Photo History of Climbing Footwear circa 1974

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Messages 1 - 127 of total 127 in this topic
Don Lauria

Trad climber
Bishop, CA
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 5, 2013 - 03:26pm PT
In a nutshell here's the choices one had in 1974:

steve shea

climber
Mar 5, 2013 - 03:28pm PT
Yup, that's about right. We could get RD's in CO. also
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 5, 2013 - 03:35pm PT
owned 3 of those myself.. PAs great jamming, EBS were of course the "sticky" ones,, and the RRs were like a dream edging and aiding.
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Mar 5, 2013 - 03:46pm PT
RD's weren't available 74?
I climbed in PA's, EB's, RD's, RR's, BITD
Tad
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 5, 2013 - 03:48pm PT
I remember RDs being around in 76.fer sure..Brown Suede stiffies...



edit: I see my K-Marche work boots didnt make the cut...
JayMark

Social climber
Oxnard, CA
Mar 5, 2013 - 06:17pm PT
What brand is that shoe on the top of the stack there?

JEM
Kalimon

Trad climber
Ridgway, CO
Mar 5, 2013 - 06:20pm PT
Kronhofer's possibly.
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
Panorama City, California & living in Seattle
Mar 5, 2013 - 06:38pm PT
Sure look like Kronhofers. Here they are on Rock 2 at Stonet Point.
Credit: McHale's Navy
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 5, 2013 - 07:07pm PT
That is one cool shot of all the toe - destroyers of the era. My EB's got to become Asolo Skywalkers( resoled 4 times and my all time favorite for comfy) and then Fire Cats (POS) Thanks for the share !!!
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Mar 5, 2013 - 07:16pm PT

What's on the bottom?
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Mar 5, 2013 - 07:20pm PT
Don I had them all and may have bought a pair or two from you, those PA's were dangerously like roller skates! EB's saved the day and kept me from reverting back to my beginnings, the klutteshoe or however you spell it..
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 5, 2013 - 07:26pm PT
Vasque Ascenders or Shoenards.  Maybe Ascender II.  These were around ...
Vasque Ascenders or Shoenards. Maybe Ascender II. These were around in 1973 in Berkeley at TNF and the other shops---make that late 1973.
Credit: Tarbusted

Here's a thread from out Tarbuh-buh-buster's way. Shoenuff. Mighty fine stuff, Roy.
http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=431046&tn=0&mr=0
storer

Trad climber
Golden, Colorado
Mar 5, 2013 - 07:26pm PT
Why no Zillertals? Maybe earlier, however. Maybe I can dig up a picture.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Mar 5, 2013 - 07:33pm PT
Don...Were you ever inside Imelda Marcos closet....? RJ
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Mar 5, 2013 - 08:07pm PT
Credit: guido
Rolfr

Social climber
North Vancouver BC
Mar 5, 2013 - 08:33pm PT
EB's , Man that was the sh#t. I still think climbing the dime edges on White Lightning in Squish was easier in EB's.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Mar 5, 2013 - 09:02pm PT
I like your shoe collection, Imelda, er, I mean, Guido.

:)
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Mar 6, 2013 - 07:10am PT
That is one cool shot of all the toe - destroyers of the era.

Toe Destroyers, thats for sure!
I remember we would buy them a size or 2 smaller than our regular shoe size.
At one point I was wearing my tight EB's so much that I developed a nasty and painful in grown toe nail (big toe).
It became infected so I had to go to the Dr., first thing he said when he saw it was "are your shoes too tight?"LOL
I told him about all the time I spent in climbing shoes, he cut away some tissue and nail, bandaged it up and told me to avoid tight shoes and I did for about a month until it healed up.

Anybody else have this happen to them?
Tad
Peter Haan

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Mar 6, 2013 - 07:46am PT
This is what I see in Lauria's photo:

guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Mar 6, 2013 - 07:48am PT
Cosmiccccc..........But monsieur, that is the great Coonyard!
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Mar 6, 2013 - 08:04am PT
I bought my first pair of EB's from England in 75. I was living in Germany and they hadn't heard of them there yet. There was an ad in Mountain magazine from a shop who if you traced an outline of your foot on a piece of paper and sent it to them with 20 bucks, they'd ship you a pair they thought was right for your foot. I think the only time those shoes ever felt good was at the end of their life when they were completely blown out.
Credit: can't say

Edit: Twistedcrank, I got them a week or so before taking this shot.
TwistedCrank

climber
Dingleberry Gulch, Ideeho
Mar 6, 2013 - 08:50am PT
Those EBs look quite fresh.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Mar 6, 2013 - 09:59am PT
RD's at work, winter, Gunks, mid-sixties.

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 6, 2013 - 10:03am PT
rack o pins, and those edgy baztids! NICE!
BooDawg

Social climber
Butterfly Town
Mar 6, 2013 - 10:40am PT
Don, Isn't that a Larry Reynolds photo that became a WestRidge ad with the caption something like, "Kronhofers-Still on top!"

By then, Zillertals were not sold much tho some lads still had them around. Where's that pic of Russ' old pair? I still have a pair of both Zillertals and Kronhofers which would be suitable for wearing to this day.

Klettershue is the German translation of "climbing shoes" and both Zillertals and Kronhofers were made in Austria, so the word in English became "klettershoe."

L to R: EBs, Kronhofers, Zillertals
L to R: EBs, Kronhofers, Zillertals
Credit: BooDawg

Seems like RR preferred Cortina Spiders for many years tho he may (or may not) have switched to his own brand after their appearance. The classic pic of RR by Glen Denny shows RR wearing his RR shoes. What did he wear on the FA of Tis-sa-ak in 1969?

