Tell me the most scared for your life you've ever been.

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 61 - 78 of total 78 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Truthdweller

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Feb 9, 2013 - 07:19pm PT
Having a #7 stopper fall out, and looking at a 50' ground fall on Johnny Quest at Suicide, then climbing another ten feet to finally cram in a #3 Friend while totally pumped would of been my scariest moment until...

ELEVEN mortars hit FOB Hit, near simultaneously, in Iraq in a coordinated attack one afternoon in 2004. Only those that have experienced close proximity ordinance phenomenon can relate, I had never, until then. FOB Hit was the heaviest mortared and rocketed FOB in theater at that time. Otherwise, it was the most boring "campout" of my life...relatively speaking, thank God.
GhoulweJ

Trad climber
El Dorado Hills, CA
Feb 9, 2013 - 07:27pm PT
For me, I'm not afraid of dying. I don't want too, but I dig my life and will always have big future plans but I know one day, the lights will dim.

For me it's more like the day I saw the small child at beach near bodega bay get engulfed by a surprise wave. I threw myself into the ocean being sucked out to sea scrambling for the missing 4 year old. I couldn't find him...

There was no way I was going to fail alive so I dove deep. and got caught in a fast current. I extended my arms in front of me face in case I hit some thing. i had my hand open and suddenly my fingers snagged his clothes!

Thrashing my right arm in the water trying to swim to the surface with his shirt in left hand i drug us both to the surface..... He was crying (thank gawd!).

I look back toward shore and it's a long way away...

Well, as you all ready know, we made it back to the beach.

Parents never said thanks.

I was 15. My older buddies just said "You're f*#king stupid"... Maybe.
Truthdweller

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Feb 9, 2013 - 07:48pm PT
Parents never said thanks.

That's okay, your initial motivation wasn't that you'd get a "thank you." Scripture calls that love, the willing sacrificial giving of oneself, for the benefit of another, without thought of return (ref John 3:16).
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 9, 2013 - 07:50pm PT
I'm kind of in the 'not fearing death' camp as well, but sometimes something so violent and unexpected happens.

I'm also in the 'not scared at the time, just reacting' camp. Fear is more of a reminiscence, unless...

You get violently jumped. It's happened to me, I didn't stand a chance, and I felt fear. However, I only feared for my health, not my life.

After the hospital visit, I was angry at my own fear. It's such a complex subject, fear.
GhoulweJ

Trad climber
El Dorado Hills, CA
Feb 9, 2013 - 07:53pm PT
Brandon, I hear ya 'bout fear being complexed and all.

One time I drew down face to face with a guy.

My jaw locked and determined. He just went away... Thank gawd!

EDIT: Truthdweller, Thanks ;)
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 9, 2013 - 08:20pm PT
I've feared what I may have to do many times. Be it at the top of a chute, below a certain runout section, or in a back alley.

It's the cognizance of risk that creates fear. When you either have to sh#t or get off the pot, so to speak.

I find that I feel fear briefly, then I'm fortunate enough to be able to compartmentalize said feelings. Fight or flight, I guess. I fight.

This topic intrigues me.
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Feb 9, 2013 - 08:34pm PT
13th Street - Seal Beach - WINTER - BIG, churny, didn't know up from down, kept surfin' though. . . cause everytime I told myself "SELF, THIS IS THE LAST ONE!" I'd get so stoked, I'd be 1/2 way out before I'd realize I was paddling out again.

WHOA.

Some trippy loop. . . like "Groundhog Day!"

:-)

MisterE

Social climber
Feb 9, 2013 - 10:37pm PT
It's funny, I never mentioned the Alaska rescue in my "Near Death Experiences" thread (linked above) because I trusted the "Sylvia" to make it through the rescue - and she did. It was just that staring at the ice-cold waves towering over us that struck the notes of fear for a moment...or a while.

As has been stated, when death is near, there is a calmness and focus to either avoid or accept what is coming, I have found - as well as others. Also (as mentioned) there is often no time to be afraid.

It was knowing I was going to go for the ride of my life and get the cold-water smack-down from the pacific that really frightened me. The sheer power of the storm before the rogue wave was the build-up...that feeling that you are just a small element of a force so much larger than you, and yet: here you are in a place you have no business being to save some stranded souls...Not one of us hesitated when the Skipper asked us if we would do it.

We towed that boat to safety in crazy following seas that tested our captain, the Sylvia and the tensile strength of our tow-line.

