Vintage climbers...your story

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riverxing

Mountain climber
Templeton, California
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 12, 2018 - 08:18am PT
The 2 girls "L" referred to were school teachers from New York. Jenny Lake Ranger Station was a good place to meet pretty girls in the summer time. They were always interested in doing adventurous things. Another ranger and I took them to the ice caves one day. As we were leaving, 3-4 cowboy types from Driggs were climbing the hill to the cave. We got only as far as Wind Cave when one of them came running down yelling for help! One guy had fallen into the hole in the big frozen waterfall room. While this guy ran on down the trail to get rescue help, we all returned to the cave with my rope to help lower a guy down into the pit (75-80 ft). It was several hours before a sheriff's rescue team showed up while we hung around. The guy was OK except for two busted legs.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jun 12, 2018 - 11:31am PT
I've slogged through waist deep water in Missouri's limestone caves...

Such as Berome Moore by any chance? Tex Yocum took several us back to the siphon many years ago. It was hellacool.
BruceHildenbrand

Social climber
Mountain View/Boulder
Jun 12, 2018 - 12:00pm PT
Jim,

thanks for posting the history of H&L. It is one of the true adventure climbs at Pinnacles National Mounument(it will always be a Monument to me!).
Jody

climber
Occupied Territory
Jun 12, 2018 - 04:52pm PT
I remember when I was 10 or 11 dad took me up on that Feather Canyon route, soon after he completed it. I remember him 3rd classing it and hip belaying me but that might have just been on the easy stuff.

One evening after dinner he must have been bored so we ran up to the Monolith...I was about 4 or 5 at the time. He third-classed the Regular Route to the top of the first pitch and then jumped to the oak tree at the right side of the east face and down-climbed that. That was the first time I remember seeing him climb.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
Jun 12, 2018 - 04:58pm PT
whoa! Jumped the oak tree to descend it? That is listed as a route in the original Hammack guide!
Jody

climber
Occupied Territory
Jun 12, 2018 - 05:07pm PT
Munge, I think David Brower was involved in the FA of that oak tree to the east face, back in 1935 or so.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
Jun 12, 2018 - 05:09pm PT
yeah, I think that's right. Looking at the tree nowadays, I gotta wonder if there weren't a different branch somewhere!
L

climber
Just livin' the dream
Jun 12, 2018 - 05:53pm PT
Such as Berome Moore by any chance?


Gary, Berome Moore was hella cool. I've never seen so many stalactites and stalagmites.

But the waterworld cave I was talking about was Allie Spring Cave. Brrrrrrr! Still remember how cold I was after that adventure.
Jody

climber
Occupied Territory
Jun 12, 2018 - 06:37pm PT
Looking at the tree nowadays, I gotta wonder if there weren't a different branch somewhere!

I think so. It would be quite a leap now with no room for error.
riverxing

Mountain climber
Templeton, California
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 13, 2018 - 06:26am PT
A little correction is in order here. First, having never been on the Monolith before, I was curious about the first pitch. Standing there looking at it, I decided to give it a try. Surprisingly I breezed right through it, but upon trying to down climb it, I spooked out. At that time a limb from the tree did overhang the rock. I just hooked an arm and leg over it and scooted out to the trunk. That's where it got scary. But once committed, I wrapped my arms and legs around the trunk and slid and scrapped down. The alternative was to have sent Jody down to get a rope.

Most of the Feather Canyon climb is third and fourth class stuff, but I did use an aid sling a couple times above the big crack to be super safe so Jody wouldn't have to hold a possible fall. There's no long runouts above the hard moves anywhere on that climb.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Jun 13, 2018 - 08:07am PT
This thread is a treasure trove!
Between Jim Langford and Bill Atkinson we've got some real granddaddys of American climbing here.

(Not to mention John Gill, who's been spoiling us with his presence for some time now)

 How many young Americans are cognizant of the Korean War, in which Jim served?
(originally described by Truman as a police action and then, actual war having never been declared, simply as an armed conflict)

 How many veterans of World War II such as Bill Atkinson, are still with us?

The latter I looked up, and it appears to be about 3% of those involved:
Yielding to the inalterable process of aging, the men and women who fought and won the great conflict are now in their late 80s and 90s. They are dying quickly—according to US Department of Veterans Affairs statistics, 558,000 of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II are alive in 2017.
https://www.nationalww2museum.org/war/wwii-veteran-statistics

..................................................................

I urge everyone here to give the content of Bill Atkinson's website a good read through.
https://atkinsopht.wordpress.com/front-page/mountaineering/

Reading the second narrative on the Mountaineering tab of his website, I became aware of American climber, fitness advocate and innovator, Bonnie Prudden.
Now here's a woman most from our later generations of climbers have probably never heard of. From Wikipedia:

In 1936 she married Richard Hirschland, a mountaineer and skier.[10] Their honeymoon in Switzerland was marked by a climb on the Matterhorn following one day of training and the purchase of a new pair of boots.[11]

She first climbed in the Gunks in 1936 with her husband along with Fritz Wiessner and Hans Kraus.
...
In 1952, Prudden and Kraus attempted a new climbing route on the cliff known as The Trapps. After attempting the crux overhang, Kraus backed off, handing the lead to Prudden. She was able to find a piton placement that had eluded Hans at the crux, and went on to claim the first ascent of “Bonnie’s Roof”. Since then, she has stated that she and Kraus always climbed as equal partners, always swapping leads.[15]

Prudden bought an empty elementary school in White Plains, NY in 1954 and after renovating it opened The Institute for Physical Fitness.[20] It housed three gyms, two dance studios, a Finnish sauna, a medical unit, two massage rooms, lockers, showers and an office. Taking classes barefoot was a requirement. Equipment, painted in bright colors, was designed after curbs, boulders, fences, railroad tracks, and walls of a less mechanized day. Chinning bars were built in every doorway. Every child used the 42 stairs between basement and top floor for conditioning, discipline and special muscle building. Outside was an obstacle course, that included America’s first climbing wall, cargo nets, hurdles, parallel bars, ladders, ramps, balance maze, tightrope, slalom poles and a rappel roof.

Read more on Bonnie's Wikipedia page, chock-full of interesting facts about her impact on American fitness culture:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnie_Prudden
Jody

climber
Occupied Territory
Jun 13, 2018 - 12:38pm PT
Tarbuster, I have signed up with dad to go on an Honor Flight as a guardian. We were supposed to go last month but had to cancel and are now scheduled to go in October. We did go to the luncheon prior to our originally scheduled flight and there were 7 WWII vets and 15 Korean War vets there. Awesome time! With 1/3 of the participants being WWII vets it was a real surprise and a thrill.

Anyway, if anybody has an Honor Flight arriving anywhere nearby go down and greet them as they get off the plane. I have gone a few times and it is definitely one of life's highlights!
Mark Rodell

Trad climber
Bangkok
Jun 13, 2018 - 01:48pm PT
This thread is a classic on this site and getting better.
riverxing

Mountain climber
Templeton, California
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 13, 2018 - 02:15pm PT
thanks for posting the history of H&L. It is one of the true adventure climbs at Pinnacles National Mounument(it will always be a Monument to me!).

Bruce, maybe you can pick out the route more precisely on these photos.

H & L Feather Canyon
H & L Feather Canyon
Credit: riverxing
H & L Feather Canyon 2
H & L Feather Canyon 2
Credit: riverxing
H & L Feather Canyon 1
H & L Feather Canyon 1
Credit: riverxing
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Jun 13, 2018 - 02:22pm PT
Jenny Lake Ranger Station was a good place to meet pretty girls in the summer time. They were always interested in doing adventurous things.

Jim, given the photos Jody has posted on this forum I have no doubt you attracted pretty girls.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jun 13, 2018 - 02:23pm PT
Gary, Berome Moore was hella cool.

We were in a crawlway so tight, I got a quick flash of claustrophobia. Not cool so far down and so far from an entrance.

I was fortunate enough to get into Mystery Cave in Missouri as well. No show cave I have been in was as magnificent as that. I doubt they let anybody down there nowadays.
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Jun 13, 2018 - 02:27pm PT
How many young Americans are cognizant of the Korean War, in which Jim served?
(originally described by Truman as a police action and then, actual war having never been declared, simply as an armed conflict)

The Korean War was the subject of M*A*S*H*. One of my favorite TV programs ever.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Jun 13, 2018 - 02:39pm PT
Just watched Robert Altman's original 1970 film version of M*A*S*H !
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Jun 13, 2018 - 02:44pm PT
Just watched Robert Altman's original 1970 film version of M*A*S*H !

That was a great film! My dad served in the Korean War but fortunately was never deployed overseas; he served his duty at Fort Smith, AR
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Jun 13, 2018 - 03:53pm PT
My dad served in the Korean War but fortunately was never deployed overseas; he served his duty at Fort Smith, AR

My dad as well but was stationed overseas,
Hawaii fortunately.

Respect to those that served!
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