Trip Report
1st Ascent "The Arsonist" Burning up the North Face of Fairview Dome

by bob
Monday March 4, 2013 12:37am
This is a route a friend and I put up last summer on the North side of Fairview Dome. Some crude pics and a bit of writing might give somebody something to do.

I do hope some enjoyment will be provided.
Peace!


"Want to do a new route on Fairview?" I asked Mr. Erik Fantasy, who had never done a first ascent and is genuinely cautious in his approach to climbing.
He was apprehensive at first and I couldn't blame him. I was just looking for someone I liked to go up with me, whether for the long run or not. I simply wanted to get started.

I had been eyeing the North side of Fairview for years. When on routes such as A Farewell to Kings or Inverted Staircase, my eyes always gazed that way from belays. The face seemed so inviting, with sweeps of grey rock crossed with roofs and sometimes covered in hard green lichen
.
When putting up Separation Anxiety, we detailed that face up and down on the initial pitches. A few years ago, while doing Captain Fairview and Lyme Line Direct, I was sold on a route to the left of Burning Down the House and right of Always Arches, which I thought would go.

*FAIL*
*BDtH, by the way, is a route I have said I would do. I hope to do it, but don't know if I ever will. I'm sure I opened my big mouth on ST with my keyboard and at some point wrote that I most certainly would do it ... blah blah. Should have bit my tongue, errrr ugh ... smashed the fingers. Maybe I'll do it. Maybe *
*FAIL*

Mr. Fantasy asked a series of calculated questions to see whether he would be getting himself into trouble. I casually explained, "You have to climb and then drill when you're too scared to climb more." Showing him the idea of my intended line, with pictures and stories of treasure, he softened to the suggestion and became quite interested. YEAH!

The first day, we walked over to the base of the route and gazed up at the impressive North Face; I pointed out the line to Mr. Fantasy, noting obvious features the route would follow, its many roofs and the striped granite shield near the top.
In reflection, Mr. Fantasy recalls, "I wasn't really sure what I was getting myself into and the 900 feet or so of granite looming before us definitely did not instill confidence. Bob, however, with his casual approach to climbing, did, and so we began."

What ensued over the next couple weeks were very good times indeed.
the route
the route
Credit: Erik

This was the first time I climbed with a radio. I"m usually not down, but this guy IS music and it makes him tick. I fell into it and listened to tons of country/bluegrass and other songs I'd never heard before -- Warren Zevon seemed to be a staple of the shuffle. He had this little i-pod box thing with speakers. Not too loud at all and it sounded great! Good stuff, though I must say that a music source is still not my first choice when thinking about what equipment is needed for a first ascent. I'm sure plenty of people don't want to hear music while high up on some multi-pitch adventure that might be the climax of their climbing life. We would have turned it off if there had been anyone else nearby. There wasn't and no one ever showed up, so ... WE ROCKED OUT!

I dashed up the initial slab, about 80 feet left of Burning Down the House and reached a left facing flake with pro that led up to an overlapping arch. The top of the arch became slabby and technical. I put the first bolt in quickly after leaving the flakes natural pro. As I was drilling the first bolt, Mr. Fantasy -- for whatever reason -- was giving a rather tight belay and suddenly I felt tension on the line. "Don't pull on me!" I shouted down, fearing I would be pulled from my tentative stance. I managed to get the first bolt of the route in without further incident. This, then, led to the underside of a huge arch. Great gear, some moves down and over right to a belay stance and the first pitch was done. Great rock with mostly moderate climbing to warm up on. Nice!
Heading up the slabs.  oh yeah.
Heading up the slabs. oh yeah.
Credit: Erik
1st pitch belay
1st pitch belay
Credit: Erik

Mr. Fantasy pushed out on the second pitch, heading out with a hammer, a drill and some hardware for the first time in his life. I told him I felt the route would go straight through this roof. He attempted this maneuver, quickly becoming convinced that it was not the way! He traversed over right with an undercling, plugging gear along the way, looking for weakness in the rock, a natural passageway.
Mr. Fantasy recalls, "I remember thinking, Holy Sh#t, what have I signed up for? I was standing at the spot where I knew the rock was easiest, wanting to give up and hand the lead back to Bob, but knew this was why I was here. I cautiously attempted the move several times, not sure I wanted to commit to the mantle, growing closer and closer to calling it quits. Finally, I committed and was suddenly in what I felt was a desperate situation."

His first utterance was some expletive regarding the situation at hand. I can't quite recall. I explained what we previously had talked about. Getting ready to put a bolt in and such. Mr. Fantasy stood there a little longer, touching gear on his harness, adjusting his feet, knocking his helmet into the wall, desperately clinging to the rock, saying, "I can't do this!" in a voice lathered in fear.

I explained to him that he had a few choices:

-- Reverse the moves and downclimb, if possible, thus further risking injury;

-- Climb to the next place you think you can drill a bolt, thus further risking injury;

-- Drill a bolt, thus further risking injury, until that bit gets in (which, if I were him and in his predicament, I would think to be the best option).

I told him to relax and try to breathe. The stance wasn't as bad as it seemed and, yes, he could do it!

He sighed and got busy and busy and busy and even busier. Dropping the hammer and drill repeatedly to grab hold of the rock again in an effort to regain a sense of security. Busy guy, that Mr. Fantasy up there on that lead. As I fiddled with gear at the belay, I returned the favor of a too tight belay and heard Erik, shout down, "Don't pull on me!" but, hey, turn about is fair play.

An hour-ish later, he sank it home and had to do the whole take-the-shoes-off, remember that breathing actually is something we need to do and, generally, get his over mached and frazzled brain back in order and underwear clean after he had drilled his first bolt ever on lead. That was entertaining.

This pitch then heads up some nice slab/face climbing, protected by another bolt and really good gear in horizontals, as the face goes vert to the belay ledge. Fun!
Me following 2nd
Me following 2nd
Credit: Erik
Another of the dork.
Another of the dork.
Credit: Erik


From off the ledge on top of pitch two, I went up a right-facing corner. I put a bolt in going to it and one after heading up to what I now believe to actually have been a bolt on Always Arches (recently replaced by Zander and Clint Cummins). I clipped it and climbed up and out left on very R with very abusive fall-potential terrain. This finally led to a loose flake with bad pro. Then, on to a flake with no pro, but signs of a previous blade. I didn't put a bolt in because I knew I was on something that previously had been climbed. If this had been virgin terrain, I would have put in that initial bolt of Always Arches and then two more! Tom Higgins and Bob Kamps had established that line in '67. Crazy to think they climbed that in such a style with the footwear they had back then!

I kept traversing left, by some stacked death blocks, to a right-facing corner and then cut all the way back over right to our line. This was not going to be acceptable as a pitch on our route, with the character we had intended.

I spied the black streak right of the first Always Arches bolt. The black streak ended up being vertical 5.11 edging. We put that pitch up on lead a few days after we had sent the whole route with the RRRRR old school pitch that meandered too much to be part of our route in the long run. The 5.11 section was great and it's very well protected (more about that at the end of this TR).
Here's the 5.11 black streak creating a direct line avoiding the wande...
Here's the 5.11 black streak creating a direct line avoiding the wandering death pitch. This is Josie on the second ascent. She replaced our nuts slung over bolts cuz, ughhhhh we forgot the hangers that day. THANKS!
Credit: bob


As time went on and the days passed, we were getting into a pretty nice routine.
Since we didn't ever fix lines and only rapped after a day's work, we had to re-climb to our high point every day. I like to do it that way on Fairview, but damn it adds up physically. I'm pretty sure we allowed a couple of rest days in our schedule.

