Jim Donini Appreciation thread

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 101 - 120 of total 152 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Alan Rubin

climber
Amherst,MA.
Feb 25, 2013 - 06:47pm PT
A poster upthread stated that Jim changed from a "fun in the sun" rock climber to an alpinist. But Jim's roots are more in alpinism than rock climbing. If I remember correctly when I first beca
Donini on the west face of the Grand Teton, August 1970 <br/>
Photo by Al ...
Donini on the west face of the Grand Teton, August 1970
Photo by Al Rubin
Credit: Alan Rubin
me aware of Jim it was as a result of some solo escapades in the Canadian Rockies soon after he got out of the Service,(Correct me if I'm wrong here, Jim). In the summer of 1970 Jim had a good season in the mountains, doing amongst others, such then well-respected Teton alpine climbs as the Black Ice Couloir (there was ice in it back then) and the West Face of the Grand. That season in the Tetons Jim and his partner, Ross Johnson, a fellow veteran, kept their distance from the "hippie" element in and around the notorious Campsite 38 at Jenny Lake. However when Ross became injured or ill (I forget which) Jim had to settle for doing the West Face with one of the denizens of 38---i.e., me.During that climb Jim complained about what he felt was the inadequacy of his rock climbing ability---though in fact he was very competent. He told me that after the summer he would be moving to California to "learn how to rock climb". When I next climbed with him 2 years later in The Valley, he had achieved that goal and then some....

Attached (hopefully--we've never tried this before) is a (blurry) photo of a young (well, younger) Donini on the West Face in August, 1970
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Feb 25, 2013 - 07:33pm PT
Alan! I love your story.

Aside from having had the pleasure of much climbing with Jim, I also knew Ross Johnson well -- although he was a very successful businessman with a lovely house and business interests all over the world, he sort of moved in with Jim and I when we were sharing a house in Boulder in the mid-1990s. Ross couch surfed with us for more than a year after his wife, Sandy, died of brain cancer.

The amazing detail of the above is that Sandy was Jim's first wife. Ross married her after she and Jim broke up, an all-in-the-family detail that didn't damage any of the involved relationships. Ross and Jim stayed great friends through all of it.

Sadly, we lost Ross a few years later, too. He was a marvelous guy, really intelligent and entertaining. I loved having him around.
Roots

Mountain climber
SoCal
Feb 25, 2013 - 07:55pm PT
I met him at Splitter Camp a bunch of years ago. Here's how the initial introduction conversation went:

Donini gave me a warm welcome: “Hey I’m Jim. Welcome to Splitter Camp! You seem really fit and look like an uber climber. What grade are you leading?”

I sheepishly answered “5.7”.

“How long have you been climbing?”

“Twelve years.”

He looked at me dumbfounded and replied “You should be able to climb better than that”.

nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Feb 25, 2013 - 08:02pm PT
When J-Do met Maestri for a momentous debate at the World Sushi Summit:

I forget that Jim was representing me at the Summit. Maestri didn't stand a chance.
Taylor Spiegelberg

climber
Wyoming
Dec 2, 2013 - 02:15pm PT
I met Jim Donini over Thanksgiving at the Creek. He was the nicest guy Ive ever met climbing and told us story after story about his days in Patagonia, the Karakoram and Alaska. We ended up spending hours around a fire and he asked us to come to Thanksgiving dinner at the Technicolor wall with him. We had an awesome night especially since we went to The Creek knowing absolutely no one. Hopefully I run into him again someday!!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Dec 2, 2013 - 02:31pm PT
He has always been cutting edge - first guy I knew who had a Mac.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Dec 2, 2013 - 02:45pm PT
Donini is one of the few who are born with the ability to earn the respect of other men. And Cosmic is still one D smurf down...
10b4me

Ice climber
Bishop/Flagstaff
Dec 2, 2013 - 09:46pm PT
In Alpinist Issue 2 ("A Climber's Life"), Jim Donini describes his 1978 attempt, with Michael Kennedy, Jeff Lowe and George Lowe, on the north ridge of Latok I (7145m) in Pakistan's Karakoram Range. The four men, perhaps the strongest American alpinists of the day, climbed more than 100 pitches on the ridge before Jeff's altitude sickness forced an end to the ascent. The resulting descent/rescue defined the term "epic." More important, in the nearly thirty years that have passed, twenty expeditions, comprising the world's strongest climbers, have thrown themselves at the ridge to finish those last three pitches without success. What has emerged is one simple fact: the 1978 effort may have been one of the strongest climbing attempts in the history of alpinism
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Dec 2, 2013 - 09:50pm PT
.............. to earn the respect of other men


Eliminating half the population respecting him????


Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Dec 2, 2013 - 11:23pm PT
Cheers, Mr. Donini. I respect the wonderful life you've lived. Will never catch up with all your travels, but you are a great inspiration to me.

lynne
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Dec 3, 2013 - 02:06am PT
Tami

Your point: Donini is one of the few men who are born with the ability to earn the respect of women. ;o) And Cosmic is still one D smurf down...
Johnny K.

climber
Jan 10, 2014 - 09:45am PT
TTT, Respect
RyanD

climber
Squamish
Jan 10, 2014 - 02:30pm PT
Missed this one.


Much respect for doninis wisdom, hope to tie in with him sometime. Either up here or down in the grounds he stomps. Cheers!
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Jan 10, 2014 - 03:13pm PT
Did I mention that he is a big inspiration for many reason?! Well he is, to me! Especially because it seems like he continues to enjoy climbing at a pretty high level after so many years of doing it and is not getting tired of it! Love it.
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Jan 10, 2014 - 03:19pm PT
I guess if I could sandbag climbers 1/3 my age, I would like it too. Ha,Ha

Jim Clipper

climber
from: forests to tree farms
Jan 10, 2014 - 03:22pm PT
Real deal. Thanks for your service. Allez. TFPU. Keep your dog away from him at the crags. I don't know how he maintains the wiry frame, but I've heard dog meat is lean and tough (but might pair well with a hearty burgundy).
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jan 26, 2014 - 12:29pm PT

A great story to be retold: Jim Donini. The Torre Egger Climb. Mountain 51, 1976.
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 26, 2014 - 03:10pm PT
Thanks for the scanning and posting Marlow!

I have been too busy to do much of that lately and it really adds to the conversations here.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Jan 26, 2014 - 03:20pm PT
I remember that article!!!!


THANKS Marlow! All of a sudden the Sierra peaks didnt seem that hard after reading that..



edit: The Lean Mean Doninimachine.. At this point im somewhat certain he was area 51's first "encounter"..The one never written of.. Heard it was because the thing escaped. This was in the very early 40s.. hmmmmmmmmmmmmm
The Larry

climber
Moab, UT
Jan 26, 2014 - 04:11pm PT
Two Blues for 100' of climbing.

Jim bringing too much gear on Supercrack.
Jim bringing too much gear on Supercrack.
Credit: The Larry
Messages 101 - 120 of total 152 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews