What book are you reading now

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dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Oct 15, 2012 - 08:57am PT
First Ascent by Stephen Venables. Great stories in this book.
Credit: dirt claud
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:15am PT
Just finished Telegraph by Michael Chabon. Lots of fun name checking of the places in my neighborhood. It had its ups and downs otherwise.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:15am PT
In one Person. John Irving
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:40am PT
Redemption Ark - Alastair Reynolds, for those of you that like hardcore sci-fi.
Hankster

Social climber
Golden, CO
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:59am PT
"Che" by John Lee Anderson... those dudes were maniacs.
sullly

Trad climber
Oct 15, 2012 - 06:04pm PT
Hey Melissa, I've been waiting for more reviews of that one. I think he peaked with Kavalier and Clay.


A friend just gave me the hot baseball one, The Art of Fielding. Anyone read it? Baseball bores me, but everyone says the book trancends the game.
phylp

Trad climber
Millbrae, CA
Oct 15, 2012 - 06:11pm PT
Jay, how did you like the new Irving? i typically love his stuff but for whatever reason the stuff I've read about the themes in the book don't seem that appealing to me.

I'm reading the whole Harry Hole series by Jo Nesbo. I'm on the third in the series, and enjoying it.
little Z

Trad climber
un cafetal en Naranjo
Oct 15, 2012 - 06:36pm PT
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne.

Not too far into it yet, but looks like it will be good. Batrock, you should read this after you're done with the Kit Carson book. Sounds like it may be the same story from two different persepctives, at least in part. I always like doing that with history themes. Think IŽll try to find your book when I'm done with this one.
Bill Mc Kirgan

Trad climber
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Oct 15, 2012 - 06:38pm PT
'The Big Drop'

Surfing stories edited by John Long









gonzo chemist

climber
Fort Collins, CO
Oct 15, 2012 - 08:20pm PT
'Last Night in Twisted River' by John Irving. Just started this morning. Haven't read any Irving in a while....

Guangzhou

Trad climber
Asia, Indonesia, East Java
Oct 15, 2012 - 09:24pm PT
Spoon River Anthology: Headstone Epitaphs: of a small town names Spoon River. (Almost poems) Sporadic reading.

best Travel Essays of 2000: Bed time reading. Short essays that I can read one at a time before I kill the lights.

Started Early, Took My Dog. Kate Atkinson. I live overseas, so what ever book I find in English or french, I pick up and read the first couple chapters. If I like it, I continue, if not, I move on. (To many books to read to bother with those I don't enjoy.

Just Reread Climbing History of North America.

Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Oct 18, 2012 - 08:17am PT
Hi, Sully. Some people are gaga for Chabon's style. It's a little self-indulgent to me, like one day he wakes up and he's writing in hard-boiled crime voice, and the next he's Kerouac.

The first thing of his that I read was The Mysteries of Pittsburgh just after college when I'd moved here from Pittsburgh. It was hard to tell if it was good or not because I loved reading about college kids in my college town too much to care. Telegraph Ave. is my hoody hood these days, so my enjoyment of the book was highly biased.

I don't think I got 50 pages into Kavalier and Clay though. I just couldn't make myself care enough about comics, golems, or the characters he was presenting to keep engaging. Similarly, in Telegraph Ave. the author shows off for pages and pages with jazz, comics, and movie trivia that would kill me if it wasn't in another context that interested me. I didn't think I could go for a whole novel centered around baseball either, so I haven't tried the Art of Fielding.
hossjulia

Social climber
Eastside (of the Tetons)
Oct 18, 2012 - 09:24am PT
I picked up 2 classics at the thrift store for a buck each; Ulysses by James Joyce and Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe.

Thumbed through Ulysses and found it almost unreadable. Did I really see a sentence that was 10 pages long? I'll tackle it sometime this winter though.

Robinson Crusoe, while a little difficult to read since it was written in 1720, is an awesome book! The way the character explores his own character, and changes his patterns of thinking to be consciously happy with his lot seems to be the point of the book, intermingled with exciting adventure and immature observations of natural history. Wonderful!