Mr. Fantasy became much more comfortable placing bolts on lead. He had some great moments in a corner on the third pitch. We call this the "Fantasy Funland Pitch."
Solid stems and awkward stances for bolt placements. He worked all the angles and put them in as solid as can be. This pitch involves awesome stemming to a roof under-cling left. Then up and out a bulge with a leg stretch of a boulder problem. After that, head up easier terrain past a bolt to the anchors.
Blonde Eric coming out of the corner on the Fantasy Funland
Blonde Eric coming out of the corner on the Fantasy Funland
Credit: bob
the boulder problem on the Fantasy Funland
the boulder problem on the Fantasy Funland
Credit: bob


Once at the next anchors, we were looking up at what were to be the "Burning Arches" pitches. These turned out to be real calf-burners waiting for those legs! One can also gaze out right to the oh-so-not-so-well-protected Burning Down the House. I'm pretty sure there's no way to know what it is going to be like up there unless you rap the route, gazing at every inch. Or climb the route, gazing at every inch and foot below you while clenching teeth, butt cheeks, etc.

I have not rapped the route. :)

The fifth pitch held another notable portion which involved me putting seven bolts in on the first "Burning Arches" pitch in one go. A nice 100+-foot 5.10ish calf-burner. I was SMOKED after that effort, but it turned into a pretty darn good face pitch with only a bit of spice. Fairview PG. I have a fine memory of effort on that one.
1st Burning Arches pitch    Josie leading
1st Burning Arches pitch Josie leading
Credit: bob
ditto
ditto
Credit: bob
Mr. Fantasy following 1st Burning Arches pitch.
Mr. Fantasy following 1st Burning Arches pitch.
Credit: bob


Once we started the sixth pitch, aka the second Burning Arches pitch, it ended up taking a couple of days. This one is quite a bit harder than the first and the drilling stances way more thin. On the first day, when we were done, instead of rapping the whole route, we traversed left from the belay with a little down climbing to meet up with the original exit of Always Arches, which consisted of two rambling pitches through corners and some scrambling to meet the east flank of Fairview.

The next day, we parked by Pothole Dome and hiked up above the Razor Back to meet up with the north east ridge of Fairview. It's an easy scramble up and around to the rope up point, which was two pitches of down-climbing and traversing back to the base of the second Burning Arches pitch. Putting up this pitch hurt.

Mr. Fantasy rocked out the first two bolts, thankfully! He'd come a ways at this point and was taking some falls too. Quite the learning curve. I fell a lot, blew hooks that I really didn't end up using much, and sh#t myself regularly, but really it's well protected. It's scary for us, falling with a drill and all that sh#t.

I got so fed up with those thin stances that, after the fifth bolt, I punched it to the roof, put gear in and promptly lowered down to drill a bolt for that stretch. It was a stupid run out for our route because we weren't looking to put up another poorly protected Fairview route. We'd like folks to be up on this, but be warned that this most definitely is not a sport route, by even the longest stretch of the imagination. The next part of this pitch goes through a big roof on great gear to a bolt, then connecting horizontals with bomber pro on a vert wall for the finale. Great stuff, for sure, in my book!

Here's what Mr. Fantasy has to say about this part: "The sixth pitch, as Bob mentioned, was not quite so easy. We had the first bolt or two in and Bob had attempted to drill the next, using hook placements to no avail. He'd place a hook, weight it and -- POW -- the hook would blow. This happened numerous times! We ended up calling it a day. When we returned, Bob offered the lead to me. I was beginning to have doubts that this pitch would even go. Still. I also knew that, if Bob went up and couldn't get the bolt in, there would be no way in hell you would find me out there on the sharp end again. I took the lead and climbed to the spot of many blown hooks, found a desperate stance and began drilling, then whipping. After a couple falls, I managed to get that bolt in and relinquished the lead to Bob. What fun!"

As I said before, quite the learning curve. WAY TO GO, ERIK!
2nd Burning Arches pitch   Blonde Eric on the lead
2nd Burning Arches pitch Blonde Eric on the lead
Credit: bob
the easier roof
the easier roof
Credit: bob
Up in the horizontals on the 2nd Burning Arches pitch
Up in the horizontals on the 2nd Burning Arches pitch
Credit: bob


From the anchor ledge, we headed left out a pitch and then did some scrambling to the northeast ridge of Fairview, over the Razor Back and down behind Marmot Dome, back to the car.

We took a day off and, then, it was time to do the route. Drum rolllllllllllllll

All went smooth as smooth could be up until the sixth pitch. The second Burning Arches pitch. Mr. Fantasy had a monumental effort on lead. He sent the tech slab and edges up through the roof and on past the horizontals that slice the upper headwall to the anchor.
What more can I say. He styled it and I'm pretty sure it's the hardest route he ever had led.
Rad!

Mr. Fantasy's side: "It's great that Bob says all went smoothly for me; however, I remember it being very challenging. We had reached the Burning Arches pitches and Bob led the first BA pitch. As I followed, I was in constant fear of blowing a foot. When I reached the crux of this pitch, I couldn't remember the beta for the life of me. I stepped into the move and slipped, landing back on a tiny ledge, without weighting the rope, thanks to a slack belay from Bob. This happened a few times before I nailed the move. Thank God for tiny ledges. I really wouldn't have wanted to do it over. Finally, we'd reached the belay ledge below the sixth pitch and the culmination of our efforts lay before me. It was do or punt; I knew I didn't have the strength to climb this pitch twice, and hadn't sent cleanly when we had been here drilling bolts, so the pressure was really on. We took a few minutes' rest to gain composure and then I took off. I remember climbing to the "spot of many blown hooks" and feeling scared (I can be a pussy on lead sometimes). I had to reassure myself I could do the climbing; after all, I had been here before when there weren't bolts and been OK. I shut off the outside world and just climbed. I dialed every foot, and tentatively inched upwards. Seeing a shiny bolt within reach, I pulled up the rope, but I was too early and the clip was just out of reach. 'Oh, no,' I thought. 'No, no, no!' Then, as if by some miracle, I grew just enough and made the clip before continuing on. Above the roof, there are three mantle boulder problems and each one was a monumental achievement for me, knowing, if I blew a single move, I'd be forced to re-climb the pitch, which wasn't an option in my mind. I finally made it cleanly. This lead of mine, however, may be a record for slowest time ever to lead a single pitch of rock."

On the other hand, I (Bob) had to pay the piper. Up the pitch I went and, a ways up, I fell, then giggled, which meant, "How on earth could that happen?" I lowered, started up again and fell, again. Repeat; repeat again, without the giggle

I couldn't believe this was happening on a 5.11 pitch that I had wired. I put most of the frikken bolts in for crying out loud! What was happening? My ego cried and cried. I relaxed on the ledge and thought about why this was happening. I spied the bottoms of my shoes. The area on my right shoe which I smear with had a skin of rubber on it. Nothing. Uh huh! A combination of my head and footwear had put me in a spot. I composed myself and chucked my ego off the cliff. (Yeah, right!) Using some different parts of my shoe, I was able to squeak by.

In the end, that was a great experience for me to be challenged like that. I need that stuff. Not always, but I need it sometimes, for sure. I'm sure Mr. Fantasy didn't mind seeing me, following him, flail on that pitch after he had just styled it as one of the most difficult and best leads of his life! :0

On this day, we went right from the anchors, to join up with Lyme Line and Burning Down the House, to reach the top. These pitches were 5.8 airy traverse and a 5.7 straight to the summit, more or less.

What a day! What a week or so! Fun Fun and sore-ass bodies from stance/hand drilling.

We did it.
Me and Mr. Fantasy and lots of teeth
Me and Mr. Fantasy and lots of teeth
Credit: bob
Credit: bob


As I said before, we went back a couple days later and put up the direct line, adding the black streak at 5.11 edging as a better third pitch to be more direct and avoid the R and way too wandering Always Arches pitch. The route has been sent in its entirety with that pitch by a person named Thea. No falls to my knowledge. This effectively gives her the first free ascent of the direct line as a whole. THIEF!!! Just kidding!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! We were done. She's a damn good climber and we were handing out topos.