RR by Glen Denny, 1969
RR by Glen Denny, 1969
Credit: Glen Denny
scuffy b

climber
heading slowly NNW
Mar 6, 2013 - 11:47am PT
RR is wearing Robbins Boots (so comfortable you can wear them to work)
in that photo, Boo.
There is a shot of him wearing Spiders in Basic Rockcraft, the picture
demonstrating the heel-toe jam. The Spiders had thicker midsoles than
Cortinas, as well as extra leather at the heel cup.
In most pictures it would probably be hard to tell the difference between
Cortinas and Zillertals.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Mar 6, 2013 - 12:19pm PT
My first shoes in '73 were Pivetta Red Spiders. Anyone remember them? Switched to EB's after about 6 months and that was that. Until Gallencamp Scats came along...
Andy Fielding

Trad climber
UK
Mar 6, 2013 - 12:24pm PT
My first pair of boots were bought in 1977 so I'm guessing they'd been around for a few years before then. They were a pair of Hawkins with blue suede uppers.
Joe Brown helmet, Whillans harness, Hawkins boots and a Hex 9 I was de...
Joe Brown helmet, Whillans harness, Hawkins boots and a Hex 9 I was determined to place somewhere.

Credit: Andy Fielding
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Mar 6, 2013 - 12:32pm PT
Don,

Thanks for the great picture. I first climbed in an old pair of Zillertols (similar to Kronhoffers), then RR's, PA's and Bill Dolt Blue Boots (Chris Vandever thought they were sold by Ellis Brigham as "Gollies"), and EB's, so your picture captures my footwear evolution quite well. I kept using PA's bouldering when I moved from Berkeley to LA, though, because the sandstone at Stoney Point wore the EB's too quickly.

I had a pair of Asolo Canyons later in the 1970's, that I thought were the successor to "Shoe-n-ards," but I never cared for them.

John
storer

Trad climber
Golden, Colorado
Mar 6, 2013 - 12:46pm PT
EB's were a game changer. I think it was John Morton who came in the UCHC office in Eshleman Hall on a Monday to report that if you slipped on Arches Terrace you'd come to a stop wearing them. Had to get a pair and try it out! Sure enough, jumping backwards, releasing, and coming back down you'd stop dead.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Mar 6, 2013 - 12:54pm PT
Other brands...


Solda's (A Gunks thing...)



???


RR's (Thanks to T Hocking)


Yellow and Black ???

JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Mar 6, 2013 - 12:59pm PT
Storer, when were you at Berkeley? As a four-year denizen of the Eschelman Hall basement (not to mention, a regular user of the space between the pillars on the outside for off-width practice), I don't remember widespread use of EB's in Berkeley until about 1972, but I do remember running across them in the late 1960's, and wishing I had a pair. I think Bill Dolt was selling them for around $20.00.

John
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Mar 6, 2013 - 01:10pm PT
WOW!! GREAT THREAD !!!! SO GLAD it's not in SMELL-O-RAMA!!


Bought my first EB's in 1978 - size 36 - 33$CDN at MEC in their shop at 4th x Arbutus here in Van.

I loved my Robbins boots. Nearly wore the lugs right of the soles. Finally murdered them treeplanting in the '80's. Yeah........stupid move.

Scored two pairs of the Shoenards in Fresno in the mid'80's for about 10$each. They were size 4 or something and nobody wanted 'em . :-) Haa!!!!

Glad that the bare hoof is also shown in the pic.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Mar 6, 2013 - 01:12pm PT
In the sixties, I was ordering my RD's direct from France. $15 including shipping and duty. And the leather on RD uppers was thick!
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Mar 6, 2013 - 01:32pm PT
rgold,
in your 3rd pic down those are RR's shoe not PA's
i'm wearing them in this late 70's pic
J-Tree Bouldering
J-Tree Bouldering
Credit: T Hocking
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Colombia, South America
Mar 6, 2013 - 01:50pm PT
They're all wearing socks. Some pulled up to the knees, lederhosen style. That's before my time.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Mar 6, 2013 - 01:57pm PT
They're all wearing socks. Some pulled up to the knees, lederhosen style. That's before my time.

From a land before time: RD's and two pair of socks, one pair knee socks, for bouldering yet:

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 6, 2013 - 01:58pm PT
Credit: Ron Anderson

pre-chalk days tu...
richross

Trad climber
Mar 6, 2013 - 01:59pm PT
Credit: richross
paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Mar 6, 2013 - 02:02pm PT
Always climbed in kronhoffers... until at the base of moby dick in yos I realized I'd left my shoes out of the pack and in order to do the climb my partner lowered his ebs down, I slipped them on and was off. What an eye opener that was. Those shoes were a game changer. Especially on face like the apron. Try any apron face climb in kronhoffers and you'll see what I mean... you have to work twice as hard to get anywhere. Don't think there's any doubt as to how much equipment has contributed to what climbing is today.
Dennis Hennek

climber
Mar 6, 2013 - 02:31pm PT
Hey McHale, thanks for the recognition of Rock 2
Jennie

Trad climber
Elk Creek, Idaho
Mar 6, 2013 - 02:37pm PT
Fascinating history thread!

Did the RD shoe appear in red and blue also? I remember dad having a blue leather pair with red trim with "Rene Desmaison" inscribed in the ankle area. (not the blue leather Royal Robbins shoe with lug soles) ??
steve shea

climber
Mar 6, 2013 - 03:41pm PT
EBs just happen to fit my feet really well. I usally bought them fit with bare feet.I would cram my feet in with a Wigwam type ragg sock and step into hot water for a full soaking and wear till almost dry. There was just enough stretch to result in a perfect almost pain free fit. As they stretched more with use eventually I could get the ragg on all the time, they were awesome for cracks. When newer and tight, great for face. I usually had quite a few pairs in rotation. They wore out fast on me. Desmaison had his name on several types. I saw many strange boots when living in France. Typically the RD referred to in the states were the stiff brown ones but there were others. We actually imported our first EBs from Ellis Brigham in the UK early 70's. Brigham had several shops in the UK and gave us a great deal on 20pr. Just shipped them airfreight no customs. I don't know why. Anyone ever climb in Lephoque's (sp)? I bought a pair from Teton Mountaineering in the late 60's. Used them for one resoling and several flaps. They had rubber flaps covering the laces. They climbed great looked funky. I donated them back to TM for their little alpine display. They are hanging in the store now, same pair.
Jennie

Trad climber
Elk Creek, Idaho
Mar 6, 2013 - 04:07pm PT
Thanks, Steve...
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Mar 6, 2013 - 04:19pm PT
Le Phoque climbing boots (from the web):



...and from the 1968 North Face catalog, see Guido's thread at http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1607712

JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Mar 6, 2013 - 04:27pm PT
I had a pair of La Phoques that I bought at Ski Hut in Berkeley in 1969 for $24.00, and kept until the LA smog rotted away the rubber cover ten years later. They were excellent mountaineering boots, provided you didn't try to hike too far in them (that fiberglass midsole wasn't made for flexion) and even worked OK at Pinnacles.

My biggest fear was that someone who knew French would pronounce their name correctly. I also lusted after the LeRoux "John Harlin" model, but finances limited me.

John
steve shea

climber
Mar 6, 2013 - 04:38pm PT
You are welcome Jennie! RGold that's the one. At the time I also got a pair of Carman Supergaitors. TM had them before Chouinard got hold of them. TM had the goods. One of the best shops in the US bitd.
storer

Trad climber
Golden, Colorado
Mar 6, 2013 - 07:09pm PT
John: I was at Berkeley '62 - '66 so we probably didn't overlap then. I was back in California say '75 - '78. Could I be wrong about when EB's became available? Could be....Do you remember the climb of the pillar in Faculty Glade, or the night ascents of the chimney between the Greek Theatre columns with the descent down the rickety ladder, or those "pinnacles" on the face of the Campanile? Long ago so my mind fails me.......I was watching Cal Bears hoops the other night on TV and they toured those old haunts......cool.....
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Mar 6, 2013 - 08:30pm PT
The West Ridge ad showing the classic after shot.



Love 'em to death with hint of knicker too.
carlos gallego

Ice climber
Spain
Mar 7, 2013 - 03:09am PT
... "Paragot" (white sole)...

Credit: carlos gallego
madbolter1

Big Wall climber
Denver, CO
Mar 7, 2013 - 05:14am PT
EBs were indeed far better than the (for me, more comfortable) alternatives. But whatever last they were built on didn't have my feet in mind.

I, too, crammed bare feet into them and settled into the pain. One pair ultra-tight for edging and jamming, and one pair slightly less tortuous for smearing.

I never got the ingrown toenail effect, but after a few years of wearing tight EBs so much, I developed a really entrenched case of fungal nails on most of my toes. Something about "dark, hot, moist environments" being really good to "grow your own." And hours in those things certainly qualified. I had the fungal nails for decades until some doc prescribed an anti-fungal pill that could possibly destroy my liver.

Over the course of each climbing day, the medieval torture-devices would get really damp, almost wet from sweat, which would make them almost imperceptibly more comfortable. It was always a neck-and-neck race to the finish line whether increasing swelling would win over the slight dampness-induced stretch.

And the "finish line" always carried with it portents of what the next day would bring: yet again "sliding" not-fully-recovered feet into the things dry. So it was almost regrettable to take them off, knowing what the next day had in store.

The memories... the discomfort/pain/damage was what "made" a "hard man."

And the aroma. I can recall it "afresh" even now as though I'm actually smelling it again, so etched into my brain cells it is. By day's end, the "environment" was literally breeding new life-forms, and these had to be exposed to light and fresh air occasionally to snuff them out before they developed opposable thumbs and perhaps even consciousness. In death, however, they exacted terrible revenge.

No amount of mental-bracing was preparation enough for the searing waves of deadly toxic fumes that would smite me to my knees as the first shoe came off. Hideous groans and cries filled the air along with the fumes.

Many of the groans and cries were mine.

People in a wide radius were also smitten. Some fled, their mournful cries fading into the distance. Others threw hard or sharp objects, intending, I believe, to drive the "blast radius" far from them.

Much of the physical damage I endured from climbing during those years was from injuries sustained from these thrown objects, as I was invariably unable to do little more than slowly roll, crawl, or knee-hop away, unable as I was to get enough fresh air to clear my head sufficiently to stand and run.

Even fresh socks and shoes for the drive home couldn't keep the car from slowly filling with the fumes emanating through the layers, hell bent as they were on making my head spin, resulting in a mental condition not unlike DUI. And the stupefying effects so eroded judgment that it often was beyond me to simply roll down the windows.

Worse, I confess that within 20 minutes or so of driving, the odor so destroyed even normal aesthetic judgment that I came to almost enjoy it... something like scratching your armpit and then smelling your fingers. And only during the eventual shower at home did my head clear enough that I could objectively assess with fascinated horror the liking of it.

The pain, ruined nails, risk of liver failure, actual brain damage, and deep-seated psychological after-effects. Ahh... the good old days! EBs rocked!
steve shea

climber
Mar 7, 2013 - 06:14am PT
Hey, Madbolter that was hilarious. We used tincture to offset the odor. A couple off good inhales on the tincture bottle would take the edge off the smell you so eloquently describe.
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Mar 7, 2013 - 07:06am PT
I had 3 from the first picture

PAs were my first
EBs
RRs
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 7, 2013 - 08:35am PT
madbolter, I love a good chuckle with my first cuppa, even if it is also
tinged with ruefullness. I never thought about how my toe fungus first
started in '77 but now, thanks to you, it all becomes clear, so to speak.
I am still fighting it to the extent that I spent 3 days in hospital last
August when the fungus enlisted help from some no few bacterial allies.
My doc assured me The Pill's threat to the liver is not that bad and worth
the risk. I am also here to report that my three month course did not
cure it.
Roots

Mountain climber
SoCal
Mar 7, 2013 - 09:24am PT
Just bought my first pair of EBs last week...LOL! Couldn't believe it when I opened the box - Brand new, never used! Almost perfect condition for being so old.

Fun stuff, you guys are climbing routes in those pictures I couldn't even climb today with modern footware.
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Mar 7, 2013 - 09:38am PT
RR's
RR's
Credit: ydpl8s
Edit: That's the 2nd resole on those RR's, courtesy of Mr. Komito in 1973

Credit: ydpl8s

TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Mar 7, 2013 - 09:45am PT
My first shoes were Blue suedes

My first friction shoe:

The friction RR's
The shirt was the closest I could find to a real rugby shirt at the 'S...
The shirt was the closest I could find to a real rugby shirt at the 'Sal'. I borrowed my dad's sail maker's palm and leathered my new R.R's right away. Had to, that's what aspiring 'StoneMasters' did back then right? ;)
Summer '75/6
Credit: TrundleBum

Looking down Sliding Board route, Whitehorse ledge N.H
Looking down Sliding Board route, Whitehorse ledge N.H
Credit: TrundleBum
Keith Leaman

Trad climber
Mar 7, 2013 - 10:19am PT
From Blakey's "Facebook Vintage '80s" thread. Some of these bootmakers (like Scarpa, Morotto, Brixia) must have been producing in the '70s. It would be interesting to see more of what the rest of the world-outside the US- was climbing in at the time-like Carlos' Paragots upthread. Note the colored chalk too.
Facebook Vintage 80's
Facebook Vintage 80's

Those posters/ads are all familiar, as are all the shoes in the first photo. Larry Reynolds was developing huge photos in a bathtub then as I recall. I liked the stiffness of RDs for alpine type climbs in the Zirkel Wilderness where snow was frequently found in summer. Swami, wool socks, rack of homemade and commercial nuts, Eiger ovals, and no chalk bag. Fun stuff.
KL on Gilpin Wall, FA Zirkel Wilderness, CO 1974
KL on Gilpin Wall, FA Zirkel Wilderness, CO 1974
Credit: Keith Leaman
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Mar 7, 2013 - 10:40am PT
Thanks, Storer. When I saw your reference to John Morton, I figured you were predating me. I remember the buildering projects you mentioned, but we also used the expansion cracks at Memorial Stadium for hand jamming, and rigged a Tyrolean Travers from Eschelman Hall to the Student Union.

My favorite buildering exploit, though, was done by two others on a Sunday night in May of 1970: They managed to put a Mickey Mouse body and hands on the clock on the south side of the Campanile.

The method was a combination of clever climbing and Cal Tech lock-picking. After cutting the power to the Campanile floodlights, picking a lock into a storeroom and waiting until dark, after the elevator rides for the public ended, they got to the viewing deck, jammed the flared crack between the pillars and the anti-suicide glass, rappelled down the side and placed the Mickey Mouse on with latex paint as an adhesive (so water would remove it).

The next Monday at noon, the carillon played the mickey Mouse Club theme song.

Ah, the good old days.

John
carlos gallego

Ice climber
Spain
Mar 7, 2013 - 01:50pm PT
In the "made in Spain" market... the first company to use sticky rubber (goma cocida) was CALMA (1980)... with models "Adherencia", "Precisión" and "Lince".
These climbing shoes were distributed in USA by Climb High.

Credit: carlos gallego

Credit: carlos gallego

Months later... BOREAL, with much better marketing style, produced the "Fire" and became number one.

Credit: carlos gallego

The other spanish manufacturer in those years was KAMET.

Credit: carlos gallego



AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Mar 7, 2013 - 05:08pm PT
Remember the first thing you did with EB's was to sew leather patches on the sides?
Also if the soles didn't last 3 years you felt ripped off?
storer

Trad climber
Golden, Colorado
Mar 7, 2013 - 05:51pm PT
The UCHC Campanile "decoration" goes back to the '50's, I think. I was part of the '65 (pretty sure) Easter endeavor. The plan was to put a 10' tall balloon-filled cloth bunny on the topmost spike. We entered as any tourist would during normal hours and hid inside. After the attendant left for the day we let our compatriots in and we all went up to the top floor. There we endlessly blew up many balloons and stuffed them into the rabbit. The leader slinged one of those corner spikes for pro and climbed to the top, hauled up the bunny, and positioned it on the top spike. We all exited down the stairs and out to await daylight to see our prized Easter bunny.

Unfortunately, the wind came up and blew all the balloons to one side. It was lots of fun listening to observers guess what it was; a pregnant woman, a trash bag,.....? Even more interesting to us was watching the professional steeplejacks rigging the top and removing the "thing" taking hours to do it. It must have cost U.C. much more than my tuition which was $112 per semester, as I recall.
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 7, 2013 - 05:53pm PT
I still have My Fire Cats with very low mileage cuz they just would not stick on granite . They , um, "sucked" and we got herded into the "Fire" marketing campaign and immediately resoled our Skywalkers with 5.10 resole rubber.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Mar 7, 2013 - 05:57pm PT
Well-patched EB's...



...and a failure to fully embrace clean climbing (nuts plus three pitons, short-thin, short-medium, and short-thick).
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 7, 2013 - 06:11pm PT
A fortune hanging around your neck in that cool pic !!!
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Mar 7, 2013 - 06:20pm PT
Incredible photos and memory flash backs.

I wish I would have kept my fires. Those suckers fit perfect and being a 5.9 dweeb at the time were such a step ahead from EBs. I recall Duane Raleigh coming into my shop in Norman,OK and rubbing the soles together to warm them up and then pasting them together.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 7, 2013 - 06:23pm PT
Credit: Ron Anderson
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 7, 2013 - 06:32pm PT
Yes indeed johntp original Fires were astounding and I burned thru 2 pair. Cats did not fair so well as we were told (after the fact that the factory had some manky rubber that was in use at the time.)
jogill

climber
Colorado
Mar 7, 2013 - 08:23pm PT
Near Zortman, MT . . . 1959
Near Zortman, MT . . . 1959
Credit: jogill


1959: Zillertals, in the wilds of the Little Rockies, MT
richross

Trad climber
Mar 8, 2013 - 08:55am PT
Some more EB's action!



Credit: Geoff Ohland

Blakey

Trad climber
Sierra Vista
Mar 8, 2013 - 10:41am PT
Some I've pulled from the Climbing in the 80s Facebook pages

Unknown to me anyone any ideas?
Unknown to me anyone any ideas?
Credit: Blakey

Shoeinards - I had a pair of these around 1977.
Shoeinards - I had a pair of these around 1977.
Credit: Blakey

Russian Galoshes
Russian Galoshes
Credit: Blakey

Asolo Canyons - my last non sticky shoes
Asolo Canyons - my last non sticky shoes
Credit: Blakey

Looking at the rand I think these are a pair of second generation EBs ...
Looking at the rand I think these are a pair of second generation EBs - the crap ones!
Credit: Blakey

There seems to be a Dolt logo on these. But they seem similar to MOAC/...
There seems to be a Dolt logo on these. But they seem similar to MOAC/Gollies - similar colour and style?
Credit: Blakey

PAs supposedly from 1948
PAs supposedly from 1948
Credit: Blakey


Steve
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Mar 8, 2013 - 11:44am PT
Steve,

Those Dolt-labeled shoes were the Bill Dolt Blue Boots to which I referred in my earlier post. I used a pair during the summer of 1971, but they kept stretching, so I switched back to my tried-and-true PA's. I still don't know of a shoe that beats PA's for edging.

I wish I would have kept my fires. Those suckers fit perfect and being a 5.9 dweeb at the time were such a step ahead from EBs. I recall Duane Raleigh coming into my shop in Norman,OK and rubbing the soles together to warm them up and then pasting them together.

Fortunately, I hung on to mine, and had them re-soled with C4. They're currently my favorite for OW, and probably my favorite right now for longer routes, too.

John
Blakey

Trad climber
Sierra Vista
Mar 8, 2013 - 12:07pm PT
Yep, a new pair of EBs were a good edging boot. We learned a trick from Martin Boysen, to recycle old outer edges, cutting out the worn section and superglueing in a new edge.

Worked quite well, though the chunk could pull out at just the wrong moment!

Steve
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 8, 2013 - 03:11pm PT
i DONT miss that swami only craze thingy.. SUCKED falling on those..
Texplorer

Trad climber
Sacramento
Mar 8, 2013 - 04:16pm PT
Some people still climb in those Ron.
Swami action shot
Swami action shot
Credit: Texplorer

http://www.mountainproject.com/v/105817617
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Mar 8, 2013 - 04:19pm PT
Before I got a swami belt it was a bowline on a coil,
Who here done that?
Tad
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 8, 2013 - 04:40pm PT
Not me.. i went for the 1" tubular diaper, then a cut off surplus parachute harness- which was HELLA comy for aid, but a bit aQQQQward in the finesse free moves. Then onto to a Lowe Alpine swami, then a straw berry swami, then i broke down and got Forest leg loops for the strawberry harness..Never went back to the swami only chit! Gotta be a man to do that(Textplorer!)! then,, the Whillans and Chouinard alpine harnesses.
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
Panorama City, California & living in Seattle
Mar 8, 2013 - 04:49pm PT
Before I got a swami belt it was a bowline on a coil,
Who here done that?

There were always plenty of reasons to not fall. I had the Sierra Club belay book that said 'the leader must not fall' - that was from the days of hemp I think - hemp was before my time! Was that the title? I do not remember.

Since I am from swami only days, I don't mind using just a swami for easier things. I still use a Forrest system of separate leg loops. If I buy a harness that does not separate, I modify it. Anyone know the Baboon Hang where you can quickly turn a long runner into a seat harness - if you are still conscious!?
Randisi

Social climber
Dalian, Liaoning
Mar 8, 2013 - 05:34pm PT
One thing that's been forgotten is that people used to personalize their EBs by drawing on them with felt tip markers.
jogill

climber
Colorado
Mar 8, 2013 - 06:34pm PT
Who here done that?

With a natural fiber rope.

;>)
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 8, 2013 - 06:48pm PT
You guys are Hardcore . My Troll Whillans was "da bomb" . 2 inch swamis sucked ( my guts payed the price; as well as any surviving ribs. This thread is morphing into "somethun outta control".
madbolter1

Big Wall climber
Denver, CO
Mar 8, 2013 - 06:54pm PT
Before I got a swami belt it was a bowline on a coil,
Who here done that?

On goldline. Not at all pretty after a fall!
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 8, 2013 - 06:55pm PT
Yes Randisi, I remember climber artwork on their EB's. You are right and I do wish I would have captured some of that with my camera. This might just become unto itself as a subject of historic import. Who knows !!
madbolter1

Big Wall climber
Denver, CO
Mar 8, 2013 - 06:56pm PT
One thing that's been forgotten is that people used to personalize their EBs by drawing on them with felt tip markers.

I used to personalize my body that way too.

Oh, wait, I'm confusing "felt tip marker" with the whole thread-wrapped-needle tattoo bit.
lars johansen

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Mar 8, 2013 - 07:01pm PT
Here's a shot of the East Butt of Middle with Whillan's harness and chinese boots from army surplus. They were about as secure as climbing with hockey pucks on your feet. Vintage mid to late 70's. lj
Credit: lars johansen

TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 8, 2013 - 07:07pm PT
Before I got a swami belt it was a bowline on a coil,
Who here done that?
Tad

Slowly raises his hand.


With goldline too.



Gilroy

Social climber
Bolderado
Mar 8, 2013 - 07:24pm PT
Bowline on a coil gave rise to the folkore about the fellow who fell at the Gunks and his bowline came untied (as they are wont to do, eh) and he spun off the rope like a top. Story went he augered into the ground so far...that all his buddies bought ball-busting Whillans.

The guy that taught me to tie into a rope climbed in these.

