A Dog's Life

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bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, CA
Aug 28, 2014 - 07:29pm PT
I love yer Doberman, Chaz. Same with Chiloe's beagle...

I e-mailed to Mussy's rescue link to see what the status is of the sick dog.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 28, 2014 - 07:34pm PT
hey there say, russ... hope the rescue links get some help there...


say, chaz... love that yawn one and the ONE where the ol' pupdog looks like a large donkey, in the shadows...


ron, is pupdog, then, going to be okay now, or is there still 'solving' that needs to happen to see what else to do?


love these dog share... well, :) i love the cat share, too, :)
yep, and the birds... oh my, :))

edit:
wow, happygrrrl, wonderful pup, there!
i've enjoyed seeing him, when you share... :)
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 28, 2014 - 10:17pm PT
hey there say, ron... (and all)...

a friend, recently was sharing this, as to her friend's dog...

hard to diagnose, addison disease:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Addison%27s_disease_in_canines


Diagnosis

Symptoms of Addison's disease in canines can include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, lack of appetite, tremors or shaking, muscle weakness, low body temperature, collapse, low heart rate, and pain in the hind quarters.[9][22] Hypoglycemia can also be present, and initially may be confused with seizure disorders, insulin-secreting pancreatic tumor (insulinoma), food poisoning, parvovirus enteritis, gastric volvulus, spinal or joint problems, earning Addison's disease the nicknames of "the Great Mimic" and "the Great Imitator".[7][14] It is possible not to see any signs of the disease until 90% of the adrenal cortex is no longer functioning.[23]

Signs that a dog may have Addison's disease include elevated levels of potassium and unusually low levels of sodium (hyponatremia) and chloride (hypochloremia). However, not all dogs' electrolyte ratios are affected during an Addisonian episode.[10] Therefore, the only accurate test for Addison's disease in canines is an ACTH stimulation test.[7][9][24] While most corticosteroid drugs will invalidate the results of an ACTH test, Dexamethasone may be used in the event of an Addison's emergency without fear of compromising the results of the test.[25]

In general, Addison's disease in canines is underdiagnosed,[26] and one must have a clinical suspicion of it as an underlying disorder for many presenting complaints. Females are overrepresented,[14] and the disease often appears in middle age (four to seven years), although any age or gender may be affected.[27] Dogs with Addison's disease may also have one of several autoimmune disorders.[27] Because it is an endocrine disorder, they may also suffer from neuropathy and some endocrine-related eye diseases.[2

course, wow, sure hope it is not this... but if they can't find out what it is... at least this info, is here to look at...


ooops, we need this:
the treatment:

Treatment

Hypoadrenocorticism is treated with fludrocortisone (trade name Florinef)[36][37] or a monthly injection called Percorten-V (desoxycorticosterone pivalate, DOCP) and prednisolone.[38][39][40] Routine blood work is necessary in the initial stages until a maintenance dose is established.[9] Most of the medications used in the therapy of hypoadrenocorticism cause excessive thirst and urination. It is absolutely vital to provide fresh drinking water for a canine suffering from this disorder.[22]

If the owner knows about an upcoming stressful situation (shows, traveling etc.), the animals generally need an increased dose of prednisone to help deal with the added stress. Avoidance of stress is important for dogs with hypoadrenocorticism. Physical illness also stresses the body and may mean that the Addison's medication(s) need to be adjusted during this time.[41] Most dogs with hypoadrenocorticism have an excellent prognosis after proper stabilization and treatment.[7][24][23]



Susceptibility of certain breeds

Certain breeds are more susceptible than others to Addison's disease:[9][10]

Great Danes
Newfoundlands
Portuguese water dogs[7][16]
Standard poodles[7][17]



West Highland white terriers
Bearded collies[18]
Rottweilers[7]
English Springer Spaniels



German Shorthaired Pointers
Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
German shepherds
St. Bernards
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Aug 29, 2014 - 05:23am PT
Dogs Get The Blues When Youngsters Go Back To School


http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2014/08/27/dogs-get-the-blues-when-youngsters-go-back-to-school/
thebravecowboy

climber
strugglin' to make time to climb
Aug 29, 2014 - 05:36pm PT
Credit: thebravecowboy
locker

climber
STFU n00b!!!
Aug 29, 2014 - 06:04pm PT



Credit: locker
...


A few seconds later...

BORED...


Credit: locker


go-B

climber
Cling to what is good!
Aug 30, 2014 - 06:56am PT
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Aug 30, 2014 - 07:42am PT
Cute new family memebr Locker!

And Neebs, thank you for that article on Addisons, the Vet did mention that one too!
The Larry

climber
Moab, UT
Sep 4, 2014 - 08:39am PT
Slack enjoying a day in the mountains.

Credit: The Larry
nita

Social climber
chica de chico, I don't claim to be a daisy.
Sep 4, 2014 - 08:53am PT
*

The Larry, Beautiful picture..It looks like a painting..^



Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 5, 2014 - 01:46pm PT
Slack leads the good life. Really all of these dogs are doing that, it's what makes the thread such a joy (even when it turns sad).

Here's our little girl keeping a sharp eye out for varmints today.

apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Sep 9, 2014 - 09:02am PT
Dogs Dogs Dogs! (Bump)

The best thing in life...
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Sep 9, 2014 - 09:02am PT
Credit: apogee
Rcklzrd

Trad climber
Durango, CO
Sep 9, 2014 - 09:58am PT
My dog knows how to photobomb
Credit: Rcklzrd
Happiegrrrl2

Trad climber
Sep 9, 2014 - 10:50am PT
Credit: Happiegrrrl2

Lucas comes to trailwork on Sundays, of course. He is still learning when "To bark or not to bark," so I offer apologies to those affected. But he does love being the center of things
SC seagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, or In What Time Zone Am I?
Sep 9, 2014 - 11:59am PT
Yeah Lucas! Man he is in the thick of things, kinda looking like a counter weight to what's going on!

Susan
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Sep 10, 2014 - 07:41am PT
Sally-O would like to extend her thanks for a very wonderful get well card to the NEEBS! And i do too!



Thank you Sweet Lady!
bookworm

Social climber
Falls Church, VA
Sep 10, 2014 - 08:30am PT
so...trying to prevent accidents by the new girl using positive reinforcement--a treat whenever she pees outside

now, she runs into the yard, turns and makes eye contact, sits down for 10 seconds and runs back to me for a treat--hilarious

the accidents occur at night and she doesn't bark...how do i teach her to wake me up when she needs to go out

i was spoiled by maggie (rip); she would pee whenever i told her to, including right after she peed
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Sep 10, 2014 - 08:32am PT
I always used the old school method. Negative reinforcement has worked time and time again. Consequence along with reward, must also be taught.
Tadman

Mountain climber
CA
Sep 11, 2014 - 07:50pm PT
Luna on her 1st Birthday!
Luna on her 1st Birthday!
Credit: Tadman
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