Watching a boat you are towing tower above you 40 feet and 100 behind you, then come rushing down while you take in line like a madman on the hydraulic hauler, then ease it out as you mount the next roller.

Mad exercises in the open seas.
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Feb 9, 2013 - 10:48pm PT
I take back what I said earlier.

I did get insanely scared when I did my first BASE jump. This was almost 30 years ago and the gear was total cave man. The gear was just getting there for it to be possible. Now you go through a mentoring process, buy BASE specific gear, you name it. You can even go through a first jump school.

I jumped El Cap on my 24th jump. Back then you had to start with five static line jumps, then work your way up to longer and longer delays. I had been off of student status for only ten jumps or so.

I was up there with my buddies and Walt who tagged along. I tell ya. There was 3 feet of snow on top and I was standing there with my gear on ten feet from the edge waiting my turn. I was so scared that I thought I was going to vomit.

I went 3rd (last) and the microsecond that my feet left the exit, my entire mind became supercalm and hyper aware. That is one damn cool experience.
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Feb 10, 2013 - 12:08am PT
I'm kind of in the 'not fearing death' camp as well, but sometimes something so violent and unexpected happens.

I'll put it like this:

I'm not at all afraid of being dead. It is the transition which concerns me...
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Feb 10, 2013 - 12:18am PT
^^^Yeah. What he said. I just hope it doesn't hurt.^^^^
moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Feb 10, 2013 - 12:19am PT
White water kayaking, a couple of close onces. Cought up in a hole.

It is the most horroble feeling when you are getting weaker and weaker and weaker...

MisterE

Social climber
Feb 10, 2013 - 12:23am PT
It really does come down to that Kris - well put...

although they have pretty good drugs and hospice to make even THAT part easier now.

moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Feb 10, 2013 - 12:49am PT
The whole secret of existence is to have no fear. Never fear what will become of you, depend on no one. Only the moment you reject all help are you freed.

Says Duck
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Feb 10, 2013 - 01:10am PT
I literally wet myself when my neighbor chased me out of his garden when I was 6. I was dared to steal some vegetables. I snuck over there and had just picked a tomato when the 6' tall dude came charging out of his house. Before I could even take a breath he was towering over me. I'm telling you all this in the strictest of confidence. I know we're all friends and this won't leave the Taco.

I'm happy to report I have not lost control of my bladder since.

I've been pretty scurd the 4 times I've found myself looking down the wrong end of a gun barrel, but I held my sh#t.

I was skurd when 5 of us got jumped by a group of 10+ high school kids, but I managed. Unfortunately Jeff didn't manage as well... lost 3 teeth, had 4 broken ribs, and had a fractured skull... pretty brutal for a 14 year old.

Most frightened I have ever been climbing was looking for the descent on East Butt of Middle. We had done the first 3 pitches of Central Pillar earlier that day. Finishing EButt around dark we convinced ourselves the rap was "just to the climber's L." We found some anchors and started rapping. After 2 raps I saw some fresh chalk on what I thought was a pretty cool looking climb... turns out it was the top of P8 on E Butt... so we climbed back up. It was exciting climbing up through them trees, but what really skurd me was when I put my hand on a 4' boulder to look over a sloping edge for some anchors. It slid about 6 inches and was less than that from going over the edge. It was at that time I learned to levitate. Sometimes, when I get really really really fuked up and start thinking of death, it is easy to convince myself that I actually died that day and this is the resulting dream/nightmare.
MisterE

Social climber
Feb 10, 2013 - 01:21am PT
Sometimes, when I get really really really fuked up and start thinking of death, I imagine I actually died that day and this is the resulting dream.

You imagine or you believe? Why do you need to get really really fuked up to consider death?

As I mentioned, all living beings have a 100% mortality rate...except for the Tardigrade...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Feb 10, 2013 - 01:26am PT
I consider death often... several times a day... but generally in a philosophical/intellectual/shallow sort of way. A common phrase I have repeated to myself far too often over the last couple decades is "there's nothing I HAVE to do, except die." I'm well aware of that aspect of my future.

The experience I was talking about is more transcendental.
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Feb 10, 2013 - 01:46am PT
There's fear, and then there's panic. Fear is of some external danger. Panic occurs when there's some internal threat to your existence. Fear is felt in the brain in the amygdala, they don't know yet where panic is experienced. But if a person does not have an amygdala, they don't register any fear, even if attacked with a knife or gun. They're fearless.
Messages 61 - 78 of total 78 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews