Show Me What You're Building!!

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Messages 1681 - 1700 of total 2673 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Jun 30, 2013 - 07:54pm PT
My wife and I spent the last 9 weekends remodeling our kitchen and parts of our first floor. It was a lot of man hours and much climbing, biking and fly fishing was missed while we did it, but we are really psyched on the results! I also pushed my DIY skills to a new level.

Credit: Crag Q

Credit: Crag Q
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 09:10pm PT
You did all that in 9 weekends?

That's impressive!

Looks way bigger and cleaner now - I bet she's happy...
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Jun 30, 2013 - 09:23pm PT
Thanks Warbler! Our main goal was to open it up a bit.

I worked a bunch in the evenings and had a few days of vacation thrown at it as well. The elapsed time was 2 months. The worst part was we neglected the kids a bit while we bared down.

My wife is super happy about it and was very patient since we waited about 7 years to do that remodel so we could afford it.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 1, 2013 - 12:03am PT
Brandon, I've used one of those Lancelot tools, but didn't know it by that name. I used it to texture some old fir beams for exposed headers in my kitchen. I used it to give the surface a scalloped look, kind of like a beam hand hewn with an adze. It cleaned up the splintery, oxidized surface layer real quick. I just set the beams on some milk crates and straddled them to work. Then stained them a dark, dark, almost black brown. It's a nice look, and I've always wanted to get one of those tools for my quiver - I borrowed one for that job.

Are you saying you fine tune your joints in the timber framing with one?
Edge

Trad climber
New Durham, NH
Jul 1, 2013 - 12:51am PT
Nice table on the last page Warbler!

How stable is the Torrey pine? Do you have to dovetail cleats in the underside or otherwise keep it from cupping while allowing for expansion & contraction?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 1, 2013 - 01:12am PT
The Torrey Pine is fairly stable, but does have a tendency to wind when drying. I mill it to at least 3 inches on slabs more than 2 ft wide, more like 4 inches after 3 1/2 ft, that leaves room to work it flat later if it winds or to possibly resaw it if it stays flat. As far as cupping goes, those tables are built with not fully dried wood tops, and after a few days in the sun there is some slight cupping when the boards are loose. I'm expecting that stickering, stacking and storage of the top boards will take most of that out. If you didn't notice upthread, Edge, they are built to be broken down quickly for easy storage and transport. They won't be intact for more than a couple of days at a time.

The way they're built, there are 4 5/4" x 8/4" cleats running perpendicular to the grain underneath the tops with 3 5/16ths lag screws running up through the cleats and pulling each side of the tops down tight to the tops of the mini beam cleats. As the top boards are only 4/4" - 5/4" thick and up to 21'' wide, a little cup can be pulled out of the with the lags. The top boards aren't planed with a full sized planer to parallel planes, but left roughsawn underneath and free planed with a Makita 6 3/4 inch planer on top. A very nice tool, BTW. There are no glue joints, so expansion and contraction doesn't matter much, the fasteners are all in oversize holes to allow movement.

They're not supposed to be perfect, and the live edges, knots, cracks, and slight variations in thickness all make any other imperfections less noticeable.
phylp

Trad climber
Millbrae, CA
Jul 1, 2013 - 01:15am PT
I have to say, all this talk about blades and saws and such makes me a bit queasy. Sharp things scare me.

But I love looking at ya'alls work.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 1, 2013 - 02:16am PT
Are you saying you fine tune your joints in the timber framing with one?

I've been using it for log scribe work.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 2, 2013 - 11:19pm PT
some might call it a burnpile.
i call it my vanity.
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
like a ship upon the dirt sea,
i often exercise, here,
Credit: Norwegian

my viking imaginations
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 2, 2013 - 11:34pm PT
One of those sticks on yer burnpile's longer than the others, sir woodsman.



Seriously, that looks cool, and a fine use for curved cedar boughs, topped with the Pipes of Pan.


Building inspectors must love you Norwegian...


Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 3, 2013 - 12:48am PT
thanks kevin.
like most whom i cross pasts with,
building inspectors walk away wondering of my intent and of my understanding.

rsin,
i exaggerated all the plumbing so you just lift the sink right off the top to access any intestinal issues.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 3, 2013 - 12:52am PT
Did you joint and plane the Cedar boughs to get 'em flat, or just whittle away at 'em caveman style?

Edit: Be careful, there's moss growing on that rig already...
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 3, 2013 - 12:55am PT

that was a six-pack project,
i free-handed that shite through the
un-fenced table saw.

rsin my wife will hardi-board
and grout the river stone on top,
to flush out the surface with the sink edge.

getting the iron sink out is like 5.9 crimper.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 3, 2013 - 12:56am PT
No effin' way

Unfenced table saw+arched cedar branches, with bark and stubs+sixer+Norwegian=


Scary
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 3, 2013 - 01:09am PT
What's the rating on the sink pull after the grout goes in?


An my skilsaw guard has been wedged back for so long it's rusted in place
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 3, 2013 - 02:43am PT
I remove mine completly, so I can run an 8 1/2 blade for thick bci's or whatever else comes up.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 3, 2013 - 08:36am PT
warbler i think i'll
fix a cam hook 'neath the
sink edge once i grout it.
so it'll be A1 plumbing.
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:41pm PT
Like this:

Credit: treez

The saw with the blue cord has an Ace blade that is the largest I've found
with a diamond knockout.

Credit: treez

I use that set-up to cut plates together for extreme accuracy. It gets about 2 and 15 depth of cut so depending on the lumber, sometimes a quick trim with
my knife on the bottom one.

I also have a Big-foot saw (heavy) and a Makita beam-saw (heavier).

I can cut 6x6 in two passes with the skilsaw which is better than dragging out the big boys.

Speaking of spinning carbide, check out my new love:

Credit: treez

I built the extension table and overhead dust collection myself, obviously.
The in-saw dust collection is a dedicated 750cfm Jet unit. The overhead goes to a 6 horse shopvac. I can rip mdf all day without a spec of dust escaping.

Credit: treez

Credit: treez

The left switch controls the Jet DC, the middle switch "arms" the overhead DC to come on with it or not, and the third is a spotlight mounted on the mast.

Credit: treez

This is Ole. Don't be an Ole.

Credit: treez

Stop by sometime.

Credit: treez

FRUMY

Trad climber
SHERMAN OAKS,CA
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:51pm PT
Please don't hurt Mr. Bill.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 02:18pm PT
Nice! I'm not a fan of pinned blade guards, but that's just because I built decks for a few years. One accidental set down of a saw with a pinned guard and you're screwed.

The reason I'm replying is to acknowledge the difference from east coast to west coast in regards to circular saws.

I moved to NH with my sweet Bosch worm drive saw. I love it, can run it one handed all day, and it has no cord to get tangled on joists. You plug the cord directly into it. Everyone I've worked with here has talked trash about it because 'its too heavy'. The saw of choice here is a left handed Makita sidewinder. No worm drives to be seen for the most part.

With my crew when push comes to shove and we need to cut beefy lumber, the worm drive is requested. Hopefully I'm changing opinions, because the longer frame on my saw allows for faster, more accurate cuts on sheet goods, and more torque on large cuts.

I wonder why this is, a worm drive was mandatory when I framed in California. Maybe it's due to codes requiring heavier framing because of earthquakes?
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