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Messages 81 - 100 of total 110 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
TravisMcGee

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
May 1, 2013 - 12:58pm PT
I sympathize. I had my first last summer. Knocked me down hard. My poor kid thought I was dying; wife too. Thank god I was close to the ER. They found a 12mm stone and didn't even begin to ask me to wait for it to pass. Two options; in through the kidney or in through the junk. Either way I was headed for general anesthesia and I was OKAY with that. Ended up going in and pulverizing it. Worse part was the damn stint they installed. No, check that, it was getting the damn stint OUT. No anesthesia for that the sick bastards.

Good luck, brother.
Dave Kos

Social climber
Temecula
May 1, 2013 - 05:23pm PT
i was told most stones are calcium based, but im allergic to milk and got them anyhow.


You must be getting calcium some other way. I think your bones would be jello otherwise.

Milk makes me fart.
Captain...or Skully

climber
May 1, 2013 - 05:55pm PT
I sure hope you get better soon, Craggy.
<<<VIBES>>>> ok?
Alpine Raven

climber
Eugene, Oregon
May 1, 2013 - 06:01pm PT
I passed one on March 13. A day I won't soon forget. The most pain I've ever endured. My wife had to drive me to the ER as I was curled up in a ball in the passenger seat, feet pushing on the dashboard, trying to find any relief from the constant pain. I went between groaning, moaning to laughing, crying as the pain was soooo intense. I passed a 2mm stone from my right kidney. It was analyzed to be Calcium Oxalate, the most common. So now I'm drinking at least 2-3 liters of water a day and watching my diet, eating items low in oxalate acid: beets, spinach are high. According to the diet sheet I was handed by my urologist, eating calcuim products is good, too much Vitamin C is bad. The CT scan showed at least one more in the right and at least two in the left. So now I have Dilaudid with me at all times as well as Flomax (relaxes the ureter). I'm 58. Did not think I was a Kidney Stone candidate.
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 07:14pm PT
Just now home from the hospital.

No infection. Had another CT scan to check for both stones and appendicitis...negative on both.

An all day shrug of the shoulders by the staff over there...and me. Gonna lie low for a day or two and see what's up after that....tough to do when the weather is PERFECT!

Thanks for all the input, concern and kind words.

D
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 1, 2013 - 07:17pm PT
Man, don't ya love it when they try to tell you you're imagining something?


All the best!
monolith

climber
SF bay area
May 1, 2013 - 08:06pm PT
Milk is actually a poor source of utilizable calcium, so poor, the industry needs to fortify it with a different form of calcium, which helps a little, but screws up iron absorption. The highest fracture rates are in countries with the highest milk consumption rates. The problem, it's high protein, and high calcium. Human breast milk is about 6 percent protein by calorie, but cows milk is 15-20 percent and 3x calcium. Pasteurization screws things up even more. I've had very little milk in my life, even as a kid(none for the last 20 years), yet have excellent bone density(had a scan). Calcium is in a lot of plant foods and is easily utilized by the body. Yep, no one wants to be preached to, so I'll not say anything further.

Lots of info out there, so search if interested.
portent

climber
May 1, 2013 - 09:27pm PT
Yikes! Sorry Dean! This is the worst!

I was down in Joshua Tree end of March and got "rocked" at the Matt Segal slideshow. I stepped outside to take a leak and next thing I knew I was face down in the dirt. Drove myself to the High Desert Hospital. Don't really remember that part but it happened. Very Fear and Loathing-esque.

They admitted me and it was just the most unimaginable pain ever. I was on the ground, throwing up, punching the floor and screaming.

Fortunately, they gave me morphine.

Unfortunately, It did nothing.

I screamed for another 20 minutes and they finally gave me dilaudid. Good night.

I woke up and they told me it was food poisoning and released me. I drove to the gates and had to pee so bad!!

Next thing I know, face down in the dirt.

Drove back. More dilaudid and then they found it. It sucks and I'm not looking forward to the next.

--Kovar


Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
May 1, 2013 - 09:30pm PT
Does anyone have an explanation for why this mostly seems to be a male problem? Women get gall stones but kidney stones seem kind of rare.
portent

climber
May 1, 2013 - 09:34pm PT
I was told by the doctor that they are more common in women. Don't know though.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
May 1, 2013 - 10:26pm PT
portent...are you insuating that cragman is a girlyman..?
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 10:34pm PT
RJ, portent knows better than to fluff my skirt.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
May 1, 2013 - 10:44pm PT
Cragchick...Skirt...? Sorry , i didn't know...? Kilt...? My friend was pregnant with stones and when we skied at night he would piss blood...Ouch...
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 10:46pm PT
Yeah, I've learned that pissing blood is WAY overrated.
T H

Social climber
May 1, 2013 - 10:50pm PT
I'd go the other direction to Reno instead of Mammoth (hospital) if I was you. ; )
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 10:52pm PT
You aren't the first one to tell me that today, Biotch.
portent

climber
May 1, 2013 - 10:59pm PT
RJ,

I for sure felt like a little bitch crying on the floor of that hospital.

Sh#t sucks.

Hats off to the High Desert Medical Center though. They were all top notch and I appreciate their patience, humor and compassion. I must have been a handful.

edit: I didn't feel mine pass but after kidney to bladder, I can't imagine worse...

--kovar


Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 11:02pm PT
The pain of those things is surreal.

Flanders watched for 2 hours as I writhed on the floor, unable to speak, head banging against the wall....with my face contorted to something that would have made Stephen King reach for a pen.
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
May 1, 2013 - 11:07pm PT
According to the Wikipedia, about 80% of those with kidney stones are men. Men most commonly experience their first episode between 20-30 years of age, while for women the age at first presentation is somewhat later.

Dietary factors that increase the risk of stone formation include low fluid intake and high dietary intake of animal protein, sodium, refined sugars, fructose and high fructose corn syrup, oxalate, grapefruit juice, apple juice, and cola drinks.

......current evidence suggests the consumption of diets low in calcium is associated with a higher overall risk for the development of kidney stones.For most individuals, other risk factors for kidney stones, such as high intakes of dietary oxalates and low fluid intake, would play a greater role than calcium intake.

Some stones are composed of uric acid, common to men with gout. Since gout is sex linked, women don' get it normally. That could in part account for the higher incidence of stones with men.

Sorry guys, I had no idea they were this common.
portent

climber
May 1, 2013 - 11:17pm PT
According to the Wikipedia, about 80% of those with kidney stones are men.

yeah, must have been the dilaudid, had me thinking crazy. I remember my dad having them. My brother's had them too.
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