Last year on this thread Woman Who Runs With Wolves was recommended by BooDawg. I had a copy for 5 years and could never get off the ground with it. I have a really hard time understanding what an 'archetype' is, or why I should try to compare myself to one. I found it a very obtuse book that did not make me feel good about being a woman. And I know I'm a wild one. Modern society is very hard for me and my instincts can be killer lethal, especially to myself!
Thoughts? I tried very hard to get through this book and understand it. It is the ONLY book thus far in my life I have failed at.
sullly

Trad climber
Oct 18, 2012 - 04:49pm PT
Melissa, I met Chabon at a Cal book event. What a flippin' vision he is! Kav. & Clay is supposed to be an upcoming Kiera Knightly flick. M. of Pittsburg sort of fell flat for me too. He likes to get into the bi side of himself and his characters. I lived it with my ex husband. Enough already. Ch. said he modeled the book after The Great Gatsby, writing it as a grad student in his parent's basement.

Thanks for the heads up on the new book. I'll wait for it to get to my library instead of buying it.

Hankster

Social climber
Golden, CO
Oct 18, 2012 - 05:09pm PT
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne.

Not too far into it yet, but looks like it will be good. Batrock, you should read this after you're done with the Kit Carson book. Sounds like it may be the same story from two different persepctives, at least in part. I always like doing that with history themes. Think IŽll try to find your book when I'm done with this one.

I did Kit Carson 1st and then Empire of the Summer Moon. 2 rad books but ones Navajo and ones Comanche, they are sorta similar.

Done with "Che'", that dude had issues. Now I'm onto "Charles II".

HISTORY BITCHES!!!!!!
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Oct 18, 2012 - 07:36pm PT
The Fifties by D. Halbersham (as suggested by Guido), Rats by Richard Sullivan. Prior to those two books Eisenhower by Stephen Ambrose.

Rats is an interesting read, about one man's study of rats in some alleys in NYC. Interesting history of warriors in the battle of man vs rat, rat migration throughout the world, the plague and other interesting history.

I came here to look for something to read next. Kit Carson, maybe.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 18, 2012 - 07:54pm PT
Batrock, how's that Fremont do in the end? Pretty well, one-time presidential hopeful and all. There's hope for Mitt, after all.

And I liked the personality of Kit Carson, short and to the point.

I just got nailed for library fines today, but I got even.

Got a copy of Dog Walks Man/John Zeaman and one of Madonna anno domini/verse by Joshua Clover, which is the name of my old bitch German Shorthair, the wanderer. Bought them at the Friends of the Library used book store for one buck each, HC. Delighted!

"Lastly, who was I to broadcast all these regrets about wildness lost? I certainly wasn't wild. Not only was I ill-suited to survive in the wilderness. I wasn't even wild in the social sense. Not since we moved out of the loft in the city. Like Pete, I had heeded the call of the mild."--ch. 10, "Call of the Wild"/Dog Walks Man.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 19, 2012 - 12:36pm PT
Credit: Donald Thompson

Not a particularly well- written biography but there are some great photos. There is an interesting section at the end all about Hendrix gear that will please guitar buffs and devotees of the Hendrix style and innovations. This book is the size of a friggin atlas.

"Jimi Hendrix Musician". By Keith Shadwick
telemon01

Trad climber
Montana
Oct 21, 2012 - 05:20pm PT

Just finished "Revelations" by Jerry Moffatt. Chapter 4- American Dreamer was great.

I thought it was super cool that he credited Mark Hudon as his inspiration for the first onsight lead of The Phoenix.

Great stories of the Gunks, Eldorado Canyon, Yosemite, Joshua Tree back in the eighties.
sullly

Trad climber
Oct 24, 2012 - 07:12am PT
Tom Wolfe has a new book out and Terri Gross interviews him today. This has made my morning!!!! Wolfe is my favorite living writer. I'll road trip to see him speak even.
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