Show Me What You're Building!!

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Messages 1661 - 1680 of total 2695 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 14, 2013 - 09:53pm PT
Just listen to the stone and the iron. You'll know when you're getting a good hone. It sings when you're doing it right and you know it.

Edit; it's Friday night and I'm still talking about work. Lame. Hope you all have a good weekend.
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Jun 15, 2013 - 09:35am PT
I just finished making a Medieval chair, bed and strong box in anticipation of my 2-week stay in a military encampment and fighting in the Pennsic War next month.

Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Pennsic War
5,000 knights on the battlefield bashing at each other in a huge melee
http://www.deviantpath.com/page/4/
http://www.deviantpath.com/page/4/
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat
Edge

Trad climber
New Durham, NH
Jun 15, 2013 - 10:47am PT
^^^^ Kinda looks like the überfall at the Gunks.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 24, 2013 - 05:44pm PT
Log play structure is done, but for a few punch list items.







The octagonal facets on the posts was a fun project to essentially wrap it up this afternoon.

Back to building with milled lumber...
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 05:40pm PT
Made 5 tables out of Torrey Pine, probably the rarest pine in the world, but plentiful in La Jolla, Del Mar and neighboring communities. The only 2 places in the world they grow natively are Torrey Pines Park and on one Channel Island, but people around here plant them in their landscapes. Problem is, when they get irrigated, they grow monstrously huge real fast, and are starting to fall and demo houses to the tune of millions in damages.

So people are scared of the big ones, and you can make stuff from the wood. This set of tables is designed to be broken down in a matter of minutes, reduced in size for transportation and storage, and reused for events on a rental basis. Maybe they'll pay for the work I put into them at some point....

I milled the tops from one 8 1/2" log, about 2 ft thick. The leg stock came from one twisted, split slab which had been improperly dried. I welded up the braces with wrought iron balusters, 1/2 inch threaded rod, 1/4" thick washers, fastened with square plain steel nuts.

We have Torrey slabs up to 6 ft wide.

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

my kid
my kid
Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Jun 30, 2013 - 05:50pm PT
5iveElevenKevin. . . I WANT YOUR KID'S SHOES!

:-)

Nice work, dood!

ox
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 05:51pm PT
Thanks.

One is bookmatched, but the width I needed to achieve prevented me from doing more. I basically had to use mismatched widths of the two boards to achieve the finished width, and I wanted to do the whole set with one log. As you mill through the log, the bookmatched sets get narrower as you cut away from center.

They aren't glue joined, BTW, the tops are two separate pieces and easier to build and handle because of that. The fabric runner covers the crack up.
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Jun 30, 2013 - 05:52pm PT
Great work, great setting, great kid!
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jun 30, 2013 - 05:55pm PT
^What Ap said!!!

Sweet!

EDIT: I'm curious, Kevin...is the Torrey Pine really pitchy?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 06:03pm PT
It's not bad at all except at the knots. When these tables sat in the sun for a day, the knots beaded up with sap droplets and I wiped them down with a rag and mineral spirits to eliminate the stickiness for the party. You get a little bit of residue on the table saw with it.

This wood is barely a year dry, so the sap hasn't crystallized - it stabilizes after a couple of years.

I just made a dining table out of a 42 inch wide Torrey slab I'll post up later.
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jun 30, 2013 - 06:08pm PT
I kinda suspected that, coming from a maritime environment.

Lovely work!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 06:08pm PT
No, rSin I have lots of different saws, a boom truck and a Woodmizer LT40. I've done tree work and carpentry for 30 years or so.

I'm a bit of a freak here in La Jolla.


Hi Kathy, I still have that quartersawn Black Acacia for Blanchard - just waiting for a new carbide blade on my bandsaw to cut it. Hope you're well sweetie!
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 30, 2013 - 06:28pm PT
Sweet table!

And you've got a Wood Mizer? Jealous!
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jun 30, 2013 - 06:36pm PT
My wife calls me the wood mizer.

: )
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Jun 30, 2013 - 06:42pm PT
Hi Kathy, I still have that quartersawn Black Acacia for Blanchard - just waiting for a new carbide blade on my bandsaw to cut it. Hope you're well sweetie!

HiKevvie!

Blanchard'll be stoked to hear when that day arrives!

:-)

I'm very well, thanks. . . hope you're gettin' out playin' and not just workin' all the time!

ox
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 07:15pm PT
I have an investor/partner who bought the Woodmizer and some other heavy equipment, Brandon, and it looks like you'd appreciate one.

We paid $8,500.00 on a low hours one on craigslist. Had to drive to Oregon to get it. They just started making carbide tipped blades for 'em - makes a big difference.

Here's a bookmatched Western Red Cedar dining table:

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler



This tree grew a few blocks from my house and was getting too big for the garden. The homeowners' grandfather transplanted it to La Jolla from Mount Palomar 70 years ago. I milled the slabs 25 years ago in their back yard with an Alaskan chainsaw mill.










Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 30, 2013 - 07:28pm PT
Nice looking work, the grain is really nicely matched in your second photo upthread.

As for the Wood Mizer.....

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 07:36pm PT
I craved a Woodmizer for a long time, Brandon, but you can do a lot with a good chainsaw mill set up. The Woodmizer is way faster and easier, but it's limited to 28 inches in width. I have a chainsaw bar and mill frame that can mill up to 7 ft wide.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 07:51pm PT
If you're serious about an alaskan mill, invest in two matched power heads - the more power the better. It's important that the two saws are matched models and makes so they run at equal RPM's. If one saw isn't built to run at the higher RPM of the other, you'll burn a piston in the slower saw because the faster one drives it faster than it's built to be run.

You can cut with one powerhead and a handle, but two powerheads have more power (duh). You also get chain oiling at both ends of your bar with two powerheads.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 30, 2013 - 07:52pm PT
That's a big dimension.

I've been using the Lancelot, which is a chainsaw chain on a grinder wheel. It's about 4''.

It's improbable, but we get our work down to no shadow line, + - 1/128''
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