Trip Report
Luna Nascente - Val di Mello - Italy - Euro Granite as good as it gets
Monday January 22, 2018 8:59am
Supertopian friends! After a far too long break Iím back with a trip report from across the big pond to hopefully please you and live up to the high standards of this site.

We had some brilliant autumn days last year in Europe and I was lucky enough to have time and a partner to spend some days in Val di Mello.
The way in
The way in
Credit: monti
The valley floor
The valley floor
Credit: monti
Credit: monti

Val di Mello is in the north of Italy, the northern side of the valley is made of such summits as the Pizzo Cengalo, Punta Allievi, Pizzi del Ferro, Punta Rasica and a few other important alpine summits, which make the border to Switzerland and tower more than 2000m over the valley floor. The eastern end of the valley is closed by the Monte Disgrazia, a gorgeous summit, by far the highest in the area.
Monte Disgrazia at sunset, the furthest summit in the sun.
Monte Disgrazia at sunset, the furthest summit in the sun.
Credit: monti
However, Val di Mello is best known for its rock climbing, which is done mainly on the granite slabs closer to the valley floor. And itís not just granite, it is GRANITE!!! Coarse grained granite with quartz veins giving it unbelievable friction and wonderful cracks.
Mello Granite, slab climbing at its best.
Mello Granite, slab climbing at its best.
Credit: monti
Precipizio degli Asteroidi, one of the main faces in the valley.
Precipizio degli Asteroidi, one of the main faces in the valley.
Credit: monti
Credit: monti
Behave, the spirits of the valley are watching...
Behave, the spirits of the valley are watching...
Credit: monti
In the 1970ís local climbers and climbers from the close by Milan pioneered routes up rock structures and slabs in Val di Mello and since then hundreds of climbs from single pitch to 20+ pitches have been opened.
Exploration of the valleyís faces and the style of climbing were inspired by what had been going on for years in Yosemite. Knowing that faces such as El Cap and Half Dome could be and had been climbed inspired the pioneers of Val di Mello and set the tone for what was to come. Climbing at the times was done in the spirit of the í68 movement and was not just sport, it was also a rebellion against the hierarchical and traditionally structured alpine clubs of the times. Generations of alpinists had previously ignored all faces and slabs located close to the valley floor, some of them hundreds of meters high but without a true summit by classical means. These structures offered a perfect playground to explore and shape a more playful discipline in the vast field of mountaineering and climbing. More playful certainly does not mean less challenging and the grades of difficulty and scarcity of protection reached in the early years prove the expertise of the pioneers. One could actually suspect that the amount of protection on the slabs must have been inversely proportional to the use of hallucinogenic substances at the time. How on earth would someone otherwise climb a 50m slab pitch graded 6c without a single piece of protection?
While the drugs have mostly disappeared, the protection has not appeared on the vast majority of the climbs. Pretty much all big classic climbs still have only old pitons left by the first ascenders or no protection at all. This is rather unusual for Europe, where bolting and re-bolting has at times been taken to extremes, with cracks that could perfectly well be protected with cams and nuts now being unnecessarily bolted. Not in Val di Mello, where only the more recent climbs have bolts. Nowadays climbers concentrate on a few popular routes, which can be protected and are not overly hard. The vast majority of climbs are for a rather small elite of people who climb well and have no fear.
Not only is the climbing in Val di Mello stellar, the place itself is also a piece of nature that has so far resisted the hordes of barbarians that flood it on weekends during spring, summer and autumn, luckily and miraculously so.
Credit: monti
Credit: monti
Credit: monti
Credit: monti
Remember weíre in Europe, not the High Sierra. So there are no really remote places, wilderness is limited to isolated specks of land and must be treasured and kept secret. Val di Mello is certainly not secret, and wilderness is limited. Itís more like a well-kept garden shaped by centuries of human presence with farmers and shepherds fighting hard for their lives in the 19th and up to the mid-20th century. Every single square meter of land, regardless how steep, was exploited for pasture, agriculture or to make a living out of it. Today itís mainly tourism. What used to be stables in more ancient times are now private holiday houses or hostels mainly visited by climbers, especially in spring and autumn, when temperatures are not too high and days are crystal clear.