Mr. Fantasy learned a ton from our experience and, nowadays, I believe he likes the first ascent kind of shenanigans. Here are some words from the man himself, Erik Anderson, aka Mr. Fantasy: "This was a fantastic experience with Bob. What a pleasure to get to establish a new line on (in my opinion) one of the most iconic pieces of rock in North America. Drilling bolts on lead is definitely one of the most exciting things a person can do while rock climbing and I have to say, 'I've got the bug!' Also this is quite likely the hardest route I've ever led, but quite do-able and safe; I recommend it to anyone wanting to tick off another Fairview route without wild run-outs!"

We came up with the name "The Arsonist," while kicking around ideas as to why a house would burn down, at some random point part way up the route on the day of the FFA. (minus the direct 3rd) It just seemed to fit, being left of Burning Down the House and all. I said it first, as Erik's lips were about to form the same word; I remember us looking at each other and saying, "That's it!"


Well, thanks for reading, if you made it this far. The pics aren't that great and the writing is writing, but I thought it might be a cool thing for others to see what goes into a route.
Here is a link to mountain project for this route:
http://www.mountainproject.com/v/the-arsonist/107742678

and Captain Fairview: http://www.mountainproject.com/v/captain-fairview/107560149

and Lyme Line Direct: http://www.mountainproject.com/v/lyme-line-direct-var/107560238

Red = Always Arches and its direct ending <br/>
 <br/>
Yellow = The Arsonist 
...
Red = Always Arches and its direct ending

Yellow = The Arsonist

Pink = Burning Down the House

Blue = Captain Fairview

Green = Lyme Line Direct

Orange = Same As It Ever Was aka Arch de Triumphe (sp?)

Purple = Separation Anxiety

Credit: bob

Peace!

Bob Jensen

  Trip Report Views: 5,101
bob
About the Author
bob is a climber from .

Comments
Did you like this Trip Report? Got something to say? Don't hold back...
Comment on this Trip Report
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
  Mar 4, 2013 - 12:51am PT
cool
ruppell

climber
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:04am PT
Bob

Looks sweet. Now about BDtH. lol
bob

climber
Author's Reply  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:05am PT
Yeah and you know if I do it who it will be with. Dude. :)
ruppell

climber
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:08am PT
I'm already getting the slab mojo on. I can't wait for tioga to open.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:24am PT
Great story and photos, Bob!
"The Burning Arches" - great name in there.
Thanks for sharing.
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:31am PT
Right on Bobby J!!! Thanks for the write up!
You're a classic and you're writing follows suit.

Hats off to you, brother, for a fine route and a great experience.

Hope to see you soon- surf or stone, your call.
lucho

Trad climber
California
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:26am PT
Thea is here and says hello Bob, nice looking route!
Fluoride

Trad climber
West Los Angeles, CA/Joshua Tree
  Mar 4, 2013 - 07:37am PT
Steve and I met you guys at the top after you finished this (we'd done the RR). Major congrats. I have a pic of you guys up top that I'll try to find. -- Beth

EDIT: here it is:

The Arsonist FA team up top.
The Arsonist FA team up top.
Credit: Fluoride
RP3

Big Wall climber
Twain Harte
  Mar 4, 2013 - 07:09am PT
Well done! Another fantastic addition to a fantastic dome.
the kid

Trad climber
fayetteville, wv
  Mar 4, 2013 - 08:09am PT
your route looks awesome! congrats..
hossjulia

Trad climber
Carson City, NV
  Mar 4, 2013 - 08:27am PT
Well timed TR. Brought back fond tactile memories of Fairview and warmer days in the sun.

tfpu!
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
  Mar 4, 2013 - 08:29am PT
Very very nice! Congrats on a cool looking route and a great write up!
Makes me want to climb face again.
I like the topo a lot too. All topos should contain art!'
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
  Mar 4, 2013 - 09:21am PT
Sweet, thanks for sharing.
Tad
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
  Mar 4, 2013 - 10:27am PT
Great TR! Thanks for posting.
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Aurora Colorado
  Mar 4, 2013 - 10:44am PT
Great job, and done in a great style too.
Double D

climber
  Mar 4, 2013 - 11:17am PT
Nice job... sweet looking line.
bob

climber
Author's Reply  Mar 4, 2013 - 12:53pm PT
A wee bump.
MisterE

climber
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:06pm PT
Hairball.

