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dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Original Post - Aug 21, 2012 - 01:20pm PT
So I see we have the "Birds" thread. I figured It would be cool to have an "Insects" thread. Not sure if one has been started, but if so I can delete this one. Spiders and other Arachnids are welcome as well.
Feel free to post all insect/arachnid related stories, pictures, jokes, etc.. here.
I'll start off with a pic of the resident grasshopper(katydid) in my yard.

pretty cool how this guys body is camouflaged to look like a leaf.
pretty cool how this guys body is camouflaged to look like a leaf.
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud

Edit: So I'm a space cadet. Just noticed I spelled "insects" wrong on the title for this thread (dohhh!!). Looks like it will have to stay that way unless I re-start the thread. Carry on.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Aug 21, 2012 - 01:22pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#255797
photo not found
Missing photo ID#255793
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 21, 2012 - 01:23pm PT
I thought maybe "insetcs" was a new climbering gizmo. ;-)


Here's lookin' at you, kid!
Credit: Reilly

Sorry about the 'noise' but I had to shoot at high ISO.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 21, 2012 - 01:45pm PT
No pictures, but a question:

For the last few days, we've been visited by crickets. There seem to always be a couple of them hanging from the ceiling somewhere in the house.

And the question? Well, we live in Seattle, and I've never seen a cricket in my life -- most of which was spent in Canada, but the last ten years in Seattle. So why the crickets all of a sudden? It's been unusually warm and dry for the last ten days or so, but then, most years have a week or so of unusually warm weather. Why didn't I see a cricket before?

Not that I'm complaining. They're cute little guys -- beautiful green color -- and they don't do anything except sit upside down on the ceiling until they die, and then I find them on the floor.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 21, 2012 - 01:48pm PT
Crickets are a fact of life here in SoCal. In 20 years in Seattle I don't
recall a one either, just herds of wolf spiders marauding around the house
at night. Maybe you need more wolf spiders? I've never seen a cricket
on the ceiling here. Maybe yours have migrated in from Hanford?
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Aug 21, 2012 - 01:48pm PT
ever wander through a migration of Morman crickets? AAAAAARRGHGHGHG! Or how about the tarantula migrations down around Jakson south?? YYYYEEEAAAAARRRRGHGHGHGHG!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:03pm PT
I've a problem too. I have this nice happy family ensconced under my eaves.
Unfortuneately it is near the front door through which walks the World's
Greatest Bug-Hater who is demanding a pre-emptive strike. Despite my pleas
that my warrior days are behind me and that I'm all about getting along I
fear that I am going to have to compromise my values. What should I do?
Why can't we all just get along?

signed,
Going Buggy in SoCal

Credit: Reilly
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:06pm PT
Funny, I've noticed a marked decline in crickets here in NH since I was a kid. I've been wondering about that.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:09pm PT
Reilly,

Wait until nighttime, when the entire swarm is sleeping. Then soak it with the spray bug killer of your choice.

( be ready to run like hell. sometimes newer, environmentally friendly bug killer takes a while to work )
this just in

climber
north fork
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:09pm PT
Credit: this just in
Credit: this just in
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:22pm PT
Last time I was up at Tahquitz I noticed something I haven't seen before on the south side descent.

What looked like a dead leaf on one of the scrub oaks flew off. A moth or butterfly that is perfectly camouflaged as a dried up scrub oak leaf. Small brown wings and a dark green body.

So perfectly camouflaged in fact that in over 40 years of stomping around in So Cal chaparral, I've never noticed one before. Once I saw the first one I saw several so they aren't that scarce.

Not an oak moth, already looked that up.

dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2012 - 02:22pm PT
I try to get along with them too Reilly, but if they get to close to my domain I have to do as Chaz recommended.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:27pm PT
Ron: Re your mention


ever wander through a migration of Morman crickets? AAAAAARRGHGHGHG!


Idaho hiking hazards:  Cheatgrass, burrs, & Mormon Crickets.
Idaho hiking hazards: Cheatgrass, burrs, & Mormon Crickets.
Credit: Fritz
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:28pm PT
wind scoprions----THOSE f*ckerz are AGRO and they scuttle right for ya! bugs-- the enemy within! I like lady bugs they seem docile...



edit: Fitz! Yeah and thats a small one! I RODE horses through a swath once- ill never forget that one. cannibals they are!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:47pm PT
The F-35 of the bug world:

Credit: Reilly
Tarantula Hawk wasp-you don't wanna get stung by one of these although as
opposed to the tarantulas they prey upon it will only feel like you've been paralyzed.
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Aug 21, 2012 - 02:50pm PT
Had this guy take up residence on my shirt. He had some hops too.

Credit: StahlBro
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2012 - 02:52pm PT
I was just gonna post something about those Tarantual/Hawks. Got em flying all over the east county right now.
On that note. Here is a pic of a supposed Cuban Tarantula Hawk. SOB is huge.
I think a bullet in the arm from .38 special would probably feel better than a sting from this thing.
taken from: <br/>
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2006/08/11/cuban-tarantula-h...
taken from:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2006/08/11/cuban-tarantula-hawk/
Credit: dirt claud
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:00pm PT
Tobacco Worms

TFPU

Sport climber
Idaho
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:14pm PT
Insects are cool animals.
Capt.

climber
some eastside hovel
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:14pm PT
Interesting this is coming up right now.I know,not an insect but I am currently in a battle with a black widow(as we speak).I'm in the process of pulling all reading material away from the wall where I've seen it the last two nights.I've owned this house for fourteen years and only ever seen one indoors.I watched it go back outside.Problem solved.These things are quik.It's in a spot that can only be reached via skinny vacuum attachment so I can't just smash it.Every time I simply turned on the hoover it takes off into the books and mags.Their are plenty outside and that's fine,but this one has provided uneasy sleep the last couple nights.Any thoughts,experiences,or suggestions.I hate these things and apparently the venom attacks your liver.My liver has been attacked enough ;)).
TFPU

Sport climber
Idaho
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:17pm PT
Capt: whenever i have problems i turn to cocaine
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:20pm PT
Capt, hair spray and a bic make a GREAT mini flame thrower..
Capt.

climber
some eastside hovel
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:20pm PT
Thinkin' 'bout attacking my liver some more right now.Vodka for the battle!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:36pm PT
Black widows are an occupational hazard for anyone working on plumbing,electrical and AC.

I knew one AC mechanic that instead of using the bug spray and wasting time waiting for them to die, along with the uncertainty that you got 'em would use a can of contact adhesive and just glue them in place.


I've run across these little alpine bugs about everywhere in CA. Sometimes so thick they stain your hands and gear. They are supposed to be predatory, but what do they eat?

These photos from Tahquitz.

Credit: TGT

For scale

Credit: TGT

dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2012 - 03:41pm PT
You can spray black widows with paint and they just keep walking.
Kind of cool to see a "florescent pink" widow. These are things I did in my youth of course.
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:46pm PT
Mantis, Santa Cruz Mountains
Mantis, Santa Cruz Mountains
Credit: karodrinker
Capt.

climber
some eastside hovel
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:51pm PT
Good widow stories guys.After I get this one I'm goin' to the shed with contact cement,spray paint,hairspray and vodka. ;)))

Edit:The image of a glued down,pink,flaming widow just cracked me up and made me feel better.LOL
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:53pm PT
Credit: Ron Anderson

an African tick fest--exotic no?
Capt.

climber
some eastside hovel
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:56pm PT
^^^ F#*k that!!!
this just in

climber
north fork
Aug 21, 2012 - 03:57pm PT
Ron we don't need to see youR ballsack, that's gross:-)
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Aug 21, 2012 - 04:02pm PT
Reilly,

Just swat the nest with a tennis racket, then there will definitely be some picking on the Irish...
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2012 - 04:05pm PT
taken from internet
taken from internet
Credit: dirt claud
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Aug 21, 2012 - 04:08pm PT
hehehe TJi, thats actually a NIPPLE ya see in the pic.;-) they used to call me "squatch" in high school gym..
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 21, 2012 - 04:09pm PT
Jim, The Irish don't do tennis- that wankers' game for English toffs.
But I think a hurling stick will do nicely, thank you.

