Paul Preuss, Our Founding Father Of Style.

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survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 2, 2009 - 04:19pm PT
Cheaper than......what do you guess $ on those 2 books?




Crozzon Di Brenta



klk

Trad climber
cali
Nov 2, 2009 - 04:21pm PT
the shipping probably costs more than the book:

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?an=scott%2C+doug&sts=t&tn=big+wall+climbing&x=0&y=0

it's still a standard.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Nov 2, 2009 - 04:48pm PT
If I remember correctly, there's a section in Doug Scott's "Big Wall Climbing" book on Preuss.

I'll try to scan that bit when I get home tonight (if nobody thinks that's too horrible an infringement on Doug's copyright).

Really good book. One of the more important ones in my view, because of the massive amount of history included.

D
Alan Rubin

climber
Amherst,MA.
Nov 2, 2009 - 05:02pm PT
Pruess was undoubtedly one of THE greats in our sport. Though, as mentioned earlier, he and Dulfer were often described as rivals and protagonists of different "schools" of climbing ethics, they were in fact friends and climbed together on occasion. Dulfer's use of aid tactics was still very limited compared to what came later. Perhaps the most classic example of Preuss "walking the walk" was his first ascent(in 1908, I think) (solo)of his epynomous route on the spectacularly exposed headwall of the Campinale di Basso in the Brenta, Dolomites which he then immediately downclimbed. The route is today rated "V"--about 5.7/8--and protected by a number of fixed pitons.The Doug Scott articles in Mountain mentioned earlier were excerpted from his book, Big Wall Climbing, which still might be available, at least on the web, and contains alot of additional facinating historical information. Messner published a book, unfortunately only in German, entitled Vertikal which goes into even greater depth on this material. I'd surely love more in English--or to improve my linguistic skills!!! But as others have noted, Preuss's early death did have a (perhaps appropriate)negative impact on the acceptance of at least the more extreme of his theories, while the imminence of the First World War (which cost Dulfer's life amongst many others)and his Jewish heritage did also serve to limit his impact on future generations.
Captain...or Skully

Social climber
Idaho, also. Sorta, kinda mostly, Yeah.
Nov 2, 2009 - 05:36pm PT
That Preuss was pretty badass, huh?
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 2, 2009 - 05:38pm PT
did i say doug robinson? my bad. i meant doug scott, the brit.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Nov 2, 2009 - 05:39pm PT
Al Rubin knows, he was there!
Alan Rubin

climber
Amherst,MA.
Nov 2, 2009 - 06:28pm PT
Uh, thanks Jim, but I do believe that you are a bit more ancient than I!!!!By the way, check out the Hoodwink thread--remember that day? Alan
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 2, 2009 - 08:13pm PT
Ghost, scan away!

Thanks Alan!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Nov 2, 2009 - 08:43pm PT
There's a bit about Paul Preuss in Bonnington's book, maybe just named "The Climbers" or something like that, based on a BBC TV series.

I'm pretty sure it identifies his main opponent, or another in addition to Dulfer (and an equally prominent figure in our eyes; if not just the Eastern Europeans), concerning the Style Wars of the day.

Or to be more accurate I think it was, in addition to and following the Dulfer rivalry, a short treatise on the old-school/new school changing of the guard struggles. I've been mentioning this guy Preuss in that context lately.

Better get back down to the library, check it out and post up.
This is a very poignant thread: and way overdue.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 2, 2009 - 11:35pm PT
Thanks Tarbuster, I was hoping to see you post here.



Guglia Di Brenta


Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C. Small wall climber.
Nov 2, 2009 - 11:51pm PT
At last the scent of incense wafted into the heavens, where the great god SCANNER, looking benevolently down upon his pitiful pleading peons, deemed it fit to grace them with yet more SCANS. From Doug Scott's The Great Pioneers of the Eastern Alps, Mountain 33, 1974.
[Photos removed - will try again.]

When I scanned the above, the file size was about 800 KB per picture, and they were quite readable. When downsizing them to SuperTopo size, they ended up about 120 - 150 KB, and at least to me aren't always readable. Suggestions? I can rescan/post, if given instructions. Plus there are another eleven pages.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Nov 3, 2009 - 01:16am PT
Just load them to photo bucket.
Sized as you like.
Old School.

Like I still do.
Purist tactics & stuff.
Heh.






......700 pixels wide & a minimum of 235 kb per page for text*
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 3, 2009 - 01:48am PT
heh....

"Like I still do.
Purist tactics & stuff.
Heh."



So very Tarbusterish!
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Nov 3, 2009 - 10:28am PT
great thread,
thank you.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 4, 2009 - 02:35am PT
North Face of Mandlwand, scene of Preuss' death.

He apparently broke rule number one, and number six.



Anyone have any idea from an old book where he actually was on this thing?

Were there any witnesses to the event? A thousand feet is such a long way, must have been awful.

It doesn't look particularly daunting compared to other things he was on, but it's hard to tell. There is a tower on the left center that looks like it could be plenty evil.
Alan Rubin

climber
Amherst,MA.
Nov 4, 2009 - 08:56am PT
Survival, I don't have any idea where he was in that collection of pinnacles and faces. I did read an account that stated that he was last seen approaching the face and that his body was later found by searchers after he didn't return, so apparantly there were no witnesses.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 4, 2009 - 09:31am PT
Thanks Alan, then I wonder how they came up with a number like 1,000ft.?
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Nov 4, 2009 - 09:44am PT
Also guys, don't forget, there is a nice section about him in Alpinist 14 with an awesome photo of Brenta. It's in the Alex Huber article about free soloing.

Arne
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 4, 2009 - 09:23pm PT
ionlyski,
Scan and post pleeez?

I don't have Alpinist 14.
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