The "you're gonna die" people

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Messages 41 - 60 of total 126 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
QITNL

climber
Feb 8, 2013 - 08:42pm PT
One last thought - Freud wrote a really good book on this subject - Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious. It's one of his best works & there are some decent jokes in it. I'll paraphrase my favorite:

These two dirtbags are hanging out in front of the employee housing showerhouse.

One asks the other, "Did you take a shower?"

"No," the second dirtbag replies, nervously. "Why? Is one missing?"
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Feb 8, 2013 - 08:54pm PT
INDEED!

Being human, we want to have some fun with the subject.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Feb 8, 2013 - 09:07pm PT
Credit: GI
Traditional Irish Valentines' Day greeting.
Lurky Lurkington

Trad climber
eh?
Feb 8, 2013 - 09:12pm PT
born to die
born to die
Credit: unknown
Guernica

climber
right there, right then
Feb 8, 2013 - 09:42pm PT
^^^ Now *that* deserves a bump. Ahem.
T H

Boulder climber
bouldering
Feb 8, 2013 - 09:44pm PT
I figure the people who write it have never had a friend who died while climbing.
Woody Stark's daughter posted a thread asking for help directly from locker the day Woody fell.
Crodog

Social climber
Feb 9, 2013 - 07:44pm PT
It is a great sport but http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v661/supine/blogstuff/2003127792.jpg
weezy

climber
Feb 9, 2013 - 07:48pm PT
MisterE

Social climber
Feb 9, 2013 - 07:51pm PT
Lighten up, Sally - no-one lives forever.

If you have fear, then it will not be an accepting moment, but one thing is for sure:

Yer gonna die!

Everyone thinks about it differently: acceptance, joy, denial, wailing, sobbing, disbelief.

The reaction does not effect the eventual 100% mortality rate of all living things.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Feb 9, 2013 - 07:54pm PT
Fear is such a crazy awesome feeling.
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:00pm PT
Hey Dan,

Sorry that you have lost friends climbing. Certainly many of us here have as well.

I think you need to look at the context in which we say these things. We're not saying it in a mean-spirited way - it's all in good fun. I think the "break a leg" analogy is a good one - I have shared that many times when stepping on stage for a gig.

And yup, we're all gonna die. And if you died tomorrow, where would you spend eternity?

And by the way ....




Yer gonna die!!!!!!!!!!!!!1111111

Come to the bridge this spring, and tell me who you are. I'll give you a free beer, along with a certain salutation ....








.....












.... you know what it is, eh?












"Cheers"
GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:02pm PT
People who throw dying as a joke, have no clue-or they never felt the emptiness that comes from that type of whorehouse- where someone steps out and you can pull on the rope as hard as you want and they are never coming back.

Show some respect or just learn to tell a joke that's funny




It's cool, bro. Obama made a joke about drone strikes on potential suitors for his girls, and we all have heard a few holocaust jokes - Anne Frankly, I think that kind of behavior is just deplorable.






















































Learn to laugh. I bet a lot of your friends you lost would want you to. We got a short time on this planet, lets ride it till the end with big f*#k off grins.

Greg
(someone who has lost friends in the mountains)
Crodog

Social climber
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:02pm PT
It is possibly the truth:

Credit: Crodog
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:03pm PT
It's true, you are going to die. I could be wrong but this is one article of faith that has absoluteness and statistics on it's side.

Because YER GONNA DIE ! you should always enjoy life. (even when life sucks)



PS: As to the pain expressed in the OP, yes, death is sometimes unfair.

That doesn't mean friends that died in a certain way, that caused us left, to shrug, feel sad but say: "what did you expect" kind of ruefully, is wrong.

WE miss you Daryl !



NoTokeRedKneck

climber
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:07pm PT
WW1 4 million US persons involved.
WW2 16 million US persons involved.
Appr. 1 in 40 lost their lives in both wars.

2005 appr. 300,000 enlisted in the US Navy and 40% are pilots.

From a new millenium C++ book by Stroustrup noting he quotes a admirals
saying being "damn the torpedos, full steam ahead". I think many college
people maybe right that we can't afford those build ups.
Batrock

Trad climber
Burbank
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:18pm PT
I have been a fireman for almost 25 years, I have lost five co-workers to on the job deaths and several others, probably 20-30 that I have worked with that died to job related cancer either after retirement or while still active duty. We see death almost everyday in one form or another. We don't take death lightly, we certainly don't sit around wringing our hand waiting for the axe to drop. Humor, gallows humor, is one way to deal with it and from someone on the outside looking in it can seem sick and twisted but it serves a very real purpose. In climbing that same type of humor can be helpful and keep you from focusing in on the wrong things that could otherwise be distracting and ruin a perfectly good time. For crying out loud, it's not disrespectful in the least. Maybe take up whiffle ball as a hobby.
skywalker

climber
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:33pm PT
I remember topping out "Long John Wall" in in Eldo' with the hopes of continuing up the Yellow Spur. What we saw was a train up every route in that area, locals can imagine. We called off our bid and just enjoyed our position.

Then I stood up cupped my hands and screamed "Yer all gonna die!!!!"

All the "on belay" Joe. "Off belay" John. "Take!!!". "Up rope!", "What??!!!", "I said...!!!" Suddenly stopped. It was dead silent...

Then two people on different routes just went "Woooooo Hoooooooo!!!!"

And that wall seemed a little more relaxed. They got it.

Dan I'm sorry for your loss(es) I have lost several as well. It sucks. But as many have pointed out, we are all gonna die. And I hope my friends and family do not mourn for me but go on laughing as well.

S...
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:55pm PT
I think people who have lost significant numbers of friends are More apt to use that phrase for the catharsis Batrock suggests.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Feb 9, 2013 - 09:07pm PT
Isaac Hayes' new album Shaft was put on and the needle dropped.

A dead man who was my father came home on a Friday night from work and was the instigator of delivering super soul sounds on vinyl to a bunch of ebullient kids. We were happy for the music and glad to enjoy the good company of the provider who was equally taken away by the sound.

Isaac is gone as well but there's no way out, so get funky ! ! !




Celebrate the life of those people you knew. It's what goes on and not a bad thing !
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Feb 9, 2013 - 09:14pm PT
Everyone now alive has a death sentence. Some of us in a dozen decades and some of us tomorrow. You don't know which one you are going to be, but you do know....


































YOU'RE GONNA DIE!








































And by the way
In our society and culture, death is something dark, mysterious, and fearful. Ancient cultures did not regard death as an enemy, but dared to make it an ally. It is ultimately about daring to live fearlessly from the centre of one's truth, to challenge and defeat the tendency to inertia, fear of life and premature old age. To quote one of the great teachers, the Peruvian shaman Don Eduardo Calderon: "a shaman is someone who is already dead [or who knows he is inescapably dying] and thus has no fear of death or life". Sometimes a life threatening crisis is what calls a person to the way of the shaman.

In traditional wisdom and knowledge, life is a continuum that does not end at the moment of death. One of the most important traditional tasks of the seer, shaman, medicine man or woman is to assist people who are either dying or the spirits of those who have died to make the transition into great domain of consciousness. This body of practices is known as Psychopomp, from the Greek word psychopompos which literally means "conductor of souls". In Greek mythology, the god Hermes served as the escort for the dead into the afterlife. This concept of a guide or intermediary between the living and the dead is a collective theme found in most religions and mythologies.
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