PULL- A Story About Lead Climbing

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Messages 21 - 32 of total 32 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
clode

Trad climber
portland, or
Aug 10, 2017 - 03:42pm PT
Yeah, Werner, so now, as you're getting ready to rappel the route, instead of yelling "ROPE", you yell "CHAIN"!
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 10, 2017 - 04:10pm PT
Yeah, Werner, so now, as you're getting ready to rappel the route, instead of yelling "ROPE", you yell "CHAIN"!

At which point the belayer yanks Werner's chain. Which is only fitting, cuz Werner has been yanking our chains since the dawn of ST.
thirsty

climber
Aug 10, 2017 - 05:46pm PT
This video obviously took some work to film, edit and produce. It is really well done. Additionally, it is entertaining. It deserves thoughtful commentary. JS and BM are both very accomplished climbers and really good people who have contributed a lot to our local climbing areas as well as our local climbing community. BM has produced some truly excellent climbing photography.
-Some catch the significance of the removable chain as a means of eliminating the need for placing bolts on a route. While hanging chain is obviously not a viable solution to over-bolting or the weakness some have for leaving project / fixed draws on routes, it does suggest that there are alternatives to the assumption that the only way to do hard routes is by leaving chains or other fixed draws hanging on cliffs that are publicly shared resources and which are receiving increased attention because of the visual impact of those permanent/semi-permanent installations. Camouflaged hangers by themselves are much less visually objectionable than draws, whether chain, cable or nylon when they are left hanging for months.
-The future of climbing is, in part, efforts to make crag development invisible by both camouflaging necessary fixed hardware and minimizing the amount of hardware that is left on the rock. Those goals can be accomplished in part by not placing bolts where natural protection is available and by not leaving draws of any type on routes, regardless of the inconvenience of hanging draws before an attempted send.

Why are hang-gliding and mountain-biking banned from wilderness areas, despite the fact that neither are motorized? The visual impact of those pursuits was considered to be too much of a negative impact on the experience of solitude and nature that the wilderness designation is supposed to protect. If climbing development comes to be seen as representing too much of a negative visual impact because of draws that are left for months, season or years on cliffs, climbing will also be banned from wilderness areas. Banning climbing from wilderness areas will provide additional justification for banning it from other areas.
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Aug 10, 2017 - 09:26pm PT
Great! Just great. Wish I would have learned to lead(?) climb that way. NOT!
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Aug 10, 2017 - 09:47pm PT
In many ways this is a look into the most future imaginable

For some reason I can't stop laughing at this
Gnome Ofthe Diabase

climber
Out Of Bed
Aug 11, 2017 - 02:40am PT
Thirsty , I too am jones in' for a hit

This video obviously took some work to film, edit and produce. It is really well done. Additionally, it is entertaining. It deserves thoughtful commentary. JS and BM are both very accomplished climbers and really good people

who have contributed a lot to our local climbing areas as well as our local climbing community.

BM has produced some truly excellent climbing photography.

-Some catch the significance of the removable chain as a means of eliminating the need for placing bolts on a route.

While hanging chain is obviously not a viable solution to over-bolting
or the weakness some have for leaving project / fixed draws on routes,
it does suggest that there are alternatives to the assumption that the only way to do hard routes is by leaving chains or other fixed draws hanging on cliffs

(cliffs n walls?) that are publicly shared resources
and which are receiving increased attention because of the visual impact of those permanent/semi-permanent installations.

Camouflaged hangers by themselves are much less visually objectionable than draws, whether chain, cable or nylon when they are left hanging for months.

-The future of climbing
is, in part, efforts to make crag development invisible
by both camouflaging necessary fixed hardware
and minimizing the amount of hardware that is left on the rock.

Those goals can be accomplished in part by not placing bolts where natural protection is available and by not leaving draws of any type on routes, regardless of the inconvenience of hanging draws before an attempted send.

Why are hang-gliding and mountain-biking banned from wilderness areas, despite the fact that neither are motorized?

The visual impact of those pursuits was considered to be too much of a negative impact on the experience of solitude and nature that the wilderness designation is supposed to protect.

If climbing development comes to be seen as representing too much of a negative visual impact because of draws that are left for months, season or years on cliffs,
climbing will also be banned from wilderness areas.

Banning climbing from wilderness areas will provide additional justification for banning it from other areas.




👍
( The Land Of Nod !? Out in view of that choss pile - what's it called ?
The Weaver Needle,
it's there, in 'Zona,
the climbs went up (& by to days standards not that many bolts went in )-
I don't remember? That was what '87?
By '90 the climbing was closed, posted -
there is the history we have all forgotten, & so are doomed to repeat)
MikeL

Social climber
Southern Arizona
Aug 11, 2017 - 06:31am PT
Thirsty: Why are . . . mountain-biking banned from wilderness areas, despite the fact that neither are motorized? The visual impact of those pursuits was considered to be too much of a negative impact on the experience of solitude and nature that the wilderness designation is supposed to protect.†

This view seems narrow and particular. In the U.S., Iíd say itís been much more about bikerís discourteous behaviors and attitudes towards others who use trails (hikers, horse people) and lawsuits brought by bikers who injure themselves in their rough pursuits. In Canada, for example, itís different. Once land managers and owners post signs that riders should be aware of the dangers of trails, then suits are difficult to pursue.

I dunno about hang-gliding.
Jon Beck

Trad climber
Oceanside
Aug 11, 2017 - 07:13am PT
sport chaining, the future of climbing. Soon we will see chains made lighter through the use of innovative synthetic materials. How about links formed from tiny strands of nylon with an outer protective layer. All sorts of potential
Brent Mattix

Trad climber
Roseville, CA
Aug 11, 2017 - 09:00pm PT
So glad to finally get a documentary going for this obscure corner of our sport. Definitely a step up.

My dad and I watched this video together and he was very impressed. Back in his climbing days (50s), the lead climbers of this style had to use barbwire. Dad says that they would pull wire off of an pasture fence stretch, but were usually only able to get twenty or thirty feet before being run off by the ranch owner. He couldn't help but admire the evolution of the sport. Apparently, there was some talk of chain back then, but the industry was still rebounding from WWII.

I noticed a movie playing in the background, during the instructional manual reading segment. Looked like bales of green cash raining down in one scene. Hope someone turns that movie into a book someday.

Hope to see more...TFPU
Bad Climber

Trad climber
The Lawless Border Regions
Aug 12, 2017 - 10:13am PT
This was SO good! Made my day. Thanks, Mr. Chossthumper.

BAd
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Aug 12, 2017 - 10:34am PT
Chain Ratings...

CH-1
CH-1
CH-2
CH-2
CH-3
CH-3
CH-4
CH-4
CH-5
CH-5
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Denver CO
Aug 12, 2017 - 01:22pm PT
That's a beautiful picture CH-5, you should get it published. The chain is actually a good alternative to bolts, never thought of that before.
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