The Skydiving and Aviation Related Photo Thread! (OT)

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 501 - 520 of total 925 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Jan 7, 2013 - 10:55pm PT
Could only smile into my tea at about 4:00 of your first link.


I'm kinda partial to the part at 5:00-5:25 in the first video.

In college I was trying to figure out what to do when I grew up. I received a recruiting postcard in the mail of a picture of a Navy jet and it said, "This desk does Mach 1."

That's all it took. I signed up that afternoon. (:
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 18, 2013 - 10:39pm PT
Somewhere in AZ:

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
the albatross

Gym climber
Flagstaff
Jan 18, 2013 - 10:52pm PT
Sikorsky S-61 landing Payson, AZ June 21,2012
Sikorsky S-61 landing Payson, AZ June 21,2012
Credit: the albatross

One of several heavy helicopters used in wildland firefighting today. Though they can't carry near the payload of a Skycrane their large fuel tanks and speed work to their advantage. They seem to work especially well in the lowlands of Texas with typically long distance initial attacks. The machine in this photo was born around 1961.
The POTUS flies in an S-61.
Tragically, in August 2008 an S-61 crash killed nine wildland firefighters in northern California.
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 18, 2013 - 10:52pm PT
In flight bevy service, amazon circa early 90s...

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 18, 2013 - 10:54pm PT
Loading up in one of them sikorskys... probably not far from Payson.

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
the albatross

Gym climber
Flagstaff
Jan 18, 2013 - 11:03pm PT
Sikorsky "Skycrane"  with 2000 gallon fixed tank and snorkel
Sikorsky "Skycrane" with 2000 gallon fixed tank and snorkel
Credit: the albatross

Though these machines are extremely expensive to operate (near 100K for a full day of work), they are one of our most effective firefighting tools today provided water and fuel are nearby. They burn something like 450 gallons fuel an hour and typically carry 1000-1400 gallons of water.
These babies are awe-inspiring crafts all the way around.
Probably born around 1960.

A friend of mine was ferrying a Crane back from the FL wildfires in 98 or so and watched as his two colleagues in front in a similar aircraft lost a main rotor blade and plummeted to their end in the CA deserts.
the albatross

Gym climber
Flagstaff
Jan 18, 2013 - 11:06pm PT
OTE that's an Sikorsky S-58T.
I don't recognize it, but its probably still flying. They are apparently very reliable. Born late 1950s. That Sikorsky was an incredible genius in the helicopter world.
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 18, 2013 - 11:08pm PT
Whoa Albatross- I used to be a smokejumper and got sent to Florida that season to do ramp management stuff- we were qualified to work around aircraft. Anyway, that ship worked out of the airport I was at and I remember hearing about that accident after I returned to my base. Sad!
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 18, 2013 - 11:31pm PT
Some days everyone is just pissing into the wind (Idaho or Montana)....

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 18, 2013 - 11:42pm PT
Alright one more and I'll shut up. Southern California....

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
the albatross

Gym climber
Flagstaff
Jan 19, 2013 - 12:08am PT
OTE after hearing rumors for a decade or more about the Crane accident, it was thought provoking to hear the story from the man who witnessed it. I think being a wildland fire pilot is one of the riskier professions around. Almost as dangerous as driving a motor vehicle to a fire.

Nice pic of the Bell 205s, lots of those mid-late 70s models still hauling us around.

Bell 205++.  This aircraft is one of most useful all around aircraft o...
Bell 205++. This aircraft is one of most useful all around aircraft on a wildland fire. Carries around 320 gallon bucket or can move 5-8 persons and tools or 3000 pounds of cargo.
Credit: the albatross

Ocala National Forest, FL
Ocala National Forest, FL
Credit: the albatross

Sikorsky S-61.  This aircraft flew over 600 hours on the Texas wildfir...
Sikorsky S-61. This aircraft flew over 600 hours on the Texas wildfire siege of 2011. We celebrated her 50th birthday in 11/11.
Credit: the albatross

ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 19, 2013 - 12:14am PT
Cargo run!

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

(somewhere in Northern California)

Do you go to the saw box or try to get the pop tarts out of the food box? What kind of man are you???!!!1
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Jan 19, 2013 - 12:23am PT
that AZ shot reminded me,, of the horrors,, the horrors.. feckin country!
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 19, 2013 - 12:39am PT
OMG! Federal workers sleeping on the job!! In their defense I'll say we were unpressurized at 12,000ish feet and it was cold as f*#k.

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

(wyoming)
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Jan 19, 2013 - 01:45am PT
The first thing that happens to most passengers above 12,000 feet is they fall asleep. Some commercial operators will fly almost to 14,000 but are themselves on oxygen, when the passengers are obnoxious. Invariably the a$$holes fall into silent dreamland! Federal regs demand that passengers be provided with oxygen ABOVE 14,000!

I for one, really enjoy high altitude flying. My trip out to City of Rocks this past July 4th was at 12,500' over the Wasatch Mountains near Logan, UT. I set the timer and measured out my "legal" time above 12,500 which occurred just as I crested the range. Then a fast ride "downhill" to 10,500 at Malad City. That was a 500 fpm descent rate at 156 kias.
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 19, 2013 - 02:13am PT
Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Look familiar brokendown? We spent several days there and then finally jumped a fire in the B-T.
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Jan 19, 2013 - 03:01am PT
alright alright I'm posting too much.... here's a couple guys about to join us, probably on the Shasta-T NF (Northern California).

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
Leggs

Sport climber
Home away from Home
Jan 19, 2013 - 03:06am PT
I've only done two static line jumps at 3,000+ ft...

I am terrified of heights, so it was kind of a big deal for me.

It was also a big deal that I hit my chin on the wheel of the plane after climbing out on the wind strut and "letting go". I didn't lose any teeth, thankfully.

I did, however, have a tire mark on my chin for about 3 months. No lie.

Good times.

~peace

EDIT: Terrified of heights = Skydiving, bungee jumping, and becoming a climbing instructor, teaching others to conquer their fears.

Still terrified of heights, which keeps me in "check", but chasing adventure!! :)
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Jan 19, 2013 - 06:33pm PT
OTE&STD!

It's now Atlantic Aviation!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 19, 2013 - 07:09pm PT
Igor Sikorsky started building airplanes, or more accurately, flying boats.
I saw an interesting interview with him during which he recounted flying in
one of his clippers down the coast of Florida at low altitude along the beach.
While doing so he was suddenly overcome by a strong sense of deja vu. Then
he realized with a start that he was seeing the exact scene that he had
previously seen 60 years before as a child in Russia only that time it had
been a dream! Whoa!
Messages 501 - 520 of total 925 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews