What book are you reading now

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 541 - 560 of total 711 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Sep 9, 2013 - 04:26pm PT
hey there say, all...

remember to try out my novels and short stories that are based on them...


:)


jake smith ranch series...

just do a search, with neebeehsaaookway, or the jake smith ranch series and it should show up...

am soon going to get the isbn numbers so you won't have to order online from
lulu.com... should be able to order from bookstores then...
MisterE

climber
Sep 9, 2013 - 04:27pm PT
A little light reading:



I found it rather pedestrian, so I am switching off occasionally with another breezy jaunt:

Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Sep 23, 2013 - 07:30am PT
Double Indemnity
Dickbob

climber
Westminster Colorado
Sep 23, 2013 - 09:44am PT
Love King or hate him you must admit that you are curious what has become of little Danny Torrance over the last 35 years. Doctor Sleep by Stephen King. The sequel to the Shining.
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Sep 23, 2013 - 11:03am PT
A little sci-fi deviation: Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained by Peter Hamilton.

Loving them.

Recommended to my son and me by our own Tom Lambert.
sullly

Trad climber
Sep 23, 2013 - 11:40am PT
Happy Banned Book Week! Long live controversial fiction. Here's the list of most challenged classics:

1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
5. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
6. Ulysses, by James Joyce
7. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
8. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
9. 1984, by George Orwell

11. Lolita, by Vladmir Nabokov
12. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck

15. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
16. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
17. Animal Farm, by George Orwell
18. The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway
19. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner
20. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway

23. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston
24. Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison
25. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
26. Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell
27. Native Son, by Richard Wright
28. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, by Ken Kesey
29. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
30. For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway

33. The Call of the Wild, by Jack London

36. Go Tell it on the Mountain, by James Baldwin

38. All the King's Men, by Robert Penn Warren

40. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien

45. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair

48. Lady Chatterley's Lover, by D.H. Lawrence
49. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
50. The Awakening, by Kate Chopin

53. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote

55. The Satanic Verses, by Salman Rushdie

57. Sophie's Choice, by William Styron

64. Sons and Lovers, by D.H. Lawrence

66. Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
67. A Separate Peace, by John Knowles

73. Naked Lunch, by William S. Burroughs
74. Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh
75. Women in Love, by D.H. Lawrence

80. The Naked and the Dead, by Norman Mailer

84. Tropic of Cancer, by Henry Miller

88. An American Tragedy, by Theodore Dreiser

97. Rabbit, Run, by John Updike
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 23, 2013 - 12:09pm PT
Ten of the Traveling Band books.

In Mr. Whipple's famous critical article about Kerouac, he described his world as 'anything but charming.'

But there is a charm about the road, starting with Charley and his travels with Steinbedeck, which didn't make the list, but then here it be, golly gee.

Cannery Row
and Sweet Thursday
and Of Mice and Men by Steinbedeck
On the Road by T.P. “Jack” Kerouac
Joe Hill by Wallace Stegner
The Adventures of Hucklebery Finn by Mark Twain
[“All American literature comes out of Huckleberry Finn.“--Hemingway]
The Further Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Greg Matthews
The Incredible Journey by Sheila Bumford
The Longest Walk by Slawomir Rawicz
The Journeyer by Gary Jennings
The Fool's Progress by Edward Abbey
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Sep 23, 2013 - 12:44pm PT
97. Rabbit, Run, by John Updike

Read that a couple years ago. Had never heard of it, nor read any Updike before that. Surprised it would make that list as it doesn't seem to be widely known. All the others I've at least heard of, if not read.

What happened to your list though? Lots of missing numbers. I've read about 2/3 of those.
sullly

Trad climber
Sep 23, 2013 - 01:02pm PT
Elcap, I got it from the National Library Association. They update it every year. Maybe the missing numbers are titles no longer challenged. I'm shocked The Kite Runner isn't listed. So many schools assign it. The assault of Hassan is pretty graphic.

If you like Updike, look into Cheever. Love those guys: mid century WASPs stuck in suburbia.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 23, 2013 - 04:08pm PT
Sully, you mean those are the books that librarians are most asked to jerk
from the shelves? The Great Gatsby, are you kidding me? Yawn...

Now, I can see that it would be hard to keep The Satanic Verses on
the shelves in Teheran, Amsterdam, or Detroit, but here?
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Sep 23, 2013 - 04:16pm PT
Just finished this one. Pretty interesting if you like Bodie and the East side of the Sierra

dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Sep 24, 2013 - 07:11am PT
That looks like a good one Stahlbro. Will have to buy that one on Ebay today, thanks.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 24, 2013 - 07:18am PT
DC, if that excites u check out Death Valley to Yosemite: Frontier mining Camps & Ghost Towns - well written and focuses more on the people - some amazing stories. We're sooo weak!
sullly

Trad climber
Sep 24, 2013 - 08:10am PT
Reilly, the list signifies titles most frequently challenged or banned by communities and school boards.

Gatsby is probably banned due to the Tom/Myrtle affair, the Daisy/Gatsby affair, the anti-Semitic depiction of gangster Meyer Wolfsheim and the references to Blacks as "Bucks."

Gatsby "Yawn"= sacrilege; I adore that book
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 24, 2013 - 09:09am PT
Sully, I wasn't yawning in reference to the book's merits but rather at
the notion that it is 'controversial'. I guess it was in 1925. ;-)
sullly

Trad climber
Sep 24, 2013 - 09:16am PT
Plus, Reilly, Fitzgerald is one of us. Old sod, Guinness, "Danny Boy"...
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Sep 24, 2013 - 09:43am PT
Awesome, thanks Reilly. Got three great books on order now, can't wait till they get here :)

Who's read this one? just ordered this one as well.
Credit: dirt claud
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Sep 24, 2013 - 01:54pm PT
Helmet for My Pillow
(From Parris Island to the Pacific)
Robert (Lucky) Leckie

For the 4th or 5th time.
NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
Sep 24, 2013 - 02:54pm PT
A Course in Miracles! Total flashback to high school, my mom's post-alcoholic post-druggie AA and NA card toting get-it-together phase, complete with positive phrases and mantras on top of every doorway. For many years I rejected new-agey spiritual stuff because it was wrapped up in my unresolved mother issues. At the time I wished I could just hate her for the ways in which she screwed me up and mistakes she made as a mother. Her efforts to improve her life was like taking away the tangible object toward which I could target my resentment, but leaving the rats' nest of unresolved crap still stuck in me and needing an outlet. With several decades of reflection, I'm glad to have that rather than an incorrigible belligerent drunk/druggie parent who never changed. I had the example of a person changing, making efforts to improve, and that was a lesson I deeply internalized and it ultimately helped me resolve a lot of crap. Of course, it would still have been nicer to not have the crap to get rid of in the first place.


Oh wait, this was the book thread...

I'm reading "A World Without End" by Ken Follett. I read Pillars of the Earth a few years ago, took a while to start on this one but it's tough to put down. Epic saga, historically insightful, but a few minor plot defects where characters do uncharacteristic things to help move the plot along. Overall a very enjoyable book though.

I actively seek out anything written by Ken Follett.
David Knopp

Trad climber
CA
Sep 24, 2013 - 03:15pm PT
Just finished Billionaire's Apprentice by Anita Raghavan-great story of the rise of S. E. Asians at the highest levels of finance and how they too can be greedy bastards.
Messages 541 - 560 of total 711 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews