What book are you reading now

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Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Original Post - Aug 1, 2011 - 05:34pm PT
Or a book or books you have recently read. Climbing books preferred, but any book of fiction or non-fiction. Title and author with a short description of the contents.

Credit: Donald Thompson

This book is an absolute classic. Details the bygone eras of mountaineering from the earliest Alpine adventures to the first ascents of the Himalayan peaks. Reads like a novel at times. Adventure writing at its
best.

Credit: Donald Thompson

The late middle-ages in all its glory and decay, and black plagues.

Credit: Donald Thompson

A very well written chronicle of the great age of central African exploration. The source of the Nile, Speke, Burton,Stanley,Livingstone,and Pasha Gordon- they're all here.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 1, 2011 - 05:41pm PT
The Name of the Wind Patrick Roth fuss
skipt

Mountain climber
Washington
Aug 1, 2011 - 05:45pm PT
I've been rereading something I enjoyed when it first came out:

"The Beginning of Wisdom - Reading Genesis"

Leon Kass
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 1, 2011 - 05:56pm PT
that reminds me, I just read R. Crumb's illustrated, Genesis.
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Aug 1, 2011 - 06:06pm PT
Just finished Killing Dragons by Fergus Fleming. On par with his Barrow's Boys. (It shares some common material too.) Now I gotta give James Ramsey's son, Bill, a call.

Some interesting choices there Donald.
I gave my mom's copy of A Distant Mirror to a young art student, but no way am I giving away my 19th century edition of Le Decameron even if my french still sux (yeah, I know, but it is a french translation my grandma owned).
Likewise I'm hanging onto my dad's first editions of The White Nile and The Fatal Impact as well as Emil Ludwig's The Nile.

Ten years ago I was reading (my paperback edition of) The Fatal Impact by the terrace of the Cliff Lodge when, to drop another name, Liz and Royal Robbins walked by. Liz was curious as to what I was reading and was surprised that it is not a book about climbing. lol



Woody's recommend of The Last Stand Of The Tin Can Sailors was so good that I just started Hornfischer's Ship of Ghosts.
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Aug 1, 2011 - 06:11pm PT
Recently finished Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. My wife and I had been talking to a Nigerian and he'd mentioned the story, and I'd planned on getting a copy. My son had it assigned as his summer reading, so I picked it up and finished it pretty quickly.

I enjoyed the storytelling, insight into life in rural Africa, and the dual theme of how our actions and "modern life" encroaching on traditions can have quite negative effects.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 1, 2011 - 06:19pm PT
Piton Ron:
Tell Bill that his Dad's masterpiece is still loved and treasured. I have a first edition copy with a dust jacket identical to the one pictured above. If ever there were a book to curl up with on a cold winter night this is it.
There was a movie of the same name released 1947 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039462/
BooDawg

Social climber
Butterfly Town
Aug 1, 2011 - 08:27pm PT
After having it recommended to me over a year ago, I've begun reading it and I'm really enjoying it. I think it's important to understand, on very deep levels, the feminine points of view. This book is like a guidebook, not a topo, to the feminine psyche.

Credit: BooDawg

Some reviews:

"Recommended for men who dare to run with women who run with the wolves."

-Sam Keen, author of "Fire in the Belly."

"Through myth, fairy tale, and an extended 'soul conversation,' Estes calls back into life the wild neglected places of the feminine psyche. This is an inspiring and complassionate book."
sullly

Trad climber
Aug 1, 2011 - 08:37pm PT
tolman_paul, I read that one too this year. The ending was sure unexpected. Such a macho protagonist, but I felt for him once the colonizers move in.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Aug 1, 2011 - 08:41pm PT
Right now I am reading Jared Ogden's Big Wall book....for the third time. Still trying to grasp all the concepts and ideas, and then take them outside.

So far, so good. Hauling will be coming up soon though. Want to get better at frog jugging first.
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Aug 1, 2011 - 09:11pm PT
Crime and Punishment- Dostoyevsky
The Rough Guide to Pink Floyd
The History of America- Zinn- probably the best book I have ever read and I have probably read thousands of history books in my life. There is a memorable quote and new epiphany on every single page.
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Aug 1, 2011 - 09:35pm PT
Boo Dawg,
tell us how you feel at the end of the month.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 1, 2011 - 09:39pm PT
Somebody, please, kindly inform poor BooDawg that the sensitive metro types
are poorly suffered on ST; bad things have happened to their ropes.
Mtnmun

Trad climber
Top of the Mountain Mun
Aug 1, 2011 - 09:51pm PT
Credit: Mtnmun
Exercise 6 days a week and reduce you chance of getting cancer, heart disease and alzheimer's by 70%.
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Aug 1, 2011 - 09:58pm PT
Almanac of the Dead

Leslie Marmon Silko
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 1, 2011 - 10:04pm PT
Riley, Gary and I climbed 'climb and punishment' last Thursday. You know that the tv character Columbo, is based on the detective in Crime and Punishment? At one point, as he's leaving he turns around and confronts Raskolnikov with, "you know, just one thing bothers me....."
Salamanizer

Trad climber
The land of Fruits & Nuts!
Aug 1, 2011 - 10:09pm PT
Currently pouring through three books. All have some very interesting insights and aspects.

Credit: Salamanizer


Credit: Salamanizer


Credit: Salamanizer
Keith Leaman

Trad climber
Seattle
Aug 2, 2011 - 08:01am PT
"The Ascent of Rum Doodle"
fiction-1956
W.E. Bowman

I'm re-reading this parody of mountaineering expeditions. Info is on Wikipedia. I especially enjoyed the antics of the expeditions cook-Pong. The Guardian includes it in it's list of "1000 novels everyone must read". It was part of our groups' early '60's indoctrination to climbing.
KL
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 2, 2011 - 08:25am PT
Spirit of the Hills by Dan O'Brien. I don't know how it reached my bookcase
but I am pleasantly surprised. Best of all it involves Native Americans,
guns, a stoopid Forest Service district ranger, a classic Park Service LEO who
sees terrorists behind every tree at Mount Rushmore, and wolves!!!! Yes,
campers, this could be the go-to book for every tacohead! Interestingly it
takes place in the 70's so the 'terrorists' are the Native Americans trying to
take back the Black Hills.

I'm also reading Fur, Fortune, and Empire, by Eric Jay Dolin.
Did you know that BITD the Catholic Church permitted the eating of beavers'
tails on Fridays as the beaver lived underwater and

"such meat was viewed as "cold" and apparently unlikely to excite libidinous passions."

More interesting might be that the Indians saw the beaver's tail in the exact
opposite and it

"was usually reserved for the sachem or chief, and was, as a seventeenth-century
English observer of Indians in lower New England noted, "of such masculine
virtue, that if some of our Ladies knew the benefit thereof, they would desire
to have ships sent of purpose, to trade for the tail alone."

I've been thinking of starting a beaver appreciation thread but that could
get out of hand here.
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Aug 2, 2011 - 10:50am PT
City at the End of Time - Greg Bear

Just finished, Between a Rock and a Hard Place - Aron Ralston

An interesting read, he was kind of an over enthusiastic neophyte when he first started mountaineering (as were a lot of us), but he certainly learned some skills that allowed him to make it through that terrifying situation (somewhat self induced).
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:01am PT
BITD the Catholic Church permitted the eating of beavers'
and was
unlikely to excite libidinous passions."

Reilly, somebody isn't doing it right.
lol
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:01am PT
Slightly OT but the Art of War jogged my thinking..

For the chronic reader who finds themselves with no book at odd times;

There are stacks of free books available online, generally of the, 'I should read that someday' category. I try to keep at least one book like that on my phone so that I always have something to read. Besides the Art of War and the Hagakure, I recently downloaded Uncle Tom's Cabin into it. Alice in Wonderland, and the Winnie the Pooh books are in there as well, for comfort reading...
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:10am PT
We put our bookshelf and hence library in storage earlier this summer, and while the monster bookshelf is finally back in place, the shelves are still mostly empty.

Somehow the Huber Brothers book The Wall wasn't put in storage, and I re-read it the other day. It's a decent read, and a reminder to take my kids out climbing more often.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:10am PT
I'm reading The Sorrows of an American. It's the best book I've read for quite a while.
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:17am PT
anyone read Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins? my new favorite book, has me eating beets and thinking immortality is possible.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:33am PT
Ron,
I'm thinking the Pope knew and that's why he started wearing those hats
that look like beavers' tails. Am I onto sumpin'?
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:35am PT
I'll give you a little white smoke on that one.
rockermike

Trad climber
Berkeley
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:40am PT
"Mormon America: The power and the promise"; Ostling

"fair and balanced" as faux-news likes to say. Some fair criticism and some restrained appreciation.

I'm a student of religion, so at least for me it is an interesting read. History, theology, authoritarian control, high standards of piety,
Credit: rockermike
explosive growth, all have a chapter.

Personally I still can't quite get my head around how/why so many people can accept such an "unusual" theology (we are all on our way to becoming Gods - or at least the men are). I guess the community warmth and family values kind of brings people in before they analyze whether the theology makes sense or not. The Church's world wide membership is approaching 14 million and going viral as they say. hmmm
David Knopp

Trad climber
CA
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:40am PT
Tales of the Oprichniki-Vladimir Sorokin

best most f*#ked up novel about modern russia-allegorical, psychedelic, bawdy and nasty.
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Aug 2, 2011 - 11:57am PT
Gotta love Tom Robbins, Sissy Hankshaw (Even Cowgirls Get the Blues) would've brought a whole new technique to piton scar crack climbing.

Sissy Hankshaw
Sissy Hankshaw
Credit: ydpl8s
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Aug 2, 2011 - 01:47pm PT
It's a never-ending book called Death of the Republicans Wrong Thread.
Tomcat

Trad climber
Chatham N.H.
Aug 2, 2011 - 03:11pm PT
Jaybro, heh, I know I'll suffer for this but...if you like that sort of thing once in a while, re-read the Piper at the Gates of Dawn from The Wind in the Willows.

Or perhaps you spoke in jest.
Captain...or Skully

climber
or some such
Aug 2, 2011 - 03:14pm PT
I'm from Arkansas. 'Nuff said?
Ricky D

Trad climber
Sierra Westside
Aug 2, 2011 - 03:15pm PT
Given that I spent last week with my young grandchild - I spent way too much with Dr. Seuss.

One fish, two fish - MEH.

Although I have reunited with the joy that is Green Eggs and Ham. Especially fun when being old enough to remember when Jesse Jackson read it live on SNL.
khanom

Trad climber
The Dessert
Aug 2, 2011 - 03:44pm PT
At Dawn We Slept: The Untold Story of Pearl Harbor, by Gordon Prange. I think you have to be a bit OCD to get through it. Oh, and several other things of little consequence.
Ricky D

Trad climber
Sierra Westside
Aug 2, 2011 - 05:09pm PT
Pearl Harbor huh?

I recall this looney old WWII Vet from down the block (since deceased) who used to tell us that Pearl Harbor happened because all of those white bread Midwestern boys were so gaga over exotic Asian girls that you could fly a bomber right over them and they wouldn't notice.

Old geezer also swore that the Commies had done the same thing to us in Vietnam using those sweet little Asian honeys to take our eye off the ball.





Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 2, 2011 - 05:13pm PT
It may almost be time to get back to Toad hall, Tomcat...
Spider Savage

Mountain climber
SoCal
Aug 2, 2011 - 05:13pm PT
"One Fish, Two Fish..." -Seuss

That book was my foundation for a life of exploration of life. Great message: Do fun things.
Tomcat

Trad climber
Chatham N.H.
Aug 2, 2011 - 05:21pm PT
" Stoats and Weasels" Not an unreasonable name for a climb.
big ears

Trad climber
?
Aug 2, 2011 - 06:29pm PT
Good Omens

By Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

A rogue Angel, and a rogue Demon team up to prevent the apocalypse because they are both having a hell of a time slacking off on earth, and the final battle between good and evil just seems like too much work. The fun begins when the switch the anti-christ at birth.

This is my second time reading it. Absolutely hilarious.

Also,

Psycho Vertical by Andy Kirkpatrick. Very good climbing book.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2011 - 06:29pm PT

Finished this book a few days ago. The definitive account of the sinking of the Titanic and an important resource for all the subsequent films. Its amazing to think that even after the iceberg was spotted some distance off,clearly visible on a cold clear night, a nonchalant response resulted in a somewhat glancing collision that nonetheless produced a 300 ft long gash below the Titanic's waterline. Lord did an excellent job of depicting the various dire events during the nearly 3 hours it took the ship to sink.1517 people perished.





Credit: Donald Thompson
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Aug 2, 2011 - 07:03pm PT
Jay- I can't get through it.
Honestly I find the Russian Authors just to powerful and in the end to depressing.
I read the short story "The Overcoat" and was deeply effected by it. The power of the poverty, pain and misery in the class systems of Russia is just to much for me.

I've started reading every Dostoyevsky novel, some more than once inclueing CandP and have never got through one.
Out of my two goals this summer, almost dying on El Cap, has proved easier then reading about the everyday life of a Russian in the 19th century.
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Aug 2, 2011 - 07:17pm PT
I enjoyed a glorious rest day here in Kentucky between caving trips.

I read the "whole entar" Downward Bound by Warren Harding, an irreverent and farcical look at his life and climbs, and the Yosemite scene back in the day.

It's great to see a guy who just did what he wanted, and didn't really care what the others thought. He did it his way, and good on him. Perhaps the first real Big Wall Camper and Big Wall Wine Aficionado.

When I grow up, I want to be just like him.
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Aug 2, 2011 - 07:19pm PT
Piper at the Gates of Dawn

Anyone know what the one degree of separation between this book and a book I mentioned is?


Edit...me too Pete
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2011 - 07:45pm PT
Picked this book up today. I always feel I need to patronize my local bookstore to help keep it around a little longer.

Credit: Donald Thompson
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 2, 2011 - 08:42pm PT
I don't know riley, did you mention LOTR? It is said that Treebeard's voice is that of CS Lewis, ( he lectured down the hall from where Tolkien did a lot of writing) that one degree?D
The only dostoyevsky novel I had trouble getting through was the Posessed.. I don't find him, esp in C & P, depressing at all. Have you tried the Idiot? I liked that almost as much as C & P, I've read them each 4or 5 times.
Also try White nights, Notes from the Underground, or if you can find it, Krokodil. They're much shorter. I've been able to read them, and the Overcoat, in Russian. Incredibly nuanced in the native tongue...
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Aug 2, 2011 - 08:44pm PT
The Foundations of the Theory of Probability A. N. Kolmogorov
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Aug 2, 2011 - 10:02pm PT
Nope nobody got it yet- it isn't that hard.


The way they live- the poverty, the sadness is unbelievably depressing.
Hunger and lives like nothing we can ever imagine in a horribly unfair society
You can certainly see where the Bolshivics anger toward the Proletariat came from.
Where all revolutionary anger and socialist thinking comes from.
If Tea Baggers only knew they are more Socialist than Marx ever dreamed.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 3, 2011 - 12:59am PT
hey there, say, all....


my books... read MY book, :)


http://stores.lulu.com/neebeeshaabookwayreadjakeanddonate


THE JAKE SMITH RANCH SERIES--though that is just the title
of all nine books, lumped together...

the five short story collections are all based on the
first three novels, and in a sense, elaborate, or continue, or just express live situations, etc... with family, buddies, or the folks in their world...

then, there is the small conclusion novel, which can be read before or after the short stories (though it was written before them)...


have fun...
the are:


































different.... :)
about a REAL 'hidden' hero.... and his twin sis... :)

twinship, at its BEST... while going through its worst...
and comeing out with victory...
ex-rodeo folks, they be, from the tip of tex, lyford...
in a montana-ranch, now displayed...

:)
Gunkie

Trad climber
East Coast US
Aug 3, 2011 - 04:46am PT
Just finished F. Scott Fitzgerald's "This Side of Paradise". Good book, particularly if you want to get an idea of where some later writers derived their writing styles. Can see exactly where Hemmingway got his cadence and prose from. Done reading, time to surf.
sullly

Trad climber
Aug 3, 2011 - 04:53am PT
Gunkie, I'm a Fitzgerald lover myself. Reading him on the East Coast must be a kick.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 3, 2011 - 06:42am PT
Um Riley, it was the aristocracy, not the proletariat, that the Bolsheviks ( who were larley made up of proletariat) had a problem with...
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Aug 3, 2011 - 07:03am PT
Rocker Mike:

Personally I still can't quite get my head around how/why so many people can accept such an "unusual" theology (we are all on our way to becoming Gods - or at least the men are). I guess the community warmth and family values kind of brings people in before they analyze whether the theology makes sense or not. The Church's world wide membership is approaching 14 million and going viral as they say. hmmm

you must have read krakauer's Banner in the Sky as well? How would you critique the accuracy of his take on Mormonism? Is it true that Joseph Smith, prior to his brain wave of transcribing a bunch of borrowed tablets and setting up as a prophet of a sparkling new religion, was a moderately successful snake oil salesman?

I read his book while in Utah with my kids. It was great horror story fodder for the campfire!
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Aug 3, 2011 - 07:23am PT
Just finished:

"The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant"



Completely riveting....the man was truly badass!
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Aug 3, 2011 - 07:56am PT
Just started - Ender in Exile - big fan of Orson Scott Card
Tony Bird

climber
Northridge, CA
Aug 3, 2011 - 09:35am PT
hell by robert owen butler.

this book updates dante's inferno. just about anybody who was anybody has wound up in hell, including dante himself and his strangely platonic inspiration, beatrice. humphrey bogart is down there too, trying forever to find lauren bacall (instead he finds skinny, anorexic beatrice).

hell involves perpetual suffering, pain, and worst of all, frustration, but by the end of this little romp, it has grown on you, and like the protagonist, a damned television anchorman still devoted to the principles of journalism, you learn to love it.
rockermike

Trad climber
Berkeley
Aug 3, 2011 - 05:38pm PT
Bruce
I read the Krakauer book some years back. All I remember (as with most of Jon's stuff) is it seemed more aimed at making money for Jon through sensationalism rather than enlightening people. But the Mormon's do have their "difficult to explain to non-believers" stuff. One thing I got from "Mormon America" is that they are not all blind followers. The Mormons evidently actually do have educated theologians who try their best to articulate explanations of their beliefs, rather than just quoting verses from the book of Mormon from rote memory. But as some of their own leaders have expressed, they are a young church and will need time to perfect their theological apologetics. But in the meantime, there is an awful lot of unquestioned faith in their leaders statements. Too much for comfort for me, and this from someone in a very "authority-centric" tradition.

Re: Banner -IMHO its easy to take cheap shots at anything - particularly religion, harder to maintain realistic balance.
AndyG

climber
San Diego, CA
Aug 3, 2011 - 05:46pm PT
The Broom of the System - David Foster Wallace
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2011 - 05:51pm PT
I read "Under the Banner of Heaven" a few years ago. It was an interesting enough expose of fundamental Mormonism which is rarely known in detail.
Gunkie

Trad climber
East Coast US
Aug 3, 2011 - 07:31pm PT
Gunkie, I'm a Fitzgerald lover myself. Reading him on the East Coast must be a kick.

Yeah, very familiar ground in This Side of Paradise. We live about 40 minutes from Princeton and my older daughter attends summer softball camp at the Lawrenceville School. One issue with the book, when Amory Blaine and gang are bivying on the beach at Asbury Park NJ, Fitzgerald talks about Amory trying to stay up to watch the moon settle into the ocean. Well, being the east coast, the moon rises from the ocean. Oops.
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Aug 3, 2011 - 11:07pm PT
Just finished, The Help by Kathryn Stockett and Irvin Yalom's Staring at the Sun, Overcoming the Terror of Death. Yalom is an existentialist Psychologist and I enjoy his perspective on life and insight into the human condition.
Right now reading, The Wife by Meg Wolitzer~ into it and enjoying it.

This summer have read one book after another, quite a break from all the studying I had to do during the previous months. A treat now!
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Aug 4, 2011 - 12:37am PT
Jay..really?
Let me check..
Been years since I studied those words...
Maybe I am confused..

Cool..my memory has been corrupted sometime the last decade..although I remember having trouble with these words when I was young...I had been thinking proletarian was the rich class for at least a few years. Probably mixed up with bourgeoisie and a little with Bolshivics.

"Marxism sees the proletariat and bourgeoisie (capitalist class) as occupying conflicting positions, since workers automatically wish their wages to be as high as possible, while owners and their proxies wish for wages (costs) to be as low as possible."

I gotta study up on my Marxist theory if I am gonna win fattards hat.
ruppell

climber
Aug 4, 2011 - 01:28am PT
How to Climb 5.12 (Eric J. Horst)

Performance ROCK CLIMBING (Dale Goddard and Udo Neumann)

Big Walls (John Long and John Middendorf)

Climbing Your Best: Training to Maximize Your Performance (Heather Reynolds Sagar)

A Falcon Guide: Conditioning for Climbers (Eric J. Horst)

Climbing Anchors (John Long and Bob Gaines)

CLIMBING SELF-RESCUE: Improvising Solutions for Serious Situations (Andy Tyson and Molly Loomis)

Basic Rockcraft (Royal Robbins)

And coming soon

How not to Knot the ends of your rope if rapping on a Gri-Gri(TM)

Just a sample of other stuff to read

As far I go anything written with half a brain who's not me.

Edited for spellng
ruppell

climber
Aug 4, 2011 - 02:42am PT
No replies must of forgotten this is not a climbers forum?

If that's the case

Existentialism from Dostoevsky to Sartre (selected and introduced by WALTER KAUFMANN)

Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand)

And so on and so forth

Twain (any of his)

Vonoghut (most of his)
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 4, 2011 - 07:22am PT
The Proletariat has nothing to lose but his chains,"- Karl Marx.
-And Fattrad's cool hat to gain!

next book I want to read, "The Posessed"- not the Dostoyevskii novel by the same name, (aka 'The Demons') But a new whimsical/ scholarly book by a young woman who is a russian literary scholar and writs about traveling in russia seeking out various various russian literary roots...
bergbryce

Mountain climber
South Lake Tahoe, CA
Aug 4, 2011 - 07:34am PT
Salt (awesome)
Born to Run
Wings of Steel (no kidding, I snagged a copy)
The Foundation (Isamov, is taking months to finish)
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Aug 4, 2011 - 07:40am PT
Jay-since it has been a few days
The book Piper at the Gates.. is Pink Floyds first album
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 4, 2011 - 07:41am PT
Riley,
Here's the proof from Moscow's Revolution Square...

Proletarians of all countries, unite!
Proletarians of all countries, unite!
Credit: Reilly
Tattooed 1

Trad climber
Sebastopol, Ca
Aug 4, 2011 - 07:47am PT
Credit: Tattooed 1
A graphic account of the rise and fall of the Comanche Nation. A very good read.
Tim
nature

climber
back in Tuscon Aridzona....
Aug 4, 2011 - 08:05am PT
Way of the Superior Man - David Deida.

It's one reason I'm certain I pass (or am I trying to fail?) the Man Test
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Aug 4, 2011 - 08:09am PT
bergbryce,
is that Salt by Kurlansky?
Interesting book, but Cod is better.
bergbryce

Mountain climber
South Lake Tahoe, CA
Aug 4, 2011 - 08:14am PT
Ron, yes Kurlanski.
I agree. I read Cod last winter and it was better.
I'm now looking for more food history books as both are pretty fascinating.
dlintz

Trad climber
Neebraskee
Aug 4, 2011 - 08:18am PT
A Feast for Crows. Awesome series!
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Aug 4, 2011 - 08:23am PT
Ya, I even remember seeing that statue and quote before.
Very cool Reilly!
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Aug 4, 2011 - 11:40am PT
D'oh! I was thinking that, The piper... was the name of one of the narnia books.

So anyway this is the book i wanna read, as soon as Chasbro is done with it;
Credit: Jaybro
Credit: Jaybro

Thought the covers might interest some.

And a Tibetan Buddhist for Riley;
Credit: Jaybro

with Georgisa O'keefe poster in background for general grooviness.
BBA

climber
OF
Aug 26, 2011 - 07:18pm PT
Just finished the Seven Pillars of Wisdom by TE Lawrence. I saw the movie ages ago, and was curious about the book when I ran across it at Powell's in Portland. The book is 10 times better than the film. What is most disturbing are the images of the Arabs, and how it looks like they haven't changed an iota since 1918 - still shooting in the air and acting like wild men. I think they will get a regime in Libya they deserve, and the farther we are away from them, the better.
nature

climber
back in Tuscon Aridzona....
Aug 26, 2011 - 07:34pm PT
Just finished She Comes First. great read :-)
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 26, 2011 - 07:38pm PT
hey there say,

wow, we need someone to say that they finished reading one of my books, ;)
:)
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 26, 2011 - 07:44pm PT
Mr Neebee:
I promise, at at future date.
nature

climber
back in Tuscon Aridzona....
Aug 26, 2011 - 07:46pm PT
LOL!

yes we do!
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Aug 26, 2011 - 08:05pm PT


"Probably More Than You Want to Know About the Fishes of the Pacific Coast."
by Milton Love

Milton Love is a very funny guy. Professor at UC Santa Barbara and recognized as one of the foremost experts on fish of the Pacific Coast.

Informative and one of the funniest books I have ever read.
fsck

climber
Dec 29, 2011 - 08:14am PT
100 pgs into this


found my copy of this so it's next
Gary

climber
That Long Black Cloud Is Coming Down
Dec 29, 2011 - 08:28am PT
Just finished the Seven Pillars of Wisdom by TE Lawrence. I saw the movie ages ago, and was curious about the book when I ran across it at Powell's in Portland. The book is 10 times better than the film. What is most disturbing are the images of the Arabs, and how it looks like they haven't changed an iota since 1918 - still shooting in the air and acting like wild men. I think they will get a regime in Libya they deserve, and the farther we are away from them, the better.

And if you substitute "American" for "Turk" it's like reading today's newspaper.
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Dec 29, 2011 - 08:30am PT
Credit: SwipedFromGOOG
Studly

Trad climber
WA
Dec 29, 2011 - 08:48am PT
Toys, by James Patterson. Best seller, got it in my Christmas stocking. Completely stupid worthless total crap. I guess if Patterson puts his name on it, everyone buys it, because its not because of content. How low have we sunk if this is on the best seller list?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Dec 29, 2011 - 09:23am PT
My last read climbing book was Bernadette McDonald's "Freedom climbers". The one before "Freedom climbers" was a spot-rereading of Lynn Hill's "Climbing Free".

I have recently read "Chasing the sun. The epic story of the star that gives us life." Richard Cohen.

I have read Cormac McCarty's "Blood Meridian" two times before and have been spot-rereading it lately.

All four books highly recommended.

The next book will possibly be Umberto Eco's "The Prague cementry".

I have never read "The Da Vinci Code".
bergbryce

Mountain climber
South Lake Tahoe, CA
Dec 29, 2011 - 09:32am PT
I pick up a Faulkner every year or so to have my mind blown. Right now it's Go Down Moses.
Recently finished a biography of Bradford Washburn, it was good. Got a Kindle recently too, first book on it is Seven Years in Tibet. Yeah, I mostly read the old stuff.
Dickbob

climber
Westminster Colorado
Dec 30, 2011 - 02:19pm PT
Charles Frazer's Night Woods. He is the guy who wrote Cold Mountain and Thirteen Moons.

11/22/63 by King. Give it a chance. What have you got to lose?
enjoimx

Trad climber
Kirkwood, ca
Dec 30, 2011 - 02:23pm PT
Shantaram

It's pretty good so far, only just begun.
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Dec 30, 2011 - 02:26pm PT
Shantaram

Prepare to have your mind blown!

IT IS REALLY, REALLY GOOD!
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Dec 30, 2011 - 02:28pm PT
God Is Not Great by Christopher Hitchens
The Litigators by John Grisham
Westmorland: The General Who Lost Vietnam
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Dec 30, 2011 - 02:35pm PT
Three Roads to the Alamo. It's about how Davy Crocket, William Travis and Jim Bowie all ended up in, and then dying in, the Alamo. They all had a different political and business reason for wanting Texas.

also Stalin, Peter the Great and the Spanish explorer LaSalle books are all staring at me.
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Dec 30, 2011 - 02:36pm PT
God Is Not Great by Christopher Hitchens

AGAIN. . . a REALLY, REALLY GOOD ONE!

REALLY GOOD!
sullly

Trad climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 02:51pm PT
Got Three Cups of Tea from a sister for xmas. I'll trade someone their copy of A Million Little Pieces. Fun with fiction.
DS66

Mountain climber
Dislocated
Dec 30, 2011 - 03:01pm PT
Just picked up:
BEYOND THE MOUNTAIN, BY STEVE HOUSE

and

NORTH BY NORTHWESTERN about Sig Hansen's Family (deadliest catch)

How is the new King book about Kennedy? Anybody finish it yet?

Thanks
Dan
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Dec 30, 2011 - 03:20pm PT
"Blink"

and, "The Hunger Games"

Getting some good ideas from this thread and going to head to the used bookstore soon.

Good one Sully, fun with fiction indeed :-)

-and eKat I really like the cover design of the book you're reading!
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Dec 30, 2011 - 03:43pm PT
hey there say, all.... read my books.... read my books... read my books...

READ my books... read MY books... read my BOOKS...

YEP, no matter how i print it, i hope i catch a 'reader', :))



http://neebeeshaabookway.com/id31.html


http://neebee-dreamcatchers.tripod.com/id31.html



then, when i am a famous author, you can say:
"you knew me back when"


book ten, is in the works... :)
Double D

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 03:48pm PT
While not a climbing book, I just finished Zeitoun by Dave Eggers, an incredible non-fiction account of a Hurricane Katrina survivor. It's quite timely regarding our country's recent abandonment of our constitutional right to a trial.

Also in the middle of Born to Run, a hidden tribe of super athlete's... very interesting to anyone who's ever trained in the mountains.

Read On!
bergbryce

Mountain climber
South Lake Tahoe, CA
Dec 30, 2011 - 03:59pm PT
Born to Run
Fantasic read. Looks not only at the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico, but other facets of running including the cycles and types of injuries modern day runners experience, the history of Nike and the marketing behind selling running shoes and equipment (it's all BS). It's safe to say this book was quasi-responsible for the barefoot running trend of late. It's a fun read even for non-hardcore runners (like me). Recommended.
Zander

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 04:03pm PT
I received 1Q85 for Christmas but haven't started it. Looking forward to it.

I'm about halfway through Independence Day by Richard Ford. I'm enjoying it. A serious endeavor though.

I'm also halfway through the second book of a romp that starts with 1632 by Eric Flint. My bro from Seattle always sends me the start of a series for Christmas and this is it for '11. It's not great literature but it is a lot of fun. The premise is that a town of coal miners gets send back in time to Germany in 1632 into the middle of the Thirty Years War. Check it out.

Zander
dirtbag

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 06:11pm PT
Just finished "Angle of Repose" by Wallace Stegner and am now reading "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave."

dirtbag

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 06:14pm PT
Donald, I read the "Hidden Life of Dogs" several years ago.

It had its moments, but I found the notion that a few of her neighbor dogs were "married" a bit much.
Gene

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 06:23pm PT
I'm browsing Roper's 1964 Climbers Guide to Yosemite. Thanks Harrison.

g
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Dec 30, 2011 - 06:31pm PT
Just finished "Angle of Repose" by Wallace Stegner

Next stop with Stegner is "Crossing To Safety". . . you will NOT want it to end!
dirtbag

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 06:42pm PT
Okay, I'll do that! I was also planning to read "Beyond the Hundredth Meridian"
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:04pm PT
Okay, I'll do that! I was also planning to read "Beyond the Hundredth Meridian"

WARNING!

Be prepared to beg, borrow or steal. . . or just plain pay for a paddling trip down the CO through the GC if you do!

FAK!

You will NEED to do it. . . not just WANT!

dirtbag

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:07pm PT
Oh no, ANYTHING but THAT!!! ;-)
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:10pm PT
Anything?

:-)
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:15pm PT

Just finished "Angle of Repose" by Wallace Stegner

My all time favorite book. You'll also like Big Rock Candy Mountain by Stegner.

Animals lovers.... How many of you have read "The Art of Racing In The Rain".
Forget the Kleenex box...break out the jumbo roll of paper towels.

Just finished __"Sarah's Key". Another tear jerker.


Susan
sullly

Trad climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:28pm PT
Now half way through the Jobs book where Ross Perot invests in NeXT. This led me to youtube to watch Dana Carvey in Ross Perot skits...which led me to Carvey's Mclaughlin Group skits.
fosburg

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:30pm PT
DS66, I read 11/22/63 last week, it's a piece of shiite. Writing valid historical fiction might be a pretty high calling.
Curious about that new Murakami someone mentioned upthread, that guy is a trip.
I'm reading Arthur & George by Julian Barnes right now.
DS66

Mountain climber
Dislocated
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:36pm PT
fosburg, thanks. As I expected, 3/4 of the way through THe Dome by King. Not like he used to be I don't think. Understandable after 75 books or so.
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:38pm PT
@Sully....don't you just hate when you go on endless backward mapping? At least yours sounds fun. In grad school ( way before Internet) I used to get hung up on back tracking through citations and references on this endless backward chain....like it was a surprise. ... The writer had usually bastardized the original authors' intent. Like a game of telephone at a birthday party.

Looking forward to January...bunch of my favorite authors have new books coming out.

Susan
DS66

Mountain climber
Dislocated
Dec 30, 2011 - 07:59pm PT
Anyone read Legends of the Fall? Any good?
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Dec 30, 2011 - 08:14pm PT
I loved "art of racing in the rain"!!!!
laughingman

Mountain climber
Seattle WA
Dec 30, 2011 - 08:24pm PT
Wild swan by Jung Chang...

and

Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong

note: Cao Cao is super cool.
fosburg

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 08:33pm PT
Hey laughingman , ever read 9 Stories by J. D. Salinger?
Gene

climber
Dec 30, 2011 - 08:36pm PT
laughingman,

What do you think of Wild Swans? I had a difficult time accepting Jung's potrayal as even close to the truth.

g
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Dec 30, 2011 - 08:58pm PT
The Stephen Mitchell translation or Ranier Maria Rilke's Selected Poetry
rockermike

Trad climber
Berkeley
Dec 31, 2011 - 06:45am PT
"Tillich: A Guide for the Perplexed" O'Neil (about the thought of Paul Tillich, 20th century protestant theologian proposing Christianity without the myths)

and on my I-Pod for by bicycle workouts, "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" - makes me sick of my race (or of the human race).

and
"The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the future of Religion" Sam Harris: he's one of the neo-atheists who are on a campaign to erase religion in all its forms from the face of the earth. Not what I expected but interesting all the same. Did you know that all evil is the result of religion? Its true, and Sam will tell you so, over and over again.
BBA

climber
OF
Dec 31, 2011 - 07:30am PT
Gary - You could be right about us being the Turks of today. I just finished The Decline and Fall of the British Empire, an interesting case history. It seems we have our own empire today run by old, crazy, ugly surrogates all over the place left over from the cold war to whom money is given which is used for military control. Maybe it's crumbling? It is a different model than the British had, but it appears to work for our moneyed classes. The sad conclusion (my deduction, it isn't mentioned in the book) is that Osama may have had a point in wanting to attack us because our troops are stationed in their lands. No one wants a foreign presence running their lives whether directly or through surrogates.
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Dec 31, 2011 - 07:35am PT
1Q84
fosburg

climber
Dec 31, 2011 - 11:45am PT
How are you liking Murakami's new one Wade?
buckie

Trad climber
Oregon
Dec 31, 2011 - 03:39pm PT
Freinds of the Abyss, by Scott Schmidt. Look it up, I won't ruin the ending but I think you can figure it out.
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Dec 31, 2011 - 03:47pm PT
Kevin- it's Murakami supersized. read it 3/4's of the way through then put it down for awhile before finishing. There's some particularly brilliant structural stuff I won't spoil by discussing. If you want it email me or facebook an address and I'll send it. Happy New Year to you and yours.
Dickbob

climber
Westminster Colorado
Dec 31, 2011 - 04:46pm PT
The Road by McCarthy. He just gave Oprah his first interview. He says he wrote it in a few weeks and that it was like taking dictation. It was dedicated to his eight year old boy and written as a love story for him.

I have not read it for a long time but I have read it twice. I am going to have to do it again now. It is that good.

http://www.oprah.com/oprahbookclub/Cormac-McCarthy-Comments-on-Passages-from-The-Road

Edit: looks like the interview was from 07
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, CA
Feb 2, 2012 - 04:25pm PT
The Founders' Key, by Larry P. Arnn

http://www.amazon.com/Founders-Key-Connection-Declaration-Constitution/dp/1595554726/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328228652&sr=8-1

Just started it. It's awesome.
sullly

Trad climber
Feb 2, 2012 - 04:32pm PT
The Things They Carried. Haven't taught it in a few years. What other book covers the Vietnam War better? I want to read Tobias Wolf's book about his V. War experiences too since I heard him speak last month and his writing resembles T. O'Brien's.
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Feb 2, 2012 - 04:32pm PT
Elizabeth George, believing the Lie, I really like British mysteries. Although an American she writes wonderful Brit mysteries.


Susan
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Feb 2, 2012 - 04:34pm PT
At the end of "Just Kids". (Audiobook...per my usual. Read by Patti Smith.)

It's been completely fascinating.

Before that it was "A Sense of an Ending" which was the best I'd read or listened to in a long time.
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Feb 2, 2012 - 05:40pm PT
last month:
Comeback 2.0- Lance Armstrong (very short)
The Invention of Hugo Cabret- Brian Selznick (short)
The Big Year-Mark Obmascik
most of 100 Favorite North American Climbs- Fred Beckey
most of Yosemite Big Walls- Chris McNamara, Chris Van Leuven
The Ox Bow Incident-Walter Van Tilberg Clark

started Moby Dick- Herman Melville ( rereading it,I'm savoring it, a little at a time)
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 2, 2012 - 06:59pm PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

Rereading Beatles bio by Bob Spitz, all 800+ pages. Very well-written and researched
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Feb 2, 2012 - 07:19pm PT
hey there, say, all...

the jake smith ranch seriies, by...

me, ;))

neebeeshaabookway, :)
twinship, at its best, :)
...annnnnddddd so much more!
fosburg

climber
Feb 2, 2012 - 07:57pm PT
The Thin Red Line and The Pale King, both really good.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:00pm PT
Chi Running, Danny Dreyer
Batrock

Trad climber
Burbank
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:01pm PT
Vultures Picnic by Greg Palast
WBraun

climber
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:03pm PT
Everyone reads books for knowledge.

Why then is the world more fuked up then ever ......

Just WTF is the world reading ????????????
Leggs

Sport climber
Home Sweet Home, Tucson AZ
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:05pm PT
"The Long Goodbye" by Raymond Chandler
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, CA
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:07pm PT
Everyone reads books for knowledge.

Why then is the world more fuked up then ever ......

Just WTF is the world reading ????????????


See my above post, old man....you just may agree.


stevep

Boulder climber
Salt Lake, UT
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:11pm PT
The Things They Carried. Haven't taught it in a few years. What other book covers the Vietnam War better? I want to read Tobias Wolf's book about his V. War experiences too since I heard him speak last month and his writing resembles T. O'Brien's.

The Things They Carried is great. Recently read Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes, which comes pretty close.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:18pm PT
Ameritopia, Mark Levin.

Succinct.

A few thousand years of political philosophy easily digested.

bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, CA
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:26pm PT
Here is the begininning of The Fathers' Key...the opening is a quote from John Adams to his wife in a correspondance;

"The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeding generations as the great anniversirrary festival. It ought to be commemerated as the day of deliverance. By solemnn acts of God almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pom and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of the continent to the other, from this time forward forever more,,,,"

Awesome
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:39pm PT
the explorer LaSalle and his forays with Indains into the great lakes and Canada. rad.
blahblah

Gym climber
Boulder
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:44pm PT
Not reading anything super noteworthy but I'll put in a plug for Kindle--just got an e-ink one and am reading more than in years.
(Finished 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, now on The God Delusion).

IV

climber
tahoe
Feb 2, 2012 - 08:48pm PT
the cerro torre thread
sullly

Trad climber
Feb 3, 2012 - 04:27am PT
Leggs, Isn't R. Chandler amazing? Femme fatale, hardboiled detective, LA at night.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2012 - 03:57pm PT

I plan on reading it this weekend. Read it once years ago.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 3, 2012 - 04:11pm PT
Some time in the 90's I picked up a copy in paperback for a re-read. I'd read the first English edition checked out from the library as a novice in 1970.


Not the same book.

There was some extensive PC editing in the later edition.

The bad part is that the later edition does not give the insight into the 30's political milieu that the first does.
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
Feb 3, 2012 - 04:50pm PT
Just finished Where Good Ideas Come From which is awesome

Here are my favorite books of 2011

White Spider is probably my favorite mountaineering book of all time. I need to re-read. Good tip.
sullly

Trad climber
Feb 3, 2012 - 04:55pm PT
Saw your list Chris. Agree about the Jobs book, but thought it lost steam the last 100 pages. Like your line, "Ivy league drop outs get it done!"
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
Feb 3, 2012 - 05:15pm PT
Yeah, I have a special place in my heart for people that drop out from Princeton...
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, CA
Feb 3, 2012 - 05:33pm PT
It astounds me the crap people waste their time with. I do realize you'd have the same opinions of my 'literary' choices.

I'm not really surprised, hanging out on a site filled with, largely, liberal people. But it really fascinates me that you guys dwell on some inane sh#t that you really feel is worthy.

Maybe it's just because you all are avid readers and have run out of quality stuff and have resorted to quasi-okay stuff. I don't read regularly because I'm pretty busy, so I choose my selections carefully. I even have some sh#t I bought but haven't gotten to.

I guess I like more of the classics and historical texts. I'm not trying to project superiority, just focus on the really good stuff.

Hemimngway and Steinbeck are really good IMO. Huxley, Heinlein, and Asimov too.

Maybe I should STFU and leave this thread to real literary conisseurs. I ain't one...hehe

EDIT: Oh! As a big fan of Michael Savage, I did read his first novel, "Abuse of Power". Excellent read if you're into Tom Clancy type stuff. Very good read. NY Times best-seller, whatever that means.
Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Feb 3, 2012 - 05:54pm PT
It astounds me the crap people waste their time with. I do realize you'd have the same opinions of my 'literary' choices.

Maybe I should STFU and leave this thread to real literary conisseurs. I ain't one...hehe
Bluring
Maybe you shouldn't bother to post to threads when you have nothing to say
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Feb 3, 2012 - 07:56pm PT
I'm knott, cuz I'm on the taco stand. But when I'm off, I'm reading
Conquistadors of the Useless by Lionel Terray.
An AWESOME read!!!!
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Feb 3, 2012 - 07:58pm PT
White Spider is probably my favorite mountaineering book of all time

I like "the Climb up to Hell" for Eiger books.
Vosser

Trad climber
reno, NV
Feb 3, 2012 - 07:59pm PT
Clifford the big red dog has my attention right now. its a classic.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2012 - 08:03pm PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

I read it a few years ago. Couldn't put it down once I started.
A worthy addition to the Eiger library.
Tobia

Social climber
GA
Feb 4, 2012 - 05:16am PT
There Was A River (Essays on the Southwest) Bruce Berger (Someone mentioned it on the forum but I don't see it on this thread) A good read!

The Worst Hard Time Timothy Egan

The HelpKathryn Stockett

Behind Sad Eyes Marc Shpiro

The Last Season Eric Blehm

The Rising Sun John Tolland

Hop On Pop Dr. Seuss
Park Rat

Social climber
CA, UT,CT,FL
Feb 4, 2012 - 06:14am PT

I have just finished Into the Silence, by Wade Davis.

The book is long and sometimes ponderous, however I found descriptions of the climbers and the time which they lived to be revealing. His treatment of George Mallory is not always sympathetic, but if it's true it explains much of the reasons behind the 1924 disaster.

You may want to skip some of the book,as they spend much of the time describing world war 1, the last chapters give a very detailed account of the 1924 expedition.

You come away from this book feeling that you know as much as anyone could about what may have caused the deaths of Irvine and Mallory.

The book concludes with the finding of George Mallory's body.

While it is a long sometimes slow book, I would recommend it to anyone who is a serious fan of Mount Everest climbing history.





Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Feb 4, 2012 - 06:39am PT


Loved it.

DMT
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Feb 4, 2012 - 09:17am PT
The dry grass of august.
Tomcat

Trad climber
Chatham N.H.
Feb 4, 2012 - 09:25am PT
I love those Follett's Lolli. Reading Fall of Giants right now and loving it too. Do you ever read Henning Mankell, the Swedish author of the Kurt Wallander series? They are my favorite crime/mysteries, set in Ystad.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Feb 4, 2012 - 09:27am PT
I have a confession, I just finished re-reading C.S Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia series. I first read them as a child and loved them.

Now, as an adult I find them to be engaging stories. However, as the series progresses there seems to be an ever growing sense of Christianity, which never registered on me as a kid.

Lots'a god in those books.

As a recommendation I'll offer up Cadillac Desert by Marc Reisner. It's a history of water use in the western states.

Edit; I read Pillars of the Earth in my teens. That type of story is my favorite when compared to Folletts spy novels.
Tomcat

Trad climber
Chatham N.H.
Feb 4, 2012 - 09:47am PT
I've read all the Wallander's Lolli, are there other Mankell's you'd recommend?
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Feb 4, 2012 - 11:22am PT
I'm just getting into:

Fatal Crossroad: The Untold Story of the Malmedy Massacre at the Battle of the Bulge

by Danny S. Parker
(Da Capo Press: Cambridge, MA, 2012)

Finally solves the long-standing mystery of the murder of nearly a 100 American POWs by the Waffen SS at a crossroads outside Malmedy in Belgium on the German border.

The rot begins at the top! Yes, indeed, there were secret orders instructing the SS to terrorize civilians and murder POWs during their advance into Belgium in December 1944. Of course, those orders have not survived, but there are German vets who saw them. So, despite the fact that no one was ever convicted of the massacre during a trial after the war in 1947, a war crime did take place that was condoned by the highest level of the Nazi regime. Parker even has maps showing where the individual tanks and SPWs were parked and who the drivers and occupants were. Extensive interviews with Waffen SS vets too. A real historical landmark.
Truthdweller

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Feb 4, 2012 - 02:03pm PT
The Bible, KJV
Gary

climber
That Long Black Cloud Is Coming Down
Feb 4, 2012 - 02:38pm PT
The Last stand of the Tin Can Sailors. Excellent stuff. The story of the pilot who emptied his .38 at the Yamato was too cool for words.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Feb 5, 2012 - 06:15am PT
Follett's history novels are excellent and serve as a great reminder of how lucky many of us are on this trip round the wheel.

DMT
Leggs

Sport climber
Home Sweet Home, Tucson AZ
Feb 5, 2012 - 12:04pm PT
Leggs, Isn't R. Chandler amazing? Femme fatale, hardboiled detective, LA at night.
Sully, YES! I can't get enough... Chandler takes his readers right to the era in which he writes about.... Makes me want to meet my own P. Marlowe. ;)

Peace, Leggs
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Feb 5, 2012 - 12:20pm PT
"Sarah's Key". Very moving. I enjoy fiction that combine contemporary events with historical events.

Any recommendations gladly received.


Susan
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 5, 2012 - 12:29pm PT
Just other day I was thumbing through my old edition of this beautifully photographed masterpiece and today I see this revived thread. Cool.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/483295/Tribute-to-Gaston-Rebuffat


Credit: Donald Thompson
Inner City

Trad climber
East Bay
Feb 5, 2012 - 12:33pm PT
"Passing Strange"...A biography of the multi-faceted climber, author and east coast enigma Clarence King
Niels

climber
Denmark, formerly Sacramento
Feb 7, 2012 - 01:17pm PT
I'm reading Thin Ice by Mark Bowen. The story centers on Lonnie Thompson, a scientist who takes ice core samples from high-altitude peaks in the tropics (e.g., Peru) to study the history of climate change. He was profiled in one of the climbing mags a while back. The author is a climber and physicist and does a great job of explaining the science. If you are interested in mountaineering, climate change, and science in general, it's a great read.
~kief~

Trad climber
nor-cal
Feb 7, 2012 - 01:28pm PT
Credit: ~kief~
tornado

climber
lawrence kansas
Feb 7, 2012 - 01:37pm PT
"Shadow Country" Peter Matthiessen
graniteclimber

Trad climber
The Illuminati -- S.P.E.C.T.R.E. Division
Feb 7, 2012 - 01:58pm PT
dougs510

Social climber
down south
Feb 7, 2012 - 03:55pm PT
We Were Soldiers once... And young
nutjob

Gym climber
Berkeley, CA
Feb 7, 2012 - 04:08pm PT
Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World (Weatherford)
The Red Pony (Steinbeck)
Grapes of Wrath (Steinbeck)
Beginning PHP 5.3 (Doyle)

I like to juggle a few in parallel... one for the torlet, one for the bedside, one for the couch, one for when I'm not in the moods for the others.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Feb 7, 2012 - 04:19pm PT
I recently read Into the Silence. It's very detailed, but I don't know that it adds an awful lot to the historiograpy of Mallory, Irvine and Everest. Still, well worth a read.
sullly

Trad climber
Feb 7, 2012 - 04:37pm PT
Shakespeare's Philosophy: Discovering the Meaning Behind the Plays and Am. Short Stories Since 1945
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 7, 2012 - 08:10pm PT
I couldn't find my copy of The White Spider so I started rereading this instead:


I am at the part slightly before the rescue gets underway.

I read it a few years ago and I had forgotten much of the detail.



This looks like the Hinterstoiser Traverse, in dry condition,without ice.
cintune

climber
Midvale School for the Gifted
Feb 28, 2012 - 04:31pm PT
A Century of Sand Dredging in the Bristol Channel: Volume Two by Peter Gosson (Amberley). A book that documents the sand trade from its inception in 1912 to the present day, focusing on the Welsh coast.

http://www.thebookseller.com/news/diagram-prize-shortlist-revealed.html
scuffy b

climber
heading slowly NNW
Feb 28, 2012 - 04:32pm PT
The God of Small Things
The Playful Brain
the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Feb 28, 2012 - 04:39pm PT
Let My People Go Surfing: The Education of a Reluctant Businessman
Yvon Chouinard (Author)

Good read.

I wonder if it's true that Patagonia basically created fleece sweaters and synthetic underwear?
manzanita man

Social climber
somerset, ca.
Feb 28, 2012 - 05:11pm PT
The Mammoth Book of Dirty, Sick, X-Rated & politically incorrect jokes- uncensored
Roughster

Sport climber
Vacaville, CA
Feb 28, 2012 - 05:20pm PT
A Dance with Dragons - George RR Martin. So far it is awesome! Note: It is the 5th book in a series.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 28, 2012 - 07:28pm PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

Excellent chronicle of the 20th century from the First World War until the 1980s. Its all here: from the Bolshevik Revolution, the Great depression,
WW2, the cold war , Hitler, Stalin, Churchill. Anyone interested in the history of the last century should read this book.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 28, 2012 - 10:14pm PT
Trying to put off finishing Whatever You Do, Don't Run by Peter Allison.
He was a snot-nosed 19 year old Aussie who went to Africa to pursue a career
as a safari guide. The guy has serious writing chops and the seemingly
innate Aussie penchant for yarn spinning, not that I doubt any of his.
Absolutely superb!
NigelSSI

Trad climber
B.C.
Feb 29, 2012 - 01:56am PT
Reading a collection of El Borak stories by Robert E Howard.
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Feb 29, 2012 - 06:05am PT

Team of Rivals by Doris Kearns Goodwin.

About Abraham Lincoln's cabinet of competitors. Excellent read!
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Feb 29, 2012 - 09:18am PT
No Ordinary Time by Doris Kearns Goodwin.

She's VERY Good.
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Feb 29, 2012 - 09:52am PT
Finished Steve Jobs biography.
Now reading -148degrees.
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Feb 29, 2012 - 09:56am PT
Finished State of Wonder by Ann Patchett, enjoyed the read.

Just beginning Zorro, by Isabell Allende, not liking it so far will read about 100 pages and if I still dislike, will stop.

Anyone read, We Need To Talk About Kevin? Lionel Shriver is one amazing author.
Gary

climber
That Long Black Cloud Is Coming Down
Feb 29, 2012 - 10:36am PT
Started East of Eden. So far, so good.
socialclimber

Trad climber
CA
Mar 30, 2012 - 12:35am PT
Finished reading Women by Bukowski about 10 min ago, reading The Snow Leopard for the umpteenth time, and just got The Man Who Walked Through Time...

Charles
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Mar 30, 2012 - 01:06am PT
Cutting for Stone. Abraham Verghese
Norwegian

Trad climber
Placerville, California
Mar 30, 2012 - 05:43am PT
David Copperfield, Dickens
Dickbob

climber
Westminster Colorado
Mar 30, 2012 - 06:19am PT
My daughter and I are on a Roald Dahl kick. Started out with Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, BFG, James and the Giant Peach and now Matilda.
phillip mike revis

climber
snowbird, ut
Mar 30, 2012 - 06:30am PT
in hand Friends of Eddie Coyle by George V. Higgins
on deck The Killer Inside me by Jim Thompson
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Mar 30, 2012 - 06:38am PT
The Octopus by Frank Norris. It's free for the Kindle.
sullly

Trad climber
Mar 30, 2012 - 06:43am PT
D.bob, Dahl wrote two fabulous short stories with twist endings worth reading: "Lamb to Slaughter" and "Beware of the Dog."
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 24, 2012 - 04:11pm PT
Just finished rereading :

Credit: Donald Thompson

Great biography, well written and researched. 900 pages.

From Bookmarks Magazine:
Edited down from a staggering 2,700 pages, The Beatles took eight years of research and writing.

Also finished:

Credit: Donald Thompson

A superb chronicle of the 20th century. This book will give you a solid grasp of the events and personages of the last century.
sullly

Trad climber
Jun 24, 2012 - 04:21pm PT
After viewing a fine production of The Sea Gull in Ashland, I've been on a Chekhov binge. Starting Uncle Vanya. Read Cherry Orchard and Three Sisters last week. Before that, his short stories.
gf

climber
Jun 24, 2012 - 04:37pm PT
caro's latest in a great biographic series on LBJ
The Passage of Power
Urizen

Ice climber
Berkeley, CA
Jun 24, 2012 - 04:59pm PT
Just finished Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth. Pretty witty.

Now I'm into Robert Hughes's The Shock of the New. Same.

Seventh in line at the public library for The Passage of Power. Hope Caro lives to finish the final volume.

Sully, if you can find it see Laurence Olivier's film of The Three Sisters. (1970). Alan Bates, as usual, gives a performance to make you believe that no one gave a moment's thought to the character until he came along.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Jun 24, 2012 - 05:02pm PT
Gervasutti's Climbs dallo stesso paragon.

Forward by Lucien Devies (struck with a real case of admiration/inspiration).


NOTE TO Phillip Revis:

The book Cogan's Trade, also by Higgins and part of a trilogy with The Friends of Eddie Coyle, has been made into a movie called Killing Them Softly. It stars Brangelina (Part I) and will be out later this year.
See imdb.com.

The last climbing-oriented novel that I read was in March, Looking for Mo, by Daniel Duane.
rockermike

Trad climber
Berkeley
Jun 24, 2012 - 05:03pm PT
"Does God Exist", by Hans Kung (liberal, sometimes banned Catholic theologian). Long, detailed intellectual history of Christian thought. Haven't finished it yet but great so far - if you are into that sort of thing. Paul, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Pascal.... they all got their place.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Jun 24, 2012 - 05:27pm PT
"Well isn't that special?"---Church Lady

rockermike's choice is by the author of the last online article I looked at. When I was seeking the word "prophet" I came across this about Muhammed, Allah's prophet. Kung is "rock" solid.
http://www.bismikaallahuma.org/archives/2005/hans-kung-on-is-muhammad-a-prophet/

edit: This is what I'm doing the rest of the evening. I am going through this whole thread and checking the Wik for the titles and seek out the reviews/synopses of each one I haven't read. Goal!!!
sullly

Trad climber
Jun 24, 2012 - 05:59pm PT
Urizen, I'll look for the Olivier version. Just watched him in something I hadn't seen in 30yrs - Brideshead Revisited (with Jeremy Irons). Olivier is mesmerizing as a dying man. I'll try House of Mirth since I love Wharton.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Jun 24, 2012 - 06:12pm PT
Just finished "The Memory of Running". It had its weeknesses, but I'm a sucker for the regular guy on a big endurance journey. Think Forrest Gump during his running phase as the sane brother in "I Know This Much Is True."
Edge

Trad climber
New Durham, NH
Jun 24, 2012 - 06:36pm PT
Currently finishing up "Toltec Dreaming" by Ken Eagle Feather, a disciple of don Juan Matus of Castenada fame. It delves into dreaming body experiences and "dreaming while awake," among other things.

Two weeks ago, when I was half way through the book, I woke up one morning with a crystal clear vision about a new route to the left of one I had established last fall. That weekend I rapped over the face, and hidden by 3" diameter lichen were three pristine routes, each containing great movement and hidden holds. Although none are terribly hard, they filled in a previously unexplored 110' high section of cliff.

"A Toltec Dream" 5.7; "Way of the Peaceful Warrior" 5.9; and the last one fell today at NH 5.9+, "Sweat Lodge" named for the 85 degree temps and high humidity.
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jun 24, 2012 - 07:54pm PT


Full Body Burden by Kristen Iverson.

About Rocky Flats, where nuclear triggers were made of plutonium
just outside of Arvada, and Denver, CO, polluting us all with
PU, having a half life of 24,000 years. . .
Mark Rodell

Trad climber
Bangkok
Jul 2, 2012 - 04:39pm PT
Too rushed to check all the above posts but I cracked The Dharma Bums yesterday. One of my students (Thai) asked about the Beats, said his Dad mentioned them, wanted to know if he could read a beat book for the novel component of a lit. class I teach. Sure, I said "I'll read it along with you, if you're Dad has Dharma Bums." The student thinks it odd that an American, Kerouac, would write about dharma. I said, "You'd be surprised what goes down on Turtle Island." My copy is a paperback from 1959, fifty cents from Signet.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 2, 2012 - 04:46pm PT
American Gods by Neil Gaiman is an outstanding novel.

I've been on a novel kick lately. For years I was reading only nonfiction. I've rediscovered the fun of a good novel.

I just bought one of Kings Gunslinger books, but haven't started it yet.
rectorsquid

climber
Lake Tahoe
Jul 2, 2012 - 04:50pm PT
The last book I read was Hamlet. That was interesting and not at all like other things I've read in the past.

I might try reading another 'spear play one day when I get up the courage.

Dave
Dickbob

climber
Westminster Colorado
Jul 2, 2012 - 05:07pm PT
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.
Incredible novel about the persecution of the jewish people and the false idea that that the majority of the Germans were in on it together.
sullly

Trad climber
Jul 2, 2012 - 06:41pm PT
Rectorsquid, so many great lines from that play. Still looking for the film version I liked with Helena Bonham Carter as Ophelia.

I'm almost finished Uncle Vanya. It's excellent so far. Has an environmental angle I didn't anticipate.
DanaB

climber
CT
Jul 2, 2012 - 06:47pm PT
I'm reading "The Best of Supertopo."
Try it.
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jul 2, 2012 - 07:24pm PT

Making A Real Killing Rocky Flats and the Nuclear West

by Len Akland
Lovegasoline

Trad climber
Sh#t Hole, Brooklyn, NY
Jul 2, 2012 - 08:05pm PT
Snowblind, A Brief Career in the Cocaine Trade by Robert Sabbag

Death Valley in '49 by WIlliam Lewis Manly.
The last lines read are still fresh in my mind, "It was on this trip that one of Mr. Bennett's ox drivers was taken with a serious bowel difficulty..."

Jackson Pollock by Kirk Varnedoe (large monograph with essays which accompanied the Polllock retrospective in the late '90s).

Recently completed Orange Sunshine by Nicholas Schou, which I thought was unexceptional writing about an interesting topic. Another book on the same topic, The Brotherhood of Eternal Love, From Flower Power to Hippie Mafia: The Story of the LSD Counterculture by Stewart Tendler and Davaid May, is available online (http://www.druglibrary.net/schaffer/lsd/books/belcont.htm);.

S.Leeper

Social climber
somewhere that doesnt have anything over 90'
Jul 2, 2012 - 08:06pm PT
Steven Ambrose D dAY
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jul 2, 2012 - 08:09pm PT
Anathem -Stephenson
&
Steve Jobs -Isaacson

switching between them as mood swings
zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Jul 2, 2012 - 08:09pm PT
The Great 1977 Airplane Crash meets the Yosemite-Modesto Pentangle


by Rick Schloss (pre-release version)
Shack

Big Wall climber
Reno NV
Jul 2, 2012 - 08:26pm PT


I read this a couple weeks ago....

It is by far the most amazing story of courage and survival that I have ever read. Absolutely mind blowing what Marcus Luttrell endured.

Here's the synopsis...
"On a clear night in late June 2005, four U.S. Navy SEALs left their base in northern Afghanistan for the mountainous Pakistani border. Their mission was to capture or kill a notorious al Qaeda leader known to be ensconced in a Taliban stronghold surrounded by a small but heavily armed force. Less then twenty-four hours later, only one of those Navy SEALs remained alive.

This is the story of fire team leader Marcus Luttrell, the sole survivor of Operation Redwing, and the desperate battle in the mountains that led, ultimately, to the largest loss of life in Navy SEAL history. But it is also, more than anything, the story of his teammates, who fought ferociously beside him until he was the last one left-blasted unconscious by a rocket grenade, blown over a cliff, but still armed and still breathing. Over the next four days, badly injured and presumed dead, Luttrell fought off six al Qaeda assassins who were sent to finish him, then crawled for seven miles through the mountains before he was taken in by a Pashtun tribe, who risked everything to protect him from the encircling Taliban killers.

A six-foot-five-inch Texan, Leading Petty Officer Luttrell takes us, blow-by-blow, through the brutal training of America's warrior elite and the relentless rites of passage required by the Navy SEALs. He transports us to a monstrous battle fought in the desolate peaks of Afghanistan, where the beleaguered American team plummeted headlong a thousand feet down a mountain as they fought back through flying shale and rocks. In this rich , moving chronicle of courage, honor, and patriotism, Marcus Luttrell delivers one of the most powerful narratives ever written about modern warfare-and a tribute to his teammates, who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country."
Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
Jul 2, 2012 - 08:51pm PT
Wild Ducks Flying Backwards by Tom Robbins
S.Leeper

Social climber
somewhere that doesnt have anything over 90'
Jul 2, 2012 - 10:06pm PT
Shack, that sounds like a real page turner!
Shack

Big Wall climber
Reno NV
Jul 2, 2012 - 10:18pm PT
S.Leeper...It is. I read it in 2 days. I could not put it down.

The synopsis doesn't even begin to do the full story justice. It was basically 4 Seals against about 150 Taliban.

Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Jul 2, 2012 - 10:19pm PT
Smollett
Smollett
Credit: Largo
Shack

Big Wall climber
Reno NV
Jul 2, 2012 - 10:40pm PT
Here's just one small excerpt from "Lone Survivor"...


And he groped in his pocket for his mobile phone, the one we had dared not use because it would give away our position..and then Leutenant Murphy walked out into the open ground. He walked until he was more or less in the center, gunfire all around him, and he sat on a small rock and began punching in the numbers to HQ.
I could hear him talking. "My men are taking heavy fire...we're getting picked apart. My guys are dying out here...we need help."
And right then Mikey took a bullet straight in the back. I saw the blood spurt from his chest. He slumped forward, dropping his phone and his rifle. but then he braced himself, grabbed them both, sat upright again, and once more put the phone to his ear.
I heard him speak again. "Roger that, sir. Thank you" Then he stood up again and staggered out to our bad position, the one guarding out left, and Mikey just started fighting again, firing at the enemy.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Jul 2, 2012 - 10:49pm PT
"The Long Walk" by S. Rawicz. Looks like my third read.

Just finished with "Gervasutti's Climbs."
Stephanie Bergner

Trad climber
Planet Send
Jul 2, 2012 - 10:53pm PT
"The Lacuna," by Barbara Kingsolver in between hundreds of MBE multiple choice questions...
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 2, 2012 - 11:30pm PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

Excellent book on the senses, well-written.
Jennie

Trad climber
Elk Creek, Idaho
Jul 3, 2012 - 08:28am PT
Uh-oh...good guy SteveW might be turning into an anti-nuke. I was loaned out to Rocky Flats in the last days of the decon and demolition a decade ago...not many structures left now. (above ground)

Interesting history, there...


Doing my annual reading of Look Homeward, Angel and struck with wonder at finding The Godfather quite absorbing. Oh, those murderous Irish ! :-)
toadgas

Trad climber
los angeles
Jul 3, 2012 - 08:36am PT
.

Reading Tortilla Flats by Steinbeck. Steinbeck is a hero of the left but today this book would surely be condemned for portraying Latinos as lazy, over-sexed, alcoholic and criminal.


...read it yerself and see


Wonderful book, imo


.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Jul 3, 2012 - 08:46am PT
Hedge Fund Market Wizards - Schwager
Hiroshige: Prints and Drawings - Forrer
Infinite Jest - David Foster Wallace
Fred Beckey's 100 Favorite North American Climbs


The stack waxes and wanes, but there is always a stack in progress.
sullly

Trad climber
Jul 3, 2012 - 01:01pm PT
Hey Jennie, did you know Mister E's relative wrote Look Homeward A.? Pretty impressive, this ST bunch.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 3, 2012 - 01:04pm PT
Hey Toad, have you read Tortilla Curtian by Boyle? Another one worth delving into.
zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Jul 3, 2012 - 01:07pm PT
The Bounty Trilogy - this is a reread and it's gonna take a while.
bit'er ol' guy

climber
the past
Jul 3, 2012 - 01:10pm PT
I'm reading something old, high-brow

and in another language

that helps me feel superior.

Jennie

Trad climber
Elk Creek, Idaho
Jul 3, 2012 - 07:49pm PT
Hey Jennie, did you know Mister E's relative wrote Look Homeward A.? Pretty impressive, this ST bunch.



Yes, I remember Mister E posting of Thomas Wolfe being a kinsperson, Sully…and I agree 100% apropos our impressive ST bunch.

I’ve been a Thomas Wolfe aficionado since my teens, grasping every TW novel, anthology and biography I could lay my hands on. (…even reading history of the“Pennsyvania Dutch”.)

Look Homeward, Angel is his brightest gem. Wish I could write like that…

Raintree County by Ross Lockridge is in similar sub-genre and nearly as captivating. Although the war narration and foot racing chronicles become a mite tedious.


toadgas

Trad climber
los angeles
Jul 3, 2012 - 08:41pm PT
-

Hey Toad, have you read Tortilla Curtian by Boyle? Another one worth delving into.


yes, I've been to a few readings by TC Boyle and they are always hilarious.

Tortilla Curtain he said was his even-handed "meditation" on the illegal immigration issue in California. For portraying the criminal element among illegals (as well as the good element), Boyle said he received quite a few denunciations from liberals (though Boyle clearly is NOT a conservative).

I've pretty much read everything by TC Boyle except his latest novel, which is set (I think) on the Channel Islands off Santa Barbara, and has an environmental theme of some sort.

His three novels I'd most recommend are: Riven Rock, The Road to Wellville, and A Friend of the Earth


People seem to enjoy Drop City (about the hippie era); and his send up of Frank Lloyd Wright in The Women was funny and amazing.


vvv

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoLYbfsNrFA

-
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 3, 2012 - 08:45pm PT
The stack waxes and wanes, but there is always a stack in progress.

Ain't that the truth. And they aren't pancakes, either.

Has anyone read the new translation of Kristin Lavransdatter? Sort of historical chick-lit, but well written. Won the Nobel Prize. The author was some sort of distant cousin.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Jul 3, 2012 - 09:09pm PT
The Chaperone
Zander

climber
Jul 4, 2012 - 07:25am PT
Independence Day by Richard Ford

Prehistory: The Making of the Human Mind by Colin Renfrew

Pillar Mountain by Max Brand
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Jul 5, 2012 - 05:39pm PT
Stanley
"The Impossible Life of Africas Greatest Explorer"

~Tim Jeal
Captain...or Skully

climber
Jul 30, 2012 - 06:29pm PT
A Kindle is NOT a book.
Eff Kindles. How much Coal burned while you were reading?
Huh?
Real Books are amazing. Unplug. At least some of the goddam time, eh?
It'll do you good.
sullly

Trad climber
Jul 30, 2012 - 06:32pm PT
+1 skully
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jul 30, 2012 - 08:47pm PT
Yeah, but keep an un read book on your phone at all times!

Death at La Fenice - Donna Leon
-in a fancy paperback edition. from a used bookstore. That my mom read first....
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Jul 30, 2012 - 08:49pm PT
Rowells Vertical World of Yosemite....Good bed time stories...Beaver appreciation thread..2 thumbs up...
Captain...or Skully

climber
Jul 30, 2012 - 08:55pm PT
I gotta phone(at) home. If I put a book on it, it gets hard to find.
Old school.
Books n shelves n sh#t. It lasts. Hard to take on the Bart, though.

zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Jul 30, 2012 - 10:27pm PT
Bekenntnisse des Hochstaplers Felix Krull. Der Memoiren, erster Teil

Thomas Mann couldn't finish it, but I did.

Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 30, 2012 - 11:32pm PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

The tragic story of the passenger liner Andrea Doria collision with another liner the Stockholm on the night of July 25, 1956.
52 people perished that fogy night out of 1134 passengers and 572 crew.

Acts of heroism, and cowardice, abound. Many of the victims were killed outright in the collision. One passenger, Linda Morgan, survived, still in her cabin bed which had miraculously landed on the prow of the Stockholm.

Andrea Doria hours after the collision. She managed to stay afloat for nearly 11 hours.

Credit: Donald Thompson


The Stockholm. Badly damaged made it into port.

Credit: Donald Thompson

A painting taken from various sounding images, etc. The Andrea Doria in 2005 in her very deep watery grave.

Credit: Donald Thompson


2002 Memorial Wreath placed by survivors.

Credit: Donald Thompson
ninjakait

Trad climber
a place where friction routes have velcro
Jul 31, 2012 - 12:01am PT
The Foundation Trilogy by Asimov. Quite possibly one of the finest works in science fiction.
sullly

Trad climber
Jul 31, 2012 - 12:23am PT
Hey Ninjakait, saw there's a two part Asimov interview on Netflix. Search Bill Moyers Writers. There's about six writers that he interviews in the series.
ninjakait

Trad climber
a place where friction routes have velcro
Jul 31, 2012 - 12:44am PT
Thanks, will check out, he was an odd duck for sure.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jul 31, 2012 - 10:27am PT
The foundation series is fascinating. Over the years I read the trilogy in order, then the additions as I came across them. Maybe a decade later I read them in order.then the the third party spinoffs and the various extra robot books. Once I tried to read them in order of publication.

Spoiler alert, procede (or don't) with caution if you haven't read Foundation's End.( I think that's the name of the last one....)
I found it fascinating how an avowed atheist made a universe that could be looked at with a religious perspective esp the later books with the Gaia stuff and referring to robots as eternals and even "angels."

Was this Asimov explaining how beliefs in religion might form to explain linear yet infinitely complex histories and events. I loved how he wrote in various peoe's ignorance ofthe past and how they made up traditions and myth to fill in the holes.

And through it all r Daneel has the most complete 'godlike' knowledge of the history and continuity of the human race while being aware that there are gaps in his own knowledge.
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Jul 31, 2012 - 10:31am PT
Donald Thompson, the best Italian restaurant in Huntington Beach was started by a fellow named Lino who was on the Andrea Doria. He made a great pizza.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jul 31, 2012 - 10:34am PT
Off topic and old news to Sully I'm sure... I find it sort of morbidly fascinating that Asimov died of Aids acquired from a blood transfusion, in the days before they checked for that. I imagine he was blindsided. Though he was in his eighties, he was still profic. I gotta wonder what else he might have had to say about the foundation/empire/robot universe..
nutjob

Gym climber
Berkeley, CA
Jul 31, 2012 - 10:39am PT
I was deep into fantasy and science fiction books in junior high and high school, then somehow drifted away from it. I would like to go back and re-read the Foundation series in order. I think I read 2 or 3 of them, never read any of the Robot ones. I never finished the later books in the Dune series either. I bet I would get more out of both series now than I did at the time. Or at least something different.


Right now I'm 48 pages into "The Enchantress of Florence," a work of fiction by Salman Rushdie. Interesting so far, more of a joy for the writing and side stories and descriptions and musings, rather than the main plot which has yet to be developed. I think the main plot will be about the collision of cultures between early-renaissance Europe and the Mughul empire at peak influence. The prose is a little dense, but not as challenging as Umberto Eco's "Name of the Rose." I had to work to enjoy that book, this one is more relaxing but many notches above say Tom Clancy spy novels.

It is interesting for me because the names and places draw upon scattered bits of history I've accumulated through travels in Italy and India and other reading.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jul 31, 2012 - 12:04pm PT
I generally like Rushdie a lot though I haven't read that one.
Last year Marty(r) and I drove from the BA to Inian creek and had the Satanic Verses on mp-3 it had been at least fifteen years since I read it, but I 'm convinced that it's a deeper experience to hear aloud, than read! Like poetry. The language is exquisite! There was so much nuance and humor, much more than I remember from the first time...

I never got farther than the first Dune either. it really would be interesting g to see what's there now and whether it seemed different now...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Aug 1, 2012 - 01:23pm PT
Editions Guerin

Les Fous Du Verdon


Ma Vie à la Verticale


Le Petit Apiniste
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Aug 1, 2012 - 07:04pm PT
Just finished a re-read, Autobiography of Malcom X. Now reading Stephen Ambrose's book on Eisenhower.
Stevenson

Boulder climber
Los Angeles
Aug 1, 2012 - 08:19pm PT
Being and Time-Martin Heidegger
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 1, 2012 - 09:01pm PT
Being and Time-Martin Heidegger

I read that book several years ago. It ranks high in the annals of existentialism.

Sartre was heavily influenced by Heidegger, as revealed by his opus Being and Nothingness

The professional philosophical community has sort of blackballed Heidegger over the years because of his alleged association with the Nazi movement. This ostracizing of Heidegger was patently unfair, in many respects. Will Durant doesn't even mention Heidegger in the index of my edition of The Story of Philosophy.
Stevenson

Boulder climber
Los Angeles
Aug 1, 2012 - 09:29pm PT
Sartre, being a Frenchman, was a Cartesian philosopher (the tradition that Heidegger set out to critique). Remember Dasein doesn't translate to "I". Nausea will forever be a classic within the genre of existentialist literature, but even Heidegger thought Being and Nothingness was a terrible text.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 1, 2012 - 09:31pm PT
Heidegger thought Being and Nothingness was a terrible text.

Heidegger was correct.

And yep, Nausea is a classic. Right up there with Kafka's The Metamorphosis
Shack

Big Wall climber
Reno NV
Sep 9, 2012 - 11:10pm PT
I just finished "No Easy Day" by Mark Owen (not his real name)


It's the story of Operation Neptune's Spear (the mission to kill Bin Laden).
It is the first person account of the planning, training and execution of the raid on Bin Laden's compound in Pakistan as told by one of the DEVGRU team leaders of the raid and the second guy into Bin Laden's room.
He was also on the helo that crashed.

It is a great read and clears up some of the questions and misinformation about the operation.
I highly recommend it.
rrider

climber
Mckinleyville, Ca
Sep 9, 2012 - 11:31pm PT
Just finished Lynn Hill’s Climbing Free. Very nice memoirs with almost a hint of mystical. She represents herself well, with a unique voice among climbers.

Now going through Jon Krakauer’s Eiger Dreams. The writing seems more sparkling and potent than some of his full-length books.
sullly

Trad climber
Sep 10, 2012 - 05:55pm PT
War and Peace (for a class I'll be taking). What I want to read, but don't want to pay for: Tyler Hamilton's cycling/doping book and Michael Chabon's new book. Met Chabon (shwing!!) a few years ago. He's an excellent writer, but not Tom Wolfe (my hero) by any stretch.
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Sep 10, 2012 - 06:23pm PT
With the Old Breed, E.B. Sledge (for the fifth time)

Eugene (Sledgehammer) Sledge's spare and unflinching account of his shattering experience with The Marines K/3/5 on Peleliu and Okinawa.
Required reading.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Sep 10, 2012 - 06:41pm PT
What I want to read, but don't want to pay for

Can you request them from the public library, even if you have to wait for a bit?
sullly

Trad climber
Sep 10, 2012 - 06:49pm PT
Righto MH. My library is within walking distance.

Anyone want my Steve Jobs book? I can hand it over at Facelift. It's pretty good.
nutjob

Gym climber
Berkeley, CA
Sep 10, 2012 - 06:52pm PT
Pirate Latitudes by Michael Crichton. Off to an interesting start :)
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 10, 2012 - 07:01pm PT
Just polishing off Gervasutti's Climbs and it was so satisfying I forced myself to read a chapter at a time space widely apart. His writing is so damned good, and the stories are so historical. Shame about the ending, though.

Sledge's book: Top five unsung battles of the War, top one, even. Read it twice, recommended it many times. With the Old Breed is the real goods...
briham89

Big Wall climber
los gatos. ca
Sep 11, 2012 - 12:56pm PT
Got to meet a hero, and get his new book fresh off the presses :)
I almost read the thing in one sitting, but had to go to work instead! It's awesome so far.

Credit: briham89
Credit: briham89
Meeting Royal Robbins
Meeting Royal Robbins
Credit: briham89
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 11, 2012 - 01:04pm PT
Mr. Briham
That photo of Robbins and yourself is very cool.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Sep 11, 2012 - 01:38pm PT
Inside Scientology

It's pretty shocking.
briham89

Big Wall climber
los gatos. ca
Sep 11, 2012 - 04:32pm PT
Thanks Donald. It was very cool to say the least
jmes

climber
CA
Sep 11, 2012 - 06:07pm PT
Margaret Atwood - the Handmaid's Tale. Pretty relevant for the coming months.
domngo

climber
Canada
Sep 11, 2012 - 08:23pm PT
finished Paul Pritchard's Deep Play about 2 weeks ago, and just finished Totem Pole. Both Great reads and highly recommended.
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Sep 11, 2012 - 08:50pm PT
HHhH Laurent Binet's novel goes inside the assassination of the SS general Reinhard Heydrich.

also finished, Into that Darkness: From Mercy Killing to Mass Murder. a study of Franz Stangl, the commandant of Treblinka.

Treblinka, you think Auschwitz was bad, whew, Treblinka was pure horror!

pud

climber
Sportbikeville & Yucca brevifolia
Sep 11, 2012 - 08:54pm PT
Credit: pud
Dickbob

climber
Westminster Colorado
Sep 11, 2012 - 09:23pm PT
I finally got a hold of a copy of "Let My People Go Surfing" I loved it.
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Sep 11, 2012 - 09:28pm PT
I just powered through the Tyler Hamilton tell all,"The Secret Race." I got it on my b.day last Thurs. I could not put it down.
Then finished "The Book Thief." It was a long one but very good.

Just started a book today about Captain Cook, can't think of the title, it's out in the car. It's very good.


Hey zbrown, by the Bounty trilogy you mean "Mutiny on the Bounty," "Men Against the Sea," and "Pitcairns's Island?" 3 of my faves, mega, mega classics.
rockermike

Trad climber
Berkeley
Sep 11, 2012 - 09:58pm PT
God, a Biography. Miles.
Fascinating. The author analyzes the 'God' of the Jewish scripture not theologically, nor historically, but as a character in a work of literature, highlighting the sometimes radical changes in his personality across the various books of the Old Testament.
Delhi Dog

climber
Good Question...
Sep 11, 2012 - 10:10pm PT
Just finished this one. Was a real eye opener regarding the timber industry especially in NA and specifically British Columbia. I'd certainly recommend it.
Credit: Delhi Dog

cheers
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 11, 2012 - 10:31pm PT
Bri,

Repeat very, very cool.

He'll treasure this photo if you send him one to thank him for all of us here for writing the book, if you would. Just a suggestion.

Bri

Edit: Thanks to Shack for bumping this thread. Time alone with a book is a precious thing, sharing what you read with others is neighborly, and using what you've read to improve your life and those of your neighbors is the highest good. Look it up in the bible.
briham89

Big Wall climber
los gatos. ca
Sep 11, 2012 - 10:38pm PT
^good idea mouse; I'll get on that. Just finished the book, and it was great. Lots of climbing in this one. I am not the fasted reader out there and I read the book in a day! I couldn't put it down.
zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Sep 12, 2012 - 10:41am PT
Hey zbrown, by the Bounty trilogy you mean "Mutiny on the Bounty," "Men Against the Sea," and "Pitcairns's Island?" 3 of my faves, mega, mega classics.

Thats it. I first read them in elementary school, my first big read. Had to ask my father what "tenacious" meant. Seems like I acquired the trait somehow.

The British are frequently criticized by other nations for their dislike of change, and indeed we love England for those aspects of nature and life which change the least. Here in the West Country, where I was born, men are slow of speech, tenacious of opinion,

Kind of amazing that you can now read the entire trilogy on-line.

http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks08/0800401h.html
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Sep 20, 2012 - 08:16pm PT
zB, yes mega classics. I finished the Cook Book "Blue Latitudes." By Yony Horwitz, "Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before."

By the way, Captain Bligh of the Mutiny trilogy was an officer with Cook on his first voyage. Also, Bligh had 2 subsequent mutinys in later life after his issues with Mr. Christian and winning the trial.

Now I'm reading the story of Major John Wesley Powell's second voyage down the Colorado River by Frederick Dellenbaugh (("Canyon Voyage?") yes, it is in the car). It is most excellant. There are no mutinys involved. Powell was a great leader, he had a sense of humor and liked to sing.
splitter

Trad climber
Hodad, surfing the galactic plane
Sep 20, 2012 - 10:50pm PT
I just picked up a couple books that are kinda old news, but I finally got around to them. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo & The Men Who Stare At Goats. So far, the TGWTDT is extremely boring. I cud give a sh#t about Swiss baking, etc.! I am around 50+ pages nto it and can remember little. I pick it up and struggle through a chapter and put it down and leave it their for a few days. Everyone I talk to says its great. Maybe I'm wierd. I have ben thinking about watching the movie first. The very beggining did pique my curriosity with the pressd and mounted flower every year. But that kind of disapeared into a fog of business coruption, etc.! Guess i will continue to slog on through it, but it was not what i was hoping for. I haven't started MWSAG yet. I prefer nonfiction/history/autobiographies, etc. or classic/american lit.! Maybe i will check what people have been reading here a little closer!
LuckyPink

climber
the last bivy
Sep 21, 2012 - 12:00am PT
maybe someone here knows of Jon Turk? climber and adventurer/scientist from Colorado. I am reading his "The Raven's Gift" about his travel in Siberia and his experience there with an elderly female shaman healer.

I also started Paul Coelho's "Aleph" also about a mystical healing while on the Trans Siberian Railroad. I had no idea I had picked up two books on the same theme describing the same area. Maybe this bodes well for my own next adventure as I've been lazily considering the Kamchatka Peninsula via Alaska as a next destination. crazy.

I am finishing "My Life as an Indian" which is great and found here upthread or on the other book thread recommended by someone here. True ish account of white guy who bridged the racial and cultural gap at the turn of the century.

yeah I read Girl with the dragon tattoo and it took quite a few pages until it became engaging as a who dunnit. I couldn't actually get into the characters although my brother read it and found the characterizations fascinating. There is a great revenge scene that is just delightful in a twisted sort of way.

I have enjoyed this thread immensely and found many recommendations that stimulated my reading. Thanks everyone.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 21, 2012 - 12:06am PT
Italic Text
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Sep 21, 2012 - 12:33am PT
The complete version of The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy. It's froody.
Mr Roy

climber
Seattle
Sep 21, 2012 - 01:06pm PT
"A Log from the Sea of Cortez" by John Steinbeck

And thanks Deli Dog, been looking for a book about that.
tornado

climber
lawrence kansas
Sep 21, 2012 - 01:37pm PT
Ronnie Wood's autobiography
Lot's of surprises. This guy has done it all and hung out with a truly odd array of famous folks.
stich

Trad climber
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Sep 21, 2012 - 02:06pm PT
I just started Stephen King's "Cell" and it's not so great. I guess I will just plod along and finish it. Meh.
fsck

climber
Sep 21, 2012 - 02:46pm PT
i thought Cell was hilarious. i just read it as a sort of a dark, extended rant against technology. The Stand it ain't but i got a few chuckles out of it.


anyone here read Cloud Atlas by david mitchell? i'm halfway thru it and interested to see how he ties all the stories together.
Batrock

Trad climber
Burbank
Sep 21, 2012 - 06:57pm PT
Autobiography of Christopher Carson AKA Kit Carson.
It is short and to the point and he is the king of the understatement. Amazing read.

Memoirs Of My Life by John Charles Fremont.
The first edition with all the maps, very cool piece of history, worth it for the maps alone.
FRUMY

Trad climber
SHERMAN OAKS,CA
Sep 30, 2012 - 08:04am PT
"SKELETONS NON THE ZAHARA"

By Dean King
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Oct 15, 2012 - 08:57am PT
First Ascent by Stephen Venables. Great stories in this book.
Credit: dirt claud
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:15am PT
Just finished Telegraph by Michael Chabon. Lots of fun name checking of the places in my neighborhood. It had its ups and downs otherwise.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:15am PT
In one Person. John Irving
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:40am PT
Redemption Ark - Alastair Reynolds, for those of you that like hardcore sci-fi.
Hankster

Social climber
Golden, CO
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:59am PT
"Che" by John Lee Anderson... those dudes were maniacs.
sullly

Trad climber
Oct 15, 2012 - 06:04pm PT
Hey Melissa, I've been waiting for more reviews of that one. I think he peaked with Kavalier and Clay.


A friend just gave me the hot baseball one, The Art of Fielding. Anyone read it? Baseball bores me, but everyone says the book trancends the game.
phylp

Trad climber
Millbrae, CA
Oct 15, 2012 - 06:11pm PT
Jay, how did you like the new Irving? i typically love his stuff but for whatever reason the stuff I've read about the themes in the book don't seem that appealing to me.

I'm reading the whole Harry Hole series by Jo Nesbo. I'm on the third in the series, and enjoying it.
little Z

Trad climber
un cafetal en Naranjo
Oct 15, 2012 - 06:36pm PT
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne.

Not too far into it yet, but looks like it will be good. Batrock, you should read this after you're done with the Kit Carson book. Sounds like it may be the same story from two different persepctives, at least in part. I always like doing that with history themes. Think I´ll try to find your book when I'm done with this one.
Bill Mc Kirgan

Trad climber
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Oct 15, 2012 - 06:38pm PT
'The Big Drop'

Surfing stories edited by John Long









gonzo chemist

climber
Fort Collins, CO
Oct 15, 2012 - 08:20pm PT
'Last Night in Twisted River' by John Irving. Just started this morning. Haven't read any Irving in a while....

Guangzhou

Trad climber
Asia, Indonesia, East Java
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:24pm PT
Spoon River Anthology: Headstone Epitaphs: of a small town names Spoon River. (Almost poems) Sporadic reading.

best Travel Essays of 2000: Bed time reading. Short essays that I can read one at a time before I kill the lights.

Started Early, Took My Dog. Kate Atkinson. I live overseas, so what ever book I find in English or french, I pick up and read the first couple chapters. If I like it, I continue, if not, I move on. (To many books to read to bother with those I don't enjoy.

Just Reread Climbing History of North America.

Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Oct 18, 2012 - 08:17am PT
Hi, Sully. Some people are gaga for Chabon's style. It's a little self-indulgent to me, like one day he wakes up and he's writing in hard-boiled crime voice, and the next he's Kerouac.

The first thing of his that I read was The Mysteries of Pittsburgh just after college when I'd moved here from Pittsburgh. It was hard to tell if it was good or not because I loved reading about college kids in my college town too much to care. Telegraph Ave. is my hoody hood these days, so my enjoyment of the book was highly biased.

I don't think I got 50 pages into Kavalier and Clay though. I just couldn't make myself care enough about comics, golems, or the characters he was presenting to keep engaging. Similarly, in Telegraph Ave. the author shows off for pages and pages with jazz, comics, and movie trivia that would kill me if it wasn't in another context that interested me. I didn't think I could go for a whole novel centered around baseball either, so I haven't tried the Art of Fielding.
hossjulia

Social climber
Eastside (of the Tetons)
Oct 18, 2012 - 09:24am PT
I picked up 2 classics at the thrift store for a buck each; Ulysses by James Joyce and Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe.

Thumbed through Ulysses and found it almost unreadable. Did I really see a sentence that was 10 pages long? I'll tackle it sometime this winter though.

Robinson Crusoe, while a little difficult to read since it was written in 1720, is an awesome book! The way the character explores his own character, and changes his patterns of thinking to be consciously happy with his lot seems to be the point of the book, intermingled with exciting adventure and immature observations of natural history. Wonderful!



Last year on this thread Woman Who Runs With Wolves was recommended by BooDawg. I had a copy for 5 years and could never get off the ground with it. I have a really hard time understanding what an 'archetype' is, or why I should try to compare myself to one. I found it a very obtuse book that did not make me feel good about being a woman. And I know I'm a wild one. Modern society is very hard for me and my instincts can be killer lethal, especially to myself!
Thoughts? I tried very hard to get through this book and understand it. It is the ONLY book thus far in my life I have failed at.
sullly

Trad climber
Oct 18, 2012 - 04:49pm PT
Melissa, I met Chabon at a Cal book event. What a flippin' vision he is! Kav. & Clay is supposed to be an upcoming Kiera Knightly flick. M. of Pittsburg sort of fell flat for me too. He likes to get into the bi side of himself and his characters. I lived it with my ex husband. Enough already. Ch. said he modeled the book after The Great Gatsby, writing it as a grad student in his parent's basement.

Thanks for the heads up on the new book. I'll wait for it to get to my library instead of buying it.

Hankster

Social climber
Golden, CO
Oct 18, 2012 - 05:09pm PT
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne.

Not too far into it yet, but looks like it will be good. Batrock, you should read this after you're done with the Kit Carson book. Sounds like it may be the same story from two different persepctives, at least in part. I always like doing that with history themes. Think I´ll try to find your book when I'm done with this one.

I did Kit Carson 1st and then Empire of the Summer Moon. 2 rad books but ones Navajo and ones Comanche, they are sorta similar.

Done with "Che'", that dude had issues. Now I'm onto "Charles II".

HISTORY BITCHES!!!!!!
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Oct 18, 2012 - 07:36pm PT
The Fifties by D. Halbersham (as suggested by Guido), Rats by Richard Sullivan. Prior to those two books Eisenhower by Stephen Ambrose.

Rats is an interesting read, about one man's study of rats in some alleys in NYC. Interesting history of warriors in the battle of man vs rat, rat migration throughout the world, the plague and other interesting history.

I came here to look for something to read next. Kit Carson, maybe.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 18, 2012 - 07:54pm PT
Batrock, how's that Fremont do in the end? Pretty well, one-time presidential hopeful and all. There's hope for Mitt, after all.

And I liked the personality of Kit Carson, short and to the point.

I just got nailed for library fines today, but I got even.

Got a copy of Dog Walks Man/John Zeaman and one of Madonna anno domini/verse by Joshua Clover, which is the name of my old bitch German Shorthair, the wanderer. Bought them at the Friends of the Library used book store for one buck each, HC. Delighted!

"Lastly, who was I to broadcast all these regrets about wildness lost? I certainly wasn't wild. Not only was I ill-suited to survive in the wilderness. I wasn't even wild in the social sense. Not since we moved out of the loft in the city. Like Pete, I had heeded the call of the mild."--ch. 10, "Call of the Wild"/Dog Walks Man.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 19, 2012 - 12:36pm PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

Not a particularly well- written biography but there are some great photos. There is an interesting section at the end all about Hendrix gear that will please guitar buffs and devotees of the Hendrix style and innovations. This book is the size of a friggin atlas.

"Jimi Hendrix Musician". By Keith Shadwick
telemon01

Trad climber
Montana
Oct 21, 2012 - 05:20pm PT

Just finished "Revelations" by Jerry Moffatt. Chapter 4- American Dreamer was great.

I thought it was super cool that he credited Mark Hudon as his inspiration for the first onsight lead of The Phoenix.

Great stories of the Gunks, Eldorado Canyon, Yosemite, Joshua Tree back in the eighties.
sullly

Trad climber
Oct 24, 2012 - 07:12am PT
Tom Wolfe has a new book out and Terri Gross interviews him today. This has made my morning!!!! Wolfe is my favorite living writer. I'll road trip to see him speak even.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Oct 24, 2012 - 07:33am PT
Thanks for the tip!

Current listen = Mountains Beyond Mountains
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Oct 24, 2012 - 08:57am PT
Just Ride - Grant Petersen
It's about bike riding from an "unracer" perspective. I'd like to write a climbing book along the same lines...

Speaking of living authors, sully, I just finished the new John Irving book, "In one Person" I think you'd find it interesting.

I'll try to Catch Fresh air today.
sullly

Trad climber
Oct 24, 2012 - 06:12pm PT
Jaybro, I love J. Irving. I'll add that to my winter break stack. Wolfe is 81, so I'm thinking this is his last book and my last chance to ever see him at an event.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Oct 24, 2012 - 06:45pm PT
I'd go see Wolfe in a second if I had the chance! Missed the interview though, distracted by a storm over Arches

Edit just listened to it on the web. Well there's another book'i'll have to read.
Fascinating interview. Interestingly enough I was thinking about the concept of "the cop stare" today, having encountered it at a coffee shop this morning.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Oct 24, 2012 - 08:55pm PT
So how was the interview?

I thought In One Person was trashy in the bad way, but not as bad as the tattoo book. I used to love JI, but the last two will definitely slow my pace to pick up his next offering.
johnkelley

climber
Anchorage Alaska
Oct 24, 2012 - 09:07pm PT
Check out A Single Wave by Web Chiles. Crazy stuff!
robfritz

Trad climber
Pollock Pines, CA
Oct 25, 2012 - 12:12am PT
Currently reading:
The Rock Warriors Way-Arno Ilgner
A pretty good read so far but it's a lot of info and hard to get into.

The Bible- God's inspired word
Easily the best book on the market today, although a little long
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Oct 25, 2012 - 08:16am PT
Trashy? Really? I don't see that. Maybe too much effort to be topical or something. Def more fourth hand than Hotel New Hampshire. I havn't read the tatoo book, couldn't get through son of the circus, though.

The interview was good. Wolfe always more natural and self- deprecating than I expect, pro ably based on the way he dresses and presents himself, which he poked fun at in the interview.
MH2

climber
Oct 25, 2012 - 04:24pm PT
several

Ad Infinitum: A Biography of Latin, Nicholas Ostler

An Introduction to Morse Theory, Yukio Matsumoto

A Place So Foreign and 8 More, Cory Doctorow

A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush, Eric Newby

Spy Hook, Len Deighton



jogill

climber
Colorado
Oct 25, 2012 - 04:57pm PT
They Kill Puppies Don't They? by Christopher Buckley. There is a priceless takeoff of Ann Coulter (who I adore!)

;>)
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Oct 25, 2012 - 05:15pm PT
Jaybro: Irving's fascination with eroticizing molestation just killed both for me. I felt kind of scuzzy for even finishing Until I Find You.

The new Wolfe book has been downloaded to my phone, and hopefully will thrill me for a week of commutes and a fine weekend in the Park. :-)
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Oct 25, 2012 - 06:03pm PT
I see what you mean,though I didn't read it that way. I had to think a bit to place the part you mean.
I get your point, glad you clarified.

Though it brings up other questions....
rrider

climber
Mckinleyville, Ca
Oct 26, 2012 - 11:49am PT
Phillip K. Dick: A Maze of Death, 1970. The book was miss-filed, and sitting on top of some climbing books in our local used book store. I figured it was speaking to me. Never heard of this PKD title. Wikipedia has it that Dick claimed to have written his 60’s era stuff while on “amphetamines”. (A precursor doping model for Lance Armstrong, but man enough to admit it...heh)

Sometimes the Politics, God and Religion vs. Science thread is a lot like a page out of a Dick book…or out of his mind. Both Haw Haw and For-Reals!

I remember a title which Slings once had his nose in: With A Finger In My I. Don't remember the author, nor have read it. There was lots of good SF book exposure going around C4 early 70's.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 26, 2012 - 12:53pm PT
Good title, With a Finger in My I.

I read Club Dumas and that got me hooked on Perez-Reverte. The Seville Communion's considered his best. They're almost all good. This is the second time around on Fencing Master.
Credit: mouse from merced

And neebee has sent me a copy of her book Steppingstones Through Jake's Ranch Vol IV.

Thanks, neebee, I'll get rolling on it after Oakdale. :O)
sullly

Trad climber
Nov 5, 2012 - 09:51pm PT
Anyone read the new Richard Russo memoir? He wrote Empire Falls which was fantastic.
moosedrool

Trad climber
Fremont
Nov 5, 2012 - 09:53pm PT
I am not reading any book, damn it! I just want to go climbing tomorrow!!!!!
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Nov 5, 2012 - 09:57pm PT
Just finished Darwin's Ghosts. And would reccomend it. Kind of a Stephen key Gould type of thing, and a cautionary tale about reading those you aknowledge!

On to "Chi marathons"
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 5, 2012 - 11:07pm PT
Joe Fitschen's "Going Up". And diggin' it.
Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Nov 5, 2012 - 11:09pm PT
Malcolm Gladwell's What the Dog Saw
Fascinating.

Just finished his Blink, which should not be missed.
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 5, 2012 - 11:17pm PT
"Blink" was cool.
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Nov 5, 2012 - 11:20pm PT
The Plutocrats - should be required reading.
the kid

Trad climber
fayetteville, wv
Nov 6, 2012 - 06:23am PT
Waging Heavy Peace by Neil Young..
super super super.. good.
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Nov 6, 2012 - 06:28am PT
Just finished "No Easy Day"

The first hand account of the mission that smoked Bin Ladin

paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Nov 6, 2012 - 09:42am PT
"Glittering Images" by Camille Paglia... grating but interesting look at art. Highly recommended for the introduction alone. Find it difficult to accept the idea that George Lucas is the greatest living artist though!
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Nov 6, 2012 - 10:22am PT
Mountains Beyond Mountains wasn't high lit, but it sure did make me feel lazy and like I should be doing more to make the world a better place. I'm very glad that I listened.

I'm not to the new Tom Wolfe book now. It's great fun. Basically, it's the Bonfire of the Vanities set in Miami in 2012, but I don't mind.
little Z

Trad climber
un cafetal en Naranjo
Nov 8, 2012 - 08:24am PT
Issac's Storm, by Erik Larson. About the 1900 hurricane that destroyed Galveston TX and killed over 6k people - still the deadliest storm in US history. Apropos, although I picked it up at a book swap last month before Sandy was in the news.

Finished the Empire of the Summer Moon and liked it a lot. Started looking up places mentioned in the book on Google to see photos and saw there is a climbing area in SW Oklahoma in the Wichita Mnts near Ft. Sill where Quanah and his Comanches settled on the reservation. Also the Palo Duro canyon looks cool.

In between these books I had a quick read of Tale of Two Cities by Dickens. I had bought if for my son to read. It was only the 2nd time I'd read it. That was because I have such good memories of the first time. That was back in High School in the early 70s when I went on a weekend trip up to Old Rag in the Virginia Blue Ridge with the idea of climbing. It never stopped raining. So my partner and I wound up bivied in some cave and just read the whole time while downing pop tarts and hot chocolate.

Ever climber must have some book that brings back memories of long bivies in bad weather, or of some great climb in their lives. What's yours?
mrtropy

Trad climber
Nor Cal
Nov 8, 2012 - 08:37am PT
"To Lhasa in Disguise" by William McGovern

Fun read about an early travler.
HuecoRat

Trad climber
NJ
Nov 8, 2012 - 09:12am PT
Just re-read Traverse of the Gods by Bob Langley. It is the best mountain fiction book I've ever read.

Now reading Indian Fights and Fighters by Cyrus Brady. It's a history of the plains indian wars written in 1904. Pretty interesting.
KabalaArch

Trad climber
Starlite, California
Nov 8, 2012 - 10:00am PT
To speak to little Z, Jon Krakauer's Eiger Dreams is a light hearted anthology of climbing yarns which is so broad in its scope of climbing areas that I'm sure it would resonate with most S Topians...although for some reasons the current edition is lacking the “Is Yosemite Going to the Dogs?” chapter.

And, to take a tip from his “On Being Tentbound,” Marcel Proust does offer more ounce of weight to hour of entertainment, Swann's Way, from his A la Recherche du Temps Perdu (In Search of Lost Time) is probably the most accessible – although one may chose to bring along all 5 volumes if contemplating a visit to Patagonia or the Alaska Range. Of course, one does not read Proust; one re-reads Proust.

Right know I'm re-reading Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand, which feels so appropriate to our current economic state. “Who is John Galt?” Our heroine eventually finds out, when she is forced to make an emergency landing in her private airplane through the mists of a remote and uncharted valley high in the Rockies. There, she meets all of the various and very prominent industrialists; scientists; inventors; financiers; philosophers and thinkers, who have mysteriously disappeared, one by one, from our country and its corrupt efforts at nationalization across all sectors to delay its economic depressions descent into complete financial collapse. And it is here, in this valley (which is rendered undetectable by the artificial mist which is sort of like a 1-way mirror) that our country's best minds have reestablished themselves in a small and self contained utopia, its internal economy based on the gold standard.

This kind of idealism I find very appealing in this day and age. It also strikes very close to home, as it closely parallels what we were to find here in the very small world of the Owens Valley, with its diverse populace which ranges from ranchers and packers; Pulitzer Prize authors; Cal Tech astrophysicists; artists; Olympic medalist athletes; Everest summiteers...and a thriving community of some damn good rockclimbers to match the world-class terrain.

And, as if by a strange coincidence, when we finally decided to make the Owens our new home, we were flown in by private plane. After dropping through a veil of clouds, spanning from the crest of the Sierra to the top of the Whites, the Valley floor was laid out before us, like some delicately tinted cartographer's artwork.
MH2

climber
Nov 8, 2012 - 12:43pm PT
All 5 volumes? I thought Proust lost more time than that.


Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Nov 11, 2012 - 03:35am PT
Neptune's Inferno by James D. Hornfischer, recommended up thread by Piton Ron; I recently read Last of The Tin Can Soldiers by the same author.

Neptune's Inferno won't let you go; from the opening pages. I don't relish the thought of having been a sailor in the Battle of Guadalcanal. I finished it 2 days prior to the 70th Anniversary of the U.S. Navy's first successful night action against the Japanese fleet trying to resupply the troops on Guadalcanal (Nov 12-13th 1942). A masterful account of the sacrifices made by the young sailors and older officers of the U.S. Navy.

Two of the most remarkable tales told are the strange ways in which the U.S. Navy would substitute inexperienced commanders of night and/or surface battles for those who had recently gained hard won experience in this brutal type of warfare right before expected clashes with the superior Japanese.

The other is the story of Eugene Tarrant, a steward, aboard the U.S.S. Atlanta. Treated with disdain due to his race, in normal times, he performs many acts of heroism that saved plenty of lives during or after the battle; only to return to status of a second class citizen later. Makes you scratch your head.

Just started Flying Through Midnight by J. Halliday as recommended on the taco by someone.

For all the discussion of OT threads on the taco, this thread and the What Song thread provide peaceful proof that some OT threads bring out the best sides of tacoians as compared to some other threads that do the opposite.
phylp

Trad climber
Millbrae, CA
Nov 11, 2012 - 09:37am PT
I just started "Lionel Asbo", the new one from Martin Amis. We'll see how it goes. I'm a bit ambivalent about Martin. There can be a little too much seamy underbelly of life stuff in his books for my delicate sensibilities.

Edit: Stopped reading it. He's a good writer but it's just not for me.
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Nov 13, 2012 - 05:23pm PT
Just finished Flying Through Midnight by John Halliday, recommended by Reilly on another thread.

Once I got into it; I couldn't put it down. More than a history lesson.
Took me away from my minuscule self for a day or so.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 20, 2012 - 12:16am PT
Credit: mouse from merced
So He's not a She in this one--meh! Not a problem.
nutjob

Gym climber
Berkeley, CA
Nov 20, 2012 - 12:57am PT
Cormac McCarthy's "The Road"


Sparse. Lean. Profound.

A few curves on canvas can paint a rich picture. If the artist is good. So it is with words. Clarity of thought, of vision, to evoke a reaction. And nothing more. Life, grief, longing, loss, love. All are on the table. Nothing is lost for want of words.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 20, 2012 - 11:29am PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

This Wikipedia entry for this excellent book says it all

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escape_from_Freedom
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Nov 20, 2012 - 11:31am PT
Issac's Storm, by Erik Larson is a good read. I have that one on my shelf also. PM me if you want it, I'll send it out.
phylp

Trad climber
Millbrae, CA
Nov 20, 2012 - 05:46pm PT
Road trip listening: Henning Mankell's "The Troubled Man" with the great character of police detective Kurt Wallender. To J Tree and back from the Bay area, 18 hours of driving, we got through 10 cds - 4 more to go!!
tom Carter

Social climber
Nov 20, 2012 - 09:46pm PT
Bernd Heinrich "Life Everlasting" (not religious).

If you have not picked up something by him - do.
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Reno, Nuh VAAAA duh
Nov 20, 2012 - 09:51pm PT
I read some sci fi the other day. Really brought back my prepubescent years.
Borut

climber
french, spider, cheater
Dec 1, 2012 - 01:22am PT
more of http://www.stevehouse.net/SteveHouse.net/My_Book.html
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Reno, Nuh VAAAA duh
Dec 1, 2012 - 02:09am PT
I wish the Steve House book chronicled his 2010 accident and subsequent recovery. That would be a wild couple of chapters indeed!
Borut

climber
french, spider, cheater
Dec 1, 2012 - 02:18am PT
check the "Speaking" Tab
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 3, 2012 - 01:40pm PT
"The Lonely Crowd" by David Reisman

Credit: Donald Thompson

What an excellent read. A great companion volume to Erich Fromms " Escape from Freedom"


"Western Civilization: The Renaissance to the Present" by j.Russell Major

An long overlooked book but thorough,exhaustive, and well written.
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Dec 3, 2012 - 03:17pm PT
Good read; whether you have any interest in the Klamath or not.
Credit: Tobia
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Dec 3, 2012 - 11:11pm PT
Dispatches by Michael Herr, for the 7th or 8th time.
First published in 68 and considered at the time one of the finest pieces on the Vietnam experience.
It's evident that Coppola and Stone lifted entire scenes intact out of this book for Apocalypse Now and Platoon.
Herr's writing style seems to break all the rules and capture the sociopolitical paradigm of an era.
This work belongs with other Vietnam war must reads such as:
Vietnam (Stanley Karnow)
A Bright and Shining Lie (Neil Sheehan)
Chickenhawk (Rober Mason)
About Face (Dave Hackworth)
We Were Soldiers Once and Young (Moore and Galloway)
Dingus McGee

Social climber
Laramie
Dec 4, 2012 - 05:53am PT
Just received an amazon copy of Flight Behavior the latest Kingsolver novel.
tradmanclimbs

Ice climber
Pomfert VT
Dec 4, 2012 - 08:17am PT
THE CAT FROM HUY
John Lawrence. non fiction.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 7, 2012 - 02:26pm PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

Another explanation of the cosmos for the layman but with some very interesting and very memorable metaphors, especially as regards the Big Bang
Howard Bloom is trip: an irrepressible atheist who attempts in his book to explain, on his own terms ,how creative and magnificent, and paradoxical the physical universe truly is.
nutjob

Sport climber
Almost to Hollywood, Baby!
Feb 5, 2013 - 09:24pm PT
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/521

Collected Short Stories of Saki: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/71189.The_Collected_Short_Stories_of_Saki




These are both excellent. I'm most amazed that Robinson Crusoe is so readable from the year 1719. You don't have to be a "classics" major to enjoy it.
rockermike

Trad climber
Berkeley
Feb 5, 2013 - 09:48pm PT
Just finished "The New Jim Crow" or why there are 2.3 million mostly black men in prison in the USA. Important book.

Now I'm back on "Theology for the Third Millenium" by Hans Kung. Progressive (some might say heretical I suppose) catholic and highly interllectual theology. Loving it. For me it hits the sweet spot where the intellect and faith converge.
paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Mar 22, 2013 - 03:00pm PT
Julian by Gore Vidal. Early Christianity and its politics. Fascinating
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 22, 2013 - 03:05pm PT
Right now?

MacBook!

:-)
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Mar 22, 2013 - 04:36pm PT
Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel. Just finished watching Showtimes's The Tudors and found this book via a Twitter connection. Very good so far. The court of Henry the VIII via the eyes of Thomas Cromwell.

Henry was one heck of a horndog!

Eric
mooser

Trad climber
seattle
Mar 22, 2013 - 05:15pm PT
Just finished "Old Man's War," by John Scalzi. Great stuff! Not much of a sci-fi guy, but my son is, and he insisted I read it. Dang it...now I have to continue with the series.

The top of the back cover reads something like: "John Perry did two things on his 75th birthday: he visited his wife's grave, and he joined the army."
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 22, 2013 - 05:17pm PT
A fascinating book about Henrietta Lacks whose cells were the foundation of cell cultivation in clinical research for all types of diseases. They were harvested unbeknownst to her and her family. There are all types of connections to segregation and medical services in the early 50s. Really astounding book!

Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks
Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks
Credit: Thank you Amazon

Susan
rrider

climber
Mckinleyville, Ca
Mar 22, 2013 - 08:46pm PT
Credit: rrider
Kind of a tangled-up presentation of a huge subject. Some good history to ponder plus the usual dialectics. The author's original ideas are in la-la-land sometimes; but other times he has a few valid points to make as well. My opinion is that humans are nowhere near the end that the author rhapsodizes about; and we will constantly evolve new forms of "good" political/economic systems which will in turn become corrupted in new unforseen ways. Freedom does that.
97 reviews@: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/57981.The_End_of_History_and_the_Last_Man
Hankster

Social climber
Golden, CO
Mar 22, 2013 - 08:49pm PT
The Rise and Fall of he English Empiew.
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Mar 22, 2013 - 08:51pm PT
Hi Susan,

There is a well done (as usual) RadioLab podcast on Henrietta Lacks:

http://www.radiolab.org/2010/may/17/

Eric
Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
Mar 22, 2013 - 08:52pm PT
Mountain Man by Vardis Fisher. Highly worthy.

(book that inspired Robert Redford's character Jeremiah Johnson)
Dickbob

climber
Westminster Colorado
Apr 12, 2013 - 04:40pm PT
The summit was a corniced crest of ice, and the precipices on the far side which plunged vertically down beneath us, were terrifying, unfathomable. There could be few mountains in the world like this. Clouds floated halfway down, concealing the gentle, fertile valley of Pakhara, 23,000 feet below. Above us there was nothing!

My wife gave me a first edition Annapurna by Maurice Herzog for Christmas. I had never read it before.

You also should check out Benediction by Hent Haruf. It is his new novel that takes place in his fictional, eastern Colorado town of Holt that his previous work was set in. Its a story of a character known simply as "Dad" who finds out he will die of cancer. Incredible dialog with fantastic character development

sullly

Trad climber
Apr 24, 2013 - 05:33pm PT
http://www.barclayagency.com/speakers/appearances/sedaris.html
Plenty of David Sedaris fans on the Taco. Above is a link to his upcoming lectures and bookstore appearances. Bummed San Jose is sold out, but Bookshop Santa Cruz is hosting him again. Saw him there about ten years ago where he did his Billie Holiday imitation. Anyone read Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls?
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Apr 24, 2013 - 05:46pm PT
Interesting you brought up David Sedaris, as I just read "Me Talk Pretty One Day" and I LOVED IT!

Also, check this out, on NPR today (a very good listen):

http://www.npr.org/2013/04/24/178656338/lets-explore-david-sedaris-on-his-public-private-life
sullly

Trad climber
Apr 24, 2013 - 06:25pm PT
Gal, I heard him on NPR today too. Didn't know he's been sober since 1999. Funny story about him garbage in the countryside talking to himself.

Liked Me Talk Pretty Too.
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Apr 24, 2013 - 06:30pm PT
last couple of books:

Coldest Winter by David Halberstam

Carnage and Culture by Victor Davis Hanson.

and now reading The Best and The Brightest by Halberstam.

(Halberstam could describe a mothball for seventy-five pages and I believe I would find it interesting.)
nutjob

Sport climber
Almost to Hollywood, Baby!
Apr 24, 2013 - 06:51pm PT
"The Red and The Black" -- Stendhal

"A Brief History of Time" -- Stephen Hawking
Captain...or Skully

climber
Apr 24, 2013 - 09:09pm PT
The Pleasure Of My Company~Steve Martin
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 24, 2013 - 09:14pm PT
The Compleat Conductor by Gunther Schuller. He says everybody is doing it wrong, but him. Not sure I'll finish this one.

Lolita sure was a hoot, though.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Apr 24, 2013 - 10:48pm PT
Art & Otherness Thomas McEvilley
Delhi Dog

climber
Good Question...
Apr 24, 2013 - 10:54pm PT
Confession of a Buddhist Atheist- by Stephen Batchelor

Really enjoying it.
sullly

Trad climber
May 11, 2013 - 08:32am PT
Back to Blood by Tom Wolfe. Spectacular social commentary and sentences. Here's one: "The subtext was: In the meantime, if the mutts start growling, snarling, and disemboweling one another with their teeth -- celebrate the Diversity of it all and make sure the teeth get whitened."
hossjulia

climber
May 11, 2013 - 12:55pm PT
"In a Sunburned Country" by Bill Bryson about Australia.

This guy is funny and wrote this travel book from a slightly different slant.

Fun read.
Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
May 11, 2013 - 01:21pm PT

Shooting the Boh by Tracy Johnston

cf. http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/911876.Shooting_the_Boh

tuolumne_tradster

Trad climber
Leading Edge of North American Plate
May 11, 2013 - 01:25pm PT
Death of the Liberal Class
Chris Hedges
FRUMY

Trad climber
SHERMAN OAKS,CA
May 11, 2013 - 01:42pm PT
THE JOURNEY OF CRAZY HORSE

A Lakota history
Walleye

climber
The Hot Kiss on the end of a Wet Fist
May 11, 2013 - 01:44pm PT
Just finished Huxleys "Brave New World" and am getting ready to start "Infinite Jest"....
Srbphoto

climber
Kennewick wa
May 11, 2013 - 01:52pm PT
Streets of Laredo - Larry McMurtry
Leggs

Sport climber
Is this a trick question?
May 11, 2013 - 02:12pm PT
Just finished "The Little Sister" by Raymond Chandler (I'm nutty about Raymond Chandler)

Just started "Loving Frank" by Nancy Horan ... LOVE IT, and I'm only on page 10!

And... I just picked up a copy of "Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim" by David Sedaris, which sits on my bedside table, ready for pages to be dog-eared.


~peace
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
May 11, 2013 - 04:44pm PT
Night Driving
&
The autistic Mind by Temple Grandin, I read her bio and saw the movie, but this was one is more of a journey into her mind as a scientist, with fascinating, unique insights from her unusual mind and and related insights.

Have to read the owl book, I liked Naked & Me talk pretty, a lot.

Good luck with infinite jest, Walleye! So far, the jest has been own me!!

Read Strong Motion, recently.. Is it just me or to Frantzen's other novels not work as well as the adjustments?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 11, 2013 - 04:51pm PT
I have ADHD so it ain't just one.

Jededia Smith - the OG hardman
Wild Bill Donovan - the guy who started the OSS/CIA
Kaufman's Advanced Birding - hey, I'm a birdbrain, what can I say?
Birder's Guide to Michigan - like I'm gonna go there unprepared?
All This and Robins too - bird guide to Wisconsin. Like I'm just going to Michigan?
Collapse;How Societies Choose to Succeed or Fail - probably too late for us.
Walleye

climber
The Hot Kiss on the end of a Wet Fist
May 11, 2013 - 05:40pm PT
Good luck with infinite jest, Walleye! So far, the jest has been own me!![/
I here ya, Jaybro. What I have always found for me is that, in great literature, the books come to me when I am ready for them, and not the other way around.
eKat

Mountain climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
May 11, 2013 - 05:53pm PT
Carolyn C

Trad climber
the long, long trailer
May 11, 2013 - 06:01pm PT
Infinite Jest - tried twice but I'm not ready for it yet.

Reading A Good Day to Die by Jim Harrison - love his writing.
sullly

Trad climber
May 11, 2013 - 06:06pm PT
Leggs, huge Chandler fan here. Had all of them, but they were casualties of my last house move. Ready to read him again since I forget his plots.

Jaybro, I agree about Franzen's last one. The Corrections it wasn't. There's a priceless three page rant within it about Apple. Though I love my iphone and live near the widow Jobs, it's a scream. Franzen should not have written as a woman (gentrifying former female college basketball star). What was he thinking?
Walleye

climber
The Hot Kiss on the end of a Wet Fist
May 11, 2013 - 06:34pm PT
Hi Kathy... Surely you jest.. I will check back after I have actually read it.. I can already tell that I am going to like it, though. I just have a feeling about such things. Funny shirt, by-the-way!
eKat

Mountain climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
May 11, 2013 - 06:47pm PT
Hi Walleye!

ox
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
May 11, 2013 - 07:46pm PT
The shirt is genius! I stole the image and am sending it, as I speak, to my brother would did actually finish that one.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
May 11, 2013 - 08:30pm PT
Just finished Everest: The West Ridge by Thomas Hornbein, which I loved. Now halfway through Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi.....kinda slow so far. lynnie
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
May 22, 2013 - 01:06pm PT
haha, I read " a heartbreaking work of staggering genius"... at first I thought it was the best thing ever, then i just thought it wasn't... but he wrote "what is the what" and that was THE WHAT.
Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
May 28, 2013 - 02:46pm PT
The Adventurist by Robert Young Pelton

cf. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/103916.The_Adventurist



I love that shirt e-Kat! : )
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jun 10, 2013 - 04:23pm PT
lost horizon, james hilton.
Hankster

Social climber
Golden, CO
Jun 10, 2013 - 06:18pm PT
Just finished, "The Rise and Fall of the British Empire"
~Lawrence James
Raaaaaaaaaaad!!! and creepy.



Now, "The General and the Jaguar"
~Eileen Welsome

About the little war between Pancho Villa and General Pershing back right before the 1st World War. Loves me some History!
hunter4884

Trad climber
Jun 10, 2013 - 06:26pm PT
HOBBIT


For the ninth time. haha;)


(im a tolkein geek)
10b4me

Social climber
Jun 10, 2013 - 06:29pm PT
A Most Wanted Man
 John Le Carre'
covelocos

Trad climber
Nor Cal
Jun 10, 2013 - 06:29pm PT
'Out there in the woods' Written by Stephen Sparks and the Mendocino Co. Sheriff, Tom Allman. Tells the 2011 tale of the epic 36 day manhunt for Aaron Bassler, accused of the shooting murder of Forester Matt Coleman and former mayor and then city councilman Jere Melo. A good read.
sullly

Trad climber
Jun 10, 2013 - 07:42pm PT
Resumed Back to Blood, reading 500+ pages in two days. Probably his last great American novel due to age.

Melissa, I agree that T. W. echoes moments from previous novels: "the pimp roll," "solar plexus," "loamy loins." Buuut, the "tintinnabulations of aluminum walkers" at the Yenta retirement community had me in stitches.

Long live the New Journalists. Sad days when Wolfe and Didion pass.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:26pm PT
American Prometheus Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin

d-know

Trad climber
electric lady land
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:33pm PT
The first third.

Neal Cassady.
ThomasKeefer

Trad climber
San Diego
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:35pm PT
"Getting Stoned with Savages"
Mark Sensenbach

climber
CA
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:35pm PT
"in cold blood' by Truman Capote
rockermike

Trad climber
Berkeley
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:39pm PT
Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics
Ross Douthat

The guy is evidently in a supporter of the neo-orthodox point of view and as such blind to the weaknesses of his home team, but otherwise well worth a read if you want to think about the direction of religion in the United States.
Matt Sarad

climber
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:44pm PT
The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch-Philp K. Dick
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:53pm PT
Most of the way through, Into the Silence; "The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest"
Wade Davis, Vintage Canada

The opening chapters on the carnage and horrors of WW1's trench warfare set a disturbing backdrop for the British exploration of Mt. Everest.
A compelling read so far.
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Jun 11, 2013 - 07:29am PT
Recent completions:
The Coldest Winter & The Best And The Brightest by David Halberstam


Now reading:
Creek Paths and Federal Roads by Angela Pulley Hudson
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Jun 11, 2013 - 07:49am PT
Navigator - Stephen Baxter, the 3rd book in the Time Tapestry series.
McCfly

climber
Jun 11, 2013 - 08:06am PT
Full Catastrophe Living: Jon Kabot-Zinn,

Untethered Soul: Michael Singer
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jun 11, 2013 - 11:08am PT
The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach. Excellent so far.
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jun 20, 2013 - 07:44am PT
Steph Davis's Learning to Fly. I just reviewed it here.

Impressive book. Very brave woman.

Now I'm into Beyond the 100th Meridian, by Wallace Stegner.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jun 20, 2013 - 08:03am PT
Three Gymnopedie by Erik Satie. Reading notes is hard.
mrtropy

Trad climber
Nor Cal
Jun 20, 2013 - 08:52am PT
The Wasp Factory by Ian Banks
Kalimon

Social climber
Ridgway, CO
Jun 20, 2013 - 08:56am PT
"Roughing It" by Mark Twain . . . a delightful look at Westward expansion in the American frontier.
Randisi

Social climber
Dalian, Liaoning
Jun 20, 2013 - 08:58am PT
I'm putting the final touches on my translation of Michel Serres's Statues.
Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
Jun 20, 2013 - 11:21am PT

Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone by Martin Dugard


cf. http://books.google.com/books/about/Into_Africa.html?id=X5xM29LaRZQC



Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jun 20, 2013 - 12:07pm PT
The Wasp Factory by Ian Banks

I really enjoyed The Wasp Factory.

If you like Banks, you might try Espedair Street, which isn't quite so bleak, and of course, his SciFi as Iain M. Banks is absolutely phenomenal. I recommend everything from "The Culture."
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Jun 20, 2013 - 12:09pm PT
"Eco-fascists" by Elizabeth Nixon
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jun 20, 2013 - 12:23pm PT
Trond Berg Eriksen: Søren Kierkegaard Den Fromme Spotteren (The Humble Mocker).
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
From Panorama City, CA
Jun 20, 2013 - 12:39pm PT
CRO-MAGNON; How the Ice Age Gave Birth to the First Modern Humans
hooth

Boulder climber
Sconnie
Jun 20, 2013 - 02:38pm PT
had enough time to steal away from my Hollywood desk job at lunch to crank off a LONG ON ADVENTURE short story. always inspiring.

sullly

Trad climber
Jun 23, 2013 - 12:01pm PT
Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Well worth getting past the moocow sentence. Did Frank McCourt model Angela's Ashes after this work or what?
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Jun 23, 2013 - 12:14pm PT
heres a good book store that may have RARE ones - i recently bought a vintage and perfect condition copy of Ropers green Sierra guide!


http://www.swansfinebooks.com
sullly

Trad climber
Jun 30, 2013 - 08:25am PT
The Pale King by David Foster Wallace. Genius and draftish at the same time. (This is the unfinished novel he was working on before taking his life.) Rebel Wallace is stuck at an IRS job for a year due to getting kicked out of Amherst for writing papers for rich kids.

Cool that he double majored in philosophy and English, his dad a philosophy professor.
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jul 1, 2013 - 07:08am PT
Knocked out a good pulpy sci-fi last week: Altered Carbon by Richard K. Morgan.

Phillip K. Dick meets Raymond Chandler.
Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
Jul 1, 2013 - 07:19am PT
Now I'm into Beyond the 100th Meridian, by Wallace Stegner.


great book!
Gene

climber
Jul 1, 2013 - 07:30am PT
The War Below by James M. Scott.

Great book about the Silversides, Drum, and Tang in WWII. I'm biased since Dad provided much of the source material for the Silversides' part of the book.

Credit: Gene
A picture from the book of the Old Man as a Young Man sailing into harm's way.

g
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jul 1, 2013 - 07:56am PT
Now I'm into Beyond the 100th Meridian, by Wallace Stegner.


great book!

I'm enjoying it, Roxy. J.W. Powell was a serious bad-ass, and it's a fascinating portrait of the West in the late 1860s, `70s, and 1880s.

I've also just posted my review of Frozen in Time, another World War II rescue story from Lost in Shangri-La author Mitchell Zuckoff.

Credit: Gregory Crouch

Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
Jul 1, 2013 - 10:32am PT
Another nice review Greg.

I started reading Davis' 'Learning to Fly', it arrived in the mail this weekend. Nice to come home to a new book.

Powell was a badass indeed.
McCfly

climber
Jul 1, 2013 - 10:56am PT
The Four Foundations Of Mindfulness

By: Bhante Gunaratana
nutjob

Sport climber
Almost to Hollywood, Baby!
Jul 1, 2013 - 11:05am PT
This caught my eye in a library sale. Exploring it a few pages at a time:



I started to say "savouring" it a few pages at a time, but that doesn't quite fit. Savour implies a sort of basic pleasure, and I can't say this book is always pleasurable. Insightful. Compelling. But not always pleasurable. It just feels real and honest, and gives me access to a set of experiences that divine grace spared me from directly acquiring.

There is an especially poignant and insightful story about his experience before shipping off to Viet Nam, a crisis of conscience while standing at a fork in the road of life. He sums up:
"I was a coward. I went to the war."
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jul 2, 2013 - 08:29am PT
Nutjub, that's one of the great modern American books.

I'm going to out myself as the outrageous tool & dork that I am, but last night I just finished my 400th book since I began writing Enduring Patagonia in January of 2000. I know this because I've been keeping a list. Forgive me, but here's the damn list.

I wish it were longer. ;-)

[And thanks, Roxy. Hope you enjoy Learning to Fly!]
sullly

Trad climber
Jul 2, 2013 - 08:58am PT
Nutjob, I've taught the book many a time. It never gets old. The story you quote from, "On The Rainy River," has that great wise old man who rows Tim to the Canadian border. I like the foreshadowing where Tim works in the meat factory. My female students love Marianne Bell who becomes a hardened greenie.

After you've exhausted O'Brien (read Going After Cacciato), move on to his friend and Vietnam vet - Tobias Wolf. He's equally funny with outdoor and Vietnam stories. He wrote This Boy's Life and teaches at Stanford. I heard him speak when I took a short story class there from Michael Krasny two years ago.

Saw O'Brien speak at Stanford too. He wrote a funny novel about his divorce that might entertain you, Tomcat in Love.
stevep

Boulder climber
Salt Lake, UT
Jul 2, 2013 - 10:21am PT
Nutjub, that's one of the great modern American books.

I'm going to out myself as the outrageous tool & dork that I am, but last night I just finished my 400th book since I began writing Enduring Patagonia in January of 2000. I know this because I've been keeping a list. Forgive me, but here's the damn list.

I wish it were longer. ;-)

Welcome to dorkland Greg. I keep the same sort of list of books I've read (as did my Dad before me). And I think my list since 2000 is longer than yours, so I'm an even bigger nerd. Though we have a fair amount of duplicates.

On the Vietnam front, the one book I've found comparable to Things They Carried is Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes.
And agree with you on Altered Carbon. If you like that, try to track down the Carlucci books by Richard Paul Russo.
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jul 2, 2013 - 10:31am PT
Welcome to dorkland Greg. I keep the same sort of list of books I've read (as did my Dad before me). And I think my list since 2000 is longer than yours, so I'm an even bigger nerd. Though we have a fair amount of duplicates.

Writing those two cost me SO MANY books... maybe I'd compete better if I hadn't sumped so much reading time into them. :-)

In Sci-Fi, I can't recommend Iain M. Banks strongly enough. His Culture novels. Start with Consider Phlebas and move on from there. His ship names alone make the books worth reading.
stevep

Boulder climber
Salt Lake, UT
Jul 2, 2013 - 10:42am PT
Several of Banks books were already on my Amazon wish list. Maybe I'll have to bump them a little higher.
And China's Wings is sitting on my book shelf in the To Be Read stack, so it will count for me, where it counted against you :-)
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Jul 2, 2013 - 10:44am PT
The problem with keeping a real list is you miss the opportunity to reread a book you already read because you see it on your list.

How many times have you begun a book and realized you had already read it? Numerous times for me and the funny part is how new it is the second time around. Amazing what we retain and what we forget.

Then again, what is really weird is to buy back one of your own books at an used bookstore!
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jul 2, 2013 - 11:15am PT
True story: A friend of mine recently bought a used copy of Enduring Patagonia from Amazon, and tucked inside the book was a very risque note from girlfriend to boyfriend describing in exquisite and superb detail what she was going to do to him when he got back from the long expedition on which he was about to embark. Apparently the book was a gift to help him while away stormy days.

No names were included, but it suddenly occurs to me that the author or recipient of that note could be among us here on Supertopo...

If you're the author and you've ditched the guy, PM me... :-)

Addendum: if she were a better friend, she'd have bought the eBook.

Hope you enjoy China's Wings, Stevep. God knows I need readers.
nutjob

Sport climber
Almost to Hollywood, Baby!
Jul 2, 2013 - 12:59pm PT
GC, I thought stuff like that only happened in male-written porn fantasies.

Sully, yeah that Marianne Bell story stuck with me. I can't say I was horrified by it, or totally creeped out, but it definitely left a disquieting feeling, and I was pondering it for a while afterward. How many people have morality dictated by fear and lack of opportunity vs. some inner notion of what they really think is right?
little Z

Trad climber
un cafetal en Naranjo
Jul 2, 2013 - 03:04pm PT
Guido,

in memory of the 150th anniversary, just plucked "Lincoln at Gettysburg" off the shelf, a book I inherited from my Dad. It'll be a reread. Last read was maybe 10 years ago.
sullly

Trad climber
Jul 2, 2013 - 06:35pm PT
Nutjob, some other parts you probably liked: Martha's volleyball photo, nose breaking, Kioawa, Lemon tree. I dare you not to cry when you get to the little girl with the red cap.
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jul 2, 2013 - 09:13pm PT
I'm sorry, Nutjob...
LuckyPink

climber
the last bivy
Jul 2, 2013 - 09:59pm PT
a friend recommended to me "House of Rain" by Greg Childs and I'm damn glad he did , I can't put it down. A narrative on the Anasazi of the southwest, he describes the current research and investigation of the vanished neolithic civilization. Fascinating, to say the least, in a ooncrete "go there, see for yourself" kind of way.

http://www.houseofrain.com/bookdetail.cfm?id=1183863026528

Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jul 3, 2013 - 09:25am PT
At my son's insistence, I read Max Brooks' World War Z yesterday evening and last night.

A guilty pleasure, but a good one.

Ryan has been running around the house singing the following:

"It's a zooombieee apocalypse...
it's a zooombieee apocalypse...
it's a zooombieee apocalypse....
it's World War Z!!!!"

There are associated hand movements, but they're indescribable. And indescribably hilarious. He's 12.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jul 4, 2013 - 07:45pm PT
I've been reading Thomas McEvilley's Art & Discontent; Theory at the Milleninium and found this interesting bit in one of the essays:

"In antiquity, people did not read silently to themselves, but aloud to one another. Cicero had a reader who followed him around all day with the book in hand; at any idle moment--in the street, in the bath, at table--he would recommence the reading. Those who were not, like Cicero, professional readers and writers, read aloud to one another or to themselves. Literature did not yet seem separate from the voice, from the body, from the living breath (spirit); it did not yet seem a silent world of abstraction into which one might wander away from the world of sense and relationship. The first person on record as having read silently to himself is Augustine of Hippo's teacher Saint Ambrose. Here is Augustine's description of it: 'When he read, his eyes scanned the page and his heart explored the meaning, but his voice was silent and his tongue was still... Often, when we came to see him, we found him reading like this in silence... We would sit there quietly, for no one have the heart to disturb him when he was so engrossed... After a time we went away..." So Ambrose sat silent with his book, lacking apparent speech or locomotion..." [Saint Augustine, Confessions]

Interesting thought that "Books on Tape" is a regression to the past...
DesertRatExpeditions

Trad climber
Flagstaff, Arizona
Jul 4, 2013 - 08:25pm PT
Doctor on Everest...
weezy

climber
Jul 4, 2013 - 09:42pm PT
cat's cradle
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Jul 5, 2013 - 06:43am PT
Mila 18. Great read by Leon Uris. The near ending of which, looked like this.

mcreel

climber
Barcelona
Jul 5, 2013 - 11:08am PT
I just finished 'Instructions for a Heatwave' by Maggie O'Farrell. I came upon it by chance, and it's great. I haven't enjoyed a novel so much for a while, now. So I kept on going, and started another one by her 'After You'd Gone' which seems to be really good, too.
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
Jul 5, 2013 - 11:13am PT
Just "read" Dune on Audiobook. Highly recommended as the get some top notch voice actors.
LuckyPink

climber
the last bivy
Jul 5, 2013 - 11:25am PT
McEvilly also wrote a comparative of early Greek and Indian philosophies containing a discussion of post modernism in the context of these ancient cultural influences.
MisterE

Social climber
Jul 5, 2013 - 12:36pm PT
Mostly through "Reave the Just and other Tales" by Stephen R. Donaldson - really good stories!
FRUMY

Trad climber
SHERMAN OAKS,CA
Jul 5, 2013 - 04:36pm PT
Credit: FRUMY
TheSweetOne

Social climber
Concord, Ca
Jul 5, 2013 - 07:55pm PT
Funny, a new bookstore just opened near me in Walnut Creek, when was the last time a bookstore opened???
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jul 9, 2013 - 09:09am PT
Frummy, I also enjoyed Toll's Pacific Crucible, although I didn't think it was as original as Six Frigates.

I also just fished out some worthwhile but more obscure books to recommend from the list of 400 I posted last week.
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
Jul 9, 2013 - 11:52am PT
"War"
Sebastian Junger (The Perfect Storm etc)
The book that goes along with the film Restrepo. (I haven't seen the film)
He gives a straightforward, no terror or gore spared, description of a top level Airborne team in the very nasty Korangal Valley, Kunar province in Afghanistan over several visits in their 18 month tour.
A lot of good insights into modern infantry warfare. All the high tech weaponry and intelligence available doesn't spare the grunts from facing the enemy at close range, once at VERY close range. Portraits of the men involved, you almost get to know these guys and for some, what they've been through before they signed up.
Truth can be more disturbing than fiction.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 18, 2013 - 09:53am PT
Why hasn't anyone made a movie of TC Boyles Water Music?

I'm re-re-rereading it, and this time around it occurred to me that this book would make a great movie. Funny, adventurous, it's a great book.

I've read almost all of Boyles books, but this one seems to lend itself to a screenplay. I'm sure I'd be disappointed with the results, as books are always more vibrant, but it would be cool nonetheless.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 19, 2013 - 12:29pm PT
Jean-Claude Izzo - A Sun For The Dying

Jean-Claude Izzo - A sun for the dying
Jean-Claude Izzo - A sun for the dying
Credit: Marlow

La Republica (Italy): "Jean-Claude Izzo knew how to recount stories of intense love found and lost, of the sea and the sun and their smell - above all the blue Mediterranean of Marseille - of the live