the big stuff. You have much to be proud of.
Gunkie

Trad climber
East Coast US
  Feb 8, 2012 - 11:49am PT
Nice!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
  Feb 8, 2012 - 12:35pm PT
Good on you lass - very well told!

Did your dad tell your mum or did you suck it up and do it yourself? :-)

Reilly-long-removed-from-the-auld-sod
Dos XX

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
  Feb 8, 2012 - 12:16pm PT
This is now my new, favourite trip report :-) Awesome send, Jane!
jfailing

Trad climber
PDX, North Slope, The Open Road
  Feb 8, 2012 - 12:33pm PT
Great TR - congrats on the send! This seems like a good first route to solo...
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
  Feb 8, 2012 - 12:59pm PT
going to read this later, looks sublimely Wall
mucci

Trad climber
The pitch of Bagalaar above you
  Feb 8, 2012 - 01:04pm PT
Very cool, way to stick it out.

I dig the writing and enthusiasm!

cheers
Gene

climber
  Feb 8, 2012 - 01:08pm PT
Jane,

What’s the story about the leopard pattern climbing gloves (photo 3)? Chic!

Great job on the climb and the report.

g
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
  Feb 8, 2012 - 01:20pm PT
Jane,,i read your TR yesterday but felt complelled to comment! NICE JOB GIRL!!!!!!!!!
JohnnyG

climber
  Feb 8, 2012 - 01:21pm PT
Great report! Great climb. You have some really funny lines in the prose.
Ihateplastic

Trad climber
It ain't El Cap, Oregon
  Feb 8, 2012 - 01:44pm PT
Nice, nice work.
le_bruce

climber
Oakland, CA
  Feb 8, 2012 - 02:30pm PT
Loved the little pearls of self-effacing (and endearing) honesty, like forcing yourself to pull the mantel because you were worried that the SAR guys and gals in the helicopter might think you were stranded!

Also liked the singing-as-courage theme. I heard it in an Irish lilt.

Enty

Trad climber
  Feb 8, 2012 - 02:56pm PT
Yay! Great TR!
You're on a roll Jane.
Please do a similar trip report for your 10 days on LF. Can't wait for that one.

E
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
  Feb 8, 2012 - 09:54pm PT
Solo? Hauling kinda sucks in places, you really need a second person to keep the pig out of trouble during the ride up. Looks like you had some company, always makes soloing nice.
westhegimp

Social climber
granada hills
  Feb 8, 2012 - 10:36pm PT
Congratulations! Nice send and great TR. Thanks for the good stuff!

Wes
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
  Feb 8, 2012 - 10:38pm PT
Good work keep at it. Nice TR.
Will_P

Trad climber
Melbourne, Victoria
  Feb 9, 2012 - 10:52pm PT
I have such a crush on you now, Jane.
Jane Gallwey

Big Wall climber
Ireland
Author's Reply  Feb 10, 2012 - 04:29pm PT
Thanks everyone for the lovely comments. I'm surprised so many people were interested/read the whole damn thing. I promise my next trip report will be shorter :-)

To answer people's questions:
Steve - I'd love to read that, always fascinating to hear about the history of a route.
Mighty Hiker - I climbed it this June.
Gene - I bought a roll of leopard print duct tape a while ago and use it for marking all my gear, makes it easier to find. Also its super classy!
Pete - Yeah we keep missing each other, but thanks for all the tech tips - you were most helpful with all my "so how do you jumar?" dumb ass questions last year.
Reilly - My Dad told my Mum, she was kinda pleased once she knew I was down okay.

As for next, I went back in Sept, but that's a whole 'nother trip report. (Which hasn't been written yet, but you've all given me great encouragement to get going on it.)
labrat

Trad climber
Auburn, CA
  Feb 10, 2012 - 06:06pm PT
Nice! Waiting on the next report..........
Erik
miwuksurfer

climber
  Feb 11, 2012 - 10:01am PT
Rad!
Love the daily recaps.
locker

climber
STFU n00b!!!
  Feb 11, 2012 - 10:07am PT



Great job on the climbing!!!...


That's a real fun and good read!!!...


;-)

Spider Savage

Mountain climber
The shaggy fringe of Los Angeles
  Feb 11, 2012 - 10:08am PT
A hard woman is good to find.


I would be thrilled beyond belief to see my daughters do this kind of thing.
Barbarian

climber
  Feb 11, 2012 - 10:40am PT
Excellent TR! I read the whole thing. Congrats on the send and on conquering the inner solo wall demons. I don't think your next TR needs to be any shorter - you told a great story. Belongs on Page 1 for a while!
elcap-pics

Big Wall climber
Crestline CA
  Feb 11, 2012 - 11:21am PT
Yo.. really enjoyed reading your TR. Like you said it is all on you and you didn't bail. Persistence, tenacity, is what it takes and what you have. Congrats!!
See you on the Captain!
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
  Feb 11, 2012 - 11:39am PT
Neat - looking forward to the next TR!
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
  Feb 11, 2012 - 11:42am PT
Awesome TR. My first bail was trying to solo the Prow. I didn't have any reason other than... I'm scared and want a partner! I ended up finding another soloist a few days later who also wanted a partner and we climbed El Cap. I think soloing Prow might be as hard as climbing El Cap with a partner... at least mentally.
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
  Feb 11, 2012 - 11:45am PT
Thank You Jane. Inspiring work.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
  Feb 11, 2012 - 11:54am PT
A totally excellent story young lady----and a very good climb too!

Thank you for taking the time to post the story and photos.
crunch

Social climber
CO
  Feb 11, 2012 - 12:29pm PT
Thanks for the story. Excellent stuff; great photos and fun read that brings back fond memories. The Prow was my first wall, my first aid climb, too, way back in 1983. I climbed with a partner, and we had a blast. My hat's off to you for going up there alone. It's steep, wild and exposed. More, please!
janice

Big Wall climber
Davis, ca
  Feb 13, 2012 - 01:13pm PT
You did fantastic Jane!!!! It was so awesome to meet you up on the Column. Seriously lady, we should go do a wall together! Let me know next time you are here in the states!

Janice
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Washington Column - Prow C2F 5.6 - Yosemite Valley, California USA. Click to Enlarge
The line follows a series of small features.
Photo: Chris McNamara
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The South Face of Washington Column.
Washington Column - Astroman 5.11c - Yosemite Valley, California USA. Click for details.
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Astroman takes a brilliant steep and clean line.
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Skull Queen.
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The steepest route on the Column.
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A series of steep corners lead to an exposed face.
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