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Messages 41 - 60 of total 73 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Apr 7, 2013 - 03:43pm PT
That's a simple system Coz. Thank you. I was cragging with a new pal this weekend and we were lowering a lot after I rigged top anchors. I would clearly communicate when I was tied in that I was off belay while I transitioned. Each time he'd say, "I'm going to keep you on anyway." I really appreciated that.

Being able to see the belayer belaying before fully committing to a rap is a superb practice.

> KennyT....the two accidents i reported were from miscommunication; they thought they were
> going to be lowered and leaned back with no one on the other end of the rope. If he fell 60
> feet it is unlikely that the rope was not long enough.
> Most of the routes there are less than half a rope length.

I think this is the exact same circumstances of Craig DeMartino's accident (of Gimp Monkey's and other fame). Except I think he fell 100 feet or more.

My condolences and sympathy to the family and friends of the Clear Creek accident.

Eric
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Apr 7, 2013 - 03:45pm PT
Lynnie... one of the kindness things anyone can do it check his/her partners know every time. I'd be extra wary of folks who blow that off.

Eric
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 7, 2013 - 03:52pm PT
Condolences to the family and friends of the perished.

But really, in these times of a bazillion people climbing, i dont think the accident rate is really above the norm in a per capita schmapita sort of way..Its the same ol since the mid seventies. Distracted. I once dropped a buddy of mine about fifteen feet on a boulder problem i was belaying him on. Again due to distraction. He was topping on the boulder and i needed to move out of his way. As i was backing up and had let the belay loose(hip belay), he slipped . Cratered he did, and i felt horrible. He was ok, other than a bruise or two,, but, that one moment of ill attention is RIGHT when the slip occurred. Perfect lil storm.
locker

Social climber
Some Rehab in Bolivia
Apr 7, 2013 - 04:15pm PT


Miscommunication (Or lack of it) = the loss of Woody also...




It's been written here at least a few times already...

Fuked up ACCIDENTS like this can happen to ANY of us...

I think of Jim Donini's posts a couple to a few months back about him almost getting spit when rapping...

Scary sh!t!!!...




EDITED:

"Always check your partners gear, because it's yours as well."...

Fuking A right on the money!!!...

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 7, 2013 - 04:26pm PT
I too did the lean back and hear the velcro parting on me harness trick. I grabbed the anchors though and all was well.. ON another stinkin spurt route.. Im starting to think its spurt climbing thats the base of all disease.;-)
locker

Social climber
Some Rehab in Bolivia
Apr 7, 2013 - 04:27pm PT

I think MANY of us have had that fuking VELCRO scare happen...

Never failed to get me...

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 7, 2013 - 04:28pm PT
Yup,, fergot to actually Lace the thing. EASY to do with that handy VELCRO.. We need to ban velcro..;-)
Dropline

Mountain climber
Somewhere Up There
Apr 7, 2013 - 04:29pm PT
2. When lowering grab the other side of the rope, belay yourself until you make direct eye contact with your belayer. NEVER ASSUME U R ON BELAY... NEVER

Learned that from you Coz way back when. Thanks.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 7, 2013 - 04:33pm PT
so we ban spurt routes and velco. We will cut the fatalities by 66% minimum.
Ben909

Trad climber
toronto
Apr 7, 2013 - 04:54pm PT
Locker, this wasn't an accident. It is a tragedy caused by complacency and negligence. An accident implies something unforeseen; this and Donini almost taking the big ride are situations with very obvious hazards easily mitigated by principles that most of us learn when we start climbing.
skywalker

climber
Apr 7, 2013 - 05:14pm PT
Tragic...

I have to admit, it happened to me 15 yrs ago. I was fortunately at the top of the second pitch of Country Club Crack. I landed just above the mantle for Athletes Feat. ~ 110 ft fall all air. Partner was tied directly to the belay anchor so he was also unhurt. Miscommunication

We went home. Don't think we ever tied in together but joked as friends at the boulders for years later.

Bummer...

S...
Bldrjac

Ice climber
Boulder
Apr 7, 2013 - 05:26pm PT
My heart goes out to this guy's family. Whether it was an accident due to miscommunication, user error, or whatever, the fact is this guy is dead, and the world of his family will be rocked in a way that they cannot yet comprehend, nor can anyone else unless they have been personally affected by something like this...not a friend, but a family member/spouse. I get that it is important as hell to try to figure out what happened so the rest of us can take note and avoid the same fate. Nevertheless, be cognizant of the fact that his family may well be reading this thread, or will be soon. Does anyone know yet who it was? I can't seem to find out. It's a shitty deal....sending lots of love and positive vibes their way!
Pam
GhoulweJ

Trad climber
El Dorado Hills, CA
Apr 7, 2013 - 05:38pm PT
2. When lowering grab the other side of the rope, belay yourself until you make direct eye contact with your belayer. NEVER ASSUME U R ON BELAY... NEVER
Been my practice for years and its worked well for me.

My whole life I've watched people "miscommunicate".
Rapping/lowering seems like an area of more risk in our sport.

Condolences to the family of the deceased.
kennyt

climber
Woodfords,California
Apr 7, 2013 - 07:07pm PT
And turn yer effin cell phone of at the crag too. please
harryhotdog

Social climber
north vancouver, B.C.
Apr 7, 2013 - 10:51pm PT
My two avoidable mistakes where I could of died happened while I was still relatively new to climbing. I had climbed an easy route and decided to put up a top rope on a harder climb adjacent to the first climb. The ledge for this harder climb was 20' lower on the cliff so I did not lower both sides of the rope to the ground, I left one strand short as I only needed 20' to get to the ledge.

Well I was talking to someone on the ground as i rapped and got distracted. I forgot for a second that I was stopping at the ledge and proceeded rap down the whole cliff. Luckily my friend saw what was going on and stopped me 10 ' from the end of the shorter strand with no knot! 50' directly below me was a sharp pointy boulder that I would of hit with my back. It surely would of finished me off. Thanks to my friend who was actually new to climbing I lived to tell about it. Nobody had told him about looking out for each other, he was just one of those people who seem to be on the ball naturally. I've never made that same mistake since.

Second mishap involved a overhanging 11a and my first Arcteryx harness with velcro. Got to the anchors and then noticed the buckle was not even once through. Removed the velcro immediately with my swiss army knife as soon as I got down.

I feel very lucky that it wasn't my time during these two incidents but others have not been so lucky.

Stay safe my friends and look out for your partners as a back-up so that ultimately old age will be
the author of our demise.
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Apr 7, 2013 - 10:51pm PT
coz's advice is right on. (and he's a good roll model)


But I don't think that this kind of screw up was as common place before gyms and sport climbs.

Common sense seems to have been a casualty of making protecting yer ass too user friendly.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 7, 2013 - 11:50pm PT
I'll wager that many of the climbers who think nothing of carrying on a meaningless conversation with someone on the ground are very happy that when they get on a commercial airliner they are legally protected from the pilots engaging in the same sort of banter while in the TO or landing phases of the flight. Jess sayin'...
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Apr 8, 2013 - 04:34am PT
2. When lowering grab the other side of the rope, belay yourself until you make direct eye contact with your belayer. NEVER ASSUME U R ON BELAY... NEVER

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
THIS

Saved my ass once. Big time. I had been teaching a girlfriend how to climb for awhile and it was the end of a weekend where we had been climbing lots (with friends watching my back while she was on belay) and she had practiced lowering with other people.

She seemed to have it down pat, so when everyone took off the next day, i was comfortable enough to put up an easier route that she could top rope. I sent the route and when i put together the anchor i got her to take which she did and told her ready to lower.

She said she had me and it felt like it too with the brake side of the rope in my hand. Turns out she didn't have the brake down and when i loaded the belay and my 220 pound frame starts going really fast! I clutched at the brake side with my other hand and managed to lower myself without burning my hands even.

I was choked tho. "You almost killed me!!!" She told me the rope was burning her hands so she let go of it, and that she was physically unable to hold my weight (she was anchored) .

The next day i bought a gri gri and made her belay me with it until i was absolutely confident she had her atc figured out.

My other policy for this is working out a plan on the ground beforehand, and when i am setting up an anchor i don't say anything until "ready to lower".
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Apr 8, 2013 - 05:55am PT
Many are here by luck.

The Rev and I never had formal instruction.

We blindly bumbled and blundered and got it right.

But it took some doing, even after we'd been in the Valley as regulars.

All it took for me to be distracted one morning on Rixon's center was a damned cigarette. I had belayed Jeff off the ground, he was on aid.

He was figuring out the next placement. I went for a short stroll to get my pack of smokes. As I turned back to the anchor my ears got blistered!

It was worse than when I stepped on the fn rope or tried to seduce his sister! I felt like sh#t, lower than a gym climber.

And I have some to tell on him, too.

It's no wonder he keeps telling me it's a wonder we ever made twenty-five.

Always be faithful to the belay, never let communications be a problem, and always check each other's outfit. And any other safety you can incorporate into routine, GOOD, DO IT!

Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Apr 8, 2013 - 06:33am PT
I never had any problems except once, and I let a certain Claude talk me into not having an anchor. "I have done Stone Groove several times," he said.

About 60 feet up or so, with his last pro well below him, he peeled. He decked but just barely, as I was yanked into the wall. I caught his fall, just barely. He wasn't hurt. But if I had an anchor, he wouldn't have decked. I never ever let anybody talk me into not having an anchor after that.
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