People in climbing...who aren't climbers...

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Messages 21 - 38 of total 38 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Brock Wagstaff

Trad climber
Larkspur
May 19, 2017 - 11:38am PT
Anye Machin 1986
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
May 19, 2017 - 11:50am PT
Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Brock Wagstaff

Trad climber
Larkspur
May 19, 2017 - 01:53pm PT
Totally agree with what Jim said about the people in the remote areas being as interesting (or more!) as the peaks you came to climb. Exploring the Tibetan Plateau from China in 1989. First Westerners since Joseph Rock, and definitely of interest to the locals.
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
Morning greeting.
Morning greeting.
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
Muli Monastery
Muli Monastery
Credit: Brock Wagstaff
kunlun_shan

Mountain climber
SF, CA
May 19, 2017 - 02:17pm PT
"First Westerners since Joseph Rock"

Nice photos, Brock! I was in Golok (Amne Machen region) and Yushu, the fall of 1984 and summer of '85, though, on unofficial trips. George Schaller spent a lot of time doing wildlife surveys in that area, and across much of Tibet, before me. I know of and met other foreigners there as well.
Brock Wagstaff

Trad climber
Larkspur
May 19, 2017 - 02:43pm PT
The last set of photos were taken in the mountainous area some distance from the city of Lijiang in Sichuan province. We were attempting the FA of a mountain called Chanadorje. Given the number of adventure travelers in the world I'm likewise skeptical of claiming "firsts", but this is also what the locals told us. Anyway, it's an incredibly beautiful area! At the time there were three unclimbed peaks, the other two being Jambeyang and Shenrezi. Not sure if any of them have been climbed yet.
Dingus Milktoast

Trad climber
Minister of Moderation, Fatcrackistan
May 19, 2017 - 02:45pm PT
The Stone Door in Tennessee is a deep fissure splitting a sandstone bluff in the backwoods rolling hill country of the central part of the state. There is a steep debris incline in the back of the chimney such as one can scramble down inside from the top of the bluff and come out at the bottom. Pretty cool and native Americans used it as a passageway - the eponymous Stone Door.

It a state park or natural area or something. Used to be some moderate but intense trad climbing there, as I recall no hammers allowed (no bolts, no pins). Doesn't matter.

Beersheba Springs is tiny town on the way there. At Beersheba Springs is Big Don's Market. Clear back in the early 80s me and my buddy would stop in Big Don's for some gatorade and a snack; beer and what have you. Big Don was always there, manning the cash register, calling out the name and price of each item he slowly punched one finger into the cash register keys.

He had giant hands and when he picked up something it sure looked small in his Shrek-like mitt. "Apple," he'd say in that slow southern style, and he'd punch in the price. Then, "Gatorade..." and again, tap tap tap.

"How you young fellers doin?" He's inquire, a big bushy eyebrow arching, a piercingly bright gaze as he considered us. You never quite knew where you stood with Big Don. He was one of those guys who could see right through you, if you know what I mean. You couldn't hide anything from Big Don, so if you were drunk or high or running from the law, it seemed like he knew it.

But he was friendly to us and we stopped in there 2, 3, sometimes 4 times a year over year. We sometimes talked about him when we were thinking of the area. He was a cool guy, a classic southerner. Well my old climbing buddy recently told me Big Don's still kicking and still running his store!

Big Don! Coulda knocked me over with a feather. And certainly one of those giant sausage fingers if it had poked me in the chest.


Check this out:


Meet Your Neighbor- “Big” Don Hill

Posted on Monday, April 20, 2015 at 10:13 am The Grundy County Hearld

“Meet your neighbor” – “Big” Don Hill

“Big” Don Hill is an institution in Grundy County. Born and raised in Beersheba Springs, his many adventures are a delight to all who know him. While Big Don enjoys telling his stories to friends, he is not boastful, and gives credit for everything in his life to the Lord.don hill



Let’s begin with your birth.

“Well, I was born in Stone Door Road in Beersheba Springs on March 17, 1939. It snowed 6 inches that day. My mother, Thelma Rollings, and father, Richard Hill, named me Charles Donald Hill.”



Have you always lived on the mountain?

“No, when I was 3 years old we moved to Nashville. My dad went to work at a defense plant. We moved back in 1944. Now, I have to tell you, the saddest day of my life occurred that year. I remember standing at the Tracy City Train Depot at 6:30 a.m. and waving goodbye to my dad. At that time and age I thought when you went to war you didn’t come back.”



Do you have children?

“Yes, I have two from my first marriage; Rick who now runs Rick’s Market here in Beersheba, and Kathy who lives in Whitwell and is a rural mail carrier in Monteagle. I also have a son Charles D. Hill, Jr. and he is a minister and an ambulance driver.”



You’ve been a businessman on the mountain for a long time. What can you tell me about that?

“I joined the Army and when I came back I opened Don Hill’s Cash Supermarket. I worked as a long distance truck driver. I ran Don’s Superette. All of these businesses suffered from my drinking. Finally in 1975 I took my last drink and have stayed sober with the help of a 12-step program and my Lord. I then opened Big Don’s Market in 1975.”



“We are sitting in “Take a Break,” so you obviously stay busy.

“I lead every funeral in Grundy County for the Grundy County Sheriff’s Office and I run this store. ‘Take a Break,’ too.”



You have to tell us about Ruby.

“Ruby is my wife of almost twenty years, (September 17, 1994). Sam’s Club takes the credit for us getting married. We went on our first date there, and at one time I was their number one customer. I bought her engagement ring there – a ruby.”



I hear you play Bluegrass music.

“My mother bought me a guitar for $10 in 1949. I also play a fiddle now. When I was younger we had a family band called ‘The Hill Family.’ We were even invited to audition for the Grand Ole Opry in front of George D. Hat.”



Finally, you are working on a book.

“I have been inspired to tell the story of the good people of Grundy County. I have taken a leave of absence from my home church and am visiting every church in Grundy County. At my count that is between 90 and 100 churches. I’m visiting each church twice. I want to make a comparison, you see.”



Big Don has two CDs and a book about his life available for purchase and enjoys playing in his band, the Bluegrass Express.



http://www.grundycountyherald.com/meet-your-neighbor-big-don-hill/

DMT
Timid TopRope

Social climber
the land of Pale Ale
May 19, 2017 - 03:52pm PT
Don Hill sounds like the real deal. Thanks for the story and share, DMT
kunlun_shan

Mountain climber
SF, CA
May 19, 2017 - 04:01pm PT
Thank you for the details, Brock. I'd guess if the locals said you were the 1st foreigners they'd seen, they were correct. I found that word travels fast and far in that part of the world, when it comes to reports of strange looking people :-)
Daphne

Trad climber
Northern California
May 19, 2017 - 05:09pm PT
Those are wonderful photos, Brock! I had no idea you were also a great photographer🌞
Matt Thomsen

Big Wall climber
Places
May 19, 2017 - 05:25pm PT
It seems like a lot of people on supertopo are, "people in climbing, that are not climbers"...
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
May 19, 2017 - 06:18pm PT
Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
May 19, 2017 - 07:51pm PT
Here's some odds and ends.

Deux jeunes filles
De Chamonix.
You also see
A young Chris D.
Photo by me.

Credit: hamie

Balti porters, Pakistan.

Credit: hamie

In Laos the crags are all owned by the local villagers, and you have to pay a small daily fee to climb there. This is the lady (and her son) who collects the fee at one of the crags near Vang Vien.

Credit: hamie

EVERYONE IS SMILING!!!!!!!!!!!
Avery

climber
New Zealand
May 19, 2017 - 08:59pm PT
Hi Jim,

Could that 'Tim' (in the dancing pic) be Tim Wethey?

Use to know him pretty well.

He's a very funny man!
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
May 20, 2017 - 07:03pm PT
Bump!
Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Playing some v-ball on a Navy base in Ecuador. Waiting (and waiting and waiting) for a plane.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Trad climber
Will know soon
May 20, 2017 - 07:36pm PT
That would be me of course....and I have no Sherpa pics to post. :&#41; <br/>
That would be me of course....and I have no Sherpa pics to post. :)

Credit: Lynne Leichtfuss

I am the Sherpa.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - May 20, 2017 - 08:28pm PT
Avery....yes, it is Tim Wethey.
Bill Thompson

Ice climber
Marquette
May 21, 2017 - 05:37am PT
Love the thread Jim- keep them coming!
Love the thread Jim- keep them coming!
Credit: Bill Thompson
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - May 21, 2017 - 07:17am PT
Credit: donini
Porters on the Chocktoi Glacier 1978
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