Credit: monti
So, last October Jakob and I rented a car and drove there. Our drive was a quest for the best music (Pink Floyd ad nauseam) and for a shop to get some good food for our coming days. We were definitively not planning to go hungry, this is Italy after all.
We had clear climbing plans: Jakob had never climbed Luna Nascente, probably the best known moderate climb of the valley and easily among the best climbs of its kind altogether; so that was a must. I had climbed it back in 1996 and was eager to have another go. Traffic is the biggest problem on Luna Nascente, itís so popular that you can hardly find it without other parties on it. We had it to ourselves back in 1996, but it was November and foggy.
Unknown parties on pitches 5 and 6 of Luna Nascente
Unknown parties on pitches 5 and 6 of Luna Nascente
Credit: monti
The upper pitches of Luna Nascente
The upper pitches of Luna Nascente
Credit: monti
And we had it to ourselves again this time, despite it being October and perfect weather. Thatís what I call luck. The approach is in a fairly steep beech forest and takes around one hour. The climb starts a few hundred meters off the valley floor with the hardest move of the entire route 3 metres off the ground. According to the guidebooks pitch 1 is a 6b, but this one single move seemed incredibly hard to me; so I aided it up. The second pitch is graded 6a+, a fairly strenuous traverse under a roof on small underclings and even smaller smears for the feet. Having done the first two pitches you enter a series of 3 spectacular pitches of non-stop laybacking and occasional jamming along a gigantic flake up the face. Move after move after move after move of beauty and fun.
Pitch 3
Pitch 3
Credit: monti
Pitch 4
Pitch 4
Credit: monti
Pitch 4, Jakob closeto the belay
Pitch 4, Jakob closeto the belay
Credit: monti
Jakob cruising on pitch 4
Jakob cruising on pitch 4
Credit: monti
More cruising
More cruising
Credit: monti
...and again!
...and again!
Credit: monti
still not done, the fun goes on!
still not done, the fun goes on!
Credit: monti
The next pitch (no. 6) involves moving away from the gigantic flake to the right, follow a crack for about 8 m, traverse back to the left, downclimb along the flake for a few metres and the finally traverse onto the flake with just a few delicate moves on friction. The pleasant surprise comes when you reach far to the left and find yet another crack, which brings the heart rate down immediately. This pitch is all on wide cracks and if you donít have any wide gear you run it all out, except for an old belay at the top of the downclimb, which is very convenient for protection. From the savior hold at the end of the traverse to the next belay come 15 more metres of exposed climbing following a crack that would take a BD #4 cam, if you had it alongÖ..
Credit: monti
One would believe that eventually all this beauty ends, but it doesnít. Pitch 7 is yet another crack, 40 m of ecstasy.
Pitch 7
Pitch 7
Credit: monti
Pitch 8 and the rest of the climb come in two options: follow the crack for another 2-3 pitches to the top, from below it looks dirty and thereís quite a bit of grass and trees looking out, not appealing and hardly ever climbed. Alternatively, follow the quartz vein traversing horizontally to the left for about 30 m, one piece of protection half way along the pitch.
Pitch 8, almost at the top, Monte Disgrazia in the background
Pitch 8, almost at the top, Monte Disgrazia in the background
Credit: monti
Pitches 9 and 10 don't quite live up to the rest of the climb, but you have to get up somehow, right? One short crack pitch and then one last pitch on slab, 50 m, no protection.
Summit?!?!? Whatever, we topped out.
Summit?!?!? Whatever, we topped out.
Credit: monti
With the exception of the first two pitches, the entire route comes at around 5c with very few 6a moves thrown in. The top 3 pitches are clearly easier.
Once at the top comes what we were dreaming of during climbing: the ham, and the cheese, and the bread, and all the rest of the food.
The path down is still a bit spicy and quite exposed at times, but fairly easy to follow and in just over one hour weíre back at the Rifugio Luna Nascente and the cool beer. Then itís dinner time, polenta, deer, ham, salami, cheese, cake, wine, grappa.
Well deserved
Well deserved
Credit: monti
Yummy
Yummy
Credit: monti
Dog on a diet....
Dog on a diet....
Credit: monti
And the coming day we opt against our original plan to climb another big route and make a short and pleasant one. By the time we top out the hangover is taken care of and weíre ready for more relaxing.
Credit: monti
Heroe's rest....
Heroe's rest....
Credit: monti
What a tough climbing holiday, I need to train harder for more of the same.

  Trip Report Views: 1,645
monti
About the Author
monti is a mountain climber from Basel, Switzerland, and likes having a beer after the climb.

Comments
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Miles Fullman

Big Wall climber
Orinda
  Jan 22, 2018 - 09:07am PT
Looked fun, especially the food!
snakefoot

climber
Nor Cal
  Jan 22, 2018 - 09:19am PT
amazing! thanks for posting up .... love italy.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
  Jan 22, 2018 - 09:24am PT
Mama mia! La dolce vita!
skywalker1

Trad climber
co
  Jan 22, 2018 - 09:25am PT
Ahhh interesting "nook" of Italy. I've only had the pleasure of climbing in the Dolomites once as a honeymoon. Granite! I wouldn't have thought. Nice photos. And thanks for the little bit of Lonely Planet description of setting and history. The food is so good there.

TFPU!!!

S....
i-b-goB

Social climber
Nutty
  Jan 22, 2018 - 10:11am PT
Molto bene!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
  Jan 22, 2018 - 10:35am PT

A great way to navigate us over the granite. TFPU!
NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
  Jan 22, 2018 - 11:17am PT
Wonderful! I'll have to share this report with my wife to give her some nostalgia. Val di Mello was where she spent most weekends for a long time before she moved to USA. I look forward to climbing there when we have a spring/summer trip instead of a winter trip.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
  Jan 22, 2018 - 12:50pm PT
Nice Monti! I first heard of this area from an Italian climber in Indian Creek seven or eight years ago. Just might have to sneak over and enjoy the Italian lifestyle along with a little climbing.
phylp

Trad climber
Upland, CA
  Jan 22, 2018 - 01:03pm PT
Monti, thanks for the really wonderful trip report, beautifully written! I have only been to that area once and thought it was beautiful (of course all of Italy that I have seen is beautiful, so no surprise). Your writing and photos made me so "homesick" and wanting to get back to Italy as soon as possible.
Phyl
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
  Jan 22, 2018 - 01:20pm PT
Great TR!

Fun spot...

Val di Mello...
Val di Mello...
Credit: Brian in SLC
stefano607518

Trad climber
italy/austria/switzerland
  Jan 24, 2018 - 04:28am PT
Monti glad you found the way down from "Luna" this time ;-) so that Siro (the owner of the Osteria down there) did not have to come and pick you up this time. he might have lost some energy since 1996 better so...

great TR, looking fwd to the planned Wetern trip this autumn...is this still up? well let`s see each other on the spanish limestone first ;-)
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
  Jan 24, 2018 - 07:08am PT
thanks for the trip report....did this climb in aug of 1989...brought back some very fine memories........a wonderful place to climb!
ddriver

Trad climber
SLC, UT
  Jan 24, 2018 - 08:33am PT
moving up the list
giudirel

Sport climber
Italy
  Feb 1, 2018 - 12:24am PT
I'm glad you apreciated Val di Mello and Luna Nascente. I'm someone you can call a "local" and I climbed it 24 times... in the last 40 years... the last time this last summer... the first time... I can hardly remember... I was a boy... I guess less than 20 years old.
The first pitch boulder is more strange than difficult. If you find the right way it is not so difficult but is uneasy to figure the trick. The legend says that the second pitch traverse was redpointed for the first time by Yvon Chouinard. I was there. Now it is a little bit greasy (and my butt very bigger than when I was young) and it is not so easy... A last beta... the large crack after the "hawk eye" takes a Camelot 5 better than the 4 one.
Coming down from the top is a little bit ackward due the fact the ancient path is deteriorated and you can abseil down even if is not a trivial task and the wall pretty impressive...but there are good bolts. Come again to climb the Luna Nascente sister "PolimagÚ": it is a little bit more runout but maybe even better.
monti

Mountain climber
Basel, Switzerland
Author's Reply  Feb 2, 2018 - 12:14pm PT
Hey giudirel, thanks for the beta on the first pitch, I'll be more patient and try harder next time. And there will be a next time, such a beautiful climb should be done over and over again. I may not reach 24 times, that's pretty impressive.
And yes, polimagÚ is on my wishlist, but that traverse pitch really scares the sh&%t out of me. Need to make some mental training before going there, it's no-fall-zone up there. Next year maybe, who knows?

Donini, you absolutely have to sneak over here, try the climbs but there's another thing to absolutely try:
PIZZOCCHERI
and don't expect to lose weight...
Drop me a line if you're over here sometime.
nah000

climber
now/here
  Feb 2, 2018 - 10:02pm PT
mmmm... looks delicious. thanks.
7SacredPools

Trad climber
Ontario, Canada
  Feb 3, 2018 - 06:35am PT
I was intrigued by an article on Val di Mello a few years back and your TR has confirmed my suspicions; the place looks definitely worth a visit. TFPU!

Brian from SLC: Hard to imagine that river deep enough for such a high leap...
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