The Skydiving and Aviation Related Photo Thread! (OT)

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Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Original Post - Jul 24, 2011 - 04:49pm PT
I've noticed that a lot of us on the Taco also enjoy tossing themselves out of airplanes or off of various fixed objects, or taking some damned cool airplane rides to get to various destinations all over the world.

So, here's the thread to put up your skydiving, BASE and airplane pics. I will even kick it off with a pic of my first skydive, taken in Sept. of 93. And yes, detractors, I know it's a shitty exit :p

I had been working at the DZ for a year and a half at this point, waiting to turn 18. For my reward, I was the first out on the demo load for my own first jump class. :-\

By sheer luck, I stood up the landing about 5 feet in front of them haha.

Ooooohhhhh...shiiiiiiiiit....... :D
Ooooohhhhh...shiiiiiiiiit....... :D
Credit: Vegasclimber


Looking forward to some awesome pictures in this thread!
Hankster

Social climber
BASE!
Jul 24, 2011 - 05:30pm PT
the Hotwife and I getting our helicopter on!
Credit: Georg
this is the picture I took while the one above was being taken from the ground.
Credit: Hankster

caylor
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Jul 24, 2011 - 05:46pm PT
Credit: Ron Anderson

a wee blast from the past..
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 05:51pm PT
NICE one Ron!!

I actually have a dual roundy setup in storage...old Crossbow, one of the first dual back rigs. Only jumped it a couple times though. Pioneer 26 main and a Featherlite 22 reserve.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Jul 24, 2011 - 05:57pm PT
most of my jumps were with surplus 28s with TU mods, and occasionally i lucked out and got to jump a para commander 2, but it was with the 24 foot surplus reserves big ol bulky azz chyt! Mains were all sleeved too! LOL!! The ram air technology was just at the start..fairly sketchy like the delta wings that were being expiremented back then..
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 06:03pm PT
Sentimental Journey Nose Art
Sentimental Journey Nose Art
Credit: Vegasclimber

Sentimental Journey - B-17 - Mesa, AZ.
Sentimental Journey - B-17 - Mesa, AZ.
Credit: Vegasclimber

Constellation in Arizona Planes of Fame Museum
Constellation in Arizona Planes of Fame Museum
Credit: Vegasclimber

F-84F Thunderflash - Rare airframe.
F-84F Thunderflash - Rare airframe.
Credit: Vegasclimber
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 24, 2011 - 06:19pm PT
The Martin Mars, world's largest seaplane, while it was down from B.C. fighting
the Station fire.

bad air/bad pic
bad air/bad pic
Credit: Reilly
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 06:40pm PT
Ah, so that was YOU stinking up Dawse's greasy 3? :D That is indeed an enviable skill. I have to say tho, if you can stink out a tailgater that well, then you were indeed a master of the gas. Awesome story.

We had a grumpy old pilot once that hated farters. He kicked one guy out the door about 2 miles short of the spot after warning him several times.

Reilly, awesome shot of the Mars. I spent a couple years fighting wildland fires, and my favorite runs of the day was when the old PB4-Y would come in the line up - this was before they lost that one in Montana and they stopped flying them.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 06:50pm PT
Here's another old bomber....radials are my favorite, any model. I'm lucky that I got to work on them once upon a time.

"Maid in the Shade"
"Maid in the Shade"
Credit: Vegasclimber
Pate

Trad climber
Jul 24, 2011 - 07:03pm PT
caylor you're a nut. so's the misses too.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jul 24, 2011 - 07:47pm PT
Had to Blow up the pic so I could see the look on her face better.



photo not found
Missing photo ID#210456




YEP!!!
She's ENJOYING herself!!!
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jul 24, 2011 - 07:49pm PT
Sorry guys. :(

I REFUSE to LEAVE a perfectly good aircraft
when it's in the air!!!


:)
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 24, 2011 - 07:53pm PT
Cosmico,
I'm with ya on leavin' before they're (the engines, that is) all burnin' or have stopped turnin'.


Vegas, did yous miss this thread?

http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1500733/Why-Tojo-and-Adolph-never-had-a-chance-OT


Did I mention I luuuvvv nose art? Yeah, I got a big nose too.









PAUL SOUZA

Trad climber
Clovis, CA
Jul 24, 2011 - 07:58pm PT
I took this pic from the flight deck of the USS Carl Vinson on our way home from our World Cruise in 2005.

Sonic Boom, World Cruise 2005
Sonic Boom, World Cruise 2005
Credit: PAUL SOUZA
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 07:58pm PT
No such thing as a "perfectly" good airplane lol! Especially jump birds :D

The one in the first shot, had duct tape holding the baggage door shut.


Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 08:06pm PT
Reilly, I did miss that thread. Thanks for linking it in! I'd say that Chino and Evergreen have the best old flyin iron anywhere.

And that MiG-15 ...well if it flies like a Chevy, it would be one of the old trucks with no power steering haha. I used to work for a company that imported them. Built like a tank though, could land anywhere.

I love the nose art shots!
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jul 24, 2011 - 08:07pm PT
Your Windows are ALL cleaned and SPARKELY now,
Travis. Tracks, Mirrors, and lights above are also cleaned.
I also did your outside porch lights as an added extra bonus.

Enjoy, and tell all your friends about me.



Cosmic
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 08:21pm PT
Thanks much man!

Christina already called to brag about how great they looked, shes super happy.

You have our recommendation for sure!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Jul 24, 2011 - 10:03pm PT
Credit: Ron Anderson

went to more than my share of these scenes,,,cessna 414-A
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 24, 2011 - 10:11pm PT
A sad day a couple of months ago - the Liberty Belle is no more.
I am happy to say all hands made it out.

Credit: Reilly
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 10:30pm PT
Yeah, I hate seeing rare birds go in. The company I used to work for, used to own the C123K that crashed in Denali several months back. It was used in several movies, most notably Con Air.

As far as the pictures go, let's try to keep it positive though ;)I've seen more then enough crash scenes.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2011 - 10:35pm PT
Here are a couple of odd airframes I saw at a museum visit. Anyone happen to know what they are?

Mystery Plane 1
Mystery Plane 1
Credit: Vegasclimber

Mystery Plane 2
Mystery Plane 2
Credit: Vegasclimber
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jul 25, 2011 - 01:27am PT
Vegas climber:
You beat me to the punch...
But Cozmic, "There is no such thing as a perfectly good aircraft"

~~~~~~~~~~

Liberty Belle Ouuuuch my heart just sank.

~~~~~~~~~~

Never jumped but I don't think it is not to far away in my future
I am posting from a sewing machine here:
http://www.skydivingservices.net/


TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jul 25, 2011 - 01:29am PT

Since you 'Cosmic' interjected that you got Vegas climber's windows done...

Thankz for the call this eve I'll be over tomorrow to pick up my resoles ;)

TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jul 25, 2011 - 01:31am PT

Vegas climber:

Mystery plane #2?
Did you see that at a hanger/airstrip over near the south rim of the Grand Canyon? Was it actually a plywood airframe with a (at one time) jet engine in the tail of the fuselage ?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 25, 2011 - 01:39am PT



This is what I call an executive transport:




Who knows what this is?
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jul 25, 2011 - 02:14am PT
Looks like Rielly has been to the Reno air show ?

Modified Spitfire ?

Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Jul 25, 2011 - 02:30am PT
My first sky dive was out of the DC-3 at Perris Valley in 1980. I was a little thing back then barely weighed over 100 lbs and the rig was heavy, old military junk-the belly wart reserve on front and the huge round canopy packed in its container on back.
I was number 8 out the door, wanted to go first, figured the quicker I got out the less time I would have to deal with my anxiety. All I remember, was when I threw myself out was not being prepared for the blast coming off those huge radial engines, there went any style that we were taught earlier in the day.
My next jump was out of a Cargo Beech 18, had to sit in the door way and shove off, that was interesting. The more interesting aircraft were the Cessna's, crawling out, handover hand on the strut finally letting the feet dangle in the wind and just letting go....... fun!

I need to see if I can figure out how to scan pictures.
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jul 25, 2011 - 02:42am PT
GeeBee
GeeBee
Credit: TrundleBum

Geebee profile angle
Geebee profile angle
Credit: TrundleBum
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jul 25, 2011 - 02:49am PT

Sky diving through the bomb bay doors of a vintage B-17
Sky diving through the bomb bay doors of a vintage B-17
Credit: TrundleBum

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9FjWDGojq4&feature=related


Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 25, 2011 - 03:32am PT
Awesome shots and stories everyone!

And Trundle, I used to work with your boss I believe. Looks like you're working with Simon Wade, by the email address. I used to pack his tandem rig for a while, I used to work at Skydive Las Vegas when Michael still owned it. Good times!

And yes, the flying wing is the one at the grand Canyon base of the Chino museum. They also have part of a B29 hidden in the back yard.

I will get some more pics up in the morning. Keep em coming, all!
Hankster

Social climber
BASE!
Jul 25, 2011 - 08:07am PT
my baby gettin' it done!
Credit: Hankster

caylor
Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
Jul 25, 2011 - 11:56am PT
Skydive #28 or 29. My friend flipped me on my back so I flipped him off.
Credit: Tfish
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 25, 2011 - 05:29pm PT
Reilly, your mystery plane gave me fits, but I finally found it - it's a Fairey Firefly, I believe.

As an added bonus, I found my mystery plane #1 - turns out that it's a de Havilland Vampire, just post WW2.

Great shots Hank and all!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 26, 2011 - 12:05am PT
Vegas,
You da man! I knew I recognized those twin shark fins of the Vampire.
I just couldn't bring it out of the subconscious. :-)

Trundle,
I have been to Reno but these shots are from this year's Chino show - way
better than Reno IMHO.
The 22 ship grand finale was beyond awesome - a combined 60,000 HP!

OK, here's some trivia shots.

The only commercial airliner with counter-rotating turbo-props.
A Tupelov 114 which used to sit at the entrance to Dushanbe International.
Donini didn't answer me whether it is still there. Grrrr.
Credit: Reilly

The most highly produced commercial aircraft in history, period - Antonov-2.
They should use the Buddy Lee jeans slogan - Can't bust 'em!
I got some hours in those things and they are the shiz! One takeoff was so
epic - overloaded, density altitude of a good 10K, etc. Weight and balance?
Fuggetabout it! I was sitting in the middle front pax seat holding the cockpit
door open with my foot (the latch was busted) so I could keep an eye on those
clowns. The clowns were good and it was an E-ticket ride. As they horsed
it off the dirt strip the stall horn was blaring like a brass band. The #2
casually sticks his head back into the cabin and says, "Pass as much baggage
forward as possible!" HaHaHaHa! Alacrity was the byword! It took a good
4 or 5 minutes before that damn horn quit.


Akbar - my homie the ramp agent proudly showing the USSA "I Ski" bumper sticker I gave him
The Chief

climber
Climber from the Land of the Free Minded Mongols
Jul 26, 2011 - 12:13am PT


That there is a Tempest! One badass Sub Hunter. Them together with the Mosquitoes used to really put a major hurt to the U-Boat community at night. They would cruise the German northern coast at night, 50' above the sea surface at 300 something knots shooting their surface radar looking for them bad boy U-Boats. When the RIO in the rear got a surface blip, they would go verify the target and then the two Mosquitoes over head would light up the U-Boat and then drop two torps each.

Bye Bye Nazi Boat!!!!!

Very awesome aircraft. TFPU!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 26, 2011 - 12:22am PT
You're close Chief but Vegas was right, :-) Not a Hawker, trust me.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 26, 2011 - 01:00am PT
Reilly,

I posted on the AN-2 shot before on another thread. I know them pretty well, Aviation Classics owned 3 of them when I was there. Great planes.

Wind up starters.....such fun.
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Jul 26, 2011 - 12:19pm PT
My father was the ship photographer on a carrier during WWII in the Pacific. I know he had a whole trunk full of photos, but these are a few he digitized and put on carriers website before he passed away.





Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Jul 26, 2011 - 02:10pm PT
Do you know what ship he served on? Just curious. Great shots.
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Jul 26, 2011 - 02:22pm PT
USS KADASHAN BAY CVE 76

Here's their ships website: http://usskadashanbaycve76.homestead.com/main.html

Here's my fathers page:
http://usskadashanbaycve76.homestead.com/index.html

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 26, 2011 - 02:46pm PT
Nice Tolman! I didn't know they flew Bird Dogs off of carriers. Was it an
Army or Navy rig?
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Jul 26, 2011 - 02:54pm PT
cessna 01-A took my first ever small plane flight in one of those- sawweeet planes those were!
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Jul 26, 2011 - 03:17pm PT
I don't know anything about the recon rig, all I know is my dad developed the recon photos. I did recall seeing some before and after bombing photos of a small island.

There are a whole lot of questions I shoulda woulda coulda but didn't ask my dad before he passed away. I really should have asked him some details about his climbing in Yosemite in the 50's. It would have at least been nice to have known what routes he'd climbed, and to go and climb them myself. But from the time I found out he had cancer to the last time I visited him was a little over 2 months, and there were a host of emotions running through me that kinda blocked out putting down a thorough list of questions. Such is life.
jstan

climber
Jul 26, 2011 - 04:13pm PT
My father crashed his cub doing touch and go on our air strip. Really sad. I wasn't in the plane at the time. I miissed my only opportunity to have an interesting experience.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Jul 26, 2011 - 04:31pm PT
I did six jumps at a DZ just over the Alabama line from Pensacola back in '72 (only the last one where I pulled). It was a run by some of the Navy team and I mostly remember a) being stunned by how fast the plane disappeared, and b) that I no idea what was what during the first couple of jumps.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 26, 2011 - 04:46pm PT
Just got this from my bro-in-law (a J3 is a Piper Cub). And 121.5 is the
universal guard/emergency frequency.

Yesterday I departed Minneapolis and was flying home to Toronto while monitoring 121.5 like I always do.

We heard an excited mayday call about an aircraft ditching in the water but did not answer because, as I expected, there were soon many joining in as well as the loud ELT signal. The original caller had given a call sign and described the aircraft as a J3 and his location but it seemed like he was somehow observing the ditching so I was a bit confused. We could see Lake Winnebago clearly as it was just to the right of our route but we were too high to spot anything on the southern end.

When we arrived in Toronto my F/O googled it on his cell phone and we were surprised to see it was already on the internet. Some divers had pulled two bodies from the plane. It was very sad to contemplate that others had gotten up in the morning with the rest of us and had gone flying on a beautiful day as we had but ended up drowning in 6 feet of water.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2011 - 03:05am PT
Awesome shots Paul! Thanks for sharing! Beautiful shot of that Bearcat.

Shame to hear about the Cub going in. Sad deal for all involved.
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Jul 28, 2011 - 12:22pm PT
Here's a couple more





I know not an aviation photo, but this one is really touching. Imagine coming back after the cesation of the war and seeing this. The carrier transported troops back in addition to its crew.



I also marvel at the changes in the Bay Area my father saw in his 80 years, born in Berkley in the late 20's and lived in the East Bay his whole life.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jul 28, 2011 - 04:05pm PT
Margaret Young and Jim Richardson loading the Cessna 180 in Palo Alto ...
Margaret Young and Jim Richardson loading the Cessna 180 in Palo Alto for winter climbing in the Wind Rivers in 1963
Credit: TomCochrane

1946 Luscombe 8A, my first airplane in 1981
1946 Luscombe 8A, my first airplane in 1981
Credit: TomCochrane

Kaman Husky UH-43B, my first helicopter
Kaman Husky UH-43B, my first helicopter
Credit: TomCochrane

logging time in a private A-4 SkyHawk
logging time in a private A-4 SkyHawk
Credit: TomCochrane

logging time in a private T-28B
logging time in a private T-28B
Credit: TomCochrane

logging flight time with Laura Mullen <br/>
first skydive 1966 on a Double...
logging flight time with Laura Mullen
first skydive 1966 on a Double-L; other owned rigs include a T-10 TU with a 24' belly reserve; Para-Commander in custom-made container, StratoStar in a SST Racer, Comet in a Streamlite; Diablo in a Javelin container
Credit: TomCochrane

my Comanche 250
my Comanche 250
Credit: TomCochrane

TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jul 28, 2011 - 04:26pm PT
Yves Rossy
Yves Rossy
Credit: TomCochrane

SpaceX Dragon, first successful private orbital re-entry vehicle
SpaceX Dragon, first successful private orbital re-entry vehicle
Credit: TomCochrane

healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Jul 28, 2011 - 04:32pm PT
Until about the age of 14 I flew most of the equipment United Airlines operated - either on my Dad's lap or in the co-pilot seat. Then the hijackings started and the party was over.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2011 - 04:57pm PT
WOW Tom.....great shots.

Also, very jealous right now lol. Thanks for adding these to the thread!

I have some T-28c time, but an A-4? Wow. I didn't even know there were any registered in private hands.

Still waiting for someone to make that one private Phantom flyable :-|

Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Jul 28, 2011 - 11:58pm PT
That may be a Mk.V Spitfire. The mystery plane #1 is probably a Dehavilland Vampire, but it could also be a Venom which looke almost identical but had a different engine.

Put me in the seat; kick the tires and light the fires!
Hankster

Social climber
BASE!
Aug 9, 2011 - 10:26pm PT
my rad Wife a couple days ago.
Credit: Hankster

caylor
skywalker

climber
Aug 10, 2011 - 01:06am PT
Damn Caylor and crew! Sweetiousness!

Cheers!!!

S...
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 10, 2011 - 01:26am PT
Dayum Hank!

Thats an awesome shot :D

jstan

climber
Aug 10, 2011 - 01:55am PT
I have to ask about the trip back from the Pacific on the Kardashan after the war. Did the crew get double rations? Your dad's site and the ship's site on the battles in the pacific are the best description of actions I have seen.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Aug 12, 2011 - 12:22am PT
HTV-2 lost at sea today at 13,000 mph
HTV-2 lost at sea today at 13,000 mph
Credit: TomCochrane
Hankster

Social climber
BASE!
Aug 12, 2011 - 08:49pm PT
i'm not a big airplane buff, but i always liked the A-10 Warthog, personally.

caylor
Hankster

Social climber
BASE!
Aug 12, 2011 - 08:52pm PT
the hot Wife and I took today off and did this, it was bitchin'.
flying out of the canyon.
flying out of the canyon.
Credit: Hankster
edit-Go-Pros kick so much ass!

caylor
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 12, 2011 - 10:46pm PT
i'm not a big airplane buff, but i always liked the A-10 Warthog, personally.

Yeah, it would be a gud jump platform, eh?
Hankster

Social climber
BASE!
Aug 12, 2011 - 10:50pm PT
i saw a special on the History channel about the Warthog, they sound wicked. doubt they would make good jump aircraft, by conventional means anyways.

caylor
Gary Carpenter

climber
SF Bay Area
Aug 13, 2011 - 01:24pm PT
Tom,
Your picture of the A-4 brought back lots of old memories!
North of Darwin, Australia
North of Darwin, Australia
Credit: Gary Carpenter
Credit: Gary Carpenter
Air Refueling over New Guinea
Air Refueling over New Guinea
Credit: Gary Carpenter
Loading Ordinance - Okinawa
Loading Ordinance - Okinawa
Credit: Gary Carpenter
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Aug 15, 2011 - 03:23pm PT
Gary, I wonder how many people on ST can imagine the experiences you had. The A-4 is a wonderful airplane. I just got a teaser taste of one; and wishing it wasn't created as a war machine.

Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 15, 2011 - 03:55pm PT
Cockpit of a 747-400F
Cockpit of a 747-400F
Credit: Ghost

You can still see a few of these old smokers working hard.
You can still see a few of these old smokers working hard.
Credit: Ghost

About to get up close and personal with a 206B &#40;one-skid touchdown...
About to get up close and personal with a 206B (one-skid touchdown on a steep ridge).
Credit: Ghost
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 15, 2011 - 05:28pm PT
The star of this month's Nat Geo article on flight...

Credit: Alain Ernault

there's some rad pics, duh.
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/09/personal-flight/shute-text
Wormly81

Trad climber
Aug 15, 2011 - 06:08pm PT
First jump!
First jump!
Credit: Wormly81
Jump number 200.  Easter 2010.  Peeps in yo face!
Jump number 200. Easter 2010. Peeps in yo face!
Credit: Wormly81
NY State balloon jumping. Copyrighted.  All rights reserved.
NY State balloon jumping. Copyrighted. All rights reserved.
Credit: Wormly81
photo not found
Missing photo ID#212995
Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
Aug 16, 2011 - 04:03am PT
Heli-Boarding in New Zealand
Heli-Boarding in New Zealand
Credit: Tfish
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
Aug 16, 2011 - 09:41am PT
Credit: David Royer

L39 &#40;good to have friends with cool toys&#41;
L39 (good to have friends with cool toys)
Credit: Tom F.
Wormly81

Trad climber
Aug 16, 2011 - 11:19am PT
Cloudy days call for low jumps.  Copyrighted. All rights reserved.
Cloudy days call for low jumps. Copyrighted. All rights reserved.
Credit: Wormly81
Ney Grant

Trad climber
Pollock Pines
Aug 16, 2011 - 12:35pm PT
Here's my website of some flying, some climbing and some photography.

http://www.westcoastflyingadventures.com

Flyby of Mt. Shasta
Flyby of Mt. Shasta
Credit: Ney Grant
G_Gnome

Trad climber
In the mountains... somewhere...
Aug 16, 2011 - 01:12pm PT
Hank, if that is the Yampa, how long does it take to walk out of there?
Gilwad

climber
Frozen In Somewhere
Aug 16, 2011 - 01:23pm PT
Recent trip by the Bugaboos.
Credit: Gilwad
jrrasmussen

Sport climber
San Francisco, CA
Aug 16, 2011 - 01:48pm PT
This was a still from a video shot by my friend Bill Voelker, at Lodi....
This was a still from a video shot by my friend Bill Voelker, at Lodi. My best friend and climbing partner, Abbey Leroux, is above me.
Credit: Bill Voelker
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Aug 16, 2011 - 02:20pm PT
A friend just sent me this. James May gets a ride up to 70K in a U2.

http://www.wimp.com/breathtakingfootage/

Pretty spectacular.
radair

Social climber
North Conway, NH
Aug 18, 2011 - 02:20pm PT
At the risk of being called a touron, here's a vimeo link to a tandem skydive I took my son on for his 19th birthday. Going out the door of that plane was an excellent adrenaline rush. The action doesn't start until about 3 minutes in if you want to skip the fluff. The freefall was from ~14k to about 4k ft. Ass kicking and highly recommended.
GLee

Social climber
MT
Aug 18, 2011 - 03:44pm PT
I have fond memories of HP doing great work for the Bureau of Land Management out of Fairbanks with this & their other PB4Y-2's dropping retardant low and close to the fire line in the tundra of Interior Alaska. You could see the pilots smiling & having a great time 'AT WORK'!

The PB4Y-2 is the Navy sub chasing version of the Army Air Corps' B-24 bomber.

HP PB4Y-2s were the best. I love radials. Then a wing came off HP C-130 Tanker 130, a wing came off HP PB4Y-2 Tanker 123, and that was the end of Hawkens & Powers (plus a few other retardent operators).

Hawkins & Powers PB4Y-2 Tanker 121 over Hayman Fire June 2002
Hawkins & Powers PB4Y-2 Tanker 121 over Hayman Fire June 2002
Credit: GLee
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 20, 2011 - 05:15am PT
Thanks for all the great additions while I was away!

I used to have some great PB4-Y shots that I took while working fires in Northern Nevada for the 02 season, but they got lost. *sadface* I used to love it when the old radials came coughing down the line. No one else in my crew was an airplane geek though so they didn't get it.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 20, 2011 - 06:49pm PT
Here's the ultimate radial firefighter - the Martin Mars seaplane. Our nice
neighbors in BC sent it down to help fight the SoCal Station fire, for a price,
as it well should be. This crappy pic (heavily cropped to boot) through
the thick smoke shows it 5000' above lining up its run on the Mt Wilson
area which as far as I heard was the only area of the fire it worked. It
was rather limited in this fire as the nearest body of water with a long
enough straight run to scoop was Lake Elsinore about 70 miles away so that
meant it could make only one drop per hour.

Credit: Reilly
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
Aug 20, 2011 - 08:39pm PT
Chasing the Otter - Photo: Mario Richard
Chasing the Otter - Photo: Mario Richard
Credit: ElCapPirate
Over Mesquite, NV - Photo: Mario Richard
Over Mesquite, NV - Photo: Mario Richard
Credit: ElCapPirate
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 20, 2011 - 08:45pm PT
nice pics ECP! just got addicted myself.
skydive mile-hi
skydive mile-hi
Credit: Snakefoot

caylor
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 22, 2011 - 08:51pm PT
yesterday
the farmlands of Colorado!
the farmlands of Colorado!

caylor
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2011 - 09:15pm PT
Nice shots, Caylor and ECP.

Always did get a kick out of watching you wingsuit types open after half the load had already landed lol.

What DZ is that in CO, Hank?
squishy

Mountain climber
sacramento
Aug 22, 2011 - 09:28pm PT
I build home made RC airplanes all the time out of bubble gum, crackers and duct tape...the stuff is cheap these dayz and tons of fun...

sometimes I even get around to flyin them: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WGPHff3AN4



Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 22, 2011 - 10:36pm PT
squishy, that looks radfun! cool vid.

p.s.- Skydive Empire-Ft. Morgan, CO

caylor
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 23, 2011 - 12:09pm PT
we're going here or Riglos, Spain. plenty of money and time but can't decide...
Zakynthos Island, Greece
Zakynthos Island, Greece

caylor
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 23, 2011 - 11:40pm PT
from 10 days ago. well worth it.
http://vimeo.com/28042753

caylor
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 23, 2011 - 11:51pm PT
RIGLOOOOOOS!

I've been wanting to go there for years. Awesome climbing on some of the most peculiar rock anwhere. The towers look like they have potatoes growing out of them everywhere.

Awesome video!
ntanygd760

Gym climber
roanoke, TX
Aug 24, 2011 - 04:54am PT
seems like a good place to ask this. Has anyone BASE jumped the el cap face in the guadalupe mountains national park, not the one in CA obv
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 24, 2011 - 01:37pm PT
ooooohh, been wanting to look at the "Texas El Cap" for a long time. if everything goes perfectly, i'm sure it's "jumpable". nobody with any real or recent BASE knowledge has been out there enough to say I don't think. it's freaking tall, should be climbing to???

caylor
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 24, 2011 - 02:36pm PT
Sorry Vegasclimber, it was a hideous decision, but we booked our tickets to Greece. Sept. 14th we are gone for a couple weeks. Riglos is a dreamtrip, but this place won our hearts this round.
Zakynthos Island
Zakynthos Island

caylor
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Aug 24, 2011 - 09:32pm PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgdIE2t8QkM&feature=player_embedded#!

Jetman Yves Rossy flying the Grand Canyon
ntanygd760

Gym climber
roanoke, TX
Aug 24, 2011 - 11:02pm PT
yeah there are a few vertical areas in the 400ft range. according to wiki (take that for what it is worth) the rock is not very good for climbing but you could probably get a bunch of FA's on it. I don't know enough about BASE to judge the landing areas they look not great but It would depend on your glide rate or your chute. If that is the right term not sure, but if you had enough forward opening speed you can probably land in flat areas.
ntanygd760

Gym climber
roanoke, TX
Aug 25, 2011 - 12:08am PT
oh and for the record most of this info is from what I remember from going there a few years back. There is a trail going up to Guadalupe peak. From there you have to go through some slightly off trail rough areas for around a half mile or mile. I didn't have pants and the time so I didn't try it so I have no idea about the best jump ledges. I also didn't know how to climb at the time so I don't really personally know the rock conditions for climbing. Next time i go I am going to try and bring some climbing equipment and see if I can find any reasonable lines with decent protection. Then again I just started climbing so I might not have a clue what I am talking about.
soaring_bird

Trad climber
Oregon
Aug 25, 2011 - 12:19am PT
Guadalupe Peak?.... Wait. Go further south to Santa Elena Canyon; higher, steeper (overhanging in places), legal from the south side (Mexico).
ntanygd760

Gym climber
roanoke, TX
Aug 25, 2011 - 01:07am PT
what are the odds of getting shot while on the Mexican side?
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Aug 25, 2011 - 05:50pm PT
This will tick off all aviators.

I'm a paraglider pilot. Are they gonna make me file a flight plan now and monitor where I go to?

Yea right.


Private planes, private no more
August 24, 2011|Steve Chapman
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-08-24/news/chi-private-planes-private-no-more-20110824_1_private-planes-general-aviation-ed-bolen

General aviation groups aren't happy, and who can blame them? "There can be no legitimate reason for a government agency to facilitate the monitoring of wholly private activity by anyone with an internet connection," said Ed Bolen, head of the National Business Aviation Association.

But under LaHood's policy, Big Brother will be watching. And so will anyone else who wants to.


I'm really getting tired of the violations and the scrapping of our Constitution and Bill of Rights.

NWO people. NWO.


(It sucks.)
perswig

climber
Aug 25, 2011 - 08:56pm PT










Dale

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 25, 2011 - 08:58pm PT
Now them there's some flyin' machines! Are they originals (not repros)?
What's the first one?
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 25, 2011 - 09:19pm PT
Same question as Reilly, what's with the 1st one?

caylor
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 26, 2011 - 06:21am PT
Ditto.

Second pic on the left looks like a repro Sopwith Camel. Awesome shots though!

I need to dig some more up to add here.
perswig

climber
Aug 26, 2011 - 12:37pm PT
First pic is a repro F.E 8, WW1 British, originally powered with a 9cyl pusher like this?

Armed with .303, I think.

Third pic is a restored J-1, used locally along the southern ME coast for mail/supplies. Repowered with a period but not original engine (upgraded from 90ish HP to 130?)
Check out the wood! and it has leather wearpatches for the cable rigging. Pretty cool.



Middle pic is two repros, I'm pretty sure. Sopwith and maybe a Spad?

They were also flying a Waco UBF-2 (uncommon version, apparently) and a Stearman.


And while it wasn't out that day, they have a BEAUTIFUL repro Etrich Taube that I'd like to see aloft.

Talk about cloth and wire.



Dale

Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 30, 2011 - 09:20pm PT
Great shots, Dale!

I haven't been able to locate many of my airplane shots. They may have gone into that hole in the sky where pictures go after a computer crash. I hope not, but I will keep looking.

To add some humor to the thread, here is a "handy cam" video of one of the loudest tandem students ever. Good thing I packed the main right, because I think the instructor was too busy laughing to deal with much...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsDmhxcvtu8
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 30, 2011 - 09:40pm PT
YEAH!!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SosnWa100bE

caylor
perswig

climber
Aug 30, 2011 - 09:49pm PT
Alright, that was gross.

Dale
Gene

climber
Aug 31, 2011 - 03:28pm PT
I found this one online of the SR-71 cruising above the Sierra. Can anybody help me identify the peaks?

Credit: Gene

LPP on the right?

g
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 31, 2011 - 03:49pm PT
Mark, you've never jumped it! The only reason you even know about it is because I'm a giver and told folks you know........so thhhhppppptttt!!!

what are you doing this weekend? dick!

caylor
Hankster

Social climber
BASE 637
Aug 31, 2011 - 10:51pm PT
Vegasclimber, here is the wingsuit flocking you require, fully kickass.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpeXUPuZDNU

caylor
BWB

Trad climber
Truckee
Sep 5, 2011 - 01:52pm PT
no pictures but I got a video of yesterday at lovers leap.

first ever tard over at the leap?

http://youtu.be/ettuc-5EkFA
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 6, 2011 - 12:38am PT
Awesome vid Hank, I saw that one a while back. Were you involved? Seriously hardcore.

I was raised around CrW dogs....did a biplane on my 3rd IAD jump. My jumpmaster and I both got grounded for a few days on that one.
ms55401

Trad climber
minneapolis, mn
Sep 17, 2011 - 12:47am PT
flying that SR71 over the Sierra has got to be the greatest gig ever
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 17, 2011 - 12:50am PT
I remember seeing one in flight when I was on a commercial flight out of Reno, this was over 20 years ago now.

The captain came on to tell us one was passing our nose. Most planes, you can see them for a while, but this momma went out of sight in a few scant seconds. Never seen anything move that fast before or since.

The Blackbird was truly a aviation triumph. The pictured bird is probably the one owned by NASA, the only two seater still in operation.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 17, 2011 - 01:27am PT
I had the 6 o'clock high position on a SR-71 once. I had him dead to rights.
Course he was parked at the Palmdale Skunk Works and I was on final approach to
Lancaster. It was pretty cool though. Actually, there were six of them
there! I never have a camera with me at the right time. They must have
been changeing out their 8-tracks.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 19, 2011 - 02:38pm PT
"Hi HO,
HI Ho,
It's off to work we go!"

Credit: Reilly
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Trad climber
San Francisco, Ca
Sep 19, 2011 - 03:01pm PT
Smokejumper en route to work...

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Trad climber
San Francisco, Ca
Sep 19, 2011 - 03:06pm PT
Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

hopefully that wasn't fuel that my parachute was laying in...

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Trad climber
San Francisco, Ca
Sep 19, 2011 - 03:20pm PT
Just a couple more..

Ecuador...

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

heading to a fire..

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2011 - 08:53pm PT
Awesome additions! Thanks much!

I wanted to smokejump, but never managed to get the initial attack time. Always had a lot of respect for them, especially on those old rounds.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Sep 20, 2011 - 11:15am PT
Jeff Lowe
Jeff Lowe
Credit: TomCochrane

Chelsea with Jeff <br/>
 <br/>
...honoring those before us who protected our f...
Chelsea with Jeff

...honoring those before us who protected our freedoms
Credit: TomCochrane

filming Metanoia <br/>
Connie, Jeff, and Chelsea  <br/>
filming Metanoia
Connie, Jeff, and Chelsea

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Sep 20, 2011 - 11:54am PT
i've been fascinated by the SR-71 since the early 60s

more recently at NASA Dryden i had free access to crawl all over two of them in a hanger
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Sep 20, 2011 - 12:24pm PT
My climbing partner for many years worked for ........... when the SR-71 was still a black project.

The SR-71 had a celestial navigation system that was almost as accurate as GPS and worked by tracking three stars thru telescopes that fed an analog computer. Drum controler logic. Really an amazing piece of hardware.


Then there was the story about the C-5 full of Coors that was flown from Colorado to Florida "in support of the SR-71"
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Trad climber
San Francisco, Ca
Sep 20, 2011 - 12:56pm PT
My favorite airline:

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Load up:

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Helicopters are aircraft too..

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Jump spot, Middle Eel wilderness.

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Sep 20, 2011 - 12:57pm PT
sure,, post all the FUN stuff pics...Then,,,the walk out!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Sep 20, 2011 - 01:18pm PT
How about some ol aviation stories?


Dateline 1974. Minden airfield. Civil Air Patrol was having a fly in, with flour sack aerial bombing and the likes. I had come up with a small chute static line system to deliver supplies to victims of crashes or lost parties etc. This was a 20 foot cargo canopy set up with a static line and a forty pound sack of sand for weight.

The pilot was Bill Williamson (owner of the tv famed "buddy the wonder dog" and we were flying in the CAP 172. We got to 1200 agl and began an approach to the area to do the drop...

upon doing the first run, i quickly discovered how hard it was with an eighty MPH breeze against the door to get it open and keep it that way. SO i moved my position in the seat and used the seat belt as a self belay and we did a go around to come back to the target area.

The door pried open and using my back to push against it, i slid the package out and let it go as we approached the "zone". Problem 1: the door being open against the prop wash caused a sucking hesitation which brought the package back toward the front of the plane and it struck the strut step! SAND FLEW INTO THE CABIN in a whipped cloud and suddenly the canopy popped from the sleeve and did a total May West across thew horizontal stabilizer!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! OOOOHHHHWWWWWWWWSSSSHHHHIIIITTTT!
mEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE the stall indicator started going off- Bill was reefing on the yoke in an attempt to gain some altitude and i was in a full on panic hanging out the door trying to see the hang up! I saw shrouds that had looped the step so i quickly got a knife out of my pocket and cut loose the shrouds - all the while the stall indicator is going off, and we are riding a bucking brick at this point. We have lost about 900 feet of elevation and are still going down as Bill attempts to steer us over a field of corn and the may west is flapping like a canopy gone wild, still draped over the tail..I hear Bill yell to me to get ready for a HARD ONE and just then i see the culprit. One shroud line had looped over the seat adjustment knob!!!!! I flicked it off the knob and the whole shittaroo flys off the tail and it falls for only a second or two before hitting the corn. Of course, with Bill pulling on the yoke for all he is worth, when the may west clears the tail we shoot almost straight up and he grabs the throttle to the max.. A recovery with only a few feet left till the corn tops was had, and we began to climb normally.

Meanwhile back at the airport, they were rolling out the response team as they all lost sight of us and knew we were down... we landed and surveyed the damage to the skin on the fuselage just behind the door from the harness and empty sand sack beating into it.. Bill was one HELL OF A PILOT! I took the delivery system back to the drawing board LMAO!!
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2011 - 01:48pm PT
Nice new shots and stories!

I was lucky enough to be in Mesa for Halloween a couple years ago, and spent a good 45 minutes crawling around in Sentimental Journey with practically no one around. Loved every minute of it, they have a great museum there.

TGT, that was a really cool bit of info about the SR-71, thanks for sharing!

Ontheedge - those bambi buckets make me nervous. Had a pilot either bump a release or had the hook fail on a fire north of Reno many years back. It hit about 15ft from our team. Scary shite man. Was like a bomb went off.

Ron, I used to work at Minden for Tony Sabino. I think I heard about that story! Talk about a close one.

We had a similar incident at Stead when we were drop testing a new round chute that the DZO had developed. Except in this case, it was attached to a body weight dummy, and it took the right side horizontal and elevator off like a hot knife through butter. Surprisingly, the pilot managed to land it.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Sep 20, 2011 - 01:58pm PT
Vegas,,, Thank gawd for GOOD PILOTS EH! lol! That story has become local lore,,glad im around to tell it still..And by golly, i almost got squished by a bucket doing a hover hook up once. Dang silly Vietnamese pilot we had hit the dropper! Fun DAYZZZ!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 20, 2011 - 04:20pm PT
A friend of mine figured he'd make some easy money and build time by scattering
ashes at sea from a 172. He wasn't so dumb as to discount the effects of
negative pressure so he put the ashes in a large trash bag. He had the theory
down pretty well but the devil was in the details and the execution. Uh, it
took hours with the FBO's shop vac to cleanse his conscience. No, he didn't
tell the family as he did scatter the ashes over the ocean, right?
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Sep 21, 2011 - 01:20am PT
http://news.yahoo.com/declassified-us-spy-satellites-reveal-rare-look-secret-140205867.html

This story was updated on Sept. 18 at 2:45 p.m. ET.

CHANTILLY, Va. – Twenty-five years after their top-secret, Cold War-era missions ended, two clandestine American satellite programs were declassified Saturday (Sept. 17) with the unveiling of three of the United States' most closely guarded assets: the KH-7 GAMBIT, the KH-8 GAMBIT 3 and the KH-9 HEXAGON spy satellites.

The vintage National Reconnaissance Office satellites were displayed to the public Saturday in a one-day-only exhibit at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's Udvar-Hazy Center at Dulles Airport, Va. The three spacecraft were the centerpiece of the NRO's invitation-only, 50th Anniversary Gala celebration held at the center last evening.

Saturday's spysat unveiling was attended by a number of jubilant NRO veterans who developed and refined the classified spacecraft and its components for decades in secret, finally able to show their wives and families what they actually did 'at the office' for so many years. Both of the newly declassified satellite systems, GAMBIT and HEXAGON, followed the U.S. military's frontrunner spy satellite system CORONA, which was declassified in 1995. [See photos of the declassified U.S. spy satellites]

Big spy satellites revealed

The KH-9 HEXAGON, often referred to by its popular nickname "Big Bird," lived up to its legendary expectations. As large as a school bus, the KH-9 HEXAGON carried 60 miles of high resolution photographic film for space surveillance missions.

Military space historian Dwayne A. Day was exuberant after his first look at the KH-9 HEXAGON.

"This was some bad-ass technology," Day told SPACE.com. "The Russians didn't have anything like it."

Day, co-editor of "Eye in the Sky: The Story of the CoronaSpy Satellites," noted that "it took the Soviets on average five to 10 years to catch up during the Cold War, and in many cases they never really matched American capabilities."

Phil Pressel, designer of the HEXAGON's panoramic 'optical bar' imaging cameras, agreed with Day's assessment.

"This is still the most complicated system we've ever put into orbit …Period."

The HEXAGON's twin optical bar panoramic mirror cameras rotated as the swept back and forth as the satellite flew over Earth, a process that intelligence officials referred to as "mowing the lawn."

Each 6-inch wide frame of HEXAGON film capturing a wide swath of terrain covering 370 nautical miles — the distance from Cincinnati to Washington — on each pass over the former Soviet Union and China. The satellites had a resolution of about 2 to 3 feet (0.6 to nearly 1 meter), according to the NRO. [10 Ways the Government Watches You]

According to documents released by the NRO, each HEXAGON satellite mission lasted about 124 days, with the satellite launching four film return capsules that could send its photos back to Earth. An aircraft would catch the return capsule in mid-air by snagging its parachute following the canister's re-entry.

In a fascinating footnote, the film bucket from the first KH-9 HEXAGON sank to the bottom of the Pacific Ocean in spring 1972 after Air Force recovery aircraft failed to snag the bucket's parachute.

The film inside the protective bucket reported contained high resolution photographs of the Soviet Union's submarine bases and missile silos. In a daredevil feat of clandestine ingenuity, the U.S. Navy's Deep Submergence Vehicle Trieste II succeeded in grasping the bucket from a depth of 3 miles below the ocean.

Hubble vs. HEXAGON

Former International Space Station flight controller Rob Landis, now technical manager in the advanced projects office at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, drove more than three hours to see the veil lifted from these legendary spacecraft.

Landis, who also worked on NASA's Hubble Space Telescope program, noticed some distinct similarities between Hubble and the huge KH-9 HEXAGON reconnaissance satellite.

"I see a lot of Hubble heritage in this spacecraft, most notably in terms of spacecraft size," Landis said. "Once the space shuttle design was settled upon, the design of Hubble — at the time it was called the Large Space Telescope — was set upon. I can imagine that there may have been a convergence or confluence of the designs. The Hubble’s primary mirror is 2.4 meters [7.9 feet] in diameter and the spacecraft is 14 feet in diameter. Both vehicles (KH-9 and Hubble) would fit into the shuttle's cargo bay lengthwise, the KH-9 being longer than Hubble [60 feet]; both would also fit on a Titan-class launch vehicle."

The 'convergence or confluence' theory was confirmed later in the day by a former spacecraft designer, who declined to be named but is familiar with both programs, who confided unequivocally: "The space shuttle's payload bay was sized to accommodate the KH-9." [Infographic: NASA's Space Shuttle from Top to Bottom]

The NRO launched 20 KH-9 HEXAGON satellites from California's Vandenberg AFB from June 1971 to April 1986.

The HEXAGON's final launch in April 1986 — just months after the space shuttle Challenger explosion — also met with disaster as the spy satellite's Titan 34D booster erupted into a massive fireball just seconds after liftoff, crippling the NRO's orbital reconnaissance capabilities for many months.

The spy satellite GAMBIT

Before the first HEXAGON spy satellite systems ever launched, the NRO's GAMBIT series of reconnaissance craft flew several space missions aimed at providing surveillance over specific targets around the world.

The satellite program's initial system, GAMBIT 1, first launched in 1963 carrying a KH-7 camera system that included a "77-inch focal length camera for providing specific information on scientific and technical capabilities that threatened the nation," according to an NRO description. A second GAMBIT satellite system, which first launched aboard GAMBIT 3 in 1966, included a175-inch focal length camera. [Related: Anatomy of a Spy Satellite]

The GAMBIT 1 series satellite has a resolution similar to the HEXAGON series, about 2 to 3 feet, but the follow-up GAMBIT 3 system had an improved resolution of better than 2 feet, NRO documents reveal.

The GAMBIT satellite program was active from July 1963 to April 1984. Both satellites were huge and launched out of Vandenberg Air Force Base.

The satellite series' initial version was 15 feet (4.5 m) long and 5 feet (1.5 m) wide, and weighed about 1,154 pounds (523 kilograms). The GAMBIT 3 satellite was the same width but longer, stretching nearly 29 feet (9 m) long, not counting its Agena D rocket upper stage. It weighed about 4,130 pounds (1,873 kg).

Unlike the follow-up HEXAGON satellites, the GAMBIT series were designed for extremely short missions.

The GAMBIT 1 craft had an average mission life of about 6 1/2 days. A total of 38 missions were launched, though 10 of them were deemed failures, according to NRO documents.

The GAMBIT 3 series satellites had missions that averaged about 31 days. In all, 54 of the satellites were launched, with four failures recorded.

Like the CORONA and HEXAGON programs, the GAMBIT series of satellites returned their film to Earth in re-entry capsules that were then snatched up by recovery aircraft. GAMBIT 1 carried about 3,000 feet (914 meters) of film, while GAMBIT 3 was packed with 12,241 feet (3,731 meters) of film, NRO records show.

The behemoth HEXAGON was launched with 60 miles (320,000 feet) of film!

HEXAGON and GAMBIT 3 team up

During a media briefing, NRO officials confirmed to SPACE.com that the KH-8 GAMBIT 3 and KH-9 HEXAGON were later operated in tandem, teaming-up to photograph areas of military significance in both the former Soviet Union and China.

The KH-9 would image a wide swath of terrain, later scrutinized by imagery analysts on the ground for so-called ‘targets of opportunity.' Once these potential targets were identified, a KH-8 would then be maneuvered to photograph the location in much higher resolution.

"During the era of these satellites — the GAMBIT and the HEXAGON — there was a Director of Central Intelligence committee known as the 'Committee on Imagery Requirements and Exploitation' that was responsible for that type of planning," confirmed the NRO's Robert McDonald, Director of the Center for the Study of National Reconnaissance.

NASA's Rob Landis was both blunt and philosophical in his emotions over the declassification of the GAMBIT and HEXAGON programs.

"You have to give credit to leaders like President Eisenhower who had the vision to initiate reconnaissance spacecraft, beginning with the CORONA and Discoverer programs," Landis said. "He was of the generation who wanted no more surprises, no more Pearl Harbors."

"Frankly, I think that GAMBIT and HEXAGON helped prevent World War III."

Editor's note: This story was updated on Sept. 19 to correct the name of Phil Pressel, who designed the HEXAGON spy satellite camera system.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2011 - 02:47am PT
Awesome report Tom! Thanks for sharing.

Starting this last weekend, I got back into an old hobby of mine, wreckchasing.

Took my fiancee out with me, it was her first crash site. She really enjoyed the documentation process and the "investigation" to try and decipher the mechanics of the accident.

I don't want to post negative stuff like crashes in this thread, but I may start a thread on it at some point. If you would like to see the pictures, they are located at http://s119.photobucket.com/albums/o137/vegasclimber/N4259J%20Crash%20Site/
mooch

Trad climber
Old Climbers' Home (Adopted)
Sep 21, 2011 - 05:07pm PT
Mooch (crouching down) gathering telemetry data after another test flight of the F-35 Lightning II, Ed-weird AFB.




Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2011 - 05:29pm PT
Nice shot Mooch!

Have to say that I'm not much of an F35 fan yet. It's an interesting concept, but it seems to me that the ducting system is really complicated and could be very prone to damage in a combat situation. I'm also a dual engine fan as far as combat airframes go.

I haven't studied it a whole lot yet though, so I don't know what backup systems or protection is in place.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 21, 2011 - 11:53pm PT
Hard to imagine the Navy falling in love with a one-banger.
It is amazing that it can cruise SS without AB.

F-15 Yankin' and bankin'
F-15 Yankin' and bankin'
Credit: Reilly
About 7 or 8 years ago the Air Force 'played' with the Indians and their Migs.
As I recall it two or three F-15's 'took out' 15 Migs. I know I have the
exact figures a bit off but not substantially.


"Hey, Sarge, check the rubber, please."
Where the rubber meets the road on a C-17.
Where the rubber meets the road on a C-17.
Credit: Reilly
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 29, 2011 - 02:09pm PT
From an 1892 "Scientific American"

Credit: Reilly

I guess it didn't 'take off'.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Oct 1, 2011 - 09:35am PT
http://firstflightfoundation.org/first-flight-foundation-events/first-flight-foundation-soaring-100/

Soaring 100!

The centennial celebration of Orville Wright's historic, world record glider flight on October 24, 1911 of 9 minutes and 45 seconds heralding the arrival of modern soaring.

Almost a century ago, on October 24, 1911, Orville Wright soared for 9 minutes and 45 seconds in Kitty Hawk, a record that held for almost 10 years, and started the sport and science of modern soaring as we know it today.


Great article on the soaring record feat and experiments from Popular Mechanics 1911 (full original article):
http://www.firstflightfoundation.org/bm~doc/1911-11-popmech-lougheed_-secret-flights2.pdf
errett

Social climber
Grumpy Ridge
Oct 1, 2011 - 11:55am PT
Just did my very first jump last sunday over Longmont, Colorado. Now I'm bored. I may have to take up this silly business.
Adios airplane.
Adios airplane.
Credit: errett
Nyyaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah.............
Nyyaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah.............
Credit: errett
Goin' down.
Goin' down.
Credit: errett
Hankster

Social climber
Boulder
Oct 1, 2011 - 12:03pm PT
ALLRIGHT errett!!!!!! and you did it with my man Sir Vato!!! well played sir.

caylor
errett

Social climber
Grumpy Ridge
Oct 1, 2011 - 12:26pm PT
Yeee Haw! Totally fun and Rich was great.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 1, 2011 - 07:24pm PT
Errett -

Your first jump costs (on average) $200.

The rest cost you about half your life's income (exactly). :D

Congrats and welcome to skydiving!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Oct 4, 2011 - 07:14pm PT
1st vertical carrier landing.

F35B 10-3-11

http://www.marines.mil/news/pages/marinestv.aspx?pid=ybfCFNAZ7G4IbBhH7HnnngbnQNWfAjLr
thekidcormier

Trad climber
squamish, b.c.
Oct 4, 2011 - 08:24pm PT
Sweet photos and stories erybody
Here's a vid of my first Week of free fall!
http://thekidcormier.blogspot.com/2011/09/twisting-turning-re-edit.html
ms55401

Trad climber
minneapolis, mn
Oct 4, 2011 - 08:39pm PT
I bungee-jumped about 15 years ago and it scared the hell out of me. I'm thinking of getting into skydiving, and I figure it's less scary on account that one doesn't really feel the sensation of falling, with the frame of reference so far away.

that right? or am I fooling myself?
Trusty Rusty

Social climber
Tahoe area
Oct 4, 2011 - 10:39pm PT
Rescue ship down
Rescue ship down
Credit: Trusty Rusty
Engine failure, 6 souls aboard, all walked.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 7, 2011 - 02:30am PT
I was at the San Diego Air & Space Museum and learned something!










Those piston rods are a good 1-1/4" thick!
FinnMaCoul

Trad climber
Green Mountains, Vermont
Oct 7, 2011 - 09:45am PT
Tragically my brother, Dave, was killed a couple weekends ago in Maine when his Cessna went down. Flying was his passion. We suspect it was a frame stall as he was flying low and slow and banking. He flew out of Greenville, Maine.

Be careful all you pilots out there. Just like climbing it only takes a moment for it all to change. He was a damn good pilot but one poor decision plus another... you know how it goes.

Don't mean to bring the thread down. I got to fly with Dave countless times and it is truly a special passion. We shared a bond; my climbing and his flying. I always enjoyed the hell out of being up there with him.

Rest in Peace, brother.

Rangely, Maine.
Rangely, Maine.
Credit: FinnMaCoul

Credit: FinnMaCoul

Dave over Moosehead Lake, Maine
Dave over Moosehead Lake, Maine
Credit: FinnMaCoul

snakefoot

climber
cali
Oct 7, 2011 - 11:01am PT
Credit: snakefoot

Eiger mushroom exit this sept
Trusty Rusty

Social climber
Tahoe area
Oct 7, 2011 - 04:22pm PT
Very sorry about the loss of your brother Finn, that's a heavy blow. Reassuring that you shared a good bond and times, and that at least he was doing what he loved.
Ditto on your comment to pilots. Often more sketch as all the cockpit management in the world is second to mechanical failure.
As good as we perform in the world aloft, we're never more than a move from checkmate.
Regards to you and family.
Abe
Hankster

Social climber
Boulder
Oct 10, 2011 - 10:41pm PT
WOOOOOOHOOOOOOOOOO SNAKEFOOT!!!!!!
okay, last one!
http://vimeo.com/30317808

Edit-very sorry finn..

caylor
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 11, 2011 - 12:57am PT
Sorry to hear that Finn. RIP to your bro.

Thanks for all the contributions lately folks - please keep sharing!

I was at the Midland airport and got some nice shots of the CAF Museum's planes - I will post them up once I get back to Vegas (hopefully tomorrow.)

The B-29 was there but they had it parked over at the main ramp so I didn't get a shot of her, which was a bummer.
snakefoot

climber
cali
Oct 11, 2011 - 02:44pm PT
hank,
looked like greece was nice. will talk later when i see ya, preferably screamin across at each other in flight.
GLee

Social climber
MT
Oct 11, 2011 - 05:18pm PT
Here is a story with a happy ending for those of us who are also skydivers, smokejumpers, pilots, or all of the above.
This is the story as told by the Extraordinarily Talented and Lucky Hawkins & Powers C-119 pilot (& skydiver), Ed Dugan:

http://www.ruudleeuw.com/c119-dugan_story.htm

A friend (who was still working as a Fairbanks BLM smokejumper in 1981) had a silkscreen made of the picture of the distressed HP Tanker 138 (as seen in the story by Ed), and printed it on T-shirts with the caption 'C-119 in Slow Flight'. I think the Bros bought that run out.

Here is a BEFORE of a Hawkins and Powers C-119 (sister HP Tanker 136):

Credit: GLee




Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 11, 2011 - 05:47pm PT
GLee,
Great story, thanks! It has something for everybody, as you noted.

This story, with balky piston engines and add-on jets, reminds me of a book by a C-123 driver in Viet Nam.
It is a fabulous book - very well written and a gripper!

Flying Through Midnight by John Halliday

Buy it, you won't regret it.
hooblie

climber
from where the anecdotes roam
Oct 22, 2011 - 04:25pm PT
john hartford, steam powered aereoplane:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdgLtzWJhbU

1842: The Aerial Steam Carriage of William Samuel Henson and John Stringfellow was patented, but was never successful, although a steam-powered model was flown in 1848.
1852: Henri Giffard flies a 3 horsepower (2 kW) steam-powered dirigible over Paris; it was the first powered aircraft.
1874: Félix du Temple flies a steam powered aluminium Monoplane off a downhill run. While it did not achieve level flight, it was the first manned heavier-than-air powered flight.
1894: Sir Hiram Stevens Maxim (inventor of the Maxim Gun) built and tested a large steam powered aircraft. The machine generated sufficient lift and thrust to break free of the test track and fly but was never operated as a piloted aircraft.
1899: Gustave Whitehead built and flew a steam powered airplane in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Stoker/passenger Louis Darvarich was injured when the plane crashed into an upper story of an apartment building. He later flew steam aircraft in Hartford, Connecticut, and was visited by one of the Wright brothers well before 1903.[1] However, this flight has never been verified satisfactorily; there are no photographs, news stories, or other media from 1899 to confirm it. Likewise, the supposed visit of the Wright brothers to Whitehead is apocryphal; other than affidavits taken over thirty years after the fact, there is no evidence the visit ever happened. Mainstream aviation historians remain unconvinced of the Whitehead claims.[2]
1902: Louis Gagnon flew a steam helicopter in Rossland, British Columbia, called the "Flying Steam Shovel". Control problems caused a crash.
1920 The Bristol Tramp would have been a steam powered aeroplane but the turbine was over powered and the construction of a reliable boiler and condenser circuit was problematic.
1930s: George D. Besler and William J. Besler's prototype steam biplane, based on a Travel Air 2000, flew several times at Oakland airport. It was powered by a two-cylinder, 150 hp (110 kW) reciprocating engine designed by the Doble Steam Motors Company and Besler weighing about 500 lbs.[3][4] and was capable of STOL operation due to the ease of reversing the thrust.[5]
1944: A steam-powered version of the Messerschmitt Me 264a was hypothesized but never constructed. This was meant to be powered by a steam turbine developing over 6,000 horsepower (4,500 kW) while driving a 5.3 meter (17' 6") diameter propeller. The fuel would have been a mixture of powdered coal and petroleum. It seems that the steam turbines would have had an SFC of 190 gr/hp/hr. The main considered advantages to this powerplant were consistent power at all altitudes and low maintenance.[6]
1960s: Conceptual drawings were made for Don Johnson of Thermodynamic Systems Inc. Newport Beach, CA of an engine. It was to be in installed in a Hughes 300 helicopter. The steam engine was a compact cylindrical double-acting uniflow [similar in layout to the Dyna-Cam Aero engine], but never prototyped by Controlled Steam Dynamics, Inc. ~~~ wikipedia
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Oct 22, 2011 - 06:47pm PT
I was at the Midland airport and got some nice shots of the CAF Museum's planes - I will post them up once I get back to Vegas (hopefully tomorrow.)

The B-29 was there but they had it parked over at the main ramp so I didn't get a shot of her, which was a bummer.

10-15 years ago on a flight back from Alaska I sat next to a CAF pilot and board member that was deeply involved in the B-29 restoration project.

When I told him I'd seen a couple of R-3350's in a surplus store yard in Cerritos it was like tellin' a kid that Santa was in the next room with exactly what he wanted for Christmas.

The father of the guy who got me into climbing was a navigator on B-29s and a member of the Caterpillar club.

His craft went down from engine overheating, a common B-29 problem.

Everyone made it out over the Nevada desert except the pilot.

ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
Oct 22, 2011 - 08:33pm PT
Photo: Zak Tessier
Photo: Zak Tessier
Credit: ElCapPirate

Photo: Zak Tessier
Photo: Zak Tessier
Credit: ElCapPirate
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 22, 2011 - 09:47pm PT
Awesome shots Ammon! Those taken at Lodi?

TGT, part of what took so long to get Fifi back in the air, was a complete redesign of the ducting and exhaust systems, for that very reason. That's part of what caused the problem on that bird as well.
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
Oct 24, 2011 - 01:27pm PT
Yes, my friend Zak took the photos of me over Lodi.

Here is another one that I took of that day:

Pete Swan flying a Venom over Lodi, CA - Photo: Ammon McNeely
Pete Swan flying a Venom over Lodi, CA - Photo: Ammon McNeely
Credit: ElCapPirate
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Oct 24, 2011 - 01:35pm PT
still AMAZED at these wing suits, as BITD they were completely outlawed lol!
Wormly81

Trad climber
Oct 24, 2011 - 05:07pm PT
Unedited video of descending my first climb in the Dolomites. Cima Grande Normal Route.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHmJ6VLP_GQ
thekidcormier

Trad climber
squamish, b.c.
Oct 24, 2011 - 05:07pm PT
man those things must take tracking to a whole new level!
RtM

climber
DHS
Oct 25, 2011 - 11:46am PT
Back in the day! Not sure where this was taken, possibly the world meet at Eloy 1996

Credit: RtM
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Nov 6, 2011 - 01:24pm PT
Wanna see a B737 built in 150 seconds?

B737 Fast Build

Crap, can they build a Hyundai that fast?
I liked the fat 12 year old playin' with the steering wheel and the spray booth!
Pretty sure that thing has its own zip code.
thekidcormier

Trad climber
squamish, b.c.
Nov 6, 2011 - 02:29pm PT
Thanks for that Reilly!! Thats was awesome, | really enjoyed it, especially the painting part!
Hankster

Social climber
Boulder
Nov 26, 2011 - 02:38pm PT
from yesterday,
http://vimeo.com/32689364
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
Nov 26, 2011 - 03:07pm PT
My brother Gabe's first skydive
My brother Gabe's first skydive
Credit: ElCapPirate
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Nov 26, 2011 - 03:22pm PT
Hankster,


Nice jumps. You know after you guys BASE, and free-fall for a few seconds, you are just low performing paraglider pilots. Lol.

There was a jumpable BASE parachute/paraglider developed, and it worked. You guys should be going the distance cross-country once you're under canopy and riding the thermals. You could top land and do it again!!!

Combining both worlds would be special.


;-))
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Nov 26, 2011 - 06:39pm PT
You sure that isn't Dennis Miller?

Really well done short film with a twist at the end.

http://biggeekdad.com/2011/11/the-german/
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Dec 6, 2011 - 01:25am PT

Packed my first chute today.
It was a reserve, so what's that tell yah...


-Yes it was a crappy job that barely made it into the container.
-No it will never get used, because...
-No, it will never leave the shop (just a beater, practice canopy)
-Yes I am stoked just the same

I just started a Senior rigger's course with Simon Wade @:
Skydiving Services

Hankster

Social climber
Boulder
Dec 6, 2011 - 10:08am PT
Allright Trundlebum!!! practice, practice and then you'll be awesome. Make sure you're sewing skills are also getting trained. sweet!!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Dec 20, 2011 - 03:27pm PT
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 2, 2012 - 09:45pm PT
The B-2 flyover before today's Rose Parade:


Credit: Reilly
thekidcormier

Trad climber
squamish, b.c.
Jan 3, 2012 - 10:43am PT
@Trundlebum; You say you packed your first chute ever, so you are taking a rigging coarse with out having packed and jumped a main canopy, that must mean you dont have you A-license yet because that is one of the requirements...

I thought you need to have a few license before you could become a rigger...

Personally I'd like to know that the rigger who packed my reserve has had a few thousand jumps with a couple reserve rides in there for the experience.

-Luke
Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
Jan 3, 2012 - 04:51pm PT
Good way to start the new year!
New Years Day Jump at Taft
New Years Day Jump at Taft
Credit: Tfish
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jan 3, 2012 - 08:50pm PT
Sgt Scratch Occupying Vancouver
Sgt Scratch Occupying Vancouver
Credit: TomCochrane

"Sgt. Scratch was born in Saskatchewan , July 7, 1919, and enlisted in the RCAF in Edmonton , as R60973 AC2 on July 20, 1940. He earned his wings as a Sergeant Pilot and flew with that rank for a long time. He flew Liberators from Gander , Newfoundland , as a co-pilot on anti-submarine patrols. Scratch was good at his job and was eventually raised to commissioned rank.

As a Flying Officer and with many hours to his credit, Scratch wanted to fly as aircrfaft commander, however, RCAF officials considered that, as he was slight in build, and had suffered ankle injuries in the past, he would not have the strength to control a Liberator in an emergency.

Sgt. Scratch wanted more action but was unsuccessful in getting an overseas posting. He became very depressed. One evening, June 19. 1944, in the mess, he entered into a debate about one man being able to take off, fly, and land, a Liberator. Scratch left the mess, went down to the hangar, fired up a Liberator, and took off. He shot up the American base at Argentia, and the base at Gander . When some fighters approached him to order him to land, they found him occupying, and rotating the mid-upper gun turret, with the aircraft on autopilot. The guns were fully armed and operational. When he returned to base he was placed under arrest, later court marshalled, and dishonorably discharged.

Mr. Scratch returned to Edmonton , Al berta , and went directly to the RCAF recruiting office where he was accepted back into the RCAF as a Sergeant Pilot. He was posted to No. 5 OTU, Boundary Bay . 5 OTU was training aircrew on Liberators for service against Japan . The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan was winding down and many of the pilots were senior aircrew from Training Command. Again Sgt. Scratch found himself flying second pilot to officers with far less experience than himself. The training started on B-25 Mitchell aircraft and advanced to Liberators. When his experience and flying skills were not recognized, Sgt. Scratch again became frustrated.

On December 5, 1944, Sgt. Scratch attempted to take off, unauthorized, in a Liberator, Due to the fact that there was no official flying that night, the field was in darkness and the control tower un-manned, Scratch mistook a roadway for the runway and crashed into a wooden bridge wiping out the undercarriage. Undaunted, he returned to the hangar and signed out a B-25 Mitchell and took off.

Scratch flew down to Seattle, Washington, area and beat up the Seattle airport causing many aborted take offs. The Americans sent up fighter aircraft to bring the Mitchell down however, Scratch returned to Canada , disrupting and grounding flights at the Vancouver airport. He then flew around the Hotel Vancouver, well below the roof level and down Granville Street .

The following is an eye witness report by Norman Green. “7:00 hrs. December 6, 1944, while it was still dark, I was in the mess hall when it was shaken, and dishes fell to the floor as a result of an aeroplane flying low overhead. The same pass shook WDs out of their bunks.

As usual that morning at 8:00 hrs., 1200 airmen and airwomen, all ranks (I among them), formed up on the tarmac in front of the control tower for CO’s inspection. Just as the parade was about to be called to attention a B-25 Mitchell bomber came across the field at zero altitude, and pulled up sharply in a steep climb over the heads of the assembled airmen, just clearing the tower. Within seconds, 1,200 men and women were flat on the ground. The Mitchell then made several 25 ft. passes over the field. Group Captain Bradshaw dismissed the parade and ordered everyone to quarters.

Over the next two hours we witnessed an almost unbelievable demonstration of flying, much of it with the B-25’s wings vertical to the ground, below roof top level, defying gravity. We were continually diving into ditches to avoid being hit by a wingtip coming down a station road. He flew it straight and level, vertically with the wing tip only six feet above the ground without losing altitude, defying all logic, and the law of physics.”

After an hour of this, three P-40 Kittyhawks from Pat Bay Station arrived on the scene, fully armed, with orders to shoot the B25 down if it left the area of the station. They tried to get on his tail but could not stay with him in his tight turns below rooftop level. After two hours of this, Sgt. Scratch flew over a corner of the field and circled one spot vertically, with the Kittyhawks joining in like may pole dancers.

Sgt Scratch then climbed to 2,000 feet and wagged his wings as he crossed the field, boxed in by the fighters. When they were clear of the station, the Kittyhawks signaled Sgt. Scratch to land. He nodded his head, gave them the thumbs down sign, rolled over, pulled back on his controls, and, aiming at an uninhabited spot on Tillbury Island in the Fraser River , dived into it. The shattered red taillight lens was later located dead centre between the points of impact of the engines.”

Al l in all, a remarkable story, but further on in the forum where this account was published, someone named JDK put into workd very eloquently what my thoughts were about this psychopath: “I've always rather liked the saying that 'the superior pilot is one who uses his superior judgment to avoid using his superior skill'. Unless there's bits we don't know, Sgt Scratch was a disgrace with a few remarkable skills. As a military airman, wrecking several aircraft (and worse) simply because he wanted to do another job than allocated in wartime was utterly selfish and short-sighted. Flying skill to the extent of suicide while wasting government equipment and hazarding the lives of your fellow airmen hardly sounds like 'a superb pilot' to me.

Makes a good bar tale though. And his ghost walks the corridors to this day...”
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jan 3, 2012 - 09:08pm PT
Credit: TomCochrane
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jan 3, 2012 - 09:14pm PT
Credit: TomCochrane



One of the most celebrated images of a low pass is this shot of F-14 Tomcat driver Captain Dale “Snort” Snodgrass making a curving pass alongside USS America. Many web-wags have stated that this was unauthorized, dangerous or that it even was a photo of a Tomcat about to crash. However, Snodgrass explained: "It's not risky at all with practice. It was my opening pass in a Tomcat tactical demonstration at sea. I started from the starboard rear quarter of the carrier, slightly below flight deck level. Airspeed was about 270 kts with the wings swept forward. I selected afterburner at about a half-mile out, and the aircraft accelerated to about 315 kts. As I approached the fantail, I rolled into an 85-degree bank and did a hard 5-6G turn, finishing about 10-20 degrees off of the boat's axis. Microseconds after this photo was taken, after rolling wings-level at an altitude slightly above the flight deck, I pulled vertical with a quarter-roll to the left, ending with an Immelman roll-out 90 degrees and continued with the remainder of the demo. It was a dramatic and, in my opinion, a very cool way to start a carrier demo as first performed by a great fighter pilot, Ed "Hunack" Andrews, who commanded VF-84 in 1980-1988.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jan 3, 2012 - 09:18pm PT
Credit: TomCochrane



A B-52 slides down the port side of USS Ranger (CV-61) in its typical nose down cruise attitude. Though it looks like it, this is not photoshopped. It happened in early 1990 in the Persian Gulf, while U.S. carriers and B-52s were holding joint exercises. Two B-52s called the carrier Ranger and asked if they could do a fly-by, and the carrier air controller said yes. When the B-52s reported they were 9 kilometers out, the carrier controller said he didn't see them. The B-52s told the carrier folks to look down. The paint job on the B-52 made it hard to see from above, but as it got closer, the sailors could make it out, and the water the B-52's engines were causing to spray out. It's very, very rare for a USAF aircraft to do a fly-by below the flight deck of a carrier. But B-52s had been practicing low level flights for years, to penetrate under Soviet radar. In this case, the B-52 pilots asked the carrier controller if they would like the bombers to come around again. The carrier guys said yes, and a lot more sailors had their cameras out this time. Photo was taken from the plane guard helicopter
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 3, 2012 - 09:19pm PT
Tom,
Is that Hetch Hetchy? I gotta try and get my bro-in-law to break open his
photo vault. When he was driving F-111's they would go down to Greece for
'exercises'. Yeah, right, drinking exercises. Oh, they would go out during
the day but that was just to determine who would be buying that night. And
you ask how was that determined? Easy - each right-seater brought his video
camera and they would video each other. Doing what you ask? Duh, who was
kicking up the biggest rooster tail! "And how big is big, Johnny?" Well,
a 90,000 pound airplane flying Mach .9 at 50' AGL makes a really big roostertail!
The pics I've seen I would guess 100'! WOO-HOO!

edit:
Great shot of the BUFF!
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jan 3, 2012 - 09:20pm PT
Credit: TomCochrane


In 2009, a Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet crew got permission for a low-level demonstration flight as part of the opening ceremony for a speedboat race on the Detroit River , This is what it looked like for Motor City residents. Officials waived rules to allow the Navy flyers to swoop under 100ft along the waterway. One resident said, "I couldn't believe how low they flew and how close they came to our building. I'm sure the pilot waved at me." Photo: AP/The Detroit News, Steve Perez. Originally spotted at the Daily Mail.


TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jan 3, 2012 - 09:39pm PT
Credit: TomCochrane

The Human Fly, a stunt man by the name of Rick Rojatt, makes a low pass on top of a DC-8 flown by the legendary Clay Lacy in front of the grandstands between events at the 1976 California National Air Races at Mojave. The aircraft is ex-Japan Airlines JA8002. It was owned and operated by American Jet Industries in 1976.
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Jan 3, 2012 - 09:44pm PT
awesome Tom!! all those airplane pics are great!
Credit: Hankster
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jan 3, 2012 - 09:55pm PT
I am gaining ground on my Sr. Riggers cert.
Alas, still some packing and testing to go.
'Eh I'm in no rush.

I might get treated to my first jump this week end :)

~~~~~~~~~

Hank:
your name came up in the shop today.
Do you know Brandon Clemons of Bad Seed BASE?

Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Jan 3, 2012 - 10:01pm PT
yep! they make good stuff.
Credit: Hankster
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Jan 4, 2012 - 12:35am PT
My daughter soloed this today....

Credit: Karen
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 4, 2012 - 12:59am PT
Wow, Karen, talk about collectables! That must be yours cause it sure can't
belong to any flight school! :-)
I'm sure you've heard all the slanderous comments about Swifts almost all of
which are unfounded I'm sure. However, it sure does look like it would
love to ground-loop and I've also heard you don't want more than about a
10 kt cross wind to land in. True?

So was this your proud daughter's first solo or first tail-dragger solo?
Judging by the size of her smile I'm going with first solo, period. KOOL!

Two more questions:
Was yours built in the first half of the last century?
And why did they put the 'steering' wheels on upside down? :-)
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jan 4, 2012 - 01:35am PT
I just went back and caught up with the thread:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Karen:
Woootah for your daughter, way cool !

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hank, I surely appreciate the positive 'tude. Thanks it gets my stoke up!
Make sure you're sewing skills are also getting trained.
I am a very accomplished sew'r, seamer, stitcher or what ever you want to call it. I am hesitant to say "I am a Blah,blahblah..." about most things. But I can and do use with pride, the statement "I am a sail maker".

My first 9-5 job at 17 was making sails at the same loft where my father was working and retired from. It was at the time the largest loft in the world. I have made 12 meter sails in Marblehead and I have jumped my own sailboard sails at Ho'okipa Maui.

Sewing I can do!

My trapping/tack'n pack'n leave something to be desired still yet,
but I'm getting it :)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

thekidcormier:
@Trundlebum; You say... you are taking a rigging coarse with out having packed and jumped a main canopy, that must mean you dont have your A-license yet
TRUE/Right you are !

because that is one of the requirements...
FALSE/Not true, incorrect.

I thought you need to have a few license before you could become a rigger...
No offence, but now your assuming.
The only requirements for an F.A.A Senior Rigger certification are:

F.A.A Senior Rigger certification

FAR Part 65, Certification;Airman Other Than
Flight
crew Members, provides for the issuance of
two parachute rigger certificates: (1)senior parachute rigger
and (2) master parachute rigger. FAR Part 65 also
provides for four type ratings; (1) seat, (2) back,
(3) chest, and (4) lap. Each senior parachute rigger
applicant must meet the requirements for at least one
rating, and a master parachute rigger applicant must
meet the requirements for at least two ratings to be
issued a certificate.

General Requirements
FAR Section 65.113 states:
(A) To be eligible for a parachute rigger certificate a person must-
(1) Be at least 18 years of age;
(2) Be able to read, write, speak and
understand the English language.
(3) Comply with the sections of this subpart
that apply to the certificate and type rating
he/she seeks.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In a nut shell the requirements to train, test and get certified as a senior rigger are:
1. Be over 18
2. Be fluent in English
3. Log at least twenty pack jobs for each of your rating type.
4. Pass an F.A.A administered written test
5. Pass an oral and 'Hands on' practical test

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It is possible to become an acknowledged, experienced (civil) Master Parachute Rigger with out your feet ever leaving the ground except to get in and out of bed.
I am not sure but I think military riggers are required to jump at least every 90 days. But that is largely due to the fact that Military riggers are first and foremost 'AirBorne' div trained.
That does not apply in civilian regulations.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
thekidcormier-
I am not defending any thoughts, or opinions one way or another.
I understand the desire to know:
"...that the rigger who packed my reserve has had a few thousand jumps with a couple reserve rides..."

However a few considerations are in order:

You don't have to be Alex Honnold to manufacture biners at Black Diamond!
The (skydiving)parachute rigging industry is very well regulated. It is a pretty smooth system of checks and balances. No rigger, that wants to keep his license is going to perform duties beyond the privileges of his certification.
As a Senior rigger I can do minor repairs, supervise the packing of mains, pack reserves etc.
I CAN NOT as a senior rigger, do major repairs or mod's to any canopy, harness or container.
I can however do any of the aforementioned work, under the supervision of a master rigger. At that point my work is then essentially his responsibility and I assure you he/she will see to it that it meets their work quality standards.
It is a little spooky to think that somebody that has as little as a one week course and 20 pack jobs just may have packed your reserve, but it doesn't really work quite that simply.
Just the same...
I climb in my own harness. At times I have worn a Black Diamond harness, which was probably sewn by some gal in the Philippines that perhaps has never even seen a cliff let alone been on a technical rock climb.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In three years from now I hope to pass my Master riggers certification.
By then I may not have a single jump...
Or I may already be a proficient skydiver and BASE jumper who knows?
Either way I am going to continue to pursue the rigging industry, be it
parachute, entertainment, yachting or industrial rope access.

I however have hopes that in three years from now I will be proficiently jumping my own gear, my own main, harness and container ;)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Edit:
I found out this afternoon that I might be ballast on a tandem jump on Saturday

WOOOOOHOOOOOO !

(but that would spoil my record of rigging with no jumps LOL)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Wishing everybody, safe and happy landings through out the New Year !
Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
Jan 4, 2012 - 06:43am PT
Trundlebum you're wrong about packing a main for our A license. It is required.

http://www.uspa.org/Portals/0/Downloads/Form_ALicenseProfandApp.pdf
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Jan 4, 2012 - 07:54am PT
NICE KAREN!!!!

Tfish, you are not talking about the same thing as TrundleBum and it's sort of funny. You are correct, to get your skydiving A license you need to pack a main "main" parachute in front of a USPA certified coach or higher instructor. HOWEVER, you need no skydives to pack "reserve" parachutes. Reserve parachutes and thier assembly, maintenence and function are governed by the F.A.A. which is totally seperate than the USPA.

Totally not trying to be a d#@&%e to you Tfish, you know the difference beteween your main and reserve parachute, right? And as for needing to make skydives, my massive dropzone here in Longmont, CO has at least 5 kids packing 100's of parachutes for students and tandems every weekend and they're in High School and not old enough to skydive! They just do that instead of mowing lawns. NOBODY has to jump from an airplane or other to legally pack parachutes, at all.

UNLESS you are in the Military. My job in the 82nd Airborne was Parachute Rigger and yes, you had to get your knees in the breeze every 30 days.
thekidcormier

Trad climber
squamish, b.c.
Jan 4, 2012 - 09:59am PT
Thanks for the clarification; I'm new to the aviation world so I need to ask questions to get the answers I'm looking for. Best of luck in the rigging business...

but who is this alex honnold guy you refer too, is he a salesman @ BD?

Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
Jan 4, 2012 - 11:39am PT
@Trundlebum; You say... you are taking a rigging coarse with out having packed and jumped a main canopy, that must mean you dont have your A-license yet
TRUE/Right you are !


because that is one of the requirements...
FALSE/Not true, incorrect.


Yeah Hank, I know it's not required to be a skydiver to be a rigger. Theres a few people at my DZ that have like 2 skydives. It's weird but yeah you don't have to jump to pack. And it's like opposite for reserves, most skydivers can't pack their reserves but can pack their main everytime.
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Jan 4, 2012 - 02:41pm PT
Reilly, yes the Swift is privately owned (her father) but I have no idea on the cross-wind issue, or when built, sorry!

Actually, she has never flown anything but tail draggers! She got her private in a Cessna 170 and also flies a Cessna 140 (see my avatar pic of the 170). She has completed all the requirements for her instrument and commercial and will attain those soon, I'm proud of her:)

Her dad collects vintage airplanes (Cessna 195, has 2 170's, 3 140', a North American Navion, the Swift, Beech 18, Seabee, and various "projects", i.e., Howard dga-15). Whew....he is obsessed to say the least!

Lastly, before we were divorced I earned my Private in the 140, needless to say, tail draggers are quite fun to fly.


edit to add: my avatar pic is of her flying the 170!
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Jan 4, 2012 - 04:08pm PT

Thank you Hank, yah saved me a lot of typing M8 !
BTW Brandon Bad Seed Base and Simon Wade of Skydiving Sevices say Hello and a Nappy New Year !
ß Î Ø T Ç H

Boulder climber
bouldering
Jan 8, 2012 - 03:32am PT
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 10, 2012 - 01:14am PT
Hard to fathom how 25 tons of whoopazz is obsolete but if yer gonna have a
'low-tech' weenie roast this 'un will still do the job. Check out the
'exhaust art'.

Taken at the Chino Planes of Fame Airshow in Oct (?)



ps
Karen,
Is yer ex still available? I think I'm in luv! All he's lacking is a DC-3! :-)
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jan 15, 2012 - 01:37am PT
F-35B Video http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=Ki86x1WKPmE

An amazing aircraft.

This video is fresh (for the public). It was made just six weeks ago in the Atlantic, just off Newport News (Hampton Roads), Virginia.

These are the latest sea trials of the F-35B on the USS Wasp. They were very successful, with 74 VL's and STO's in a three week period. The media and the program critics had predicted that we would burn holes in the deck and wash sailors overboard. Neither of which happened. You will notice a sailor standing on the bow of the ship as the jet rotates. That was an intentional part of the sea trials.

The USS Wasp is an amphibious assault ship designed to embark a Marine Expeditionary Unit. It is capable of simultaneously supporting rotary and fixed wing STOVL aircraft and amphibious landing craft operations. For this test deployment the USS Wasp was outfitted with special instrumentation to support and measure the unique operating environment as the F-35B conducted short takeoffs and vertical landings.

No catapult...... No hook ............

The shape and scope of warfare – worldwide – just changed.
thekidcormier

Trad climber
squamish, b.c.
Jan 18, 2012 - 12:48pm PT
First head down exit; with merlin the wizard
First head down exit; with merlin the wizard
Credit: thekidcormier
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Jan 18, 2012 - 01:00pm PT
I like to fly, slowly working on becoming a commercial pilot... here is a video from last week landing on Oregon's shortest public runway...
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Jan 18, 2012 - 01:02pm PT
I just got a go-pro and have been having fun playing with it. Here is my first shot at editing something since the VHS days... Not that cool of a flight but the go-pro makes it look kinda cool. =)

ms55401

Trad climber
minneapolis, mn
Jan 28, 2012 - 08:47pm PT
Oct 4, 2011 - 05:39pm PT
I bungee-jumped about 15 years ago and it scared the hell out of me. I'm thinking of getting into skydiving, and I figure it's less scary on account that one doesn't really feel the sensation of falling, with the frame of reference so far away.

that right? or am I fooling myself?
buckie

Trad climber
Oregon
Jan 29, 2012 - 10:08pm PT
East coast and back in the Beaver
East coast and back in the Beaver
Credit: buckie
This is old thing comes in handy gettin around the Cascades Lakes.
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Jan 30, 2012 - 02:37pm PT
ms5441, there is no sensation of falling skydiving, only if you jump from say a hot air balloon or a helicopter. The forward speed of an aircraft prevents one from feeling it, what you get to feel is an awesome sensation of the wind and a 60 second free fall is amazing. Think of how it feels when you put your hand out of a car window while traveling fast, that is how it feels except a lot cooler-going terminal velocity is almost cushion like.

Hank you probably can explain it better:)

Reilly, he wants a DC-3. Have you ever flown one? It is a hoot, heavy on the controls like a big lumbering giant. Story for you, years ago when Perris Valley still used DC-3's, my ex and I took one up for a flight just the two of us. We spaced out not knowing the ladder was still in the doorway, so the office radios us up to report this. Well, my ex tells me to fly it while he puts on a parachute to go in the back to pull it inside. It seemed like he took forever, when I noticed the air speed was getting a bit low, at that time (really no experience flying) but I knew enough to lower the nose to gain speed. My ex got back in time, thank goodness since I think the 3 was getting ready to stall. Crazy.

Another thrill was taking off in it on that short runway at Perris. Full power was applied while feet on the brakes, when he would let go of the brakes it would shake like crazy, the sound was incredible, the whole experience was just plain fun! Miss that. Oh, the guys often did low fly-bys after dropping off the sunset loads, screaming by you could see the fire coming out of the engines, the 3's were called the fire breathing dragons.

Lastly, I live under the final approach by Long Beach airport and every time that Catalina DC-3 flies over I practically get ..., lol, use your imagination!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 30, 2012 - 04:32pm PT
Karen,
Let me know when he gets his DC-3 so I can get a divorce. Not only have I
not flown one I've not even flown in one! From what I hear you were in no
danger of stalling it - all it would have done was mush and nose over on its
own.

What I really want is a PBY. I went through one that was for sale about
15 years ago. The dood had pimped it out BAD! We're talking tuck-and-rool
white leather setees under the blisters, a chef-worthy galley, and a couple
of Ritz Carlton staterooms! Oh yeah, and he had these big-azzed speakers
installed on the underside of the wings so he could fly over some idyllic
bay and hail the natives.

"I say my good people, might I land in yer lagoon and have a palaver?"
hooblie

climber
from where the anecdotes roam
Jan 30, 2012 - 07:40pm PT
it's not hard to love a dc-3. departed in one from a dirt strip outside cabo san lucas back in '75. we walked along the runway to the terminal taking note of the tires marking the edge. each one had a several plies revealed by wear. i suppose those were the ones that didn't get carted off and remounted. still it was unsettling to realize that they were in use with three out of four plies exposed. surely things have changed since the airport is paved now. it might have lights!

how about a little love for the c-46 ... curtis-wright commando.
this outfit made regular fuel deliveries in their less pampered one of these to our village along the yukon. as the weather guy i would host the crew in my office while the truck was off unloading a third of what they brought.

their coveralls were basicly saturated with polished diesel grime seasoned with aged urine which i assumed resulted from inflight relief out some hole air was rushing into. i'm not sure since i never took them up on the standing offer to ride along. anyway, we've all learned some empathy for the condition, though for the sake of the office upholstery, i provided each a trash can to park on.

must be a couple of relief holes ... i dunno
must be a couple of relief holes ... i dunno

pretty lax these guys. when the (non-explosive rated) pump would catch fire under the belly they would gather round and casually kick snow on it.

on one (luckily summer) occasion they called from twenty miles out and i provided the full airport advisory which included the obvious showers in the vicinity. when they announced three mile final for straight in runway 24, i gave them a windcheck since things had gotten gusty. before long i was startled to hear them roaring by at midfield, tail up fully loaded with 2k ft of gravel remaining.

a lot of dust and commotion down that end. i looked at my instruments and the wind had reversed direction in that short time. i was mortified but very relieved to see them back taxi. one can presume a microburst like condition existed where a column of descending air hits the ground and blows out in every direction. as it passes directly overhead one can watch the windsock swing right around, and that's what i should have been doing.

an unexpected downwind landing only barely phased these guys,
but that was cold water out past the threshold
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Jan 31, 2012 - 12:24am PT
Reilly, you know what I would like?

Stagger wing beech
Single engine otter on floats
Super cub all set to be STAL

And the money for all the fuel !!!

Vintage planes rock!!!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 31, 2012 - 01:48am PT
Hooblie, who was flying that crate in the second picture? I know damn well
it doesn't have an autopilot.

Karen,
You have good taste in airplanes.



A few more from last October's Planes of Fame show.
If you missed the original thread:
Planes of Fame

Might as well get something for yer tax dollar!
Credit: Reilly

Is he running Premium?
Credit: Reilly

The original Stealth Bomber...
Credit: Reilly
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 1, 2012 - 10:58pm PT
Karen, I've changed my mind. I'm not gonna get a PBY. It's gonna be an
Ekranoplan or nuthin'! I know it doesn't look real sleek but you don't
wanna be in its way especially seeing as how it could only fly a maximum
of 60' off the deck! But it could haul a boatload of vodka at 300 kts!

Can you say 'White Elephant' in Russian?
Can you say 'White Elephant' in Russian?
Credit: Reilly
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 3, 2012 - 10:51am PT
An interesting article in LA Times about hang gliders vs paragliders brings
up some disturbing similarities to 'trad' vs 'sport'. Oh, and there are
curmudgeons involved!

Riding the winds of change
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 3, 2012 - 07:15pm PT
No photos but interesting article.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_generic.jsp?channel=aerospacedaily&id=news/asd/2012/02/01/02.xml&headline=USAF%20Reveals%20Latest%20X-Plane:%20X-56A
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 3, 2012 - 08:47pm PT
It seems odd that they can't do adequate flutter testing in a wind tunnel
although I do realize there are limitations especially of scale.
perswig

climber
Feb 3, 2012 - 09:03pm PT
Big agree with Reilly on the PBY. I've always thought they were beautiful airframes.
That behemoth above is a horse of a different color.

Haven't been back to this thread in awhile. Thanks for all the recent addtions.
Dale
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 6, 2012 - 12:31pm PT


http://martinjetpack.com/video-gallery.aspx
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Feb 6, 2012 - 06:59pm PT
bad ass right here!!
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Feb 7, 2012 - 10:06pm PT

DRAGON FLYING IN CHINA

http://player.vimeo.com/video/31481531?autoplay=1
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
Feb 7, 2012 - 11:53pm PT
Great stuff, Hankster!

Sorta reminds me of this wingsuit attempt in 1912



Click here if that doesn't play http://youtu.be/_7sZQ9WaPj0

PS: Loved the BASE segment in Front Range Freaks. That was right about the time I was just getting interested in BASE. That and having Frank G's video and Will Ox's Baffin footage were all part of getting me psyched to learn.
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Feb 8, 2012 - 12:06am PT
i shot this video last week... was a nice day to fly through the gorge

walt

climber
Kirkwood, CA
Feb 8, 2012 - 11:37am PT
A friend of mine having fun in the wave over Minden, NV.  Gordon Boett...
A friend of mine having fun in the wave over Minden, NV. Gordon Boetteger has set all kinds of gliding records in the wave in the last year. The sierra is his playground!
Credit: walt
Looks Like Fun!
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Feb 10, 2012 - 08:17pm PT
this kicks so much ass!! only 37 seconds long and GOLD I TELL YA'!!

http://www.iloveskydiving.org/view/videos/friday-freakout-ground-launching-into-a-herd-of-cows/
MBrown

Big Wall climber
The Eastside.... UUUUHHHHHHH!
Feb 24, 2012 - 11:44am PT
^ HAHAHAHA! classic! good thing that pilot is safe and did not get trampled too bad. But the real bummer is his wing. It' s FU*#ED
thekidcormier

Trad climber
squamish, b.c.
Feb 24, 2012 - 11:49am PT
that is freakin hilarious, what a dumb dumb. I've only done one ground launch so far but made sure there was livestock in my way!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 24, 2012 - 11:58am PT
HANK! I almost spit my yogurt! That rooskie 'tard is clearly the frontrunner
in this year's Darwin Award race. But Hollywood needs to find that chick
who was doing the Exorcist moaning track in the background.
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Feb 25, 2012 - 12:02pm PT
The FreakWife and I went to see Bob D'Antonio in Taos yesterday. He hung out on the rim and watched us do THIS!!
http://vimeo.com/37418526<---video
Credit: Hankster

Then we went to the lodge he operates in town and he treated us to the best damn chicken enchilades(Taos folks know thier green chile!!)ever. Thanks Bobby D!!
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Feb 25, 2012 - 04:44pm PT
http://www.dump.com/2011/10/26/raw-cockpit-footage-taken-during-a-blue-angels-air-show-video/
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Feb 25, 2012 - 09:11pm PT
Why you don't want to follow a 'heavy':

wake turbulance
wake turbulance
Credit: TomCochrane

wing vortex in clouds
wing vortex in clouds
Credit: TomCochrane

wing vortex
wing vortex
Credit: TomCochrane

FL 330 FL vs 340 with 1000' separation
FL 330 FL vs 340 with 1000' separation
Credit: TomCochrane

F 15E Strike Eagle
F 15E Strike Eagle
Credit: TomCochrane

F 15C fastest recorded takeoff
F 15C fastest recorded takeoff
Credit: TomCochrane
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 28, 2012 - 06:57pm PT
Looks like I missed some great posts while I have been out doing the real life thing!

Love the Eagle shots, Tom. Thanks for sharing, everyone!
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Feb 28, 2012 - 07:28pm PT
Walt, that glider picture is amazing! Wow, how fun....




This is for you Reilly....Kalinin K-7


Credit: Karen


Crazy isn't it?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 29, 2012 - 01:03am PT
Karen, thanks so much! When will it arrive?




That thing looks more like a Hollywood set design.
Yeah, those Rooskies like to think big. Talk about drag! Whazzup with those
gear housings, or whatever you wanna call them? No wonder the designer
was shot by Stalin.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Nice shots, Tom! Yeah, a friend got sequenced into LAX a little too tightly
one night flying the night bank checks. All looked good until about
50' when the vortex slid sideways into his path and his Navajo turned turtle.
He survived, barely, but that was the end of his flying career.

Sadly he had survived a previous crash, of which he was blameless (he was
dead-heading-yeah,ironic,eh?), that really should have killed him. I say
sadly because to have survived the first he should have been allowed by
the powers that be to enjoy his true passion. What was more sad was
that the second crash occurred before new rules about landing spacing
were adopted by the FAA. As I recall he had no idea how close he was to
the jet ahead of him.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
BREAKING NEWS!
A former former Cal quarterback just launched a paper airplane on a 227' flight!
Who needs real airplanes?
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Mar 7, 2012 - 01:12pm PT
Credit: TomCochrane
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Mar 7, 2012 - 01:30pm PT
Hoffbrow

Trad climber
California
Mar 7, 2012 - 01:32pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#240122
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Mar 7, 2012 - 01:46pm PT
Tom-

THX for posting the Blue Angels link! Also, THX for all the great photos!The wake turbulence photo says it better than anything a CFI could ever tell a noob or wannabee pilot about the dangers there.
I've had occasion to follow a C-17 in the pattern; when told by ATC "to be aware of wake turbulence," my response was to say "extending downwind for wake turbulence avoidance." I then extended downwind for about 2 miles before turning base. I missed all the thrills that way.
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Mar 7, 2012 - 02:11pm PT
Still messin around with my Go-Pro, shot this last week flying home after going to Chico for some In-N-Out... 2hr flight compressed into 9min kinda cool as the sun sets and landing with no landing light.

TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Mar 7, 2012 - 02:18pm PT
Towering dust devil casts a serpentine shadow over the Martian surface...
Towering dust devil casts a serpentine shadow over the Martian surface in a new image from the high-resolution camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. More info: http://bitly.com/zNeD5P
Credit: TomCochrane

with 1% of Earth's atmospheric density, Mars features extreme winds and turbulence; and take-off speeds on Mars exceed Mach 1
redrocker

climber
NV
Mar 7, 2012 - 02:23pm PT
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Mar 7, 2012 - 02:27pm PT
I've got that whole dead stick take-off video, that guy is pretty nuts! Tons of cool rock footage of Leslie Gulch area as well!
corniss chopper

climber
breaking the speed of gravity
Mar 7, 2012 - 03:07pm PT


Adventure Kite Surfer fights off Red Sea Sharks with a his knife while floating for 2 days during a failed attempt to set a crossing record of the body of water.
Saudi Coast Guard rescued him after tracking his emergency radio beacon.

http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/weird/NATL-kite-surfer-kills-red-sea-sharks-141598613.html
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 7, 2012 - 05:53pm PT
Hoffbrow, shweeet! Where did you launch from? How did you get to 14K?
Did you ride a wave up San Gorgonio?




Redrocker, you want dead stickin'? Here's some good ones:
__Gimli_Glider__

And perhaps the most impressive: __Air_Transat_Flight_236__

Interesting that two of the three most famous ones were conducted by
Canadians after they screwed up their fuel management.


Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Mar 7, 2012 - 08:03pm PT
No wonder the designer
was shot by Stalin.

But Stalin shot EVERYBODY I thought! This is a great thread you folks, really great diversity and pretty much all on topic and unique.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 7, 2012 - 10:02pm PT
We got to get more paragliding represented in this thread . . . It's incredible what you can do and how far you can go on thermals, ridge lift, convergence, and evening magic lift . . .

Fusion Nuclear Reactions safely 93 million miles away ---> full EM spectrum sent towards Earth --> sun-light heats the ground ---> ground heats the air immediatley above it ---> convection and differences of air pressure (wind) thoughout the lower atmosphere boundary layer ---> essentially free energy to travel 100s, even potentially 1000s of miles on just nylon canopies and string. Incredible really.



An oldy (1999) but a goody . . .


From Nowhere to the Middle of Nowhere (directors promo)
The first paraglider crossing (tandem) of Western Nepal with John Silvester
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGU0c78V9qI


PARAGLIDING - Cross Country Over Swiss Mountains
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VBwlOHjzRw


When you are really good with your canopy and have become one with it and you're a little insane you can do #$@! like this!

First Tandem Paragliding Infinite Tumble
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kr13xRIPfvk&feature=related


The incredible journeys to be done via XC flying on a paraglider have really just begun. Vol Bivouc all the way, doing traverses across massive mountain ranges, circumnavigations and triangles through massive mountain ranges, and flat-land flying for 1000s of miles. Climbing and paragliding. Nothing really like it. It's a dream come true.



What it's all about . . .


Red Bull X Alps 2011 Event Trailer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CD-UYu8cc-Y&feature=relmfu
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Mar 7, 2012 - 10:15pm PT
Cool arse thread.

Tom your posting some great stuff.
That shot of the Shuttle coming out above the clouds is fantastic.

I love those shots of cloud and vapor illuminating the massive tip vortices off the big jets. It is a wonderful, visual representation of the airflow kinda like that fighter jet pic where the wings are almost entirely engulfed in condensation.
Great pic and stories folks, keep'm coming !

K I will now stop playing hookie and go back to work.
I have two Icaraus, 330, tandem mains to reline and a third to deline :)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Mar 7, 2012 - 11:16pm PT
TomCochrane: Those wake turbulence pictures are wild!
ms55401

Trad climber
minneapolis, mn
Mar 7, 2012 - 11:25pm PT
so many cool photos -- is the Space Shuttle one real? and the F15 with ass on the tarmac is great too

has anyone built an airplane? My uncle did this maybe 20 years ago and still flies. I was thinking of following in his footsteps, under his tutelage.
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Mar 7, 2012 - 11:26pm PT
Was a nice day to go scope some crappy Oregon rock...

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Mar 8, 2012 - 10:56am PT
[youtube=http://www.parahawkusa.com/Home.html]
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Mar 8, 2012 - 05:03pm PT
Just a guess here, but I suspect the shot of the shuttle is one taken while the vehicle was still on the launch pad, sitting shrouded in low lying fog? The orientation is too vertical for in-flight, since it has a pretty aggressive attitude change as it begins tilting over on it's back for orbital entry. The astronauts wind up flying the beast head down, towards the Earth once orbit is achieved.
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Mar 11, 2012 - 03:46am PT
I re-edited the video I posted above, slowing it down n stuff so its easier to see the cool stuff. Probably much more enjoyable to watch...

Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 11, 2012 - 12:38pm PT
Paragliding Mont-Blanc, Chamonix
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZgxO6Foxlw


TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Mar 14, 2012 - 01:41am PT
New photos from Cassini:

Saturn and Rhea
Saturn and Rhea
Credit: TomCochrane



Saturn and Rhea
Saturn and Rhea
Credit: TomCochrane


Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 14, 2012 - 01:47am PT
Jack Herer, where's that airport with the port-a-potty by the taxiway?
That's a first for me I do believe! A crapper and a pay phone, what more
could one ask for?
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
Mar 14, 2012 - 02:11am PT
Reilly,

Thats my home strip in Corvallis, the same one landed at. The owner of the FBO really makes his money off of owning Honey Bucket porto-pots. So its great, that one in the video is one of the cleanest ones I've seen! Corvallis is a great airport, not much traffic, big runway, lots of IAPs, was/is a great place to learn.

http://www.airnav.com/airport/KCVO


Cheers,
Tyler
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
Mar 16, 2012 - 04:05pm PT
Skydive just went down from 71,000 feet

Photos http://www.redbull.com/cs/Satellite/en_INT/Article/Red-Bull-Stratos--Test-in-the-Death-Zone---021243179035293

Video http://www.redbull.com/cs/Satellite/en_INT/Video/Red-Bull-Stratos-2012--First-Manned-Test-Flight-021243179002966
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Mar 19, 2012 - 02:43am PT
http://news.yahoo.com/missing-balloon-pilot-saved-others-crashing-040127153.html

Missing balloon pilot saved others before crashing

FITZGERALD, Ga. (AP) — Authorities searched Sunday for a hot air balloon pilot from North Carolina who went missing in the South Georgia woods when his balloon crashed during a weekend thunderstorm.

Ben Hill County Sheriff Bobby McLemore said 63-year-old Edward Ristaino of Cornelius, N.C., was taking five skydivers into the air Friday evening during a festival in Fitzgerald, Ga., when a storm hit.

Ristaino told the skydivers to jump from the balloon. None were injured.

"He saved our lives," Jessica Wesnofske, 30, one of the skydivers, told The Charlotte Observer. "Another minute, we would have been in the storm with him."

Erin Daly, whose brother was one of the skydivers, called Ristaino a hero who saved lives.

The sheriff said strong winds then forced the balloon up to about 18,000 feet before it collapsed in a downdraft and plummeted to the ground.

Authorities have not found the balloon. Ristaino, who had nearly two decades experience flying hot air balloons, had brief radio contact with authorities.

"He told them he was in trouble," the sheriff told The Associated Press on Sunday evening. "He didn't think he was going to make it."

McLemore said the pilot was reading off his altitude readings as he fell, in an apparent effort to assist any search. The sheriff said crews would resume a ground and air search of the mostly wooded area on Monday morning.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 20, 2012 - 08:16pm PT
I'm so glad that in addition to all the private money being spent now the
government sees fit to waste more time on this to expunge the collective
guilt over a mediocre pilot who was clueless about navigation and radios.

Amelia Earhart mystery: Hillary Clinton announces U.S. support of new search
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 22, 2012 - 12:31pm PT
Check out this chopper crash. Hard to believe there were no "serious injuries".

Military Helicopter Crash

What happened? Pretty clearly a case of the mustard coming off the hotdog.
Dood might have survived the crash but he's gonna be in the ICU from the chewing-out.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 24, 2012 - 04:26pm PT
I read somewhere that the crew now faces criminal charges. Destruction of govt property to start with.


On a happier note.

A solution to the sonic boom?



http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/03/16/supersonic_biplane/
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Mar 25, 2012 - 11:11pm PT
Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 29, 2012 - 12:37am PT
It's finaly here!

The Tacocopter.

http://www.ksl.com/?sid=19748145&nid=1014&title=tacocopter-would-deliver-tacos-via-unmanned-drone&s_cid=featured-4

TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 31, 2012 - 10:52pm PT
ms55401

Trad climber
minneapolis, mn
Mar 31, 2012 - 11:03pm PT
Red Bull vid was anticlimactic. Shows the dood moving out of the capsule, but fades to black before showing free-fall. Bullsh#t. Or rather, Red Bullsh#t.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 3, 2012 - 12:06am PT
Passenger lands plane with Wis. pilot unconscious

Associated Press – 1 hr 31 mins ago

STURGEON BAY, Wis. (AP) — An 80-year-old woman was able to successfully land a twin-engine airplane in northeastern Wisconsin after her husband became unconscious at the controls and died.

Door County Sheriff Terry Vogel says the dispatch center was told just after 5 p.m. Monday that a Cessna about 6 miles south of Sturgeon Bay had declared an emergency.

The pilot, an 81-year-old man from the Sturgeon Bay area, had suffered a medical emergency and was unconscious. His wife, who was the passenger, was flying the plane.

A certified pilot was able to fly alongside the plane and coach the wife. Just after 6 p.m., her right engine ran out of fuel and lost power.

She was able to land at Door County Cherryland Airport. The wife suffered minor injuries. Her husband was pronounced dead.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

While she had, no doubt, watched he dear husband land many times this is
a more impressive feat in light of her losing an engine which can make
a twin considerably more tricky to fly. To me the most remarkable thing
is that the poor thing had the composure to do so.


80 yr old lands twin Cessna
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Apr 5, 2012 - 01:48pm PT
Oh man Reilly - I found this audio this morning. GRIPPING. I cannot imagine being her son and the others.

I'm gripped.

audio of the event as she talks with the other pilot, tower personnel and her son:

http://doorcountysheriff.homestead.com/april_2012_002.mp3
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Apr 5, 2012 - 10:28pm PT
Punkin', about to aviate!
Punkin', about to aviate!
Credit: Hankster
video------> http://vimeo.com/39543055
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Apr 12, 2012 - 11:14pm PT
Bitchin Hankster!



Credit: Ron Anderson

largest ass ive ever seen..
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Apr 13, 2012 - 10:36pm PT
Yeah, you win Ron!
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Apr 16, 2012 - 06:54pm PT
http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news/Lost_Spitfire_Squadron_206526-1.html

April 15, 2012
Lost Squadron Of Pickled Spitfires Found


By Russ Niles, Editor-in-Chief



Aviation historians and warbird enthusiasts are drooling at the discovery of at least 12 and maybe as many 20 perfectly preserved brand-new Spitfire Mark 14s buried in Myanmar, which was formerly Burma. Thanks to the tenacity (and apparently considerable diplomatic skills) of British farmer David Cundall, the lost squadron of pristine fighters was found where they were buried by U.S. troops in 1945 when it became clear they wouldn't be needed in the final days of the Second World War. At least a dozen of the aircraft, one of the latest variants with their 2,035-horsepower Roll Royce Griffon engines replacing the 1,200-1,500-horsepower Merlins in earlier models, were buried without ever being removed from their original packing crates. It's possible another eight were also buried after the war ended. After spending 15 years and $200,000 of his own money, Cundall was rewarded with visual proof of the magnitude of his discovery. "We sent a borehole down and used a camera to look at the crates," he told the Telegraph. "They seemed to be in good condition."

The aircraft were declared surplus when they arrived in Burma because the Japanese were in retreat by then and carrier-based Seafires were getting all the action. They were ordered buried in their original crates, waxed, swaddled in grease paper and their joints tarred against the elements. Cundall found some of the soldiers who buried the planes by placing ads in magazines and was able to narrow down the search before using ground-penetrating radar to confirm the burial site. The next obstacles to recovery are political. Myanmar's former military junta was under a variety of sanctions, among them an international convention that prevented the transfer of military goods to and from the country. Recent political reforms have led to the lifting of that ban effective April 23. Cundall will also need the permission of the new Myanmar government to unearth the treasure. He helped his own cause by making numerous trips to the country and earning the trust of government officials. British Prime Minister David Cameron is expected to seal the deal with Myanmar President Thein Sein during a visit.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Apr 16, 2012 - 07:03pm PT
Wow! ebay gonna have a heart attack when they see the bids on those lmao!!
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Apr 16, 2012 - 08:32pm PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvtQ3g0ELuE&feature=related

IMAX Fighter Pilot
murf02

climber
NYC
Apr 16, 2012 - 08:46pm PT
Credit: murf02
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
Apr 16, 2012 - 09:11pm PT
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^NICE!!!!!!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 19, 2012 - 10:44pm PT
http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/04/19/buried-treasure-in-burma-squadron-lost-wwii-spitfires-to-be-exhumed/?intcmp=features

Still in cosmolene and buried in the original packing crates.
ms55401

Trad climber
minneapolis, mn
Apr 19, 2012 - 10:47pm PT
what are the odds of a n00b launching off the Cap and not getting caught or tased? I'd guess that, all things considered, there's a 2-in-7 chance of things not going well
Robb

Social climber
The other side of life
Apr 20, 2012 - 02:19pm PT
Awesome Red Flag video!
Thanks Tom
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Apr 21, 2012 - 10:54pm PT
In spite of missing the Todd Gordon fest in Joshua Tree today, life was still good!

My damaged airplane was finally fixed last week, and Wednesday my CFI signed me off for my High Performance Airplane logbook endorsement. And today, I made my first solo flight in the "Rainbow Bird." I had another pilot in the right seat, but I was flying as PIC (pilot in command). Brian was a CFI candidate, waiting for HIS checkride with the FAA Designated Examiner, and wanted a chance to ride in the airplane as an observer. Yep. We had fun.

Finally some good pictures:

Piper PA 28-236 "Dakota" on the ramp at Atlantic Aviation, Casper, WY.
Piper PA 28-236 "Dakota" on the ramp at Atlantic Aviation, Casper, WY.
Credit: Brokedownclimber

Brokedownclimber and N84602, on the ramp in Casper.
Brokedownclimber and N84602, on the ramp in Casper.
Credit: Brokedownclimber

Even though it looks very sleek and racy, it isn't a speed machine; it's my flying SUV and a heavy load hauler. Normal cruise speed in normal flying conditions is 137 KIAS, and 146 KIAS is about the top speed in calm air. (That's 158 and 168 mph, respectively)
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 22, 2012 - 01:53am PT
SWEET! Now you just have to keep idiots away from it and keep the shiny side up.
But you knew that although I don't think you have "Keep idiots away" on the checklist. :-)

Don't feel bad. My bro-in-law was in a part of Canada that they tell a lot
of jokes about. It was a couple months ago and he landed as a big blizzard
was rolling in. He had an early departure the next morning so he went out
to the airport to make sure the ground crew got the plane prepped properly
and on time. He saw a mechanic on a stepladder holding an 18' flex duct that
was hooked up to a 'Herman Nelson' to pre-heat the engine. A 'Herman Nelson
is one of those giant propane heaters that looks like a small jet engine.
Andrew went up to the mechanic and asked him how long he had been heating
the engine. He got a rather vague reply. Andrew informed the guy that he
could probably speed up the operation if he would make sure the flex duct
was actually connected to the heater. There, now you know a true-life 'Newfie' joke!
Mind you this was a union mechanic. ;-)
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Apr 27, 2012 - 11:30am PT
Apr 26, 2012 - 11:21pm PT
Asteroid Mining Plans Revealed by Planetary Resources, Inc. (with video)

"Planetary Resources, Inc. announced today its plan to mine Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) for raw materials, ranging from water to precious metals. Through the development of cost-effective exploration technologies, the company is poised to initiate prospecting missions targeting resource-rich asteroids that are easily accessible."

http://spaceref.biz/2012/04/asteroid-mining-plans-revealed-by-planetary-resources-inc.html

View our multi-media news release with photos and video: http://prn.to/PlanetaryR

Resource extraction from asteroids will deliver multiple benefits to humanity and grow to be valued at tens of billions of dollars annually. The effort will tap into the high concentration of precious metals found on asteroids and provide a sustainable supply to the ever-growing population on Earth.

A single 500-meter platinum-rich asteroid contains the equivalent of all the Platinum Group Metals mined in history. "Many of the scarce metals and minerals on Earth are in near-infinite quantities in space. As access to these materials increases, not only will the cost of everything from microelectronics to energy storage be reduced, but new applications for these abundant elements will result in important and novel applications," said Peter H. Diamandis, M.D., Co-Founder and Co-Chairman, Planetary Resources, Inc.

Additionally, water-rich NEAs will serve as "stepping stones" for deep space exploration, providing space-sourced fuel and water to orbiting depots. Accessing water resources in space will revolutionize exploration and make space travel dramatically more economical.

"Water is perhaps the most valuable resource in space. Accessing a water-rich asteroid will greatly enable the large-scale exploration of the solar system. In addition to supporting life, water will also be separated into oxygen and hydrogen for breathable air and rocket propellant," said Eric Anderson, Co-Founder and Co-Chairman, Planetary Resources, Inc.

Of the approximately 9,000 known NEAs, there are more than 1,500 that are energetically as easy to reach as the Moon. The capability to characterize NEAs is on the critical path for Planetary Resources. To that end, the company has developed the first line in its family of deep-space prospecting spacecraft, the Arkyd-100 Series. The spacecraft will be used in low-Earth orbit and ultimately help prioritize the first several NEA targets for the company's follow-on Arkyd-300 Series NEA swarm expeditions.

Chris Lewicki, President and Chief Engineer, said "Our mission is not only to expand the world's resource base, but we want to increase people's access to, and understanding of, our planet and solar system by developing capable and cost-efficient systems."

"The promise of Planetary Resources is to apply commercial innovation to space exploration. They are developing cost-effective, production-line spacecraft that will visit near-Earth asteroids in rapid succession, increasing our scientific knowledge of these bodies and enabling the economic development of the resources they contain," said Tom Jones, Ph.D., veteran NASA astronaut, planetary scientist and Planetary Resources, Inc. advisor.

Planetary Resources is financed by industry-launching visionaries, including Google CEO Larry Page and Ross Perot, Jr., Chairman of Hillwood and The Perot Group, who are committed to expanding the world's resource base so that humanity can continue to grow and prosper:

 Eric E. Schmidt, Ph.D., Executive Chairman of Google, Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOG) and Planetary Resources, Inc. investor: "The pursuit of resources drove the discovery of America and opened the West. The same drivers still hold true for opening the space frontier. Expanding the resource base for humanity is important for our future."

 Ram Shriram, Founder of Sherpalo, Google Board of Directors founding member and Planetary Resources, Inc. investor: "I see the same potential in Planetary Resources as I did in the early days of Google."

 Charles Simonyi, Ph.D., Chairman of Intentional Software Corporation and Planetary Resources, Inc. investor: "The commercialization of space began with communications satellites and is developing for human spaceflight. The next logical step is to begin the innovative development of resources from space. I'm proud to be part of this effort."

The company's advisors include film maker and explorer James Cameron; General T. Michael Moseley (Ret.); Sara Seager, Ph.D.; Mark Sykes, Ph.D.; and David Vaskevitch.

Founded in 2009 by Eric Anderson and Peter H. Diamandis, M.D., Planetary Resources, Inc. is establishing a new paradigm for resource utilization that will bring the solar system within humanity's economic sphere of influence by enabling low-cost robotic exploration and eventual commercial development of asteroids. For more information, please visit www.PlanetaryResources.com.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Apr 27, 2012 - 11:31am PT
Akoya
Akoya
Credit: TomCochrane

http://www.aopa.org/aircraft/articles/2012/120426yachtings-lsa-akoya-luxury-amphib-to-land-in-us.html?WT.mc_id=120427epilot&WT.mc_sect=tts
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 27, 2012 - 12:11pm PT
Here's what the future of air freight looked like sixty years ago...

squishy

Mountain climber
Apr 27, 2012 - 12:18pm PT
I prefer the little ones, they are much cheaper, and believe it or not, harder to fly...



or FPV views...
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 27, 2012 - 12:44pm PT
If anyone cares about the history of the aircraft, visit one of Central California's best museum displays in Atw#ter, Calif.

It is well worth the time.

http://castleairmuseum.org



Has anyone knowledge or photos of the downed jet located in the gully above Tenaya Canyon to the left of Pywiack Cascade?

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/10972487

In 1970 or 1971, part of our search team was detailed to descend the gully shown near the left side of the photo and we found the wreckage half-way down. The fuselage but no wings, no engines, and I don't remember about the tail. Schmitz was the leader of this group. He can vouch for it. I am certain he must remember it. It involved tragedy.

Werner, you been in there yet?
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Apr 27, 2012 - 04:54pm PT
F-35B Ship Suitability Testing

http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=Ki86x1WKPmE&feature=colike
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 28, 2012 - 09:40am PT
2012 Raytheon Award Video.

http://vimeo.com/40935850
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Apr 28, 2012 - 12:03pm PT
Another "must visit" air and space museum is in McMinnville, Oregon: the Evergreen Air and Space Museum. It's the home of the Spruce Goose, world's largest all wood airplane. It's a really huge bird. Many other outstanding aircraft there as well.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 2, 2012 - 11:41am PT
It seems that they just can't fix the F-22's O2 system so now pilots are
refusing to fly it! Are you kidding me? I can't believe the AF is even
admitting this although I guess they must have some reason other than just
being up front and open.

F-22 pilots refuse to fly
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 2, 2012 - 11:44am PT
THE REAL CHARLIE BROWN (THIS IS AWESOME!!)
Look carefully at the B-17 and note how shot up it is - one engine dead, tail, horizontal stabilizer and nose shot up.. It was ready to fall out of the sky. (This is a painting done by an artist from the description of both pilots many years later.) Then realize that there is a German ME-109 fighter flying next to it. Now read the story below. I think you'll be surprised ...

Charlie Brown was a B-17 Flying Fortress pilot with the 379th Bomber Group at Kimbolton , England . His B-17 was called 'Ye Old Pub' and was in a terrible state, having been hit by flak and fighters. The compass was damaged and they were flying deeper over enemy territory instead of heading home to Kimbolton.
After flying the B-17 over an enemy airfield, a German pilot named Franz Stigler was ordered to take off and shoot down the B-17. When he got near the B-17, he could not believe his eyes. In his words, he 'had never seen a plane in such a bad state'. The tail and rear section was severely damaged, and the tail gunner wounded. The top gunner was all over the top of the fuselage. The nose was smashed and there were holes everywhere.
Despite having ammunition, Franz flew to the side of the B-17 and looked at Charlie Brown, the pilot. Brown was scared and struggling to control his damaged and blood-stained plane.
BF-109 pilot Franz Stigler B-17 pilot Charlie Brown


Aware that they had no idea where they were going, Franz waved at Charlie to turn 180 degrees. Franz escorted and guided the stricken plane to, and slightly over, the North Sea towards England . He then saluted Charlie Brown and turned away, back to Europe . When Franz landed he told the CO that the plane had been shot down over the sea, and never told the truth to anybody. Charlie Brown and the remains of his crew told all at their briefing, but were ordered never to talk about it.
More than 40 years later, Charlie Brown wanted to find the Luftwaffe pilot who saved the crew.. After years of research, Franz was found. He had never talked about the incident, not even at post-war reunions.
They met in the USA at a 379th Bomber Group reunion, together with 25 people who are alive now - all because Franz never fired his guns that day.
(L-R) German Ace Franz Stigler, artist Ernie Boyett, and B-17 pilot Charlie Brown.

When asked why he didn't shoot them down, Stigler later said, "I didn't have the heart to finish those brave men. I flew beside them for a long time. They were trying desperately to get home and I was going to let them do that. I could not have shot at them. It would have been the same as shooting at a man in a parachute."
Both men died in 2008
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
May 2, 2012 - 01:30pm PT
Oberleutnant Franz Stigler also narrated the English soundtrack of the original German W.W. II training film of the Me 262 jet fighter.

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 2, 2012 - 02:07pm PT
What happened to CLASS in warfare eh!? Ive been amazed of this story but even more amazed they had to hide it.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
May 2, 2012 - 02:09pm PT
Mutant space microbes attack ISS: 'Munch' metal, may crack glass

http://rt.com/news/iss-bacteria-mir-mutation-765/?goback=.gde_48305_member_110223536

Seventy-six types of unregulated micro-organisms have been detected on the International Space Station (ISS). Though many are harmless, some are already capable of causing severe damage. And no one knows how they will mutate in space.

­“We had these problems on the old MIR space station, now we have them on the ISS. The microflora is attacking the station. These organisms corrode metals and polymers and can cause equipment to fail,” Anatoly Grigoryev, the vice-president of the Russian Academy of Sciences, told Interfax news agency.

Despite extensive precautions, most of the microbes are accidentally brought to the space station with various cargoes.

One of the early Russian crews also carelessly released a fungus that was later allowed to spread.

Of particular concern is the Zarya – the first ISS module launched into space in 1998.

But the crew is also in potential peril.

“Uncontrolled multiplication of bacteria can cause infectious diseases among the crew,” said Grigoryev.

­
Surprisingly common problem

As stations grow older, microbe contaminations get worse.

On the predecessor of the ISS, the Russian MIR (Peace), there were 90 different micro-organisms in 1990, four years after its launch. By the time it was decommissioned in 2001, the number had risen to 140.

In the relatively sterile and temperature-controlled environs of the station, bacteria were allowed to spread easily.

Micro-organisms also evolved and became highly aggressive. Cosmonauts reported corroded illuminator glass, holes in the metallic casing of the control panel, and exposed leads, the insulation of which had been eaten away.

The ISS is expected to be in operation at least until 2020.

Russian scientists also believe that particularly resilient bacteria can survive for years in extreme conditions on the outside of the station, as several experiments have proved.

Whether their mutations could be dangerous if these are allowed to escape is not clear.

Currently, Russian cosmonauts are wiping down surfaces in their modules with anti-bacterial liquids, but it is not possible to reach all contaminated areas by hand. Russian scientists are planning to deliver a powerful anti-bacterial UV lamp in one of the next shipments to combat the growing problem.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 2, 2012 - 02:12pm PT
swell, now we are breeding MUTANT SPACE FUNGUS!!!! those ol sci-fi movies arent looking so stupid now lol!
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
May 2, 2012 - 06:56pm PT
Researching the best places to do my AFF.

Lodi looks good but is 4 hours away.

Taft is an hour but expensive.

Anybody have any advice?

Lake Elsinore has the wind tunnel training which I have dine there once.
But also seems much more expensive than Lodi.

Riley

Riley, suck it up and drive out to Lodi. Those prices just can't last forever and they are dirt cheap for excellent instruction. You won't regret a second bro!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
May 2, 2012 - 07:08pm PT
Sort of on-topic, though macabre:
Hang-gliding pilot William Jonathan Orders is accused of swallowing key evidence in the death of Lenami Godinez, who fell 300 metres after becoming detached from a tandem glider last weekend.

Affidavits filed in Chilliwack Provincial Court, and obtained by Global News, suggest Orders attempted to withhold evidence by swallowing a memory card recording the fatal flight.
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Pilot+involved+fatal+hang+gliding+accident+accused+swallowing+evidence/6549902/story.html#ixzz1tkyG7t3O

Chilliwack is about 100 km east of Vancouver.
ms55401

Trad climber
minneapolis, mn
May 2, 2012 - 07:09pm PT
two questions: (1) how much does a standard rig cost, and (2) how soon can one do a solo jump?
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
May 2, 2012 - 07:23pm PT
A decent used rig is $1,500-$3,000(approx.) You start solo jumping after 7 or so(approx.)AFF jumps, depending on the DZ.
Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
May 2, 2012 - 07:42pm PT
Your first AFF jump is solo, but they hang onto you. You don't need to go tandem or anything, you can just start the AFF jumps.

I think AFF level 5 is like your first solo jump where you dive out and they don't touch you but just hang out next to you.

And then after 7 AFF's you can go solo and do coach jumps, but you need your A licence after 25 jumps to jump with your friends.
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
May 2, 2012 - 08:01pm PT
Every dropzone is different, in Lodi they require you to do a tandem first. Riley, let me know if/when you make it to Lodi. I'll do some jumps with you. Cheers!
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
May 3, 2012 - 06:46pm PT
My badass Wife piloting the DZ's Twin Otter in her wingsuit! snakefoot lurking as well.
Credit: Jeff Barnow
snakefoot

climber
cali
May 3, 2012 - 07:36pm PT
oh we had so much fun that day hank. oooops, i mean we were so scared and hated every minute, almost shed a tear thinking about your drive.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - May 6, 2012 - 02:25am PT
Great to see this thread is still coming up with some great posts and pics - keep it up!

I remember riding right seat in a Tw#tter during Diamond Quest at SkyDance...this was back in 93 I think.

Pilot was letting me fly, and as I was getting in the pattern he tells me "Put in 10deg of flaps, but you will have to correct for it..." boy he wasnt kidding...felt like I was going to have to shove the wheel into the panel to keep the nose down. Figured out real quick how those things used to fly in and stop so damn short in Alaska :D

More pics!!
perswig

climber
May 6, 2012 - 05:26pm PT
Today's the 75 ani of the Hindenburg crash at Lakehurst, NJ.
Be careful around dirigibles, folks.

Dale
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 6, 2012 - 05:34pm PT
Credit: Ron Anderson

hard landing african style..photo off net
Sierra Ledge Rat

Social climber
Retired in Appalachia
May 6, 2012 - 07:22pm PT
Here are some aviation-related photos from my distant past....

Naval Aviation Officer Candidate School, Pensacola, Florida
I hated my D.I. (drill instructor)
God damn Marines
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Sierra Ledge Rat, call sign "BAD DOG"
Sierra Ledge Rat on his combat jet on the deck of the aircraft carrier...
Sierra Ledge Rat on his combat jet on the deck of the aircraft carrier U.S.S. John F. Kennedy.
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

My centurion patches - 100 traps each
My centurion patches - 100 arrested landings on the aircraft carrier U...
My centurion patches - 100 arrested landings on the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Kitty Hawk and 100 arrested landings on the U.S.S. John F. kennedy
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Back when I was a jet pilot flight instructor and I still had a full head of hair. Dig the cool Ray Bans. Still in my ejection seat harness and "speed jeans" (G-suit)
Sierra Ledge Rat <br/>
Call sign "Bad Dog"
Sierra Ledge Rat
Call sign "Bad Dog"
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Flying over Mount Baker, great way to scout routes
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Gentleman, start your engines!
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Suckers! Tomcats on the fantail, sucking everyone else's fumes.
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Waiting behind an A-7 Corsair and the jet blast deflector for my turn on the catapult
Zero to 150 m.p.h. in 2.5 seconds
Whoopie!
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

F-14 Tomcat in full after-burner for launch
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Mass air strike: A-6 Intruders, A-7 Corsairs and EA-6B Prowlers
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

F-14 intercepting a Russian Bear bomber
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Rolling into the upwind leg, in formation, heading for the break
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

1-2-3 down and locked
Flaps 30
Stab shifted
Slats full
Boards out
Hook down
Harness locked
"On centerline, slightly high, 3/4-mile, call the ball"
"604, Prowler Ball, 8-point-oh"
"ROGER BALL!"
.....................................................Who is Roger Ball?
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

In the beginning: I get paid to do this? (:
In the end: You can't pay me enough for this dangerous sh#t ):
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
May 6, 2012 - 09:05pm PT
Sierra Ledge Rat-

Were you an A-6 "Intruder" driver? Judging from the canopy, that would be my guess.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 6, 2012 - 09:13pm PT
sweet stuff Ledge rat! Bet yur first deck landing was a PUCKER factor FOUR!
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
May 6, 2012 - 11:15pm PT
Okay, so Ledge Rat is the coolest person on this thread. Let's just get that out in the open right now.
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
May 6, 2012 - 11:53pm PT
Wow, yeah S.L.R. is freaking hard core!!! That is some serious shit!!

Now here's some more of my boring videos flying around in the Skyhawk. And one of my first experience in a glider.







Sierra Ledge Rat

Social climber
Retired in Appalachia
May 7, 2012 - 08:50am PT
Glad you like the photos.

I was a right-seater (copilot) and flight instructor in the EA-6B Prowler. Haven't flown in 20 years.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - May 7, 2012 - 08:23pm PT
Seriously awesome pics, S.L.R. - thanks for adding them to the thread!

Love the Tomcat shot with the Bear intercept. Double Uglies and Tomcats were about the newest birds I liked to see - prefer the older iron!

Sierra Ledge Rat

Social climber
Retired in Appalachia
May 8, 2012 - 12:55am PT
HEY WHO YOU CALLIN' DOUBLE UGLY?

I hope you're referring to the Prowler and not the Phantom, 'cause the Phantom is a wet dream come true.

jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
May 8, 2012 - 01:53am PT
Here is another boring one flying around Mt. Theilson in Oregon looking for ice lines. Shot in my friends Cherokee.

Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
May 8, 2012 - 02:31pm PT
I flew a navigation exercise yesterday from Casper, WY. to Chadron, NE as part of the requirement towards my Commercial certificate. I spotted some rock outcrops in the Sandhills region of Western Nebraska that looked interesting, but my photographic efforst were fruitless. Nevertheless, my first experiment in aerial photograpy is shown below:

View from 9,500 feet; 6,000 feet agl &#40;above ground level&#41;. Roc...
View from 9,500 feet; 6,000 feet agl (above ground level). Rocks in distance.
Credit: Brokedownclimber

I generally fly as high as possible for maximum glide distance; in the event of an engine failure I might make it to a good landing site. It does nothing, however, for photography of--maybe- 30' high boulders.

Total time aloft yesterday: 5.2 hours; two separate flights.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
May 8, 2012 - 06:45pm PT
It seems to be lost to history that the X-37 was originally a NASA project to provide an economical alternative for the Space Shuttle. The X-37A sat unappreciated, neglected and unfunded for years in a hanger at NASA Dryden; where I had it all to myself to examine in detail. I was trying to get people interested in equipping it for solo piloted missions for asteroid exploration. However at the time it was a NASA career-kiss-of-death to mention asteroid missions. Then the Air Force decided to stick it on top of an Atlas and declare it top secret; and its NASA genesis now appears forgotten.

http://www.space.com/15575-secret-x37b-space-plane-mission-success.html

Secret Air Force X-37B Space Plane Mission a 'Spectacular Success'



Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 8, 2012 - 07:07pm PT
a rare pic of an even more rare plane,, the F8-U3 only one known left- in the smithsonian. This picture was borrowed from me for a museum at an air base in North Dakota they wanted to reproduce it for thier collection!
Credit: Ron Anderson

the photo was one of my Fathers aviation/aerospace pics- he worked on that project.

it lost out to the Phantom for the contract.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 8, 2012 - 07:11pm PT
Credit: Ron Anderson

Pa working on fragile tiny adjustments to the guidance system on the Regulas 2 --you might say an early 50s "white room" - i have the roll-away in the LL corner and tool boxes/tools.

Edwards AFB.


Credit: Ron Anderson

Regulas 2 lightin the desert up! Edwards AFB



Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 8, 2012 - 07:15pm PT
My Dad standing in the crater -post launch of the Reg2....
Credit: Ron Anderson



project group-hug!
My Pa is the one w/ short hair and big ears lol!;-)
Credit: Ron Anderson
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 8, 2012 - 07:20pm PT
and last but not least,,the Apollo 11 Lunar Module engine ascent stage being redied for test fire at area D- Rocketdyne facility at palamino valley NV after which my Dad stamped the engine with his signature as ready to burn..Same for the descent stage which sets on the moon. This picture couldnt be shown for a number of years afterward.
this photo was classified for years after the event and is actual rock...
this photo was classified for years after the event and is actual rocketdyne photography at the site, not some google image.
Credit: George R. Anderson
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
May 11, 2012 - 12:33am PT
Alpine Coaster with no brakes

http://zanylol.com/coaster.html
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 11, 2012 - 11:57am PT
Good stuff Ron! Amazing how big the Regulus was!

Ledge Rat, great shots! I'm cornfused though about the Bear intercept shot.
When did Prowlers fly CAP with Tomcats? ;-) Or were you guys in the area
and came around for the photo op?


On a side note - if you want to read how effed up the Indian aviation industry
is then here ya go...

I wouldn't fly with these clowns

Nosewheel landings? Are you kidding me?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 11, 2012 - 05:31pm PT
A mint condition P-40 was just found in the Libyan desert.
The pilot clearly survived the landing but no trace of his remains were found.

WWII P-40 found in Libya
Jeremy

Social climber
Albuquerque, NM
May 11, 2012 - 05:35pm PT
AWESOME STUFF GUYS!!!!!
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Trad climber
San Francisco, Ca
May 11, 2012 - 05:49pm PT
What a bummer to crash in the middle of the desert.

Does anyone else remember that old movie about the bomber crew that crashes in the desert? Their ghosts spend their days playing baseball until some explorer or something finds the wreckage. They find the bodies and send them home, letting the ghosts find their peace. They disappear from the screen one by one, except for one whose body does not get found. He's left there alone forever. Depressing movie!

Ledge Rat-- awesome photos!!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
May 11, 2012 - 08:16pm PT
On a side note - if you want to read how effed up the Indian aviation industry
is then here ya go...

I wouldn't fly with these clowns

Nosewheel landings? Are you kidding me?

years ago I managed a rather large project for Pepsi for security lighting upgrades for every facility in N. America. In a meeting someone asked the director of security, (an ex secret service guy)what his biggest concern was.

It was employees flying on then Russian airliners that have an unnerving habit of falling out of the sky. Back then, about one a month.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
May 17, 2012 - 05:15pm PT
There's a big Airshow in Moreno Valley/Riverside this weekend at March ARB. Thunderbirds are performing (7 of them plus a spare were practicing today and probably will be tomorrow, got a pretty good show myself about an hour ago), B52, C17, KC135, lots of other aircraft performing and several static displays.

Sat and Sun.
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
May 17, 2012 - 06:42pm PT
No fair, my craps just BASE jumping... Really good posts from everybody!!
Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
May 17, 2012 - 11:10pm PT
My first AFF jump from last year.
AFF Level 1
AFF Level 1
Credit: Tfish
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
May 18, 2012 - 12:23am PT
It's been nice out... FINALLY!!! So I've been ticking off some new grass strips. Now I've landed at every public airport in the NW corner of Oregon... WOOHOOO!!





Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
May 18, 2012 - 06:23pm PT
More info on the March ARB airshow this weekend. Today a load of stuff arrived, T-birds are out there right now practicing.

Arrived today: F-18, C5, KC10, A10, B25, P36, F-86 Sabre, AV-8 Harrier (this thing is badass), and a whole lot more. F/A-18 doing a slow pass was ridiculous and that C5 is probably bigger than most of our houses. Watching a Harrier hover and rotate, then back up is mind boggling.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
May 18, 2012 - 07:32pm PT
Russia now has #1 fighter plane in the world... SU-30MK -Vectored Thrust with Canards.

The maneuverability of this plane is incredible.

This plane would be nearly impossible to defeat in a dogfight.

As you watch this airplane, look at the canards moving along side of, and just below the canopy rail. The "canards" are the small wings forward of the main wings. The smoke and contrails provide a sense of the
actual flight path, sometimes in reverse direction.

This video is of an in-flight demonstration flown by the Russian's

The fighter can stall from high speed, stopping forward motion in seconds. (full stall). Then it demonstrates an ability to descend tail first without causing a compressor stall.

It can also recover from a flat spin in less than a minute. These maneuver
capabilities don't exist in any other aircraft in the world today.

We don't know which nations will soon be flying the SU-30MK, hopefully China isn't one of them.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Note: Friends worked with advanced aircraft flight control systems and concepts for many years as an extension of stability control and means of control...

Canards and vectored thrust were among many concepts examined to extend our fighter aircraft performance. Neither our current nor our next generation aircraft now poised for funding & production can in any way match the performance of this Russian aircraft NOW FLYING in any near combat situation.

Somehow the bankrupt Russian aircraft industry has out produced our complex politically tainted aerospace industry with this technology marvel. Scratch any ideas of close in air-to-air combat with this aircraft in the future.

Take a look at the video with the sound up. This aircraft is of concern to U.S and NATO planners. Maximize your screen for best viewing.

trying to figure out how to paste the video
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
May 18, 2012 - 07:42pm PT
Uh...Tom-

Where's the link?
jack herer

Big Wall climber
Veneta, Oregon
May 20, 2012 - 03:53pm PT
I re-edited one of the earlier videos and made it half the length with out techno music for once, a little more enjoyable to watch.

I'm especially psyched because I just got my license on January 31st. So this was like the first day I went out by my self and "on-sited" some grass strips. So I finally feel like a real pilot!

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 20, 2012 - 04:08pm PT
Jack, Le Tour de Grass! Boy, grass strips in Oregon don't get overused, eh?
What, four months of flyin' and 8 months of hard muddin'?
Man, don't like a wall of trees at the TO end, but maybe that's just me. ;-)
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
May 20, 2012 - 05:17pm PT
Coolest airplane I ever rode in: Helio Stallion. I'm not sure if there are any left. You could fill it full of lead and take off in 200 feet. It was Air America's version of a Pilatus Porter on steroids.

Funnest: I gave an airshow pilot a free tandem and he took me up for 45 minutes in a Christen Eagle (sic). It was basically a 2 seat Pitts biplane.

Within 15 minutes I cold do a decent roll, keeping the nose flat. You could do anything in that airplane.

5 gees kind of makes you grunt, but 2 negative gees makes you feel like your eyes are going to pop out. Negative gees are extremely uncomfortable.

Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - May 23, 2012 - 04:57am PT
SLR, I was indeed referring to the Prowler when I said Double Ugly.
If I was talking about the Phantom, I would have said "clean air converter" :p

J/k of course, phantoms phorever!
Silver

Big Wall climber
Nor Nev
May 23, 2012 - 08:47am PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-9RPJDoC5E&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Enjoy this is central Nevada
Crag

Trad climber
Pennsyltuckey
May 23, 2012 - 09:33am PT
RV7A pre-flight check
RV7A pre-flight check
Credit: Crag

heading off into the sun on a 3hr flight to ME for Lobstah!
heading off into the sun on a 3hr flight to ME for Lobstah!
Credit: Crag

Pilot, plane's builder & friend Jeff V @ 6000ft some where over NY.
Pilot, plane's builder & friend Jeff V @ 6000ft some where over NY.
Credit: Crag

Off the coast of ME
Off the coast of ME
Credit: Crag

Mission accomplished
Mission accomplished
Credit: Crag

On the way back got this neat pix of the shadow off a con-trail.
On the way back got this neat pix of the shadow off a con-trail.
Credit: Crag

Silver

Big Wall climber
Nor Nev
May 23, 2012 - 09:40am PT
See a skydiver died in Tahoe yesterday. Jumped from a helo and apparently landed in the lake and drown.

Bummer only 29 and experienced they say. From south lake Tahoe apparently.

TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
May 24, 2012 - 03:03am PT


http://www.lizard-tail.com/isana/tracking/

"SpaceX Falcon 9/Dragon: According to this morning's IMMT (ISS Mission Management Team) meeting, "the vehicle is performing nominally and all planned demonstration objectives have been successfully completed to date. There are currently no known issues that would prevent proceeding with the planned ISS fly-under demonstration, currently scheduled for early tomorrow morning. During the fly-under, Dragon will briefly approach to within 2.5 km of the ISS to perform another series of demonstration objectives."

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Thursday, May 24 (Flight Day 3): Live NASA Television coverage from NASA's Johnson Space Center mission control in Houston as the Dragon spacecraft performs its flyby of the International Space Station to test its systems begins at 2:30 a.m. EDT and will continue until the Dragon passes the vicinity of the station. A news briefing will be held at 10 a.m. following the activities.

Friday, May 25 (Flight Day 4): Live coverage of the rendezvous and berthing of the Dragon spacecraft to the station begins at 2 a.m. and will continue through the capture and berthing of the Dragon to the station's Harmony node. A news briefing will be held at 1 p.m. after Dragon is secured to the station.

Saturday, May 26 (Flight Day 5): Live coverage of the hatch opening and entry of the Dragon spacecraft begins at 5:30 a.m. and will include a crew news conference at 11:25 a.m. NASA TV also will provide live coverage of the departure and reentry of the Dragon spacecraft once a date is determined.
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
May 24, 2012 - 10:53am PT
This could have been really bad..
Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
May 24, 2012 - 12:05pm PT
^Holy f*ck that is scary. I know there is a vid where the tandem master forgets to clip 2 of the points in on his student, but he gets them in freefall. But this one is way worse.
Jon Beck

Trad climber
Oceanside
May 24, 2012 - 01:30pm PT
Solar powered plane on 1500 mile trip

http://photoblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/05/24/11861805-solar-plane-takes-off-for-its-first-transcontinental-flight?lite
Silver

Big Wall climber
Nor Nev
May 24, 2012 - 02:18pm PT
Hank I just lost a gallon of water out my palms on that one.

Scary!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 24, 2012 - 02:22pm PT
did she land on her arse??
Hankster

Social climber
Zakynthos
May 24, 2012 - 02:27pm PT
Hank I just lost a gallon of water out my palms on that one.

Scary!

Me too!! I'm sure she didn't die, but they will pull the plug on that video soon.
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
May 24, 2012 - 03:25pm PT
Nice one, Hank... I was just about to post the same vid. I like how Mikey tried to come in and help, realized it wasn't going to happen and bailed. I'm sure Bill fired the tandem master after that one.
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Trad climber
San Francisco, Ca
May 25, 2012 - 03:12am PT
We recently had some WWII bombers come through town. I pulled my son from school to check them out. He is too young to understand the horror of it all, but I wanted him to see these planes.

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

I've always thought that being a ball turret gunner would have been especially terrifying. Imagine being 18 years old, probably never having been in an airplane before and being made to crawl inside this and having fighters swooping up at you? These gunners apparently had the worst rates of survival among bomber crews.

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

This is looking forward to where the bombadier and nose gunner sat.

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Maning the top turret.

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Waist gunner

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

It was really cool crawling through these planes. It was kind of intense seeing vets checking them out. I'm guessing some had not been in a B-17 or a B-24 since WWII!

Once my son got impatient working our way through a plane because this super old guy was touching everything and was having a hard time with the small spaces- obviously the guy had flown bombing missions. My son is 7 so doesn't get it all, but I told him to shut his mouth and be respectful.

Interesting and more intense morning than I anticipated.

edit: a couple more photos--

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Credit: ontheedgeandscaredtodeath
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
May 25, 2012 - 06:27am PT
thanks for the dose of perspective. it takes more effort to grasp than forget, except for our veterans. respect
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
May 25, 2012 - 02:35pm PT
this morning's arriving traffic at the International Space Station

i participated in the early planning meetings for this mission, briefing them on how to interface with ISS communication and control systems, briefed them on my SimStation Project and how to interact with Houston Mission Control, acted as a technical reviewer for all their planning documents submitted to NASA, acted as adviser on parachute recovery operations, and was a NASA observer for the first test firing of their operational configuration of nine Merlin main engines

Dragon Capture
Dragon Capture
Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

meanwhile back in the NASA barn, we spent five years of our lives designing the Orion and Ares launch vehicle, and this is where it is right now:

Orion in the Vertical Assembly Building &#40;with no more Saturns or S...
Orion in the Vertical Assembly Building (with no more Saturns or Shuttles to clutter up the place)
Credit: TomCochrane
tradmanclimbs

Ice climber
Pomfert VT
May 26, 2012 - 06:39am PT
It just made the front page of yahoo!http://www.viddler.com/v/fb107c3d

Will you pros tell us what happened? did something come undone when they were fighting to get out the door?
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
May 26, 2012 - 09:26am PT
Considering how much $$$ and effort was expended on the Ares I and Ares V, the abandonment of what was becoming a successful flight test program was utterly supid. Of course the present administration would rather spend the NASA budget on more failed "social engineering" programs. I'm a supporter of Dr. Robert Zubrin's "Mars Direct" concept, by the way.

Skip the Moon, and go straight for the Gusto: MARS!
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
May 26, 2012 - 11:00am PT
It's been a very slow Saturday morning here in Wyoming; totally foggy and rainy! No climbing, no flying, but the internet surfing is great. I just went back through all this thread and enjoyed everything. A few comments:

Jack Herer-I just noticed that you fly out of CVO, Corvallis. I began my flight training at S12, Albany, 5 years ago. I've visited Corvallis umpteen times in a C-152, N25899. I've visited a fair number of airports in NW Oregon myself: McMinnville, Tillamook, Independence, Salem, Lebanon, Hillsboro, and Cottage Grove.

Tom-I particularly loved the U-2 footage and the 70,000 feet! I've been to 51,000 feet onboard a C-135 back in 1964, and the curvature of the Earth is distinctly visible from that altitude, as well.
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
May 26, 2012 - 01:03pm PT
did something come undone when they were fighting to get out the door?

No, nothing came undone. She was curled in a ball when the instructor exited, forcing her leg loops to slide down towards her knees. They could have been a bit loose but this wouldn't have happened if she wasn't fighting, sitting down and curled up like that. The tandem instructor shouldn't have exited the plane, he should have gone back to the seats and let others go and try to calm her down. If that didn't work they should have gone down with the plane.

I'm not a tandem instructor but have seen ten's of thousands gearing up, exiting, landing, etc. This is just my observations.
BASE1361

climber
Yosemite Valley National Park
May 26, 2012 - 04:40pm PT
I agree Ammon. You can even see in the video the orange warning sticker on the passenger that should be tight to the TM chest. It almost looks like she's also coming out of the top of the harness.

Of the 3 DZ's I've jumped at this vid was a shocker. Not one of the TM's at each DZ would have exited the plane with her fighting that much.

Hope to see ya soon.

p.s.

I wonder if she was even conscious during FF? People do pass-out and if she was that scared, her sympathetic system in overdrive just shutting her down.
tradmanclimbs

Ice climber
Pomfert VT
May 26, 2012 - 04:40pm PT
Pretty crazy stuff. maybe the instructor was ex military jumpmaster and not used to dealing with the civilin type situation where a boot in the arse is not always the best solution?
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
May 26, 2012 - 04:46pm PT
I haven't tandem skydived. I did static line to free-fall progression.

But I can't help but think that once a paying (or non-paying) passenger has second thoughts sitting in the door about taking "The Long Lonely Leap," isn't an instructor obligated to stop and back-up? How can he just fight over this decision and jump anyway? Seems unethical and morally wrong.

Also seems the tandem harness needs to be redesigned so no passenger can back-out of a harness or wiggle out no matter what they do.

My buckle-less "Thin Redline" paragliding harness is very difficult to get into, and when you have everything secured properly, I'm not coming out in any direction. In case of a water landing I will have to cut my way out with a cutaway knife.

Man that was a scary video to watch. I thought she was going to plummet sans harness, instructor, and parachute. Yikes!!!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
May 26, 2012 - 07:10pm PT
going back down with the plane can be WORSE! I did that on an "observer" ride,,,once..The crazy cowboy we had as a pilot,(Pat Weatherman) would race the last one out to the ground, and often won. I have noooo idea how tha ol 180 tail dragger held together under the Gs he put her through.



edit: Tom Interesting stuff!!!To bad about NASA..
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
May 27, 2012 - 01:44pm PT

Yeah Ron, I know what you mean. They sent a whole load down once at the Couch Freaks Boogie a few years back because of too many clouds. I was GRIPPED! Thought we were going to crash.

Usually, on an observer ride they dive the plane for about 10k' because they make more money the faster they can pick up more jumpers. Pretty thrilling but quite scary if you don't know it's coming, ha haa.

I love Bill's comment on the Yahoo report: "This happened a long time ago and everything worked as advertised," said Parachute Center owner Bill Dause in a statement to ABC News. "No one got hurt or injured."

Too funny! No wonder he's been in a bad mood lately.


http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/80-old-womans-skydiving-trip-hell-201811864--abc-news-topstories.html
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
May 27, 2012 - 10:43pm PT
#3 Thunderbird, Right wing.

Maj. Caroline Jensen, and Staff Sgt. Tacota LeMuel




yeah, the USAF tends to go for overkill on photo resolution.
Captain...or Skully

climber
May 28, 2012 - 02:34am PT
Jet Chicks are hot.
stich

Trad climber
Colorado Springs, Colorado
May 28, 2012 - 08:30am PT
Jet Chicks are hot.


Definitely, but then so are climbing, motorcycle riding, skydiving, adventurous chicks in general. My lady's cousin flew either F-14s or f-16s. The pictures are pretty cool.

I could never fly and especially couldn't pilot high performance jets with my motion sickness propensity.


As for grandma, she survived and wasn't even that butthurt about it.
But of course all of the comments on the video say to sue.
The instructor probably didn't tighten the harness too much because
she was not some hot chick he wanted to grind against I'm thinking.
Any tandem instructors want to comment on that?

Hank, they can't pull the plug on the video. It's gone viral, so there are
way too many copies out there now.

El Cap, you're the late one. I edited it out already! ;-) I thought there would be more discussion about it, so didn't look above this page at first.
I saw a vid of her interview on CNN. She's all happy and looking forward to
doing something else on her bucket list like riding in a race car. Hope she
didn't mean a NASCAR car. Aint got no passenger seat in them things.
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
May 28, 2012 - 08:41am PT
Uh, a little late stich... look up thread

Credit: ElCapPirate

Credit: ElCapPirate

Credit: ElCapPirate

Credit: ElCapPirate
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
May 28, 2012 - 10:28am PT
This weekend out at the Mojave bone yard.



Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - May 29, 2012 - 02:41am PT
Ammon...when ISN'T Bill in a bad mood?!

Day one there, after a half hour: "you pack too slow, you're fired"

Ten minutes later: "Quit standing around and get back to work!"

Lol...good old Bill.
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
May 29, 2012 - 11:36am PT
I used to do a ton of tandems, and no way should anyone fall out of the harness. That will be operator error.

It is common to ride to altitude without the hip attachments undone. It is just too uncomfortable. However you give yourself plenty of time before exit to run through the checklist.

Lots of studies have been done, and any one of the four main points of attachment is sufficient to keep both harnesses attached during freefall.

In tandem master school, it is more or less a bunch of experienced skydivers trying everything to kill each other. Grabbing hands, not getting the drogue out. Full blown karate fights in free fall.

It is all fun.

The normal MO is this: When you are all rigged up and at the door, there is no going back. It is too dangerous to bring an active rig into the plane.

We used to do that with static line jumps as well. We would go out and pry their fingers from the strut.
Silver

Big Wall climber
Nor Nev
May 29, 2012 - 12:38pm PT
TGT

That's hilarious. I guess when you put the flaps down and set for max lift and you remove the engines all the fuel and probably gut the rest of the beast its pretty light.

That's a nice scrap yard. Those things are millions to build but I bet you get 100K to recycle everything that is recyclable on one of those.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 2, 2012 - 01:23am PT
The lone remaining Dornier 24 is back in the air, albeit with updated PT-6's.

Dornier DO-24
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jun 4, 2012 - 02:13pm PT
"The U.S. government's secret space program has decided to give NASA two telescopes as big as, and even more powerful than, the Hubble Space Telescope. Designed for surveillance, the telescopes from the National Reconnaissance Office were no longer needed for spy missions and can now be used to study the heavens. They have 2.4-meter (7.9 feet) mirrors, just like the Hubble. They also have an additional feature that the civilian space telescopes lack: A maneuverable secondary mirror that makes it possible to obtain more focused images. These telescopes will have 100 times the resolving power of the Hubble, according to David Spergel, a Princeton astrophysicist and co-chair of the National Academies advisory panel on astronomy and astrophysics."
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jun 4, 2012 - 10:33pm PT
Secret mission accomplished: America's mysterious space plane to land after a YEAR in orbit - and no one knows what it did up there

The X-37B has been circling the Earth at 17,000mph and was due to land in California in December
Mission of highly classified robotic plane extended for unknown reasons
Will now land in mid- to late-June


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2154405/Secret-mission-accomplished-Americas-secret-space-plane-land-YEAR-orbit--knows-did-there.html#ixzz1wslcPKQh

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2154405/Secret-mission-accomplished-Americas-secret-space-plane-land-YEAR-orbit--knows-did-there.html?fb_action_ids=10150846543371603%2C10150846542351603%2C10150846465746603&fb_action_types=news.reads&fb_source=other_multiline

Credit: TomCochrane
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Jun 4, 2012 - 11:37pm PT
^^^ all brought to you by those daring guys of yesteryear- doing seat-o-the pants engineering and problem solving in lovely desert spots like Edwards or maybe Pt Magoo - woikin on stuff like the regulas one and two, X-15, Bell X-1 and such!
squishy

Mountain climber
Jun 11, 2012 - 04:31pm PT
how about an airplane, skydiving?
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=4fd_1339327478
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Jun 11, 2012 - 05:08pm PT
theres a BETTER one i got in an email but cant get it to post right here- INCREDIBLE ONE WING LANDING at an air show!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Jun 11, 2012 - 05:24pm PT
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lJy1idHwCc]
ElCapPirate

Big Wall climber
California
Jun 11, 2012 - 11:15pm PT

A couple of BASE jumps in the past weeks. Gotta laugh at the second one's landing, ha ha

Both legal, gotta love THAT!


https://vimeo.com/43430942


https://vimeo.com/43858015


Why not video embedding from Viemo?
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Jun 14, 2012 - 12:05pm PT
dunno Ammon^^^ but in ref to the vid i posted above of that one wing landing-- ive been told by local pilots that that was a FAKED video!!! Ive looked at several times- dont know how it was faked but thats the word.!
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jun 17, 2012 - 03:19am PT
http://news.yahoo.com/mystery-mini-space-shuttle-x-37b-lands-california-154330257.html

Mystery Mini Space Shuttle X-37B Lands in California

The mysterious unmanned mini-space shuttle on a classified mission has finally returned to earth.

It landed early Saturday morning at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California after weather conditions kept pushing back landing attempts the last few days.

The Air Force's X-37B, is an unmanned reusable spacecraft built by Boeing that has spent more than a year on a classified mission in space.

Measuring 29 feet in length and having a 15-foot wingspan, the unmanned reusable X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle looks like a miniature version of NASA's now retired space shuttles.

The spacecraft landed at Vandenberg at 5:48am PDT after having spent 469 days in orbit.

The craft went into orbit on March 5, 2011, but as was the case during its first launch in 2010, very little has been known about its mission or what payloads it might be carrying because its missions are classified.

That has led to speculation that the spacecraft is involved in intelligence gathering operations or the testing of new technologies.

In keeping with the scarce mission details for the X-37B, all the Air Force would say in a statement Saturday wais that the spacecraft had "conducted on-orbit experiments" during its mission.

Lt. Col. Tom McIntyre, the X-37B program manager said, "With the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet, the X-37B OTV program brings a singular capability to space technology development." He added, "The return capability allows the Air Force to test new technologies without the same risk commitment faced by other programs. We're proud of the entire team's successful efforts to bring this mission to an outstanding conclusion."

Even the initial announcement about an upcoming landing details kept the details vague. A May 30 Air Force statement said the spacecraft would return to earth in the "early- to mid-June time frame."

Designed to stay in extended Earth orbits, the X-37B remained in orbit for 224 days during its maiden mission in 2010.

This mission kept it in orbit more than twice as long this time around.

An Air Force statement announcing Saturday's landing says the X37B will launch again later this fall aboard an Atlas V booster.
Sierra Ledge Rat

Social climber
Retired in Appalachia
Jun 17, 2012 - 07:36am PT
Jet Chicks are hot.


Q: Why can't a chick be a pilot?

A: Because it's a COCKPIT not a BOX OFFICE
.
.
.
Q: Why can't a chick fly upside-down?

A: Because then she'd have a hairy crack up.
.
.
.
Naval Aviator to Air Farce guy: "Flare to land, squat to pee."
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jun 17, 2012 - 12:27pm PT


Walked away with a sprained ankle
Sierra Ledge Rat

Social climber
Retired in Appalachia
Jun 17, 2012 - 02:06pm PT
"A Brazilian airline says one of its female pilots tossed a passenger off a flight because he was making sexist comments about women flying planes.

"Trip Airlines says in a Tuesday statement the pilot ejected the man before takeoff as he made loud, sexist comments upon learning the pilot was a woman. The jet continued on to the state of Goias after a one-hour delay...."

Female pilot tosses passenger for sexist remarks

Q: Why shouldn't women fly airplanes?
A: Because they have bad tempers
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jun 19, 2012 - 10:56pm PT
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jun 22, 2012 - 12:37pm PT
Is this the beginning of the end for manned naval air?



http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/U_S__Navy_Northrop_Grumman_Complete_X_47B_Flight_Testing_at_Edwards_Air_Force_Base_Move_Second_Unmanned_Aircraft_to_East_Coast_999.html