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Messages 1461 - 1480 of total 9004 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
MH2

climber
Apr 7, 2012 - 11:32pm PT

gf

climber
Apr 7, 2012 - 11:45pm PT
Nice post MH2
I opted for the n shore spring thing - a little touring followed by a visit to the shining sea

bmacd

Boulder climber
100% Canadian
Apr 8, 2012 - 12:45am PT
Which casino Bruce ? There are so many of them ... count me in !
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 8, 2012 - 12:51am PT
My project today. Apart, that is, from a gondola meeting, getting some fine Norwegian bread at the Golden Crust, socializing with Brian Moorhead, and visiting my brother and delivering his birthday present. (He lurks, but rarely posts.)
photo not found
Missing photo ID#243695
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Missing photo ID#243696
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Missing photo ID#243697
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Missing photo ID#243698
That's about three hours of effort. You put the paste on, wait a while, repeatedly scrub like hell and rinse, then repeat. Plus socialize a bit. Luckily the ditch-crick is still running, so I could refill on water, the key element. Luckily also it was at ground level. One more session should do it, maybe in this case requiring a bit of wire brushing. At least it's an area with little lichen or moss - removing the graffiti in such cases inevitably leaves a bare patch. An improvement, but you never get back to normal.

I've been working on one removal project in the Bluffs that requires use of a rope and harness, and is on a high, dry rock. The logistics are a nuisance, but I guess it's good exercise.
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 8, 2012 - 01:19am PT
Big Mike. Here's the promised pic of Europa/Crap Crags, and hardly worth the wait. It shows the first pitch above Trichome Ledge, some kind of a chimney/jam crack thingy. Apparently this pitch can now be avoided by a 5 bolt ladder, @ A0. I looked up 'trichome', and it means 'the outgrowth from the eperdemis of a plant', which didn't make me any the wiser!
Photo by Dick Culbert--1962.
Photo by Dick Culbert--1962.
Credit: hamie

EDIT. Good work MH. Thanks.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 8, 2012 - 01:27am PT
Nice photo, Hamie.

"Trichome" from the Greek trikhoma meaning "growth of hair." The name came about because of the rather bushy nature of the ledge and also because it's about 2/3 of the way up the wall at that point, hence the "tri". Sort of a double allusion.
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 8, 2012 - 01:55am PT

I think that a while ago there was a consensus decision not to discuss politics, religion or bolts, unless all other possible topics, including the Sq gondola, had been completely exhausted.

@ kaiser.
If we were to replace every dead tree with a new bolt, we would have a fine mess indeed. I do not recall slinging any trees, although we may have done so. The three saplings currently growing out of the main pitch are all new, and should be removed. With today's incredible selection and range of protection it should be possible to arrange something else.

@ Bruce Kay.
No offence taken I hope, but no reprieve for that bolt. I would still enjoy sharing a brew sometime. Make that several!
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 8, 2012 - 02:05am PT
Nails. OMG! You must be a whiz at those cryptic crosswords. Either that, or you spent way too much time with Dick. I know that tricouni means a three bumped hard nail which used to be attached to a climbing shoe, but surprisingly it is not listed in my fairly robust dictionary. Maybe on Wiki.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 8, 2012 - 02:42am PT
Nails. OMG! You must be a whiz at those cryptic crosswords. Either that, or you spent way too much time with Dick. I know that tricouni means a three bumped hard nail which used to be attached to a climbing shoe, but surprisingly it is not listed in my fairly robust dictionary. Maybe on Wiki.

Yep, tricounis are a form of saw-tooth boot nail with three teeth (hence the 'tri") invented sometime around WW 1. They were considered far superior to the older-style and softer hobnails and were the dominant sole for climbing boots well into the 1950s. In sure the Bruce Kay's and Tami's parents were well aquainted with them. Even the first edition of "Freedom of the Hills" waffled on the question of which was better: tricouni-nailed boots or Vibram.

I once had a pair of boots with Vibram soles and tricouni heels. Worked great in the bush and on slippery logs, where I could dig in my heel. Great on steep, frosty meadows. Great descending steep, hard snow. Good ascending rock. Crappy ascending hard snow, crappy descending moderate rock and really crappy descending talus (mis-judge one jump, and you were skittering onto your ass). I loved those boots.

In 1993 my wife and I were casting about for a name for our microscopic publishing company. Our first book was a hiking/outdoors book to the Whistler area (great cartoons by Tami, for all you Tami cartoon completists). We wanted an outdoors-sort of name, and also something that was unique in the publishing world. There was already a Tantalus Press (Tantalus is a peak near Squamish) and a Cloudburst Press (north of Squamish). There were zillions of Whister Presses, a few Black Tusk Presses, and the like.

North of Cloudburst is Tricouni Peak, named by Tom Fyles and the 1931 first ascent party because the 3 summits remined them of a tricouni nail. There was no Tricouni Press anywhere in the world that I could find, and the name sounded unusual enough, so we became Tricouni Press Ltd. We've done about 8 books to date, with another at the layout and design stage, and one more (on glaciers) in the planning stage.

So my email address is tricouni @ blah blah, and hence the avatar. Tricouni nails are highly unfashionable and rather antique, even obsolete, sort of how I feel these days.
hamish f

Social climber
squamish
Apr 8, 2012 - 09:57am PT
I'd have to say Bruce looks pretty happy with his Red Rocks climbing partner. Way to go.

Wow Anders, that's a lot of hard work and you're generating a bunch of good karma; I think you should go join Bruce in Vegas.
kaiser

Trad climber
squamish
Apr 8, 2012 - 12:21pm PT
I think that a while ago there was a consensus decision not to discuss politics, religion or bolts, unless all other possible topics, including the Sq gondola, had been completely exhausted.

@ kaiser.
If we were to replace every dead tree with a new bolt, we would have a fine mess indeed. I do not recall slinging any trees, although we may have done so. The three saplings currently growing out of the main pitch are all new, and should be removed. With today's incredible selection and range of protection it should be possible to arrange something else.

@ Bruce Kay.
No offence taken I hope, but no reprieve for that bolt. I would still enjoy sharing a brew sometime. Make that several!

Hamie,
I whole heartedly agree with this statement
@ kaiser.
If we were to replace every dead tree with a new bolt, we would have a fine mess indeed
but I think every case is different, If we followed Tami's statement to the letter of the law, climbing in squamish would be quite different then it is today and we would have tons of chopping to do. The pet wall would fall back into its former state as a "hardmans only" crag, Deirdre would be an even worse nightmare without the 2 bolt anchors at each belay and world class long routes such as cerberus (Free version) would not exsist. Thats just to name a few.
The problem with YPLS is that darn tree island at the top. Without constant traffic, it would get reclaimed by the jungle quite quickly especially if it gets a rep as being a spooky lead.

Anyways, no offense to anyone, but I do hope the bolt stays.
In fact after 20 years of climbing in squamish, ypls has remained on my hit list.
Since my bold days all long behind my, I had better get on it before the hammer falls.

Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 8, 2012 - 12:44pm PT
Hey Kaiser - I said "NO added bolts". Letter of the law ? Are you Anders' evil clone or something ? :-D

What I meant is No Added Bolts - to routes already done. The word "added" implying something is already there. Perhaps I should have written "additional" or the more explicit " No additional bolts should be placed on established routes".

New routing is different & that can mean people will put in bolts and they may do it in a style that doesn't agree with some folks. Maybe I"ll get my knickers bunched up. Maybe not. Who cares.

Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 8, 2012 - 12:51pm PT
Tami- That's all well and good, but what if a pertinenent piece of protection such as a tree died and left the climb in way more of a run-out state than the first ascentionists enjoyed? Not sure about YLPS yet, but that certainly seems to be the case for the first piece of pro on Clean Corner.

Hamie- Thanks for the pic! I don't remember us agreeing to never go off-topic but rather to limit it so as not to de-rail the thread. If something is worth discussing then it is worth starting a new thread. That doesn't mean such discussions can't start here, but I think we would all be disapointed if they took over.
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 8, 2012 - 01:09pm PT
Back on topic.