Credit: Reilly
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Aug 21, 2012 - 04:16pm PT
i was on a fire once, bout an acre from an escaped campfire- and imperial wasps, i believe is the correct term were in their to lay thier eggs in fresh warm wood. We in the circus knew them as "stumpf*ckers". You could bat em with a shovel and they would come back at you. HATED those things!
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Aug 21, 2012 - 04:47pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#260025
Captain...or Skully

climber
Aug 21, 2012 - 04:56pm PT
Hey, Cap. I'd leave yer Widow be, myself. Web Spiders, like Black Widows, tend to stay put. As a plus, they kill dangerous wanderers, like Hoboes & recluses. Watch for egg sac construction, steal & destroy & you're golden.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2012 - 05:03pm PT
Ok, so I'm a space cadet. Just noticed I spelled "insects" wrong on the title for this thread. Does anyone know if you can edit the title of the thread once it's been posted?
Captain...or Skully

climber
Aug 21, 2012 - 05:06pm PT
Not so much....
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Aug 21, 2012 - 05:07pm PT
Cosmic,, why does that ANT look familiar?;-)
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 21, 2012 - 05:08pm PT
Dirt Claud,
Yer gonna













































live in infamy! Woo-Hoo!

Credit: Reilly
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Aug 21, 2012 - 05:08pm PT
"Ok, so I'm a space cadet. Just noticed I spelled "insects" wrong on the title for this thread. Does anyone know if you can edit the title of the thread once it's been posted? "






Nope. You are stuck with the title unless you delete the first post.

As for the spelling; Did you go to the same school Weld_it went to???


:)
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2012 - 05:10pm PT
Good one Reilly.
Went to public schooling Cosmic, that might explain it, :-)

Credit: dirt claud

Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Aug 21, 2012 - 05:11pm PT


:)
MH2

climber
Aug 21, 2012 - 11:52pm PT

Tami

Social climber
Canada
Aug 22, 2012 - 12:40am PT
Credit: Tami
MH2

climber
Aug 22, 2012 - 10:44am PT

fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Aug 22, 2012 - 10:54am PT
As someone that was bitten by a Black Widow as a small kid...

KILL THEM ALL!

There are plenty of other spiders that will take their place and function.
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Aug 23, 2012 - 12:54am PT
Cool idea! I am both intrigued and grossed out by insects. Something about an exoskeleton creeps me out!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 23, 2012 - 01:41am PT
Credit: Reilly
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Aug 23, 2012 - 02:09am PT
Credit: hamie

Credit: hamie
MH2

climber
Aug 23, 2012 - 10:07am PT


fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Aug 23, 2012 - 10:47am PT
WTF is that grey colored thing that killed the bumble-bee?? That looks awesome.
matty

Trad climber
under the sea
Aug 23, 2012 - 10:52am PT
monarch butterfly
monarch butterfly
Credit: matty



Credit: matty




MH2

climber
Aug 23, 2012 - 10:37pm PT
that grey colored thing that killed the bumble-bee



is an assassin bug, I think

It has other common names.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 26, 2012 - 07:13pm PT
This guy about gave the wife a heart attack in the backyard. I had to intervene on his behalf...
He was a good three inches.
Credit: Reilly
MisterE

Social climber
Aug 26, 2012 - 07:22pm PT
This spider was hanging out under our shade canopy
This spider was hanging out under our shade canopy
Credit: MisterE
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Aug 26, 2012 - 07:28pm PT
Insects need love too

Credit: StahlBro
Rock!...oopsie.

Trad climber
the pitch above you
Aug 26, 2012 - 09:40pm PT
tarantula having a bad day
tarantula having a bad day
Credit: Rock!...oopsie.

Shot this action in Costa Rica last year. Tarantula Hawk dragging home dinner for the family.
Randisi

Social climber
Dalian, Liaoning
Aug 26, 2012 - 10:27pm PT
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 27, 2012 - 12:37pm PT
Check out the Venezuela Poodle Moth!

Credit: Obviously not me

Contrary to internet experts' opinion it is real.

Venezuela Poodle Moth
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Aug 27, 2012 - 01:04pm PT
This succulent from Somalia produces flowers that smell like a combination of Sh#t and rotting flesh
Credit: Dr. F.

The flies love it
Credit: Dr. F.
MH2

climber
Aug 27, 2012 - 03:39pm PT
That moth looks kitted for polar regions, not Venezuela. The others on the link look Mardi Gras.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Aug 27, 2012 - 04:27pm PT
I distinctly recall Maggie identifying Jiggs as an insect. She then tried to do him in by throwing the nearest object at him. Bringing Up Father. By McManus?
Tim Camuti

Trad climber
CA
Aug 27, 2012 - 07:08pm PT
Rhino beetle &#40;dead&#41; on my buddy in Guyana, South America
Rhino beetle (dead) on my buddy in Guyana, South America
Credit: Tim Camuti
One of the largest insects in the world. Allowed through customs when I came back to the USA, but the border control officer wasn't supposed to let it through. Yeah for good graces!
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Aug 27, 2012 - 07:34pm PT
Just stumbled onto the thread - awesome shots, all.

Ron mentioned stumpfu*kers a while ago upthread. God how I hated those damned things. No bite mark, but when they bit you it would feel like an electric shock going through you. We had one fire north of Reno where the ground was literally moving with a carpet of them.

I have been trying to find a picture but haven't had any luck, so a description will have to do...

We were cold trailing a fire near Pahrump on July 4th..02? I think. Anyways, I put my hand down to check the root clump of a Joshua tree and got hit by about 40 of the bastards on my arm ( I had the sleeves rolled up as it was about 110 at the time.)
I started doing the "Stumpfu*ker Dance" which consists of banging on the affected body part, along with yelling "ARRRRGH STUMPFU*KERS GET OFFA MEEE" and my partner is dancing around me trying to get his camera out to take a picture of the swarm all over my arm instead of helping get them off...thanks Billy....
Anyways it was a great shot of me looking like the world had ended and my pulaski flying off while I'm trying to kill the damned things...sorry to have lost it, was a classic shot of the joys of firefighting.

Keep up the awesome shots of the creepy crawlies!
Double D

climber
Aug 27, 2012 - 08:53pm PT
It's the season of love in Zion...
Credit: Double D
MH2

climber
Aug 27, 2012 - 10:27pm PT



hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Aug 29, 2012 - 02:20am PT
One big and scarey Mo-Fo.

Do not touch.  10 inches of evil.
Do not touch. 10 inches of evil.
Credit: hamie






xxxxx







xxxxx








ha ha! that's the top of a dead bush!
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 29, 2012 - 01:03pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 23, 2012 - 01:25pm PT
"It's smellementary, Homes!  He daid!  He daid a long time!"
"It's smellementary, Homes! He daid! He daid a long time!"
Entomophobia.
shakin' man

Trad climber
california
Sep 23, 2012 - 05:49pm PT
Top of Tollhouse grade, Auberry Rd.
Top of Tollhouse grade, Auberry Rd.
Credit: shakin' man
Same spot as prior
Same spot as prior
Credit: shakin' man
knudeNoggin

climber
Falls Church, VA
Sep 24, 2012 - 12:06am PT
Late to this party, I know; but a few points:

1) That "fast" black widow doesn't sound like a BW to me :
BWs, like house spiders, reside in webs, and are pretty SLOW, overall.
If you really have that, you should be able to bait its web,
draw her out to the *volunteer* bait, and capture her easily.
(Then, she'd make a striking pet.)

2) On those paper (polistes) wasps nesting in the inconvenient eave
by a door --and annoying at least one (other) family member --:
you could make a vision shield for the nest out of a plastic milk
carton (e.g.), to keep them from being alarmed by people passage.
You could also (bonus points) move the nest, but I imagine this is
just good for a laugh. (I once salvaged an attacked? bald-faced
honets nest at a young stage (7-9 wasps?), and with the hornets
in a jar, I reconstructed the nest in a cut-in-half milk carton which
I ducTaped to a porch window, trying to realize a dream from youth
in which some Think-&-Do book showed a (lucky) person with a
big nest up on house glass --what an observatory!
(Sadly, the nest remained small --didn't add even a 2nd comb. boo)

*kN*

photo : polistes wasps with two in the horizontal center chewing
up a caterpillar ball one of them had just brought to the nest,
then to feed grubs. delicious!
Polistes wasps with green caterpillar ball &#40;chewing&#41;
Polistes wasps with green caterpillar ball (chewing)
Credit: knudeNoggin

Robber fly with lunch fly, on MY lunch!
(LX3, so the lens was close to the subjects)
Robber fly consuming house fly, on MY lunch!
Robber fly consuming house fly, on MY lunch!
Credit: knudeNoggin
Sparky

Trad climber
vagabond movin on
Sep 24, 2012 - 01:28am PT
Camel Spiders

Credit: Sparky
Credit: Sparky
Credit: Sparky
Credit: Sparky
Captain...or Skully

climber
Sep 28, 2012 - 12:29am PT

Meet my neighbor. He's cool.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 2, 2012 - 02:20pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud

Some more killer pics here.

http://www.artematriz.com/andiyan-lutfiha-y-sus-fotografias-en-macro/
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Nov 23, 2012 - 09:11pm PT
We have a passion fruit vine that has taken over a fence so we always have a few of these around, but nothing like this year.

Credit: TGT
Agraulis vanillae


What's with that letter A?

This one even has squadron markings on the wing.

Credit: TGT
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Apr 17, 2013 - 10:46am PT
Credit: mouse from merced
I'm so mundane and oh so plain.

How'd you find ME?
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 18, 2013 - 02:05pm PT
That was a killer comic book cover Mouse.

Credit: dirt claud
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Apr 18, 2013 - 03:39pm PT
Reilly that poodle moth may have been from Venezuela, but now I think it lives north of 125th street, drives a Cadillac, and runs a "stable".
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 24, 2013 - 12:24pm PT
Mohamed Babu from India, captured these amazing pictures last year after his wife noticed that ants turned white when they drank milk.

He dissolved sugar in food colouring solutions of red, green, blue and yellow and then placed them in his garden to attract ants. Some of them even moved between the different solutions, resulting in psychedelic colour combinations.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2011/08/translucent-ants-photographed-eating-colored-liquids/

Credit: dirt claud
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 24, 2013 - 12:43pm PT
Claude, that's amazing!




I caught these shameless Berkeleyites doing it in plain view at the UC Arboretum!
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 24, 2013 - 12:51pm PT
The nerve of those two, no respect these days I tell ya.
weezy

climber
Apr 24, 2013 - 01:35pm PT
i love insetcs!

live mantis


dead mantis


butterfly and his proboscis


macro lenses are fun as hell. i advise all photographers to add one to their quiver.
the above photos are from a sigma 105mm (about 135mm on my digital non-full frame camera)
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 24, 2013 - 03:16pm PT
Good stuff Weezy. I don't have a good camera but enjoy getting real close looks at insects with my spotting scope. I can see very good detail with it, discovered it once while following a bird around and than saw a butterfly that came into view. Was surprised how well it worked for checking out insects.
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Apr 24, 2013 - 09:02pm PT
Joshua Tree
Joshua Tree
Credit: dee ee
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Apr 24, 2013 - 10:11pm PT
Guido and buddy Sharkie love roaches........
Credit: guido
Bowser

Social climber
Durango CO
Apr 24, 2013 - 11:05pm PT
Orb spider about the size of a golf ball in La Jolla CA.
Orb spider about the size of a golf ball in La Jolla CA.
Credit: Bowser
This guy/gal was about 4 inches long in Phoenix AZ.
This guy/gal was about 4 inches long in Phoenix AZ.
Credit: Bowser
weezy

climber
Apr 25, 2013 - 01:58am PT
that's a really nice photo of the orb spider, bowser. the dark background really highlights the spider and the web.

dirt claud, the spotting scope seems like a great way to view them. it's tricky with a macro lens since you have to get so close to them.
shady

Trad climber
hasbeen
Apr 25, 2013 - 12:16pm PT
Credit: shady
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 29, 2013 - 05:55pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 29, 2013 - 06:13pm PT
Some beetle in Anza Borrego...
Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly
10b4me

Ice climber
Soon 2B Arizona
May 5, 2013 - 07:33pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#301839
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
May 5, 2013 - 11:07pm PT
Cool photos y'all!

Credit: dee ee

Credit: dee ee

Credit: dee ee

Reilly, I've got a pic of those red beetles copulating somewhere. Yes, it IS true!
MH2

climber
May 6, 2013 - 12:05am PT
I saw this last week.




I remembered seeing one during a summer we lived in a botanical garden near St. Louis when I would have been 7 or 8 years old. I remembered the name Velvet Ant and the caution my Dad advised. This one wouldn't sit still for my camera.
kennyt

climber
Woodfords,California
May 6, 2013 - 12:11am PT
^^ fur ants bite hard^^
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
the crowd MUST BE MOCKED...Mocked I tell you.
May 6, 2013 - 12:42am PT
I've heard tell that Lady Bugs bite when they swarm.

Seen some big batches of them Yosemite. wild!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 6, 2013 - 01:31am PT
The 'Velvet Ant' is actually a wasp whose sting has been characterized often as 'excruciating'.
Don't say I didn't warn you.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
May 6, 2013 - 02:55am PT
Credit: mouse from merced
Ant lions' condominium packages in Yosemite start at $300 a night.
Credit: mouse from merced
The once and future meal.
Credit: mouse from merced
He was under a rock. I replaced it for him.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - May 8, 2013 - 12:46pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
May 8, 2013 - 12:57pm PT
anyone ever been "engaged" with STUMP-FUKKERZ?? (aka imperial wasps?)


They bore thier eggs in freshly burnt wood-- a fire fighters nightmare!
Almost as bad as the mutant alien bug i kilt!


They fly at you,, take a smackin from a shovel that makes the shovel RING,, and come back for round two!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 8, 2013 - 01:02pm PT
No, but I was sitting on a rock at about 13K above base camp in Bogustan
when a hummingbird suddenly appeared and hovered right at my boot, drawn
by my flashy red laces, I guessed. I was mesmerized for seconds until I realized,

"THERE AREN'T ANY HUMMINGBIRDS ON THIS CONTINENT!"

Holy crap! It was huge and it had fallen in love with my foot! <cue little girl screams>
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
May 8, 2013 - 01:05pm PT
DOH!
hamersorethumb

Trad climber
Menlo Park, CA
May 8, 2013 - 01:16pm PT
My favorite insect.  On a pond in Maine.
My favorite insect. On a pond in Maine.
Credit: hamersorethumb
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - May 8, 2013 - 01:22pm PT
Dragonflies are way cool, too bad they are hard to look at in detail usually, since they are often flying around, like butterflies.
gimmeslack

Trad climber
VA
May 8, 2013 - 01:55pm PT
Tho' they are more of a superorganism than an 'insect', here's one of my queens. Any other beeks out there?
Credit: gimmeslack
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - May 8, 2013 - 03:11pm PT
Beeks, I take is slang for beekeepers?
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
May 8, 2013 - 04:32pm PT
Ron, I posted up a stumpfu*ker story earlier in this thread. Hate em.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
May 8, 2013 - 04:35pm PT
beekeepers?

"Apes," if you please.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 8, 2013 - 04:37pm PT

"Take me to yer leader!"



Dood was hanging out in a potted plant by the front door. I think he had
the wrong address cause when I told the wife some dood wanted her it wasn't
a gud scene. I thought I was gonna have to call PETA or something.





Some people are born poseurs, n'est ce pas?

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
May 8, 2013 - 05:04pm PT
and folks dont believe in ALIENS!



edit: And Vegas,, the stumpf*ckers are actually horntailed wood wasps!

gawd help ya if the fire yur on is infested lol!
shady

Trad climber
hasbeen
May 12, 2013 - 11:59pm PT
Credit: shady
Salmon fly (aka Willow-fly aka giant stonefly aka...?)

dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - May 14, 2013 - 11:30am PT

Phyllodes Imperialis
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Bowser

Social climber
Durango CO
May 14, 2013 - 02:41pm PT
My wife found this monster of a fly catcher while cleaning my parents garden in Oklahoma.
Credit: Bowser
Credit: Bowser
Credit: Bowser
Credit: Bowser

This one was found while skavaging for brass in northern NM.
Credit: Bowser
Credit: Bowser
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
May 16, 2013 - 12:44pm PT
Sooo i have this stoooopid lil cricket SOMEWHERE in the show room near the computer. Its been squakin non stop this am...each and evry time i think im close - i "aint" ...frikkin BUGS!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 16, 2013 - 12:46pm PT
Ron, it's only a cricket, give him a break. He's only trying to scare up some you-know-what.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
May 16, 2013 - 12:48pm PT
I actually dont MIND crickets,, but this one is seeking to drive me knutts lol! I dont believe there is any you-know whats in the shop currently! He do far better outside!
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
May 16, 2013 - 08:59pm PT
MH2, this one was at Devil's Punchbowl (looking a little "furantic"):

Credit: justthemaid
MH2

climber
May 16, 2013 - 09:10pm PT
Looks like it might get angry, too! Good you stayed out of its way.
Bowser

Social climber
Durango CO
May 16, 2013 - 10:27pm PT
Those furry ants sting harder than anything I have ever been stung by ever!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
May 16, 2013 - 10:28pm PT
pretty sure the shotgun would handle that ant too!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 16, 2013 - 10:29pm PT
They're knott ants, you blighters, they're wasps!
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
May 21, 2013 - 02:50pm PT
In my yard yesterday:

Western Pine Elfin
Western Pine Elfin
Credit: Willoughby

Hey Ron, I don't know why you'd want to smack a Stump-F*#ker with a shovel. All they want is to visit flowers and find a piece of timber to punch their eggs into. I have a lot of experience with Megarhyssa nortoni from working in the Angora burn. They're harmless, and fairly tame early in the morning

Overexposed, but that's my finger
Overexposed, but that's my finger
Credit: Willoughby
Visiting a corn lily flower
Visiting a corn lily flower
Credit: Willoughby

That ovipositor IS scary though:

cleaning off its ovipositor
cleaning off its ovipositor
Credit: Willoughby

The males actually go after the females before they even emerge as adults. They have to back their abdomens down the holes to try to reach them. They jam them way down in there; it's pretty crazy to watch.

Credit: Willoughby
Credit: Willoughby

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
May 21, 2013 - 03:04pm PT
Will,, being a bit "bug-a-phobic" ,, having those winged bastids come right at yur face is a bit much LOL! I was on a quarter acre escaped camp fire once that had about seventeen thousand descend upon us.. it was BUGMAGEDDON!
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
May 21, 2013 - 09:33pm PT
it was BUGMAGEDDON!


That's hilarious. I guess one man's heaven truly is another man's hell.

MisterE

Social climber
May 21, 2013 - 09:42pm PT
They're knott ants, you blighters, they're wasps!

I ain't buying what you're selling - that thing was wingless and grounded.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 21, 2013 - 09:44pm PT
E, they're like termites - they lose their wings when they hit the deck
and go commando. Ain't that right, Willoughby?

The Mutillidae are a family of more than 3,000 species of wasps (despite the names) whose wingless females resemble large, hairy ants. Their common name velvet ant refers to their dense pile of hair which most often is bright scarlet or orange, but may also be black, white, silver, or gold. Their bright colours serve as aposematic signals. They are known for their extremely painful stings, hence the common name cow killer or cow ant. Unlike a real ant, they do not have drones, workers, and queens. However, velvet ants do exhibit haplodiploid sex determination similar to other members of Vespoidea.
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
May 21, 2013 - 11:35pm PT
Yup, that's a mutillid WASP, aka "cow killer." They kick like a mule, or so I'm told.

One of my favorite wasp mimics, a clearwing poplar borer. It's a moth, if you can believe it. I found this one on a lawn in Sierraville.

Credit: Willoughby
MisterE

Social climber
May 21, 2013 - 11:59pm PT
I am "insetc" unaware - had no idea stingy flying things lose their wings and still pack the punch.

Where's that "things people say to climbers" video?

I need a "Huh!" right now...


;)
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
May 22, 2013 - 12:07am PT
My formicidae hell thread from the way-back time machine.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=419417


10b4me

Ice climber
Jun 5, 2013 - 05:26pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#305771
shady

Trad climber
hasbeen
Jun 6, 2013 - 02:08am PT
Credit: shady
Something about them ashes they like.
10b4me

Social climber
Jun 9, 2013 - 09:12pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#306195
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jun 14, 2013 - 04:51pm PT
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 17, 2013 - 05:56pm PT
Some pics from a recent California road trip.

This guy must have been sleepin in. I got the camera about 2" from him...
This guy must have been sleepin in. I got the camera about 2" from him/her so I could take this pic.
Credit: dirt claud
This guys antennae were about 3x id body length. Anyone know what this...
This guys antennae were about 3x id body length. Anyone know what this is?
Credit: dirt claud
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Jun 24, 2013 - 07:08pm PT
We got smoked out of climbing last Monday, and ended up chasing butterflies along Lee Vining Cr., just downstream from the Hall Nat. Area. Lots of great bugs, but the best find was a group of Dispirited Tiger Beetles, including tons of active larval burrows. This was a good find because A), they're not known to be gregarious, and B) their larval ecology is completely undescribed. I'm going to have to go back and collect some data on this population.

Credit: Willoughby
Dispirited Tiger Beetle larva at burrow entrance
Dispirited Tiger Beetle larva at burrow entrance
Credit: Willoughby
Credit: Willoughby
Credit: Willoughby

I also found a spearhead that day:

Credit: Willoughby

This Saturday I led a hike up above High Camp at Squaw, and the Cow Path Tiger Beetles were going crazy - lots of sex!

Credit: Willoughby
Credit: Willoughby

Tiger beetles are the coolest!
shady

Trad climber
hasbeen
Jun 24, 2013 - 10:05pm PT
Nice shoot'n Willoughby!
When I see a tiger beetle, I'll know to show it great respect.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 26, 2013 - 04:37pm PT
Cool shots of them beetles.

Found this one on the web, pretty cool close up.
Credit: dirt claud
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jul 3, 2013 - 06:50pm PT
willow Bee, tremendous display. Kudos and good hunting!

Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced

Purple Bee, that pair was for you and Camila.

Here's one for T Hocking. A dragonfly; I sure like that song!

Credit: mouse from merced

And the good old water striders.
Credit: mouse from merced

A vice-regal display or is it?
Credit: mouse from merced
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jul 3, 2013 - 09:00pm PT
Credit: mouse from merced
Exoskeleton of an Evaporator Bug. Merced South Fork.
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Jul 9, 2013 - 09:41pm PT
Here are a few from this weekend's NABA butterfly count at Yuba Pass.

Dotted Blue on naked buckwheat:

Credit: Willoughby

Synanthedon polygoni, a wasp mimic, and one of the coolest little moths around:

Credit: Willoughby

Here's an American Emerald, posing while chowing down on a deer fly:

Credit: Willoughby

And lastly, an Acmon Blue nectaring on Mondardella odoratissima:

Credit: Willoughby

South Lake Tahoe's NABA butterfly count is this Sunday. Shoot me a PM if you're interested!
MH2

climber
Jul 9, 2013 - 10:36pm PT
They may be little but they make our world much bigger.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 10, 2013 - 12:44am PT
The first and the last look the same to me, how are they different?
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Jul 10, 2013 - 12:47am PT
Those Synanthedon Polygoni were all over the Dinky Creek, Shaver Lake and Courtright res last week.

Wow, they are moths.
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Jul 10, 2013 - 02:35am PT
Reilly, the blues are tough, tough, tough!! Note the checked fringes on the Dotted Blue, lacking on the Acmon. Note the iridescent blue lunules (just outside of the orange triangles) on the Acmon, lacking on the Dotted. There are other subtle differences, but those two should be quite apparent once you're looking for them. From a quick glance, these look identical, but they're not even in the same genus.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 10, 2013 - 02:11pm PT
OK, now that you point out the 'obvious' differences, well, duh! :-)
But you really went too far by half with the "not even in the same genus" comment!
Those guys be insectivorous Empids IMHO!
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Jul 11, 2013 - 07:25pm PT
Sorry Reilly, I really didn't mean it to come off that way. There's nothing so obvious to me about what puts them in different genera, but it's true, different genera. A couple of the blues are damn near identical, and your best bet is to see which species of buckwheat they're laying their eggs on, or whether they're on buckwheat versus lupine (or just look at their genitals through a dissecting scope or grind them up for DNA or ...). But the blues are a piece o' cake compared to large Speyeria fritillaries, and a bunch of the skippers are a bastard to tell apart as well. At least for me. Erynnis persius versus pacuvius? Forget it.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jul 14, 2013 - 11:39am PT
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/10177660/Japan-clinic-launches-snail-facial.html
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 17, 2013 - 11:22am PT
And you thought birders were, uh, a little 'different'?
LA Times:
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _

South Africa butterfly hunters: A rare breed

The leader of the net-toting group is Mark Williams, who has traveled widely, fending off baboons and dodging hippos and snakes, in search of his obsession.

By Robyn Dixon

Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa

July 17, 2013

Since Mark Williams founded the Lepidopterists' Society in 1983, the h...
Since Mark Williams founded the Lepidopterists' Society in 1983, the hunt for endangered species has grown more urgent, with habitat loss and climate change threatening some species. (Hannelie Coetzee / For The Times)
Credit: Reilly

Mark Williams was out with his butterfly net in his favorite South African mountain range when a flutter of gray-blue wings sailed by. They were almost as small and nondescript as the other gray-blue butterflies drifting past.

Almost.

Heart pounding and net flailing, he dashed after the bobbing sliver of color, hope fluttering like a wind-blown flag. He hooked in the tiny creature, its wingspan just over 11/2 inches. It was a Lotana blue, believed to be extinct. Nobody had seen one alive in decades.

"I ran it down and caught it with a huge swipe, because they can move," Williams said of that moment five years ago. "I knew straight away I'd rediscovered the Lotana blue."

His search for the Lotana blue had taken eight years. Yet a lepidopterist's life the childhood bedroom stuffed with bird's nests, pebbles and butterflies, the years of research, the wild goose chases can be distilled into such wild, joyful moments.

Dashing through the scrub, net aloft, is a passion that has not changed much over the decades except that like certain butterfly species, the South African lepidopterist population has dwindled to a few dozen fiercely competitive fanatics, most of them middle-aged men.

And the 63-year-old Williams, a man who has traveled hundreds of thousands of miles with his trusty net, confronting angry baboons, dodging bull hippos and narrowly avoiding snake bites, is one of their gods.

"I'm being called the Butterfly Whisperer," Williams said with a smile, carefully moving the remains of rare and common species from one pinboard to another. "I'd love to go out with that title. Mark Williams, the Butterfly Whisperer," he said, rolling the words as if savoring wine.

When Williams first announced his 2009 find, fellow collectors found it hard to believe until he published photographs online. Since then, Williams, who earns a living as a veterinary pathologist, has netted two other species not seen in decades: the Juanita's hairtail last year, and the Waterberg copper in March.

The Waterberg copper was so intensely sought that the Lepidopterists' Society of Africa distributed "wanted" posters with pictures of the insect, and offered a reward of about $1,000.

Searching for the copper, Williams used Google Earth to pinpoint an isolated plateau in South Africa's Limpopo province at the same elevation as the butterfly's former habitat, but 25 miles east. He took a weekend off and forged along a bush track, trailed by his wife.

As soon as he saw the orange flutter of wings, he laughed, not so much at the joy of finding it, but at the irony that he, as the founder of the society, would be collecting the reward. He plans to invest it in future butterfly searches.

Although Williams is gregarious and talkative, he's happy staring at Google Earth on a computer screen, shifting locations, sifting for possible sites. He will spend hours looking up rainfall data for various locations (to help him get the timing of his expeditions right) and analyzing vegetation cover (to find the plants the caterpillars eat).

Mostly, though, he has an edge because of the knowledge gained in more than half a century of tracking the insects in this land rich with butterfly species about 650 of them.

Since Williams founded the Lepidopterists' Society in 1983, the hunt for endangered species has grown more urgent, with habitat loss and climate change threatening some species, particularly those that have retreated to the tops of mountains, looking for cooler air, and may soon run out of altitude if the highest peaks become too warm for them.

At the end of this year, Williams will launch a quest to rediscover the Bashee River buff the holy grail for South African butterfly experts. If the buttery-winged creature still exists, it's most likely to be found on the densely forested banks of the Mbashe River, in the wilds of Eastern Cape province.

Williams likes to put himself in the shoes of collectors such as James Henry Bowker, a British colonel who in the 1860s was the first and last person to see the Bashee River buff, capturing three females, which he promptly pinned to a board and sent on to Cape Town.

Williams gets a faraway look in his eye at the thought of becoming the second person ever to lay eyes on the Bashee River buff, and perhaps the first to capture a male.

One of Bowker's specimens remains mounted in the South African Museum in Cape Town, the other two in British museums.

"It's 1 1/2 centuries it's been missing," Williams said. "We don't even know what the male looks like."

One problem with Williams' mission is that the buff might really be extinct.

"The cost of the trip is around 20,000 rand [$2,000] to go and look for a butterfly that I might not even find," he said.

Williams has read Bowker's letters about the buff, which is said to flutter around the tops of trees. He has gone back to Google Earth for any clues on habitat.

But when asked for details, Williams clams up. If he ever finds the creature, he says, then he will share such information. South African lepidopterists might be a tiny community, but competition can be cutthroat.

Williams stopped collecting most butterflies some years ago and instead began collecting eggs to hatch caterpillars. But when he finds a particularly rare one, he does capture and "set" it a euphemism for pinning it to a board to verify its identity.

The act of killing a near-extinct species may surprise outsiders, but lepidopterists insist that taking a few specimens of rare species is essential, because mere sightings are not accepted as scientific evidence, given the complications of identifying the insects accurately.

Some of the butterflies captured by Mark Williams are on display in hi...
Some of the butterflies captured by Mark Williams are on display in his office. He started collecting at 5 and says he was an avid lepidopterist by 7. (Hannelie Coetzee / For The Times)
Credit: Reilly

"No knowledgeable lepidopterist would find it ironic. In fact, they would mostly likely be flabbergasted if voucher specimens were not collected," Williams said. "Five pairs of rhinoceroses, breeding remorselessly, would not reach a total population of a hundred in 10 years. Five pairs of African monarchs would reach about 36 million in six months. Laypersons don't understand this, unfortunately."

A friend and fellow member of the lepidopterists' society, Jeremy Dobson, said the scientific value of identifying and keeping track of rare and endangered butterflies outweighs the damage of capturing and setting small numbers of them.

Dobson, a soft-spoken, gentlemanly Englishman, is awed by Williams and other South African lepidopterists, and seems ready to pinch himself at the honor of being a member of such a society.

There are gentlemen's rules about sharing information in butterfly science, broken by one South African collector who, Williams said, was so possessive about lepidopterology that he regarded the insects almost as his own property.

Williams said he shunned the community, they shunned him, and "he died a lonely man."



At some point in his childhood, Williams' bedroom metamorphosed from a clutter of messy kid's curios into the beginnings of a serious butterfly collection. He started collecting at 5 and says he was an avid lepidopterist by 7.

He doesn't really know why he was attracted by butterflies.

"I'm a very curious guy," is all he will say.

As a schoolboy in the mid-1960s, Williams, accompanied by two friends, stumbled into a bush camp to find an old Chevy beside a tent and the well-known South African lepidopterist David Swanepoel, who had gorgeous azure butterflies pinned on a board.

Williams managed to annoy the old man, who had been collecting since the early 1900s, and who offered to show the boys where to find the creature. Though tantalized, Williams said he'd find it himself and watched in disgust as his two camping companions trotted after Swanepoel, "like obedient puppies."

"He called me a hard head and a little bliksem a little rascal, or literally a lightning strike and said I'd never find them. It took me three days. I worked my butt off.

"And I came back and held it up and I said, 'I found it.' He leaned over conspiratorially. He said: 'Those other two will give up butterflies. But you will do this for the rest of your life.'"

In years of bushwhacking, he's grown used to sprinting across rocky ledges, looking both down (to avoid a broken ankle) and up (to avoid losing a butterfly). He's had a couple of close encounters with leopards ("You just run at them with a butterfly net") and deadly black mambas ("You just back off. You're in his territory").

Once, he scrambled up a tree in his red underpants when two bull hippos starting fighting just outside his tent. But his scariest moment came one morning at dawn when, as a long-haired young man in his 20s, he disturbed a baboon colony and was charged by four huge males.

"I stuck my net up over my head and stood on tiptoes. I bared my teeth. I gave a thunderous, inhuman screech which stopped them all in their tracks 15 meters away."

Then there was the angry farmer armed with a shotgun, who grabbed him for trespassing and took him to the police (but later gave him coffee and cookies in his kitchen as Williams showed him his specimens).

Williams conceded that the Bashee River buff search could prove fruitless. But if he finds it?

Well, that would leave him with one last great quest, for a species seen and collected just twice in the 1870s. The wily old butterfly hunter David Swanepoel went looking for it. But even he couldn't find the Morant's blue.

South African Butterfly Whisperer
MH2

climber
Jul 17, 2013 - 11:11pm PT
Thank you, Reilly.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 18, 2013 - 05:16pm PT
"Alas, poor Yorick, attracted by new paint fumes he alit and was overcome."

Credit: Reilly
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2013 - 05:22pm PT
That sounds like a caption you would read on a Gary Larson Far Side cartoon Reilly, LOL.

Credit: dirt claud
labrat

Trad climber
Auburn, CA
Jul 18, 2013 - 05:30pm PT
Evaporator Bug?

Is that another name for a stone fly that has crawled out of the water, split open, and then flew around to mate?
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2013 - 11:32am PT
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 25, 2013 - 10:58am PT
Here is a cool butterfly. You seen one of these Willoughby?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kallima_inachus

Credit: dirt claud
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Jul 25, 2013 - 11:00am PT
Dang BUGS !!! LOL! And Mouse might that be a helgramite? (sp?)
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 1, 2013 - 12:41am PT
Just back from the Great Midwest Cicada Explosion.
I grew up there and never remembered so many. At times they were deafening!
I took a video but I haven't a clue how to upload it.

But here's a head shot. It was raining so he/she/it was a little misty-eyed.
Yeah, they're almost this big! At least my wife feels so.

MH2

climber
Aug 3, 2013 - 11:56pm PT
^^^

I think that is the Tibicen yearly variety of cicada. Here is a Magicicada 17-year cicada. I had to look it up.

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 4, 2013 - 04:12pm PT
The "88" butterfly from Argentina/Brasil...
mongrel

Trad climber
Truckee, CA
Aug 5, 2013 - 03:46am PT
Not an insect, but there was enough talk about spiders upthread to justify posting this beautiful one from Equatorial Guinea. It was HUGE for an orb-weaver, a good 4-5" or so, foot to foot. Web was just about face level. That little red blip on the back of it is a male hoping for good times before he's eaten. Some of the dudes who didn't get lucky can be seen elsewhere in the web, awaiting their innards being liquified and sucked out. Oh boy!
Credit: mongrel
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Aug 13, 2013 - 11:03pm PT
Dirt, that thing is AWESOME. Never seen 'em; never been in their nape of the woods, neck of the nape, never been to Asia.

Reilly, those 88s occur far closer than South America, and they even stray to Texas now and again.

I've been rearing some Dispirited Tiger Beetle larva at home, feeding them earwigs mostly. Kinda fun, though not for the earwigs! Nobody knows a thing about the larval ecology of this species.

My little monsters
My little monsters
Credit: Willoughby

I even managed to find a pupa when I was collecting specimens. It's been rad seeing this thing slowly morph from a case of goo into an adult.

About two weeks back
About two weeks back
Credit: Willoughby
Another angle from the other week
Another angle from the other week
Credit: Willoughby
Today
Today
Credit: Willoughby

Notice how the mandibles are now fully formed and sclerotized within the larger fold they started in. I don't care if you're talking about butterflies, wasps, or lowly houseflies, complete metamorphosis is completely amazing.
MH2

climber
Aug 13, 2013 - 11:17pm PT
Yes. It is astounding how that blob of goo sorts itself out into a working insect.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Aug 15, 2013 - 10:52am PT
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_babies_can_a_cockroach_have

None if you step on the bastard bitches.

If you hate Raid (and the smell of it drives me nutso as much as the hordes of roaches in the summertime, especially) then I recommend a good fly swatter/roach reacher to get the ones on the walls and ceilings (amazing climbing talent is useless then).

Be sure to keep a pair of flip-flops handy for dealing with the ones on the floor.

But the big thing is to keep food in containers, regular cleaning of counter tops and range to keep grease spots (prime roach fodder) to a minimum, taking the garbage out daily, and just being quicker and never hesitating when striking out at the suckers.

Don't be squeamish. It's all in a day's work here in Middle Earth and the rest of the Tioga's apartments.

If you don't have them, I pray you never do.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 15, 2013 - 12:43pm PT
Credit: Reilly
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Aug 15, 2013 - 01:03pm PT
every time i look at this thread i get the HEEBY JEEBYS LOL!
G_Gnome

Trad climber
who gave up and just goes sailing now!
Aug 15, 2013 - 02:54pm PT
No, Mouse's picture is of a discarded casing from a Stonefly. They turn into these.
Credit: G_Gnome
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Aug 15, 2013 - 07:37pm PT
It's eclosion day (days?) for my tiger beetle pupa. Maybe I'll try to take some photos. Not too pretty though - kind of mostly-still-in-the-old-skin mess at the moment. But it's got the legs moving, which is pretty cool to see, and the back is split at the head, and the top of the noggin' is free and clear. It just blows my feeble little mind how they rearrange almost all of their cells from larva to adult.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Aug 15, 2013 - 08:51pm PT
The helgrammite, you say!

Grampa Ed called 'em evaporator or evaporated bugs. What's his game? He was a edumacated man and a whiz with the rod.

You think it's hereditary, mis-nomering critters?

I figgered it for a stone McFlyy, having a future, but doomed to endless sequels.

And then a trout ate me.
Comin' to getcha, Ronnie!!!!  Dragon yer ass off and sharin' ya with t...
Comin' to getcha, Ronnie!!!! Dragon yer ass off and sharin' ya with the guys at the mission!!!!
Credit: mouse from merced
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 19, 2013 - 05:58pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 19, 2013 - 06:06pm PT
Claud, HaHaHaHa! So it was a dark and stormy night. OK, it was only dark.
We were walking down a dirt road near Vancouver. I can't tell you where or
I'd have to come after you. Jeff, a hard man, had to take a pee. I don't
to this day know why he had to step off a dirt road in the dark to take a
pee. All of a sudden he comes running back screaming like a 13 year old girl.

"Geez, man, what happened?"

"Uh, I walked into a spider web. I went to wipe it off of my face and there
was a spider almost the size of my hand sitting on my face."

"Uh, OK, that's worth screaming about."
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 22, 2013 - 08:47pm PT
Hey, Ron, a new bug was discovered for you to lie awake at night thinking about!
Maybe you could get some to help you glue stuff together. ;-)

New Glue-Spitting Velvet Worm Found in Vietnam

By Douglas Main, Staff Writer EnvironmentNatureLiveScience

Small bugs of the rain forest have many things to worry about, assuming they are capable of anxiety. But surely some of their more feared predators are velvet worms, a group of ancient animals that spit an immobilizing, gluelike material onto prey before injecting them with saliva and chomping down.

It turns out the velvet worm family is more diverse than thought: A new species has been found in the jungles of Vietnam. Unlike related velvet worms, this species has uniquely shaped hairs covering its body. It reaches a length of 2.5 inches (6 centimeters), said Ivo de Sena Oliveira, a researcher at the University of Leipzig, Germany, who along with colleagues describes the species in Zoologischer Anzeiger (A Journal of Comparative Zoology).

The paper and related work by Oliveira suggest thousands of unknown species of these creatures are waiting to be found throughout the world's tropical rain forests, he said. Research by Oliveira in the Amazon rain forest alone suggests there may be one new species of velvet worm about every 15 miles (25 kilometers), he told LiveScience. [See Amazing Images of Creepy Acorn Worms]

Little-known glue-spitter

The animals are extremely difficult to find and little known, because they spend most of life hidden in moist areas in the soil, in rotting logs or under rocks, due in part to the fact that their permeable skin allows them to quickly dry out, Oliveira said. In some areas, "if you're not there at the right moment of the year, during the rainy season, you won't find them," he added. The rainy season is the one time of year this Vietnamese species exits the soil, he said.

Unlike arthropods (a huge group of animals that includes ants and spiders), velvet worms lack hard exoskeletons. Instead their bodies are fluid-filled, covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by pressurized liquid. This hydrostatic pressure allows them to walk, albeit very slowly, on fluid-filled, stubby legs that lack joints.

Slimed

Their slowness works to their advantage. To hunt, they sneak up on other insects or invertebrates. And that's when the sliming begins velvet worms like the newfound species hunt by spraying a "net of glue" onto their prey from two appendages on their backs, Oliveira said. This nasty material consists of a mix of proteins that impedes movement. "The more the prey moves, the more it gets entangled," he said.

Oftentimes the velvet worms will eat any excess "glue," which is energetically costly to make. Although the animals have been shown to take down prey larger then themselves, they often choose smaller creatures, likely to ensure they don't waste their precious bodily fluids, Oliveira said.

Fossils show that velvet worms haven't changed much since they diverged from their relatives (such as the ancestors of arthropods and waterbears) about 540 million years ago, Oliveira said. Studies of velvet worms could help shed light on the evolution of arthropods, he added.

There are two families of velvet worm, one spread around the tropics, and another found in Australia and New Zealand. Members of the former group generally tend to be loners. But the other family may be more social. One 2006 study found that members of the species Euperipatoides rowelli can hunt in groups of up to 15, and that the dominant female eats first.

While it's not a surprise to find a new species of velvet worm, this is "great work by [these researchers] to actually characterize and name a new species from this region," said Nick Jeffery, a doctoral student at the University of Guelph who wasn't involved in the study.

The new species, Eoperipatus totoros, is the first velvet worm to be described from Vietnam, said Georg Mayer, a co-author and researcher at the University of Leipzig.

This species was first discovered and listed in a brief 2010 report by Vietnamese researcher Thai Dran Bai, but the present study is the first to describe the Vietnamese animal in detail, Oliveira said.

Email Douglas Main or follow him on Twitter or Google+. Follow us @livescience, Facebook or Google+. Article originally on LiveScience

Image Gallery: The Leggiest Millipede
New Species Gallery: Expedition into Suriname's Jungles
Images: One-of-a-Kind Places on Earth
Copyright 2013 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Glue Spitting Bug

cowpoke

climber
Aug 29, 2013 - 07:11pm PT
Credit: cowpoke
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 13, 2013 - 01:51pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Sep 29, 2013 - 11:37pm PT
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 5, 2013 - 12:08am PT
This guy guards our front door.
You don't want him to say

"Thou shall not pass."

Pepe Le Poseur

Social climber
Parts North
Oct 5, 2013 - 12:29am PT
Reilly and Dirt - Can relate to the spider stuff. Once, going up this gorgeous little mountain creek in Borneo, I came across this volleyball net of a web stretched across the creek. This thing looked like it was designed to catch birds, not bugs.

Saw the critter responsible, and was looking at it in awe (nearly size of my hand) when, like a genius, I decided to "f*ck" with it. I tapped the web to see what it would do....what it did was immediately drop from the web into the current and get washed up on my leg.

Talk about screaming and dancing like a girl. Always f#ck with large spiders from UPSTREAM.
perswig

climber
Oct 17, 2013 - 08:08am PT






Dale
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
Oct 17, 2013 - 09:49am PT
Not sure if anyone linked the story about the bizarre Ball's Pyramid insect they found they thought went extinct 80 years ago. I love this bug's story: (Edit- apologies if this has already been posted.. the stupid 4-letter word-rule here made it impossible to search)

http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2012/02/24/147367644/six-legged-giant-finds-secret-hideaway-hides-for-80-years

Credit: justthemaid

(Edited version):

On Lord Howe, there used to be an insect, famous for being big. It's a stick insect, a critter that masquerades as a piece of wood, and the Lord Howe Island version was so large as big as a human hand that the Europeans labeled it a "tree lobster" because of its size and hard, lobsterlike exoskeleton. It was 12 centimeters long and the heaviest flightless stick insect in the world. Local fishermen used to put them on fishing hooks and use them as bait.

Then one day in 1918, a supply ship, the S.S. Makambo from Britain, ran aground at Lord Howe Island and had to be evacuated. ...It took nine days to repair the Makambo, and during that time, some black rats managed to get from the ship to the island, where they instantly discovered a delicious new rat food: giant stick insects. Two years later, the rats were everywhere and the tree lobsters were gone.

Totally gone. After 1920, there wasn't a single sighting. By 1960, the Lord Howe stick insect, Dryococelus australis, was presumed extinct.

There was a rumor, though....in 1960 climbers reported seeing corpses [on nearby island, Ball's Pyramid]...

...The only thing to do was to go back... Nick Carlile and a local ranger, Dean Hiscox, agreed to make the climb. And with flashlights, they scaled the wall till they reached the plant, and there, spread out on the bushy surface, were two enormous, shiny, black-looking bodies. And below those two, slithering into the muck, were more, and more ... 24 in all. All gathered near ONE plant.

...The Lord Howe Island stick insect, Dryococelus australis, once believed to be extinct, was found living under a small shrub high up Ball's Pyramid in 2001...

They were Dryococelus australis. A search the next morning, and two years later, concluded these are the only ones on Ball's Pyramid, the last ones. They live there, and, as best we know, nowhere else.

How they got there is a mystery. Maybe they hitchhiked on birds, or traveled with fishermen, and how they survived for so long on just a single patch of plants, nobody knows either. The important thing, the scientists thought, was to get a few of these insects protected and into a breeding program.

That wasn't so easy. The Australian government didn't know if the animals on Ball's Pyramid could or should be moved. There were meetings, studies, two years passed, and finally officials agreed to allow four animals to be retrieved. Just four.

When the team went back to collect them, it turned out there had been a rock slide on the mountain, and at first they feared that the whole population had been wiped out. But when they got back up to the site, on Valentine's Day 2003, the animals were still there, sitting on and around their bush.

The plan was to take one pair and give it a man who was very familiar with mainland walking stick insects, a private breeder living in Sydney. He got his pair, but within two weeks, they died.

Adam And Eve And Patrick

That left the other two. They were named "Adam" and "Eve," taken to the Melbourne Zoo and placed with Patrick Honan, of the zoo's invertebrate conservation breeding group. At first, everything went well. Eve began laying little pea-shaped eggs, exactly as hoped. But then she got sick. According to biologist Jane Goodall, :

"Eve became very, very sick. Patrick ... worked every night for a month desperately trying to cure her. ... Eventually, based on gut instinct, Patrick concocted a mixture that included calcium and nectar and fed it to his patient, drop by drop, as she lay curled up in his hand."

Her recovery was almost instant. Patrick , "She went from being on her back curled up in my hand, almost as good as dead, to being up and walking around within a couple of hours."

Eve's eggs were harvested, incubated (though it turns out only the first 30 were fertile) and became the foundation of the zoo's new population of walking sticks.




Original ST climbing thread about climbing on the island...worth a read as well:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1031298/Balls-Pyramid

Ball's Pyramid Island
Ball's Pyramid Island
Credit: justthemaid
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 17, 2013 - 02:21pm PT
Great post Justthemaid, those things are crazy. That was a good story Pepe, LOL
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 1, 2013 - 05:45pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Nov 1, 2013 - 06:24pm PT
Credit: survival
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Nov 12, 2013 - 11:43am PT
Survival, the Hopper Whisperer! Very nice!

I doubt Mighty Hiker checks this, or any, thread any more but this one's for you, Mighty!


From the Life Is Strange Dept; waiting for the termite man I saw this
little guy/gal on my front window...
And just how does one palm vertical glass?

dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 26, 2013 - 05:14pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Nov 26, 2013 - 07:20pm PT
Claud, that prolly happened in Aussieland where anything that bites you will
prolly kill you. A buddy of mine was visiting friends there and woke up in
his guest bedroom watching this spider spin this cool web in the corner near
his bed. He goes out for breakfast and starts telling them about it and
they all immediately ask,

"Is the web funnel shaped?"

A big stampede for the RAID ensued.



Found this little cutie while working on my deck.
He's all of an inch long but he was most uncooperative - all he wanted
to do was haul balls for some place dark.
Credit: Reilly
Credit: Reilly


This Tarantula Hawk Wasp was good sized, 1-1/4" body?
Credit: Reilly
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 26, 2013 - 08:38pm PT
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Timmc

climber
BC
Nov 26, 2013 - 08:50pm PT
Panama ants
Panama ants
Credit: Timmc
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Nov 26, 2013 - 08:53pm PT
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 27, 2013 - 12:35pm PT
"You don't have to be big to be successful."

Collective wisdom of Pratt, Chouinard, and Harding on Watsonkins and El Cap, for sure.

Grade VII, let's go to the coffee shop.

Ya guide us into that cloud of mosquitoes and I'll slit ya from brinne...
Ya guide us into that cloud of mosquitoes and I'll slit ya from brinney to brisket, Clemens.
Credit: mouse from merced
The ultimate boulder problem.  Stuck inside a ceramic Mark Twain-y cof...
The ultimate boulder problem. Stuck inside a ceramic Mark Twain-y coffee mug with sloping inner walls, this roach is wondering WTF do I do now?
Credit: mouse from merced
It's simple.  You are gonna die, like this one, you little pest.
It's simple. You are gonna die, like this one, you little pest.
Credit: mouse from merced
No way out, Jose Cucaracha!  Your sponsors called, too.  Your perks ar...
No way out, Jose Cucaracha! Your sponsors called, too. Your perks are cancelled, Mr. Superclimber! The North Face doesn't want you around anymore.
Credit: mouse from merced
Sparky

Trad climber
vagabond movin on
Nov 27, 2013 - 03:14pm PT
Zombie ants

Credit: Sparky

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/pictures/110303-zombie-ants-fungus-new-species-fungi-bugs-science-brazil/
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 27, 2013 - 03:26pm PT
That's crazy, some real sci-fi stuff there.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 7, 2014 - 12:09pm PT
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 7, 2014 - 12:44pm PT
Hoh, man! "Daddy, be careful."
She should have said, "We're gonna need a bigger bucket, daddy."
Rudder

Trad climber
Costa Mesa, CA
Jan 7, 2014 - 03:46pm PT
Don't know anything about insects, but this boy was hard at work in the yard of a house I'm working on. That's a Bee he's wrapping up, so you can get a sense of his size, he's a beefy fellow.

Credit: Rudder
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 7, 2014 - 03:49pm PT
I've seen those guys around here too. Never have found out what kind they are.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jan 10, 2014 - 05:49pm PT
You mean "insetcs."
Credit: mouse from merced
The entree.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 17, 2014 - 12:59pm PT
Think you had a rough day?

Credit: Reilly

The weird thing is that after patiently posing for a dozen pics I was
thinking about putting him out of his misery. No sooner than the thoughts
coalesced he emphatically took off!



ps
Rudder's spider looks a Garden Spider but that's not definitive.


Black Widow egg sac...
Credit: Reilly
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2014 - 11:41am PT
Awesome camo!!/ pic taken from the web
Awesome camo!!/ pic taken from the web
Credit: dirt claud
Tvash

climber
Seattle
Mar 6, 2014 - 12:15pm PT
Die!
Die!
Credit: Tvash

FU!
FU!
Credit: Tvash

Yellowstone NP
Yellowstone NP
Credit: Tvash

Cleared for landing &#40;Yellowstone NP&#41;
Cleared for landing (Yellowstone NP)
Credit: Tvash

Accessorizing &#40;Zion NP&#41;
Accessorizing (Zion NP)
Credit: Tvash
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Mar 6, 2014 - 12:47pm PT
Rudder et al, those are cat-face spiders. Either Araneus gemma or gemmoides. Fun to have around in the garden for sure.
Keith Leaman

Trad climber
Mar 6, 2014 - 01:26pm PT
As part of my BA in art, I specialized in science illustration. Here are a few of many insect paintings I did in partial fulfillment of the degree. They are small- 3"-4" gouache (opaque watercolor) on paper, made with the aid of a camera lucida Some of my illustrations appeared in Scientific American and other journals many years ago.

Mexican beetle displaying mimicry. Gouache painting 1971
Mexican beetle displaying mimicry. Gouache painting 1971
Credit: KL
Scarab painting, gouache  1971
Scarab painting, gouache 1971
Credit: KL

While doing grad studies in Anthropology in Nayarit, I was hiking in the jungle with a local and saw a caterpillar similar to this one. My guide, Jose Angel, shouted out- "Don't touch it!!" It turns out some of these things can kill a person, just by touching the hairs.

Asp moth caterpillar
Asp moth caterpillar
Credit: Wiki

Some selected from the www~

"Froggy went a courtin' and he did ride um hm,
Sword and pistol by his side um hm."

Frog and Beetle
Frog and Beetle
Credit: Web

photo not found
Missing photo ID#348049

photo not found
Missing photo ID#348050

dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2014 - 02:56pm PT
Great illustrations Keith, cool pics too, thanks for posting. I've heard about them caterpillars.
Plan B

Ice climber
Agua Dulce,CA
Mar 31, 2014 - 11:12pm PT
Some pics from the South Coast Botanic garden last Sat at the Birdapalooza (see Birds thread)

sorry about the quality...those guys don't sit still too much :)
Credit: Plan B

Credit: Plan B

Credit: Plan B

MH2

climber
Mar 31, 2014 - 11:22pm PT
Nice ones. Like the red cactus flower and the bee with red pollen boots.
mongrel

Trad climber
Truckee, CA
Apr 1, 2014 - 12:03am PT
Keith, those are absolutely superb, in the best traditional of biological illustration going back to Hofmeister and those folks, combining artistic beauty with scientific accuracy. Thanks.

Since we've seen plenty of spiders on this insects thread, it seems fair to post up something of even more ancient ancestry, a Scolopendra centipede. This one's only about 5-6 inches long, from the hills in Santa Barbara Co., but there are footlong ones (which I've encountered) in the tropics. All of them, including our local ones, have an extremely vicious bite, I believe known to have been fatal to children. So, presumably even worse than a velvet ant (yes, I know, a wasp, but that's the name), which is probably the worst insect sting available for sampling in the western U.S.
Keep your eyes open when digging soil pits.
Keep your eyes open when digging soil pits.
Credit: mongrel
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Apr 1, 2014 - 12:25am PT
Beautiful paintings, Keith!

BTW, that "mantis" head is a damselfy. Gobs of dewey damsel images on the interwebs. A popular subject, I guess.
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
May 16, 2014 - 04:54pm PT
Cow Path Tiger Beetles have been active in my neighborhood for a few weeks. Bummed the lighting was so harsh; this thing was fresh and had ridiculous green, bronze, and purple hues that didn't really show in the photos:

Credit: Willoughby
Credit: Willoughby
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
May 23, 2014 - 09:21am PT
Sentinel approach and lions' dens.
Sentinel approach and lions' dens.
Credit: mouse from merced
Same colony.
Same colony.
Credit: mouse from merced
Yummy, yummy, yummy,
I got ants in my tummy.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 23, 2014 - 10:53am PT
Keith, more, please! Those are art. It is too bad you weren't on HMS Beagle.

Mouse, be carefull what you wish for!
Plan B

Ice climber
Agua Dulce,CA
May 23, 2014 - 04:21pm PT
Western Tiger Swallowtail
Western Tiger Swallowtail
Credit: Plan B
Western Tiger Swallowtail
Western Tiger Swallowtail
Credit: Plan B
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol
May 23, 2014 - 04:35pm PT
Paracotalpa leonine somewhere in the middle of Nevada


go-B

climber
Cling to what is good!
May 23, 2014 - 04:47pm PT
Help me!
Help me!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 2, 2014 - 11:05am PT
Great shot, Jerry!


"Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite
jest, of most excellent fancy."
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 5, 2014 - 05:08pm PT
Robo Bug came my backyard today! I got him to land on my hand so he could
show me his latest trophy... It's a jungle out there!

[
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jun 6, 2014 - 12:55am PT
Close inspection reveals three ladybugs and one fly.  Cookie Cliff are...
Close inspection reveals three ladybugs and one fly. Cookie Cliff area.
Credit: mouse from merced
Ladybug #3 is in the clover, upper-middle left, partly-hidden, for those with poor vision.
May flowers and bumble bee.  Smith Station Rosd, Greeley Hill.
May flowers and bumble bee. Smith Station Rosd, Greeley Hill.
Credit: mouse from merced

This thread is getting to be very educational and humorous, gents. Good job!
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 1, 2014 - 10:16am PT
ok, would hate to have this mofo in my sleeping bag!!


PlanB, did those ST birders know you were sneaking away and taking pictures of insects instead of birds at Birdapalooza? These ST birders can be pretty hard core ;) The bee with boots is cool.
Plan B

Ice climber
Agua Dulce,CA
Jul 1, 2014 - 04:29pm PT
Thanks Dirt,

Sometimes birds and bugs go together. Here's a Junco with a mouthful for the chicks.
Dark-eyed Junco
Dark-eyed Junco
Credit: Plan B
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 21, 2014 - 10:07am PT
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jul 21, 2014 - 11:03am PT
Credit: mouse from merced
It took a lot, but I got this guy to where he'll sit still with the bug on top of his beak. (That was the hard part.)

Then I give the command, "Flippit" and he tosses it in the air and catches it in his beak and then eats it.

Max the Mound House parrot can barely talk!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jul 21, 2014 - 11:18am PT
And this, just in:

A bee on the fountain in the square.
A bee on the fountain in the square.
Credit: mouse from merced

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/15/opinion/bees-and-colony-collapse.html
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