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The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 3, 2013 - 01:09am PT
What's the rating on the sink pull after the grout goes in?


An my skilsaw guard has been wedged back for so long it's rusted in place
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 3, 2013 - 02:43am PT
I remove mine completly, so I can run an 8 1/2 blade for thick bci's or whatever else comes up.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 3, 2013 - 08:36am PT
warbler i think i'll
fix a cam hook 'neath the
sink edge once i grout it.
so it'll be A1 plumbing.
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:41pm PT
Like this:

Credit: treez

The saw with the blue cord has an Ace blade that is the largest I've found
with a diamond knockout.

Credit: treez

I use that set-up to cut plates together for extreme accuracy. It gets about 2 and 15 depth of cut so depending on the lumber, sometimes a quick trim with
my knife on the bottom one.

I also have a Big-foot saw (heavy) and a Makita beam-saw (heavier).

I can cut 6x6 in two passes with the skilsaw which is better than dragging out the big boys.

Speaking of spinning carbide, check out my new love:

Credit: treez

I built the extension table and overhead dust collection myself, obviously.
The in-saw dust collection is a dedicated 750cfm Jet unit. The overhead goes to a 6 horse shopvac. I can rip mdf all day without a spec of dust escaping.

Credit: treez

Credit: treez

The left switch controls the Jet DC, the middle switch "arms" the overhead DC to come on with it or not, and the third is a spotlight mounted on the mast.

Credit: treez

This is Ole. Don't be an Ole.

Credit: treez

Stop by sometime.

Credit: treez

FRUMY

Trad climber
SHERMAN OAKS,CA
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:51pm PT
Please don't hurt Mr. Bill.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 02:18pm PT
Nice! I'm not a fan of pinned blade guards, but that's just because I built decks for a few years. One accidental set down of a saw with a pinned guard and you're screwed.

The reason I'm replying is to acknowledge the difference from east coast to west coast in regards to circular saws.

I moved to NH with my sweet Bosch worm drive saw. I love it, can run it one handed all day, and it has no cord to get tangled on joists. You plug the cord directly into it. Everyone I've worked with here has talked trash about it because 'its too heavy'. The saw of choice here is a left handed Makita sidewinder. No worm drives to be seen for the most part.

With my crew when push comes to shove and we need to cut beefy lumber, the worm drive is requested. Hopefully I'm changing opinions, because the longer frame on my saw allows for faster, more accurate cuts on sheet goods, and more torque on large cuts.

I wonder why this is, a worm drive was mandatory when I framed in California. Maybe it's due to codes requiring heavier framing because of earthquakes?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 4, 2013 - 02:35pm PT
Nice shop, treez, and so clean it makes me nervous! Wish I had that kinda space


Have you seen a Skilsaw 107? It runs a 10 inch blade, and I just missed one on craigslist for 65 bucks. I just learned they're out there, and seems they'd be comparable to a Bigfoot, only less $. I have a Makita beam saw that runs on a modular extruded aluminum track which makes a nice straight rip cut in thick slabs, but it's really too big for 2" to 3 1/2".

Deluxe table saw setup, too...



treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 02:41pm PT
I got my first Skilsaw (a 6 1/2) 26 years ago and was immediately taught to pin my guard. So I've NEVER thought it might be there. I have a subconscious connection between my trigger finger, my ear, and the saw. That zone is always hot and treated with care. It gives me the willies when I see someone set a spinning saw down on the blade guard. What if it was stuck with pitch?
Kickback just doesn't happen to me. You can see that coming from a mile away.

Growing up, we cut these things called rafters. The blade guard just won't advance itself on an angled cut smoothly. Holding the guard up creates much more potential danger due to less than ideal body positioning and material handling.

I've always had worm drives. I cut with my right hand and couldn't imagine having to peak over the saw to see my line. I do have a couple sidewinders for when I need to start a beveled cut the other way that dead ends. My favorite is 6 1/2 Ridgid with the guard pulled so it takes a 7 1/4.
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 02:46pm PT
A 16inch tracksaw!? Sweet.

Its coming together in the shop. I went so broke getting it to where it's at, that I'm out building one "last" custom home this season for some sure money. The plan is to hole up in there for the rest of my life.

Never heard of the 10 inch Skil either! Probly have to have one, now. Thanks!



Brandon - I bought one of those Bosch plug-in handles years back and had it mounted on a skil (they're interchangable) for a while and liked it to a certain extent, but hated the bulkiness in my hand. The male prongs burned up in a year or two due to the cords getting just loose enough to arc. I like about 15 feet of nice flexible 14 gauge epoxied into the cord protector.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 02:53pm PT
Growing up, we cut these things called rafters

Easy there, snarky. I throw a pencil in the guard to pin it when needed.

Typically when cutting those things called rafters.

But, I never leave it pinned because I work on a crew where nobody does that. If you're not familiar with it, it can be mucho peligroso. I err on the side of caution and safety.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:03pm PT
i've the saw though minimal skull,
i did not see a guard to pin back?

am i missing something?
a few chromesomes maybe?

norwegian finish tool:
Credit: Norwegian
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:04pm PT
Wasn't a dig at you, just trusses.

Off to the parade.........
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:09pm PT
No worries man.

90 percent of my roof systems are framed with rafters.

Happy holiday!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:13pm PT
I also was taught 30 yrs ago to pin the guide back, and I agree trying to use the saw with the guard operating is more of a hassle, and more dangerous, if you're used to no guard. I was taught by my contractor boss to leave the guard on, but pinned back to avoid problems with OSHA. The idea being that the guard could be reactivated at a moment's notice.

There is also the liability issue of someone unfamiliar with the torque of a wormdrive picking up a saw with a removed guard on the jobsite or at home,

I still have and use my first wormdrive which I bought 30 years ago for construction work in Idyllwild with Fred East. I often marvel at what a great, well built tool it is. I've topped out the oil level a couple of times, and the table mounting bolts are a little sloppy, but the thing still rips.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:13pm PT
brandon you ever use i-joists as rafters?
super straight, light, any-length available
r-38 compatible.

plus a std. skill saw blade'll cut em.

Credit: Norwegian
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:20pm PT
A standard 7 1/4'' blade will cut any rafter, it's the angle that's the reason for pinning the guard.

I'm pretty aware of when I pin my guard, but since I don't do it all the time, I've had some close calls. Potentially mangled floors and thighs.

Yikes!

There is also the liability issue of someone unfamiliar with the torque of a wormdrive picking up a saw with a removed guard on the jobsite or at home,

I know I'm just nitpicking here, but every beam saw I've used had the guard intact. It is part of knowing how to make accurate cuts that requires you to pull the trigger, let the wobble go away, retract the guard with one hand, and begin the cut with the other, before returning your lesser hand to the equipment. Like I said, nitpicking, but I like keeping things safe on a jobsite.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:43pm PT
ah the most liberating skill that
i've learned as a carpenter is surrender.

i fall trees for a living,
and i recognize in each one,
a personality.

some argue with me all day long.
others concede willingly to mine will.

at first, when i began to build my home,
i mistook this material input as my mistake.

then after a few wrestling matches 'tween i and understanding,
i let go of my hope for plumb and level.

i let the character in the wood define our relationship,
of course with minimal coercion on my part;

and this led to complementary "mistakes" that suitors
of my space cannot pinpoint.

it's a spacial feeling thing.

we strive as a society for absolute definition of
our's confinement; but then we inhabit this strangled
space and cannot realize why it is dis-inviting.

the eyes seek out confusion, for mere entertainment,
because everywhere within our domesticated cage,
organization suppresses the covalent message as offered
of that which we interact with.

so i built my space all reckless and drunk,
and my hope crawled down a hole and died;
so i buried it proper, and out of that patch
grew some dreams, that now manage my reality.

brandon, and other in-business builders:
clients absolutely love the slightly compromised
spaces that i create.

seriously, i've no contractor's license and i disclose as much,
but i cant keep my phone silent, or my bank account empty,
no matter how hard i try.

f*#k up and call it art.
as long as your song is convincing enough,
prisoners of our culture and of our domestic interpretation
but heartily into your folly.

and thus, the bills be paid.
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:44pm PT
Well, obviously, that's my personal gear. I'd sooner share a needle.

The gumbies get a saw with an operable guard for sure. I don't need to be hung in public.

I think you kindof missed my point.

90% rafters? Nice. Trusses just make sense most of the time.

You cant cut 360 series and up bcis in a single pass with a stock 77.

You can see my 044 in the van too. I used that the other day to cut an entire bunk of tgis that went between top flange hangers on beams. Best to have a quarter inch in that situation.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 03:46pm PT
You can see my 044 in the van too. I used that the other day to cut an entire bunk of tgis

that's rad, treez.
you cut lumber with a gun.
surely without ear protection, right?
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 04:27pm PT
Huh?


Cheers
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