:)
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:09pm PT
Great work! Thanks for adding some variety to the TR page, I enjoyed the story!
Tork

climber
Yosemite
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:34pm PT
This route is now at the top of my hit list for this summer.


Stuff like this is the reason I ever started checking out this site, thanks!!!!!!!!!
Erik Anderson

climber
California
  Mar 4, 2013 - 01:40pm PT
Figured I'd chime in here since I'm spoken of so much in the TR. Anyways this was a fantastic experience with Bob. What a pleasure to get to establish a new line on (in my opinion) one of the most iconic pieces of rock in North America. Drilling bolts on lead is definitely one of the most exciting things a person can do rock climbing and I have to say, "I've got the bug!"

A few additions to Bob's TR, Bob put up the fifth pitch in Heroic style drilling all the bolts in a single push! An amazing feat to behold. The sixth pitch like Bob mentioned was not quite so easy. We had the first bolt or two in and Bob had attempted to drill the next. using hook placements to no avail. He'd place a hook weight it and POW the hook would blow. This happened numerous times! We ended up calling it a day. When we returned Bob offered the lead to me. I was beginning to have doubts that this pitch would even go. But also knew that if Bob went up and couldn't get the bolt in, there would be no way in hell you'd find me out there on the sharp end again. So I took the lead and climbed to the spot of many blown hooks, found a desperate stance and began drilling, then whipping. After a couple falls I managed to get that bolt in and relinquished the lead back to Bob, what fun!

Thanks again to Bob for letting me join him on this one. Also this is quite likely the hardest route I've ever lead, but quite do-able and safe I recommend it to anyone wanting to tick off another Fairview route without wild run-outs!
le_bruce

climber
Oakland, CA
  Mar 4, 2013 - 02:24pm PT
Sweet.

Edit: Erik A said:

The sixth pitch like Bob mentioned was not quite so easy. We had the first bolt or two in and Bob had attempted to drill the next. using hook placements to no avail. He'd place a hook weight it and POW the hook would blow. This happened numerous times! We ended up calling it a day. When we returned Bob offered the lead to me. I was beginning to have doubts that this pitch would even go. But also knew that if Bob went up and couldn't get the bolt in, there would be no way in hell you'd find me out there on the sharp end again. So I took the lead and climbed to the spot of many blown hooks, found a desperate stance and began drilling, then whipping. After a couple falls I managed to get that bolt in and relinquished the lead back to Bob, what fun!

Cool to think about that. What a dif between bolting ground up vs coming down from the top. Cheers to you guys.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
  Mar 4, 2013 - 09:27pm PT
Looks killer guys, and sounds doable (maybe) even for a senior citizen like me!

Way to keep the sprit alive - the photos are great and the climbing looks varied, continuous, clean - all good!
Greg Barnes

climber
  Mar 4, 2013 - 09:50pm PT
They're beyond old school, they're hand drilling 3/8" on dicey stances on lead! (or did you finally join the "dark side" Bob?) Even after being offered 1/4" gear...so much easier to drill 1/4" then pull and place a big bolt!
mucci

Trad climber
The pitch of Bagalaar above you
  Mar 4, 2013 - 10:10pm PT
Awesome guys!

I have looked over that stone once, very proud line.

3/8ths on lead keeps you honest...
bob

climber
Author's Reply  Mar 4, 2013 - 11:46pm PT
No 1/4's Greg.

C'mon you get the bit in far enough and you can hang. