Show Me What You're Building!!

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Messages 1701 - 1720 of total 2454 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jun 30, 2013 - 02:55pm PT
^What Ap said!!!

Sweet!

EDIT: I'm curious, Kevin...is the Torrey Pine really pitchy?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 03:03pm PT
It's not bad at all except at the knots. When these tables sat in the sun for a day, the knots beaded up with sap droplets and I wiped them down with a rag and mineral spirits to eliminate the stickiness for the party. You get a little bit of residue on the table saw with it.

This wood is barely a year dry, so the sap hasn't crystallized - it stabilizes after a couple of years.

I just made a dining table out of a 42 inch wide Torrey slab I'll post up later.
rSin

Trad climber
calif
Jun 30, 2013 - 03:04pm PT
you buying those already resawn?

i worked alot for a furniture guy back in the 90's
he would buy logs and they would sit around all year till his guy showed up with a mobile mill to saw then into boards then theyd get stickered up in the shed with the AC for years and years
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jun 30, 2013 - 03:08pm PT
I kinda suspected that, coming from a maritime environment.

Lovely work!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 03:08pm PT
No, rSin I have lots of different saws, a boom truck and a Woodmizer LT40. I've done tree work and carpentry for 30 years or so.

I'm a bit of a freak here in La Jolla.


Hi Kathy, I still have that quartersawn Black Acacia for Blanchard - just waiting for a new carbide blade on my bandsaw to cut it. Hope you're well sweetie!
rSin

Trad climber
calif
Jun 30, 2013 - 03:10pm PT
i bid a remodel there once

the owners plans came with elevations done in 4 color on heavy parchment...
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 30, 2013 - 03:28pm PT
Sweet table!

And you've got a Wood Mizer? Jealous!
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jun 30, 2013 - 03:36pm PT
My wife calls me the wood mizer.

: )
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Jun 30, 2013 - 03:42pm PT
Hi Kathy, I still have that quartersawn Black Acacia for Blanchard - just waiting for a new carbide blade on my bandsaw to cut it. Hope you're well sweetie!

HiKevvie!

Blanchard'll be stoked to hear when that day arrives!

:-)

I'm very well, thanks. . . hope you're gettin' out playin' and not just workin' all the time!

ox
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 04:15pm PT
I have an investor/partner who bought the Woodmizer and some other heavy equipment, Brandon, and it looks like you'd appreciate one.

We paid $8,500.00 on a low hours one on craigslist. Had to drive to Oregon to get it. They just started making carbide tipped blades for 'em - makes a big difference.

Here's a bookmatched Western Red Cedar dining table:

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler



This tree grew a few blocks from my house and was getting too big for the garden. The homeowners' grandfather transplanted it to La Jolla from Mount Palomar 70 years ago. I milled the slabs 25 years ago in their back yard with an Alaskan chainsaw mill.










Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 30, 2013 - 04:28pm PT
Nice looking work, the grain is really nicely matched in your second photo upthread.

As for the Wood Mizer.....

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 04:36pm PT
I craved a Woodmizer for a long time, Brandon, but you can do a lot with a good chainsaw mill set up. The Woodmizer is way faster and easier, but it's limited to 28 inches in width. I have a chainsaw bar and mill frame that can mill up to 7 ft wide.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 04:51pm PT
If you're serious about an alaskan mill, invest in two matched power heads - the more power the better. It's important that the two saws are matched models and makes so they run at equal RPM's. If one saw isn't built to run at the higher RPM of the other, you'll burn a piston in the slower saw because the faster one drives it faster than it's built to be run.

You can cut with one powerhead and a handle, but two powerheads have more power (duh). You also get chain oiling at both ends of your bar with two powerheads.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 30, 2013 - 04:52pm PT
That's a big dimension.

I've been using the Lancelot, which is a chainsaw chain on a grinder wheel. It's about 4''.

It's improbable, but we get our work down to no shadow line, + - 1/128''
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Jun 30, 2013 - 04:54pm PT
My wife and I spent the last 9 weekends remodeling our kitchen and parts of our first floor. It was a lot of man hours and much climbing, biking and fly fishing was missed while we did it, but we are really psyched on the results! I also pushed my DIY skills to a new level.

Credit: Crag Q

Credit: Crag Q
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 06:10pm PT
You did all that in 9 weekends?

That's impressive!

Looks way bigger and cleaner now - I bet she's happy...
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Jun 30, 2013 - 06:23pm PT
Thanks Warbler! Our main goal was to open it up a bit.

I worked a bunch in the evenings and had a few days of vacation thrown at it as well. The elapsed time was 2 months. The worst part was we neglected the kids a bit while we bared down.

My wife is super happy about it and was very patient since we waited about 7 years to do that remodel so we could afford it.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 09:03pm PT
Brandon, I've used one of those Lancelot tools, but didn't know it by that name. I used it to texture some old fir beams for exposed headers in my kitchen. I used it to give the surface a scalloped look, kind of like a beam hand hewn with an adze. It cleaned up the splintery, oxidized surface layer real quick. I just set the beams on some milk crates and straddled them to work. Then stained them a dark, dark, almost black brown. It's a nice look, and I've always wanted to get one of those tools for my quiver - I borrowed one for that job.

Are you saying you fine tune your joints in the timber framing with one?
Edge

Trad climber
New Durham, NH
Jun 30, 2013 - 09:51pm PT
Nice table on the last page Warbler!

How stable is the Torrey pine? Do you have to dovetail cleats in the underside or otherwise keep it from cupping while allowing for expansion & contraction?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jun 30, 2013 - 10:12pm PT
The Torrey Pine is fairly stable, but does have a tendency to wind when drying. I mill it to at least 3 inches on slabs more than 2 ft wide, more like 4 inches after 3 1/2 ft, that leaves room to work it flat later if it winds or to possibly resaw it if it stays flat. As far as cupping goes, those tables are built with not fully dried wood tops, and after a few days in the sun there is some slight cupping when the boards are loose. I'm expecting that stickering, stacking and storage of the top boards will take most of that out. If you didn't notice upthread, Edge, they are built to be broken down quickly for easy storage and transport. They won't be intact for more than a couple of days at a time.

The way they're built, there are 4 5/4" x 8/4" cleats running perpendicular to the grain underneath the tops with 3 5/16ths lag screws running up through the cleats and pulling each side of the tops down tight to the tops of the mini beam cleats. As the top boards are only 4/4" - 5/4" thick and up to 21'' wide, a little cup can be pulled out of the with the lags. The top boards aren't planed with a full sized planer to parallel planes, but left roughsawn underneath and free planed with a Makita 6 3/4 inch planer on top. A very nice tool, BTW. There are no glue joints, so expansion and contraction doesn't matter much, the fasteners are all in oversize holes to allow movement.

They're not supposed to be perfect, and the live edges, knots, cracks, and slight variations in thickness all make any other imperfections less noticeable.
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