Trip Report
Saber Ridge / Angel Wings with Peter Croft: New Routes
Wednesday August 6, 2014 5:00pm
We spent 6 days, 4 climbing days and many hours in the rain in the Saber Ridge / Angel Wings area. In a word – fantastic. Most anyone that has been in the area in the last few years and has seen and experienced the new routes and fantastic scenery agree – there is going to be a lot more activity here in the future. But it is a long way in at 16 miles of hiking and substantial elevation gain.

Peter Croft on the Summit of Angel Wings
Peter Croft on the Summit of Angel Wings
Credit: Ney Grant

First, some logistics. We used a mule supported trip put together by Sierra Mountain Guides (http://www.sierramtnguides.com) with guides Peter Croft and Howie Schwarz and climber Amy Ness as camp manager / cook. My wife Betsy and I have used SMG twice before to accomplish climbs in the backcountry we couldn’t do alone – Third Pillar of Mt. Dana and a one day ascent of Fishhook Arete on Mt. Russell.

Somehow, someway, the trips just keep getting better.

Mules mean pillows, thick sleeping pads and almost plenty of wine
Mules mean pillows, thick sleeping pads and almost plenty of wine
Credit: Ney Grant

Tamarack Lake Campsite
Tamarack Lake Campsite
Credit: Ney Grant

On this trip we had the awesomely good luck to have terribly bad weather. We had planned to do Saber Ridge the first climbing day but it was already cloudy the evening before and the forecast wasn’t good. Peter explained that Saber Ridge has a long and committing ridge traverse (like Mathes Crest but harder to escape off of) that would result in a lengthy exposure to weather. Instead of Saber Ridge, Peter said, would we be interested in being involved in putting up a possible new route on The Prism, a similar rock formation next to Saber Ridge? He warned it could be an adventure, we may need to back off for numerous reasons, we would have to carry a bolt kit and pitons, etc.

Let’s see. Be involved in a possible first ascent with Peter Croft, or read a book in camp because it may rain? Tough decision.

We got up at 3:30 am and left camp at first light, clouds already filling the sky. At daybreak Peter and Howie were racing back and forth across the base of the climb, with Peter saying, “I think this will work. Yes, It looks great!” Nothing like the enthusiasm of Peter Croft to get you hyped up for a climb.

Dawn at the base of The Prism
Dawn at the base of The Prism
Credit: Ney Grant
Super clean high Sierra granite.
Super clean high Sierra granite.
Credit: Howie Schwartz

The first two pitches were fun on super clean rock with a few sections of 5.6. The third pitch was extremely run-out with no pro on fun, easy, highly featured rock, except it turned to 5.7/5.8 about 20 feet before you could get a sling around a jug. We discussed later and agreed a bolt would be beneficial to the climb, but we also all agreed there was no way anyone was going to stop and put one in with the clouds already threatening to rain at any moment.

The crux came later in the climb, with Peter taking a proud and vertical line. Although it was extremely enjoyable watching Peter work out the line and moves on an unknown route, a constant and predictable thought cycled through my head: “Can I follow that?”. It turned out to be steep but quite doable and later we all agreed it was 5.10 something. Betsy followed Peter then Howie also led the pitch and I followed. A super classic pitch in my opinion, and in fact a super classic climb. I’m looking forward to Peter and Howie’s description and rating. You can find more route information on Howie’s blog at http://www.sierramtnguides.com/new-routes-in-sequoia-national-park/

Betsy, Howie and Peter before the day's rains
Betsy, Howie and Peter before the day's rains
Credit: Ney Grant

Fortunately we kept our speed up on the climb because Peter and Betsy took refuge under a tree while Howie and I got drenched at 11:30 am while coming off the climb. By noon we were back in camp and by 3:00 pm we were all napping with heavy rain beating down on the tents at Tamarack Lake. A glorious nap.

A little rain?  Nap time.
A little rain? Nap time.
Credit: Ney Grant

We were back up at 3:30 am to do Saber Ridge and were thankful to see a sky of stars but were then dismayed to see the stars disappear by first light. “Well”, Peter and Howie said, “there is this short line on Angel Wings that we’ve been eyeing. We don’t think anyone has done it. Are you guys up for it?”

Seriously? Another possible first ascent with Peter Croft? Simply the right place at the right time.

A few minutes later we were off heading towards Angel Wings. This line is of course much shorter and much more moderate than the modern classic Valkyrie that Dave Nettle, Peter Croft, Brandon Thau and Greg Epperson put up in 2012. But still it turned out to be another classic (in my opinion). It was a six pitch sustained 5.7/5.8 with a 5.9 crux step around / traverse into a crack. At one point it was déjà vu. I was belaying Peter up through a vertical line through a small roof and it looked a little imposing. But he would reach into a crack and break into a wide smile. Then he would reach up again and smile. Finally, about halfway up, he turned and said, “Alpine climbing just doesn’t get any better than this”. And it was true.

Howie on Angel Wings ridge route
Howie on Angel Wings ridge route
Credit: Betsy Grant
Peter working up the ridge
Peter working up the ridge
Credit: Betsy Grant
Betsy on top of Angel Wings in the good, the great and the awesome wea...
Betsy on top of Angel Wings in the good, the great and the awesome weather
Credit: Ney Grant
Angel Wings Panorama
Angel Wings Panorama
Credit: Ney Grant
Peter on top
Peter on top
Credit: Ney Grant

Again we made it back to camp by noon and were asleep in the rain shortly after. What terribly, terribly great weather.

Even though the weather didn’t seem to be getting any better (or worse, or whatever, because now I’m confused as to what is good weather and what is bad weather) we decided to do Saber Ridge but keep our speed up. As usual we left camp at first light and started climbing about dawn. As reported, Saber Ridge is an extremely fun route, both the climb (short 5.7 sections) up to the ridge and the long, fantastic and exposed ridge traverse. The “Saber” portion is great, with a super hand traverse on the thin “saber” ridge but little traction for your feet.

Classic butt shot of Howie, but it shows 5.7 crux of Saber Ridge.
Classic butt shot of Howie, but it shows 5.7 crux of Saber Ridge.
Credit: Ney Grant
Contemplating the "Saber".
Contemplating the "Saber".
Credit: Howie Schwartz
Feet?  Not so much.
Feet? Not so much.
Credit: Ney Grant
Howie on Saber Ridge
Howie on Saber Ridge
Credit: Ney Grant

Our luck held out and we were able to get off the climb at around 11:00 am (a reasonably fast pace for the Saber) just as the raindrops started to fall, followed by the hike to camp and another one of the best naps in my life under a pounding rainfall.

The next day we hiked out the 16 miles under blue skies, then waited a couple of hours for the mules to show up with our stuff. An incredible trip.

Credit: Ney Grant
Credit: Ney Grant



  Trip Report Views: 4,989
Ney Grant
About the Author
Ney is a trad climber from Pollock Pines.

Comments
Did you like this Trip Report? Got something to say? Don't hold back...
Comment on this Trip Report
bob

climber
  Aug 6, 2014 - 05:06pm PT
Wow. Thank you.

Dream ridge!
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
  Aug 6, 2014 - 05:12pm PT
Awesome!
TFPU
Tad
susu

Trad climber
East Bay, CA
  Aug 6, 2014 - 05:12pm PT
Beautiful rock and landscape shots! Sounds like a great trip, rain and all.
splitclimber

climber
Sonoma County
  Aug 6, 2014 - 05:14pm PT
A 5.9 on angel wings. YES!!!

I've been wanting to go out there ever since I saw Thau's writeup in the AAJ for saber ridge.

Way to still get lots of climbing in with terrible weather.

Pics of mules but none of Amy. hmmm.
Spider Savage

Mountain climber
The shaggy fringe of Los Angeles
  Aug 6, 2014 - 05:31pm PT
Sucking the sweet marrow out of that bone called life.
Ney Grant

Trad climber
Pollock Pines
Author's Reply  Aug 6, 2014 - 05:46pm PT
Here's Amy!
Here's Amy!
Credit: Betsy Grant
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
  Aug 6, 2014 - 06:23pm PT
Incredible! Stuff! Area sure looks good and climbing with Peter must have been a great experience. I bet he has a lot of cool stories to share!
Ezra Ellis

Trad climber
North wet, and Da souf
  Aug 6, 2014 - 06:40pm PT
Well done sir!!!
Looks like the trip of a life time!!!!
Peter is an inspiration!!!
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
  Aug 6, 2014 - 06:57pm PT
Sweeeeeet! Any pics showing the locations of the two new routes?
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
  Aug 6, 2014 - 07:13pm PT
Southern Sierra Stoke!!!!! Thanks for sharing, awesome!!!!!

Charlie D.
Ney Grant

Trad climber
Pollock Pines
Author's Reply  Aug 6, 2014 - 07:21pm PT
Sweeeeeet! Any pics showing the locations of the two new routes?

There is a good route photo of the 5.10b South Face of Prism route on Howie's blog: http://www.sierramtnguides.com/new-routes-in-sequoia-national-park/

I'm sure either Howie or Peter will detail the 5.9 Angel Wings route, and I would rather let them do that.
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
  Aug 6, 2014 - 09:54pm PT
Thanks, I forgot it said that. Some great information in that blog and an awesome trip!
overwatch

climber
  Aug 6, 2014 - 08:55pm PT
Haven't checked the blog yet but nice report...trip of a life time with a master.
That last tree shot looks like something from the mind of Tolkien
msiddens

Trad climber
  Aug 6, 2014 - 09:39pm PT
Wow man a dream trip
thebravecowboy

climber
walking, resin-stained, towards the goal
  Aug 6, 2014 - 09:43pm PT
seems pretty tame to me. ;---}
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
  Aug 6, 2014 - 09:49pm PT
Tree shot is awesome. Whole trip is da kine bra.
W.L.

climber
Edge of the Electric Ocean Beneath Red Rock
  Aug 6, 2014 - 09:50pm PT
Sweet trip! Thanks for posting, sounds like an incredible experience/opportunity. Nice new routes ;-)
RP3

Big Wall climber
Twain Harte
  Aug 6, 2014 - 10:28pm PT
Beautiful stuff! Thanks for sharing.
NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
  Aug 7, 2014 - 04:26am PT
There's a jackpot of a few days in the backcountry! Heck, with some moderate climbs in the area I might have to make my way back there sooner than later. My favorite backpacking trip ever was heading up that way, staying at Precipice Lake, and tagging Black Kaweah. I didn't know how to use ropes at the time, but I was just staring and staring at Angel Wings and telling myself I gotta figure out how to climb that thing.
Aerili

climber
SLC, Utah
  Aug 7, 2014 - 09:34am PT
Great TR and photos. Thanks for posting. Been wanting to get out there for a few years now!!!
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
  Aug 7, 2014 - 10:50am PT
excellent
mooser

Trad climber
seattle
  Aug 7, 2014 - 11:34am PT
Fantastic! Thanks for bringing us along!
Stevee B

Trad climber
Oakland, CA
  Aug 7, 2014 - 11:34am PT
Good God that looks fun. Thanks for sharing!
pc

climber
  Aug 7, 2014 - 01:15pm PT
Wow! Great trip indeed! Thanks for sharing.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
  Aug 7, 2014 - 01:29pm PT

A dream trip report. TFPU!
le_bruce

climber
Oakland, CA
  Aug 7, 2014 - 01:31pm PT
Thank you very much for posting!

While belaying him, did you ever just for kicks call up to Croft "There's a good foothold out left there, use your feet. But good job, you're doing great Peter."

Like standing behind Jordan at the free throw line and telling him to aim for the back of the rim and to follow through with his wrist, haha.



Worth a repeat posting. Wonderful pics all around!

I keep a Top 10 list of naps, too.
Ney Grant

Trad climber
Pollock Pines
Author's Reply  Aug 7, 2014 - 04:07pm PT
While belaying him, did you ever just for kicks call up to Croft "There's a good foothold out left there, use your feet. But good job, you're doing great Peter."

That is funny. I'm sure Peter would think so too, but perhaps not if I actually tried it on the rock.

That rainbow scene looks peaceful, doesn't it? It wasn't. Howie and I were shirking our duties by taking photos of it. Everyone else was in camp holding down the tents from the wind. The tent you see in the photo was the floor-less cook shelter and a split second after I took this photo it took flight, close-lined Amy (who was inside) and threw her on the ground. She was stunned and bruised. All I saw was this tent growing large in the viewfinder and realized it was flying toward me at 40-50 mph. My elbow still hurts from catching it, and I crouched for a second, waiting to let it go if it started dragging me.

I think that is called a micro-burst from a thunderstorm. Or some wind funneling effect from that bowl. But there were some mighty winds for a few minutes.
ryankelly

Trad climber
el portal
  Aug 7, 2014 - 04:08pm PT
Good thing I don't ever get jealous. #nofomo
rfshore

Trad climber
Cali-centric
  Aug 13, 2014 - 06:42am PT
Too much sadness and bullshit on the front page. BUMP for climbing!
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
  Aug 13, 2014 - 07:15am PT
Awesomeness. Beauty.
WBraun

climber
  Aug 13, 2014 - 07:22am PT
Anything with Peter Croft is a plus 100 ........
Roughster

Sport climber
Vacaville, CA
  Aug 13, 2014 - 07:53am PT
Awesome. Looks like an adventure that will be remembered for a long time!
Magic Ed

Trad climber
Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  Aug 13, 2014 - 08:37am PT
Niiice! That's what climbing is all about.
The Alpine

climber
  Aug 13, 2014 - 08:41am PT
So rad, thanks for sharing.

If you don't mind me askin' - what's the cost on a trip like that? Mules round trip, food, Croft guiding... $3k?

People spend similar amounts on cruises or trips to Disney world and end up with far less value and memorable experiences.

Wouldn't it be great if more would wake up and spend their money wisely; doing what they love and supporting that passion.
skitch

climber
East of Heaven
  Aug 13, 2014 - 08:42am PT
Amy Ness is a local bad-a$$! She lives in Lone Pine with her boyfriend and they put up a lot of incredible routes in the sierras. That must have been a fun trip, all of those people are super nice, especially Howie.
curt wohlgemuth

Social climber
Bay Area, California
  Aug 13, 2014 - 09:10am PT
When I read the thread title, I figured it'd be another "You'll never be able to climb THESE routes" TR. Thanks for posting something that we old duffers can aspire to!
mike m

Trad climber
black hills
  Aug 13, 2014 - 09:15am PT
Great report. We had stormy weather in the Winds all last week and it looks like it is moving east. Hopefully you guys got lots of rain in CA from the storms.
phylp

Trad climber
Upland, CA
  Aug 13, 2014 - 10:37am PT
Looks wonderful, thanks for the writeup.
Texplorer

Trad climber
Sacramento
  Aug 13, 2014 - 11:39am PT
But did Croft start at true toe of the buttress?
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
  Aug 13, 2014 - 12:02pm PT
If you don't mind me askin' - what's the cost on a trip like that? Mules round trip, food, Croft guiding... $3k?

Interesting question. I went to SMG web site and they have some rates on it. As I understand they had two guides - Howie Schwarts and Peter Croft. When I chose option for two guides it shows 9,300$. +190$ per porter per day. For those who could afford it, probably an incredible experience worth every penny!

http://www.sierramtnguides.com/program/porters-pack-support-camp-assistants/
http://www.sierramtnguides.com/program/sabre-ridge-climbing-camp/
mooch

Trad climber
Old Climbers' Home (Adopted)
  Aug 13, 2014 - 02:38pm PT
Nice!! Brandon passed a topo to me last year of the Prism. Wanted to get back there ever since. A ga-jillion years ago, we were back in the area (well, the Hamilton drainage and Tamarack) and did both Hamilton Dome and Mount Stewart.....amazing climbs and both worthy objectives.
Ney Grant

Trad climber
Pollock Pines
Author's Reply  Aug 15, 2014 - 09:30am PT
Everyone is correct, it was kind of expensive and it caused some heartburn when we discussed whether to do it. We looked at what else we could do with the money for our vacation - a trip to Europe or South America perhaps. But this trip sounded awesome in a truly special area. Indeed it was worth every penny.

I'll never forget what Galen Rowell said. I don't remember his exact words (which means I actually did forget), but he said he had been on expeditions and explored all over the world, but nothing compares to our own Sierra Nevada. Although not nearly as well-traveled as Galen was, I've been to the Himalayas, Alps and Andes and have to agree the Sierras are truly a special place that we get to call home.

Going on a mule supported trip and discovering an area of the Sierras I had only read about, not to mention the good people, fantastic climbing and the sweet naps, was well worth the trade off on a trip overseas. - Ney
hellcyon

climber
  Aug 18, 2014 - 08:44am PT
What a spectacular cirque and wonderful trip report, thank you for taking the time to share it with us, something I rarely do, so pardon me as I piggyback a few photos from a few years ago ...
Pot of Golden Granite
Pot of Golden Granite
Credit: hellcyon

As climber in the area I felt outnumbered 3:1.
As climber in the area I felt outnumbered 3:1.
Credit: hellcyon

Someone else's photo I doodled on.
Someone else's photo I doodled on.

Green goods
Green goods
Credit: hellcyon

A thousand words...
A thousand words...
Credit: hellcyon
eagle

Trad climber
new paltz, ny
  Aug 18, 2014 - 05:41pm PT
WOW!!!THAT PLACE LOOKS BEAUTIFUL ALL THE WAY FROM NEW PALTZ
jwreed

Gym climber
Tualatin OR
  Aug 18, 2014 - 06:17pm PT
Angel Wings.

Credit: jwreed
Scott Thelen

Trad climber
Truckee, Ca
  Aug 18, 2014 - 06:33pm PT
Nice trip report

Saber is super fun!!
Ney Grant

Trad climber
Pollock Pines
Author's Reply  Aug 18, 2014 - 07:12pm PT
Prism (new route goes straight up face) is on the left, Saber is on the right. Although it doesn't look like it, Saber is higher and longer.

Prism on the left, Saber on the right.
Prism on the left, Saber on the right.
Credit: Ney Grant
ElGreco

Mountain climber
  Aug 18, 2014 - 11:04pm PT
I hate to detract from the awesome routes, photography and anything that involves the great, the awesome, the inspiring, the incomparable Peter Croft. But...

What exactly is going on here?? You are paying him and Howie to gun routes several number grades below their level so you can then follow them up? While mules cart your stuff around?

Call me old fashioned, but that seems to go against what climbing is all about for me: patience, hard work, overcoming difficulties and fears, making the impossible possible. We all come at it from different angles. Some have more talent, skill, dedication and time than others, but it's not about standing at the top at any cost that makes it worthwhile - it's about knowing that you've earned every inch of the way there...

A few years ago I saw that a guiding company was offering mule carries for their U-notch clients, and couldn't help but think how sad that was. The whole point of climbing in the Palisades is to escape to a remote, rugged alpine environment where Clyde, Chouinard and their buddies made history. You can't stomach the long hike in and the elevation gain with heavy packs? Then maybe you should focus on lesser objectives and work your way up to the Palisades when you are ready. Where is this sense of entitlement coming from? (Not to mention the mess that mules leave behind, but that's a whole different topic)

Finances are besides the point here. Maybe this is peanuts for you, or maybe these are the savings from several years of hard work - it doesn't matter. The point is that most of the physical and mental challenge is taken away. The climb becomes just another service you can buy off the shelf, denying you the chance to build that unique sense of achievement and elation one drop of blood, sweat and tears at a time. I am a totally inconsequential and un-noteworthy climber. But I feel on top of the world just like anyone else when something that I could only have dreamed of becomes a reality.

Peace. Be safe. Challenge yourselves. And thanks for posting.
couchmaster

climber
  Aug 19, 2014 - 05:56am PT
I'd disagree with that assessment ElGreco (for myself). That might be true FOR YOU as you say of course, and that's fine. And it might even be true for others SOMETIMES. But these guys defined what they wanted to do, went out and had a hell of an adventure and fantastic climbing that they will remember all of their days.

Right on and thanks for sharing it with the rest of us.
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
  Aug 19, 2014 - 07:37am PT
ElGreco, To each his own, if you're not into it then don't do it.

BTW after almost 50 years of climbing going up and coming down my 63 year old knees speak to me on every outing. I've finally listened and this next weekend we've rented a mule!!!
Ney Grant

Trad climber
Pollock Pines
Author's Reply  Aug 19, 2014 - 08:56am PT
El Greco,

I was wondering if someone would take that stance. To each his own opinion, but we did not pay Howie and Peter to do first ascents. We paid them for their guiding service. We do get out often, for example last weekend we did north ridge of North Peak to north ridge of Mt. Conness. This weekend we'll do Lone Pine Peak. We'll do 5.10 on shorter routes.

But we greatly enjoy getting out into the backcountry for harder and longer routes, but we don't feel comfortable leading them. With Howie and Peter we can do that, keep the speed up, and have a wonderful time. I understand you and others would not enjoy that.

The first ascents? We just got incredibly lucky, that's all. Truly the right place at the right time. I know where I stand there. I didn't put a lot of detail or route photos into the trip report. I left that up to Howie and Peter. I made a self-deprecating joke to Peter and he stopped me and said, "Look, I couldn't have done that without the support of climbers I knew could climb it and climb fast in threatening weather. You guys were capable and were on the team".

I am proud of that.
The Alpine

climber
  Aug 19, 2014 - 09:14am PT
There's no rules in rock climbing.

micronut

Trad climber
Fresno/Clovis, ca
  Aug 19, 2014 - 09:49am PT
Amazing trip and I also totally disagree with El Greco. I once hired a guide in North Carolina....a local legend Arno Ilgner.....to take me up Whitesides before I left the south for good. I had the skills and the knowhow but wanted a safe and fast trip to an area legendary for 100 foot runouts and devious route finding. It was a blast to do the route in style and meet a legend. I'd do it again in a heartbeat and it took nothing away from the adventure.

I also fished the world famous trophy trout waters of the Little Blackfoot River in Montana one week totally alone because "Hey I'm a lifelong trout hunter who ties my own flies and this is world class water and I don't need no stinking guide...pfft."

I caught not a single trout. And have never been back. Sadness.

I'm stoked for your great trip and hope you have many more down the road. Way to put your money where it matters!



Scott
Stevee B

Trad climber
Oakland, CA
  Aug 19, 2014 - 10:22am PT
El Greco,

I was wondering if someone would take that stance. To each his own opinion,...

It saddens me a little that you felt put in a position to have to justify the nature of your awesome trip, but the added details only make the story better. Thanks again for posting up!
Amy Ness

climber
ND
  Aug 19, 2014 - 10:24am PT
I was the mere cook on this trip, but did rope up with Betsy the last day on Saber Ridge...these two are not your average clients! Betsy insisted on carrying the rope and figuring out all the moves for herself. She moved super-fast, and I could tell the climbing was easy for her as we had full-on conversations while running the ridge!

Just the other day while guide-training on a trip I had a group of women ask...to our client...whether the summit counts if you are guided up something. I was shocked! You do not carry someone up a summit, or place their hands on the holds. One of the 3 women admitted that she had just done Kilimanjaro the year before, with a guide, and "it counted!"

I have several friends that I rope-gun up routes for, the only difference is, they are not paying me...I think I have more respect for those that know their limitations and simply have more to live for than to get in over their heads.

Ney and Betsy- I would love to climb/hang-out with you anytime!
It was as magical as your amazing pictures make it look:)
ElGreco

Mountain climber
  Aug 19, 2014 - 12:51pm PT
Did not mean to detract from the stoke, guys. I am not offended or affected by what you did. Rules and reasons are personal, and if yours work for you then that's what counts.

I wanted to inject a different viewpoint, but you've clearly considered that and reached your conclusion.

Thanks for the TR, and climb on!
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
  Aug 19, 2014 - 01:06pm PT
Thank you for the TR.... AW is one place I really want to go climb at someday.

No worries about the mules, I have used them before and will again. I find that you still have your 5.10 climbing legs under you when you didn't carry 100 lbs- 18+ miles.

climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
  Aug 19, 2014 - 08:15pm PT
No guide in the world (not even Peter Croft) would put up a multipitch FA route in a remote area with climbing upwards of 5.10 with someone they did not consider a solid "partner". It's a lucky guide who gets clients who are "real climbers" they can trust. That doesn't happen every day in the guiding business.

What a great Trip.. What a special place. Thanks for sharing
Scalparm

Trad climber
Berkeley
  Aug 20, 2014 - 11:22pm PT
I'm sorry, you used mules to to Third Pillar of Dana?
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
  Aug 20, 2014 - 11:30pm PT
Had to, the Helo was in the shop
Fletcher

Boulder climber
A very quiet place
  Aug 25, 2014 - 12:16am PT
Loved this trip report. Thanks for sharing. I love Peter Croft's outlook and spirit. It's infectious even in a trip report!

Eric
deez nuts

climber
Zona
  Aug 25, 2014 - 07:06am PT
Is there word that Peter is coming out with a new Sierra guide?
peter croft

climber
  Aug 25, 2014 - 08:10am PT
Yes, bigger and in color.
It will be better than before. Better...stronger...faster.
j-tree

Big Wall climber
Typewriters and Ledges
  Aug 25, 2014 - 08:47am PT
Beautiful. TFPU
Macronut

Trad climber
Fresno, Ca
  Sep 3, 2014 - 07:14am PT
All I can think of to say is...jealousy. Jealous of the whole blasted trip. TFPU, but truly thanks for sharing your experience it sounds like one for the books and priceless. Glad you had a great one.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
  Sep 3, 2014 - 10:21am PT
Greco,

"it's about knowing that you've earned every inch of the way there"

Using that same principle would mean that your ascents must be solo to "count."

Also, that would mean ascents of aid big walls that use adjustable daisies and hauling devices that use mechanical advantage are similarly discounted.

For some, the guided experience is not what they are after. For others, it saves time and adds a margin of safety that works for them.

I used to not be into the idea of a guide, but now looking at a European trip, I have no idea where to go, the gear, and will have limited time. A guide makes sense in a lot of places.
Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
  Sep 3, 2014 - 10:35am PT
Yes, bigger and in color.
It will be better than before. Better...stronger...faster.

Hope the stories in it are as good too! Loved some of the humor in the last book.

PS: Photo of Prism/Saber and those yellow flowers is quite nice. Thanks for posting again.
Did you like this Trip Report? Got something to say? Don't hold back...
Comment on this Trip Report
Go