Credit: Gilroy

John Harlin II taught him to climb while he was at a rich kid school in Leysin. I learned in my hiking boots to 'hang a lug' on a crystal whilst slab climbing in Texas. Soon be the blue suede shoes. Not that they helped with the slabs but, boy, were they stylin.
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
Panorama City, California & living in Seattle
Mar 8, 2013 - 07:30pm PT
This thread is morphing into "somethun outta control".

The Cortina on the bottom of the shoe pile looks like it has some epoxy on it. We used to shore up the leather with epoxy to keep them from wearing out. Seems like I may have done that to Kronnies to.
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 8, 2013 - 07:49pm PT
That shoe looks like he should have been pacing laps at the local high school. Incredible what you climbed in ; if you laced a pair of those on , I commend you.
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
Panorama City, California & living in Seattle
Mar 8, 2013 - 07:54pm PT
I remember those Adidas leather 'dress' track shoes. I never had any but I sure remember them.

The Corinas were not bad at all. Like any shoe - you wore them tight. The ones in the pick look a bit beat. When they were new, you edged. When they wore down you smeared. They were good training for what came next. It was never really about the shoes. I skipped the whole EB phase with Robbins boots and then started using PAs and RDs and on and on! Kamps did amazing things with Cortinas. Can't remember Shoenards - never had any - may have tried then on but maybe they didn't have them in Idaho at the time.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Mar 8, 2013 - 08:09pm PT
Almost ninety posts and no love for the Fabiano Black Beauty!?!

Pure unbridled stiffness.

When I had a chance to climb with Fritz Wiessner back in high school he was wearing a pair along with an Edelrid woven rope chest harness craging around Tucson! Or were those Hanwags...
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Mar 8, 2013 - 10:31pm PT
Shounards came out after PA's and even EB's, I think. My buddy bought PA's and I bought Shoenards as our first shoes in 77 or so. Shoenards sucked at anything but mixed aid/easy free.

It seemed like forever at the time, but when Fire's came out, they had several years where they were THE shoe.

I found an old titanium ice screw when scrounging around today. BITD, the eastern block climbers were behind the Iron Curtain. I guess there was a good black market, because some of them were making ice screws out of titanium. The workmanship is top notch, done on a lathe, and the thing weighs about two ounces. I traded for it in Europe and hung onto it. When they got permission to go climbing, they would bring this kind of stuff over and trade for money because they had little money.

It really is amazing quality. You could tell that somebody knew what they were making, and the spirals are precision cut on a lathe.
Blakey

Trad climber
Sierra Vista
Mar 9, 2013 - 03:27am PT
Shoeinards appeared in the UK in 77, they worked well on the FAs of some of our crimpy/edgy sandstone routes. Some of which still get high numbers....

In fact a lot of the outcrop routes here, done in EBs and the like, still get high numbers and aren't done that often.

They require a good head, more than good feet I guess ;-)

Steve
hobo_dan

Social climber
Minnesota
Mar 9, 2013 - 11:45am PT
What about Black Beauty's?

Like the blue RR's only stiffer, blacker and more beautiful!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 9, 2013 - 12:03pm PT
stylin the new EBs!!!!!!
stylin the new EBs!!!!!!
Credit: Ron Anderson

Painters pants dayz....^^


Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Mar 9, 2013 - 12:07pm PT
What a great thread! Sorry I wasn't around earlier to contribute this October 1972 Galibier Ad from Off Belay Magazine.

Credit: Fritz
F10

Trad climber
Bishop
Mar 9, 2013 - 07:38pm PT
EB's with customized leather upper



EB's in action



New RR's

carlos gallego

Ice climber
Spain
Mar 10, 2013 - 04:45am PT
... years before than I discovered the "Paragot and EB"... I used the "supercalcarea" boots... rigid and paintful...

Credit: carlos gallego
richross

Trad climber
Mar 15, 2013 - 08:56pm PT
More EB's!

Credit: richross

Credit: richross
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 15, 2013 - 09:15pm PT
For some reason EB's still look so , so cool! Must be the blue and natural white . Love and Rockets !!!
Mimi

climber
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:27pm PT
Rock on!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FJR6mOKrUI
R.B.

Trad climber
47N 122W
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:30pm PT
You forgot to add "Black Beautys" which were a Vibram-waffle stomper leather boot, but man could they allow you to pick an edge as thin as a dime.

Edit: Hey, at least I am consistant eh? http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1271198&msg=1271471#msg1271471
docsavage

Trad climber
Albuquerque, NM
Mar 18, 2013 - 12:24pm PT
The bare foot now, that was something. Throw a couple leather spats on it & you're good to go for Dresden ( ... or maybe that was later, around '76-'78 ish).
Kironn Kid

Trad climber
Mar 18, 2013 - 12:40pm PT
I actually still have my original EB's from that period. I'll have to post a snap of them.

EB's on the left. Wore them up Half Dome.
Abissi

Trad climber
MI
Mar 18, 2013 - 12:55pm PT
I used to wear a pair of Galibier Black Beautys. Full length steel shank Which made them really cold to wear in the middle of Winter) full umber rans and a Vibram sole. I traded mine in for a down payment of a 67 Plymouth Belvedere from a friend
geiger

Trad climber
Doylestown pa
Mar 18, 2013 - 01:52pm PT
We quickly learned to put a leather wrap around the upper of the EB's as well as a haul loop on the back.
SammO

Social climber
Ohio
Mar 18, 2013 - 06:19pm PT
I worked for Neptune at his first shop, circa 1974-5, then 1980 did the Boulder Bootworks w/ Scott Johnston in a tiny hole behind a sports bar and
King Soopers; many memories of the shoe trade, tho' only a fraction of Komito's history. Did a replacement rubber flaps on Lefoux Boots, a real
bitch; broke scores of needles trying to stitch thru the nylon midsoles of Choonards/aka Vasque Ascenders - the stiffest rock shoe-boot ever made. Kevin Donald I recall saying how he was standing nonchalantly on a thin faceclimb in Eldorado when his foot dropped an inch and scared him - he'd been standing on some invisible nothing an inch above the hold he thought he was standing on all along!
I bought my first rock shoes from Ski Hut, mail order, about 1969, and amazingly they fit- Voyager fake kronhofers that were actually far better than the German originals by virtue of a stiffer midsole that gave a better edging shoe.
EBs were a superior shoe for all-around use mostly because the rubber was stickier - Galibiers and others had astonishingly hard, brittle soles that broke off in chunks, sort of like old superball rubber. The RD was ridiculously overbuilt, with actual fullgrain leather outers, smooth side in against your foot. The EB peculiarity was the thin canvas upper actually was a laminate with a thin rubber layer which made the shoe upper totally unbreathable, if not entirely waterproof. This certainly aided in the heat and sweat build-up which caused the notorious stench and inner cardboard rot.
I had a working fan system that drew air down thru the gluing table top to keep the brain damage to a minimum, and one day I knew instantly that
somebody had come in, because I was hit by an overpowering stench - the guy had EBs that had a few chunks of rotten cardboard left inside the soggy shoes - against every plea, I kicked him out with dead skunk shoes in hand.
The sidepanel biz was a real cottage industry, essential to crack-climbing durability, but also easy to customize with colors and designs.
Original Fires were strangely wonderful in even thin cracks, because the solid rubber rand box toe gave great protection when torqueing toes, and the substantial midsole made handcracks almost comfortable! You had to "smedge" on thin holds, which created the unique worn hole under the big toe, before the actual sole edge itself wore down.
My own best edging shoes were the original Megas, the first odd toe-down designs that also featured a weird space beneath one's heel- you could put
a marble in your heel, and not feel it while climbing! Only trouble was it took 6 months to break them in. After that, I could edge on nickels,
without strain. Rubber was both sticky (nowhere near Fires, tho) yet hard enough to not distort off small edges.
Patrick Edlinger's Dolomite shoes were IMO really mediocre, stiff foresole but slippery rubber jobs that made his Snowbird win even more
impressive.
5.10 rubber eventually surpassed the earlier Boreal and Sportivas for stickshion, but Vibram and others have caught up, and differences are negligible. Shoe quality of 5.10 has generally been awfully poor, so how good does original rubber have to be to offset bad fit, etc? I worry about the future availability of resoling sheet rubber now that Adidas owns the company; some MBA genius will surely decide they can make more money by just selling new shoes, without recognizing how cheap halfsoles have become integral to affordable footwear. Maybe Chuck kept his aftermarket options open, and can still sell rubber outside the 5.10 corporate shell? That would be really shrewd of him.
I hate the current extreme incurved downtoed shapes, and suspect many people with pronation issues are improperly served by them- straighter
lasts are what runners who pronate need, and climbers should be no different.
Last, of course, Mr. Gill's photo circa 1959 isn't fair, because we all remember how every shot of him makes it look like his feet are on holds, when the reality is he's always entirely suspended by his fingertips alone - especially true with RDs!
Don'tKnowHim

Social climber
California
Mar 18, 2013 - 06:33pm PT
As to the original picture of this posting, the shoe on the top that looks like a hiking boot is a "kletterschuh." A few people back in the day used it for general scrambling, sometimes as a cheap "aid" or approach shoe.
jabbas

Trad climber
phx AZ
Mar 18, 2013 - 06:34pm PT
Thanks SammO for a little if ever looked into art of reviving the climbing shoe. Sending of our shoes to be resoled had a certain "dark magic" feeling . Enter 5.10 rubber and we felt like we could make new shoes outta thin air - ha ha . It is way tougher than the little page of ' structions made it out to be. A way cool thread -- Thanks .
Redwood

Gym climber
West Sacramento CA
Mar 18, 2013 - 06:46pm PT
PAs: I still have mine. Could not bear to part with them. I remember all those others, too. At one time, Cortinas were de rigeur at Stony Point. Robbins Boots: I saw a British climber lead Coonyard Pinnacle in Robbins Boots.

Credit: Redwood

TMJesse

Mountain climber
Olympia, WA
Mar 18, 2013 - 09:27pm PT
I went on the cheap side for $19 bucks and bought Directissimas. Sold them to my roommate Phil Bone at the Columbia College Apartments in 1979.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=204602&msg=204785#msg204785
Freecloud

climber
California
Mar 18, 2013 - 10:39pm PT
What about Fire's? (fee-rays)? Weren't they around during the same time? Can't remember what I had first.
MGuzzy

Trad climber
Orangevale
Mar 18, 2013 - 11:34pm PT
Climbing fashion of the days gone by.. Ah to reminisce. I went back through a few photos looking for shots with EBs and thought to myself.. sh#t I climbed that in EBs! I still remember the day me and a friend bought our first pair of climbing shoes (EBs of course) in a Santa Cruz climbing shop. We went to his parents house and immediately tried them out on their livingroom fireplace! Mom was none to happy.
Credit: MGuzzy
Back in the day wearing what I think are my second pair of EB's and crew socks, I was stylin'. The shorts are Chouinard Stand-up shorts, and my favorite "man in the mountain" t-shirt from the Yosemite gift shop. The harness was fished out of a sale bin at the Berkeley REI, consisting of leg loops from one brand and the swami from another because I couldn't find a ready made one that fit me. I cut the chalk bag in half myself and I added the yellow nylon 'cause I heard it kept your chalk from spilling. I even added fleece to the inside, I wanted the most up-to-date chalk bag technology just like the big boys! I bought the yellow Edelweiss rope through the fine folks at the UCHC. It had a fruity smelling water repellent coating and became know as the banana rope. Its now out to pasture as a rope swing in the backyard for the kids.
Kironn Kid

Trad climber
Mar 19, 2013 - 06:52am PT
No. The Fire's came much later. It was because of Matt Cox, Largo and Bachar that I went with the original EB's. I wore them so tight, that they killed the nail bed on my big toes. Decades later, my large toe-nails still grow out very thick and wavy. Necessitating that I remove them about once a year.. Afet the EB's, I went to the original La Sportva (Purple-yellow model)shoes.

Harness? We learned and climbed in Swami belts. Those were the days...
qigongclimber

climber
Mar 20, 2013 - 05:08pm PT
RDs were around at least as early as 1972 because that's when I climbed the East Buttress of El Cap in them.
jogill

climber
Colorado
Mar 20, 2013 - 06:51pm PT
RDs were around at least as early as 1972

Mid 1960s at least. The Kronhofers in the first photo on this thread were used as state-of-the-art rock climbing shoes in the late 1950s and early 1960s, not merely as approach or scrambling shoes. I remember Kamps climbing in a pair in the Needles then. I had a pair also. But my favorites before RDs were Zillertals (very stiff, for edging), then PAs.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Mar 20, 2013 - 08:04pm PT
From the Archives of Antiquity. Many of us on ST worked at the Hut at one time or another. I worked there from 1958-1963. The Golden Years in Hutology, when Steck was my boss. Someday, when I have nothing else to do, I will scan the entire series.

Credit: guido
1959 Ski Hut Catalog
1959 Ski Hut Catalog
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
1960 Ski Hut Catalog
1960 Ski Hut Catalog
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
1967/68 Ski Hut Catalog
1967/68 Ski Hut Catalog
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
Ski Hut Catalog 1968/69
Ski Hut Catalog 1968/69
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
Ski Hut Catalog 1969/70
Ski Hut Catalog 1969/70
Credit: guido

can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Mar 21, 2013 - 09:10am PT
When I was first exposed to climbing in 1971, the sexiest things going were high quality mountain boots. As I was coming from an intrepid backpacker culture this was a natural progression of technology. Regardless of what sport I indulge myself in, I always by the best sh#t on the market. So after being tempted in mountain porn mags I was convinced I needed these 5 lbs rigs. Talk about resistance training.

I saved enough on a PFC's wage until I could buy a pair of Super Guides, I was stoked to say the least. But one of their design failings was from a soft toe box and crampon straps that would inevitable crush it. So Galibier came out with the Super Pro, which was basically the Super Guide with a PVC toe cap. After many years of use the toe caps were gone. Nice boots none the less.
Credit: can't say
Credit: can't say

Another shoe that promised good things but didn't live up to RR's was the Vasque Ascender. It had a nice stiff shank;) and tried to be the next blue suede shoe but it never really matched the RRs for standing in slings. It is stiff as heck so standing on edges is about it's main forte. When I first gave them a shake down run I noticed the toe rand wore thru in about 3 pitches of aiding and jugging. The sole sucked for any kind of free climbing, so I had them resoled by the Rubber Room with C4. Unfortunately my life took me in a direction at this time where I didn't need them, so in a way they are still virgin.
Vasque Ascenders w/ C4 resole
Vasque Ascenders w/ C4 resole
Credit: can't say
Credit: can't say
LongAgo

Trad climber
Mar 21, 2013 - 04:08pm PT
I used Kronhofers from 60's through 70's for all face climbing. With the help of Bruce Cooke, I learned to resole with smooth neoprene for super edging. I also added epoxy around the welt to minimize any bending, covered with rubber glue gunk. Really a mess come to think of it, and pretty poor on friction. These shoes were good in Tuolumne IF you mainly edged, but friction on glassy knobs was far from secure. Had to really keep your butt out. On Glacier Point Apron, Ks demanded even finer edging. For my crack climbing phase in Yosemite, I used EBs.

I seem to recall partner Bob Kamp liked Cortinas early on, even with no customized sole. Imagine doing hard 5.10 and 5.11 edging in vibrum soles on those shoes!

By the 80's, we finally moved on to "modern" shoes where, thankfully, edging and friction power were pretty well combined.

Tom Higgins
LongAgo
Blakey

Trad climber
Sierra Vista
Nov 12, 2013 - 10:37am PT
Bump
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Nov 12, 2013 - 11:53am PT
I remember Rosholt doing Kloberdanz in Addidas, I also remember falling (sliding) right off of Moby Dick Center in RR's.

I still love Kronhoffers, you can do an alpine approach and climb with the same shoe. I had a larger pair for wearing thick wool socks when doing alpine rock routes in the cooler seasons.
Curt

climber
Gold Canyon, AZ
Nov 12, 2013 - 01:33pm PT
Shounards came out after PA's and even EB's, I think. My buddy bought PA's and I bought Shoenards as our first shoes in 77 or so. Shoenards sucked at anything but mixed aid/easy free.

It's a good thing nobody ever informed Steve Wunsch of that before he freed Supercrack in the Gunks wearing them.

Curt
Curt

climber
Gold Canyon, AZ
Nov 12, 2013 - 01:37pm PT
Yellow and Black???
Yellow and Black???

Those were made by San Marco, Rich.

Curt
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Nov 12, 2013 - 01:39pm PT
There was a climb in Eldo I could only lead in my Shoenards. C'est La Vie edging up that crux dihedral. Ironically they were only needed for one foot and one move, and on the next move (smearing) I wished I could magically change shoes.

I'm sure better climbers have done both moves barefoot.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Nov 12, 2013 - 01:50pm PT
I think we are all lucky not to have DEERFORMED lower ribs after the "swami only" days!
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Nov 12, 2013 - 03:01pm PT
Top roping on a roadcut between Long Lake and Tupper Lake on a drizzly day in the Adirondacks around 1974.

Kris Solem on a road cut in the Ads.
Kris Solem on a road cut in the Ads.
Credit: Julie Lazar

Climbing in Fabianos. Obviously I devolved since I didn't get to Josh 'till '82...

Credit: Ksolem
Curt

climber
Gold Canyon, AZ
Nov 12, 2013 - 09:36pm PT
The classic shot on Diamond Dogs. Very nice.

Curt
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