risking his life to tell you about NSA surveillance [ot]

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patrick compton

Trad climber
van
Jul 30, 2013 - 01:19pm PT
Like! Freedom rings.

Next question: why haven't GLBT groups supported him? Could it be they are 'in bed' with the military?
monolith

climber
SF bay area
Jul 30, 2013 - 01:21pm PT
Manning guilty of 5 espionage counts.
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Colombia, South America
Jul 30, 2013 - 01:39pm PT
Manning will get locked up in solitary confinement in an SHU for the rest of his life, and will lose his mind like most do after a few years of solitary. I guess its good that he didn't aid the enemy. RT is reporting that the Russian immigration authorities are warning Snowden that he is not safe if he leaves the airport. Not sure what threats they refer to.
I'm supposed to debate some dude about drones in about an hour. Got to study up on it.
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Jul 30, 2013 - 04:42pm PT
Would love to hear your debate, Don.


We all are living in interesting times.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 30, 2013 - 05:07pm PT
Today we have a "money economy" - with some people being "have's" and some people being "have-not's". A recent report told us that 4 of 5 Americans are now experiencing what it is to be "poor" and a few experiencing what it is to be extremely rich. Fewer and fewer are in the middle. In Scandinavia we're still a lot better off than you are in America, but I'm afraid the players of the "internationalisation money game" will soon get to us. And in Norway we will soon elect a conservative government. Their intentions will be good, but my best guess is that their actions will strengthen the patterns making a few extremely rich and more and more people poor and dependent on the extremely rich.

In the future we will also have a "surveillance information economy" with a few people on the top being "have's" and the masses beneath being "have-not's". All information patterns from the surveillance system will then to the few on top be accessible and valid information used strategically to involve the few they prefer and exclude the many not of interest to their goals - mainly more power and more money. And let's add - more information. It will be the players' world.

We have to be careful or we will soon be there...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 30, 2013 - 05:12pm PT
"This is my resignation letter. I’m walking out on in silence. In the future there will be no need for people like me because there won’t be a democracy to save, just private interests, battles for more power, more money. The few files I take with me regard men who must save themselves from the storm, black souls, mercenary captains. Yet, as we’ve already seen in history, they’ll be the rulers of the chaos."

Fascinating? Yes... fascinating as it is when you see the eagle strike the dove or the viper bite your neighbour...
Reeotch

Trad climber
4 Corners Area
Jul 30, 2013 - 05:46pm PT
Obama should pardon Manning.

I mean, we've already given the government a free pass on the constitution.

What's a few espionage statutes?

Fair's fair . . .
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 30, 2013 - 05:53pm PT
The state of exception (Agamben - written some time between 2001 and 2006)):

"In the speech he delivered to Congress when it was finally convened on July 4, the american president openly justified his actions as the holder of a supreme power to violate the constitution in a situation of necessity. "Whether strictly legal or not," he declared, the measures he had adopted had been taken "under what appeared to be a popular demand and a public necessity" in the certainty that Congress would ratify them. They were based on the conviction that even fundamental law could be violated if the very existence of the union and the juridical order were at stake ("Are all the laws but one to go unexecuted, and the Government itself go to pieces lest that one be violated?").

Because the sovereign power of the president is essentially grounded in the emergency linked to a state of war, over the course of the twentieth century the metaphor of war becomes an integral part of the presidential political vocabulary whenever decisions considered to be of vital importance are being imposed. Thus, in 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt was able to assume extraordinary powers to cope with the Great Depression by presenting his actions as those of a commander during a military campaign.

President Bush's decision to refer to himself constantly as the "Commander in Chief of the Army" after September 11, 2001, must be considered in the context of this presidential claim to sovereign powers in emergency situations. If, as we have seen, the assumption of this title entails a direct reference to the state of exception, then Bush is attempting to produce a situation in which the emergency becomes the rule, and the very distinction between peace and war (and between foreign and civil war) becomes impossible."

And what have you become, my friends, what have you become...
Reeotch

Trad climber
4 Corners Area
Jul 30, 2013 - 06:28pm PT
^^^ [never mind, I'm afraid to speak freely] ^^^
kunlun_shan

Mountain climber
SF, CA
Jul 31, 2013 - 09:37pm PT
More info is revealed. Snowden and Glenn Greenwald are the best thing that has happened to the US for some time now.

XKeyscore: NSA tool collects 'nearly everything a user does on the internet'
 http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/31/nsa-top-secret-program-online-data

XKeyscore presentation from 2008 – read in full
 http://www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/2013/jul/31/nsa-xkeyscore-program-full-presentation


Presenting XKeyscore: What the N.S.A. Is Still Hiding : The New Yorker
 http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/closeread/2013/07/presenting-xkeyscore-what-the-nsa-is-still-hiding.html
froodish

Social climber
Portland, Oregon
Jul 31, 2013 - 10:12pm PT
Senators take intelligence officials to the mat over secret courts, phone metadata:

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/07/senators-take-intelligence-officials-to-the-mat-over-secret-courts-phone-metadata/

Sounding the alarm: Ars speaks with vocal NSA critic Sen. Ron Wyden:


http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/07/two-years-later-senators-criticism-of-nsa-spying-sinks-in/

Yup, only the fringe kook bloggers care about this.

fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Jul 31, 2013 - 11:15pm PT
But the bulk of the Sheeple still sleep. The ones that wake focus their displeasure on the current puppet in chief. The rest divide their limited attentions to identifying with the Blue or Red team.

While the media/propaganda machine spins Snowden into a "traitor" for daring to do the one thing that might save us all.... to tell the truth.
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Aug 1, 2013 - 12:49am PT
OK, Snowden's name appears only at the very end of the artice, but super interesting (and related) nonetheless:

link: Top Ten Ways Bradley Manning Changed the World


From this:

2. Manning revealed the full extent of the corruption of Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidin Ben Ali, adding fuel to the youth protest movement of late 2010, which translated the relevant US cables into Arabic. Manning contributed to the outbreak of powerful youth movements demanding more democratic governance in the Arab world.
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Aug 1, 2013 - 01:04am PT
froodish, those are two excellent articles.

The ending of the second one is very succinct:

Ars: Anything else you want to add?

Sen. Wyden: This is a unique time in our constitutional history. There's been a combination of dramatic changes in technology and sweeping decisions from the FISA court. If we don't take the opportunity to revise our surveillance laws now—to show that security and liberty can go hand in hand—all of us are going to regret it.
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Colombia, South America
Aug 1, 2013 - 09:57am PT
Breaking news - Snowden goes free. Got his asylum approved, now he just has to watch out for the jackals.

k-man - that's cool that someone actually wants to watch my tv show, thanks. Here you go:

US Drone Strikes Increase Extremism
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Aug 1, 2013 - 08:43pm PT


XKeyscore, the documents boast, is the NSA's "widest reaching" system developing intelligence from computer networks – what the agency calls Digital Network Intelligence (DNI). One presentation claims the program covers "nearly everything a typical user does on the internet", including the content of emails, websites visited and searches, as well as their metadata.

Analysts can also use XKeyscore and other NSA systems to obtain ongoing "real-time" interception of an individual's internet activity.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/31/nsa-top-secret-program-online-data

couchmaster

climber
pdx
Aug 2, 2013 - 09:49am PT
haha, a woman was googling "pressure cookers while her husband was googling "backpacks" and they get a visit from 6 armed tactical team joint terrorism/FBI guys. The government is watching everything you do online. Including this.



http://news.yahoo.com/google-pressure-cookers-backpacks-visit-feds-140900667.html


Google Pressure Cookers and Backpacks, Get a Visit from the Feds


Michele Catalano was looking for information online about pressure cookers. Her husband, in the same time frame, was Googling backpacks. Wednesday morning, six men from a joint terrorism task force showed up at their house to see if they were terrorists. Which begs the question: How'd the government know what they were Googling?

RELATED: We'll Never Know What Google's Doing With the NSA

Catalano (who is a professional writer) describes the tension of that visit.

[T]hey were peppering my husband with questions. Where is he from? Where are his parents from? They asked about me, where was I, where do I work, where do my parents live. Do you have any bombs, they asked. Do you own a pressure cooker? My husband said no, but we have a rice cooker. Can you make a bomb with that? My husband said no, my wife uses it to make quinoa. What the hell is quinoa, they asked. ...

Have you ever looked up how to make a pressure cooker bomb? My husband, ever the oppositional kind, asked them if they themselves weren’t curious as to how a pressure cooker bomb works, if they ever looked it up. Two of them admitted they did.

The men identified themselves as members of the "joint terrorism task force." The composition of such task forces depend on the region of the country, but, as we outlined after the Boston bombings, include a variety of federal agencies. Among them: the FBI and Homeland Security.

RELATED: PRISM Companies Start Denying Knowledge of the NSA Data Collection

Ever since details of the NSA's surveillance infrastructure were leaked by Edward Snowden, the agency has been insistent on the boundaries of the information it collects. It is not, by law, allowed to spy on Americans — although there are exceptions of which it takes advantage. Its PRISM program, under which it collects internet content, does not include information from Americans unless those Americans are connected to terror suspects by no more than two other people. It collects metadata on phone calls made by Americans, but reportedly stopped collecting metadata on Americans' internet use in 2011. So how, then, would the government know what Catalano and her husband were searching for?

RELATED: Which Tech Company Does the NSA Use Most?

It's possible that one of the two of them is tangentially linked to a foreign terror suspect, allowing the government to review their internet activity. After all, that "no more than two other people" ends up covering millions of people. Or perhaps the NSA, as part of its routine collection of as much internet traffic as it can, automatically flags things like Google searches for "pressure cooker" and "backpack" and passes on anything it finds to the FBI.

RELATED: Very Similar Statements from Facebook and Google on PRISM Still Have Holes

Or maybe it was something else. On Wednesday, The Guardian reported on XKeyscore, a program eerily similar to Facebook search that could clearly allow an analyst to run a search that picked out people who'd done searches for those items from the same location. How those searches got into the government's database is a question worth asking; how the information got back out seems apparent.

RELATED: Will Google's Request to Publish Secret Court Orders Do Anything?

It is also possible that there were other factors that prompted the government's interest in Catalano and her husband. He travels to Asia, she notes in her article. Who knows. Which is largely Catalano's point.

They mentioned that they do this about 100 times a week. And that 99 of those visits turn out to be nothing. I don’t know what happens on the other 1% of visits and I’m not sure I want to know what my neighbors are up to.

One hundred times a week, groups of six armed men drive to houses in three black SUVs, conducting consented-if-casual searches of the property perhaps in part because of things people looked up online.

But the NSA doesn't collect data on Americans, so this certainly won't happen to you."

The response from the gov. http://news.yahoo.com/no-fbi-isnt-snooping-york-google-users-002041892.html "Oh noes, we don't do that, it was some other reason, just a knock and talk by the local friendly sherrif". Cough* bullshit* cough
froodish

Social climber
Portland, Oregon
Aug 2, 2013 - 11:03am PT
Really couchmaster? You think it is more likely that it was the NSA and not the employer that instigated this? I have no love for what the NSA is doing as evidenced by my posts in this thread, but come on.
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Aug 2, 2013 - 11:24am PT
I don't know and can't say Steve. Looks like the cops are still trying to get the corrected story straight though:

Updated version says:
"The Guardian reported that an FBI spokesperson said that Catalano "was visited by Nassau County police department … working in conjunction with Suffolk County police department." (Catalano apparently lives on Long Island, most likely in Nassau County.)

Detective Garcia of the Nassau County Police, however, told The Atlantic Wire by phone that his department was "not involved in any way." Similarly, FBI spokesperson Peter Donald confirmed with The Atlantic Wire that his agency wasn't involved in the visit. He also stated that he could not answer whether or not the agency provided information that led to the visit, as he didn't know."

jstan

climber
Aug 2, 2013 - 12:16pm PT
The current situation has been and is being very badly played IMO.
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