Aislinn on Make It Monkey 5.10+


This girl is scared to lead easy trad but she'll jump on a 10+ slab route :)
MH2

climber
Apr 8, 2012 - 01:47pm PT

"Time eventually positions most photographs, even the most amateurish, at the level of art."

in On Photography, Susan Sontag


That picture of the final chimneys on Crap Crags is worth a lot! The value is a combination of what's in the photo and what's in the viewer. For me at least, that picture reminds how much climbing has changed and how much it has remained the same. Kind of a funny feeling.

Neil Bennet and I climbed Crap Crags, pre-cleaning, on a recommendation from Ghost. The first 3 pitches were all cedar, if I remember. We didn't really know where we were or where to go. That is probably why we finished up Clean Corner. At least we knew where we were.

I think hamie's Dick Culbert photo was taken near the picture below. This is the place where Europa has a bolt ladder. Over to the left out of sight there is a chimney we have used to bypass the bolts (and people) on a couple occasions. We transfer back to Europa across the right side of the chimney a little above the end of the bolts.





Here are recent pictures from near the top of Europa, looking up and then down.



kaiser

Trad climber
squamish
Apr 8, 2012 - 01:50pm PT
Hey Tami,
I think I understood what you meant about no added bolts to existing routes, in fact all the examples I gave were established routes with bolts added. The pet wall ones were added by the FAists but others like cerberus or the black dyke or the bolted anchors on Deirdre were done by others.
I personally think the squamish climbing community does a great job taking care of it's routes, some anchors get added, some bolts replace pins or just get pulled and don't get replaced because they are not needed, other unneeded bolts get chopped never to return. Some of the most famous ones would be the 2 on the pillar, the one at the top of the sword and the 2 on the sail flake pitch of the grand wall.
Anyways this topic has been beat to death over the years and I will let it go, Like I said earlier
it's just my .02 cents worth.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 8, 2012 - 05:12pm PT
Anyways this topic has been beat to death over the years


Y'think? :-D

Interesting that trees were cleaned from Clean Crack ( yeah I know it's offlimits now ) but no bolt was replaced. Ditto the little trees from 2nd pitch of Exasperator. Yes, I realize you can get gear in there. I'm not familiar with the place this bolt we're presently writing about is.......

I'm actually in favor of not replacing a tree with a bolt and simply letting the route be harder. Plenty o' rock to go around.

But yes, this horse is flogged.

Happy Choklit Bunny Day Y'awl !!! :-D
cowpoke

climber
Apr 9, 2012 - 09:34am PT
Thread lurker confession. Keeping me stoked, between the bouts of envy.

Gonna be there in a few days (my honey's first time) = yay! Hoping for a day or two of climbing-cooperative weather, but coming prepared and psyched for a variety of fun.

Thanks for the writing and pics!
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 10, 2012 - 12:09am PT
Not being as old as Tricouni [ha ha], I have never owned any nailed boots. However I did use some once. My first climbing boots were an ex-army pair, to which some Vibram Montana soles had been glued. Towards the end of a trip to Zermatt they delammed, and were beyond repair. A friend had brought along a pair of fully nailed boots as a spare. Having no choice, and regardless of fit, I wore these on our last climb, an ascent of the Zinal Rorhorn by the voie normal. They worked well on the lower snow ridge, but were a bit scratchy on the final rock slabs and gendarme, especially on the descent. An interesting once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Another party on the lower snow ridge, Zinal Rothorn.
Another party on the lower snow ridge, Zinal Rothorn.
Credit: hamie

Another party at the gendarme, Zinal Rothorn.  Matterhorn behind.
Another party at the gendarme, Zinal Rothorn. Matterhorn behind.
Credit: hamie

As for my old boots, well.....well.....blush.....I chucked them in the powerful glacier-fed river which flows through Zermatt. I know, I know, but it seemed like a good idea at the time.
Relic

Social climber
Vancouver, BC
Apr 10, 2012 - 02:12am PT
Its was a party most definitely... now to go cleanse my bloody left kneecap.
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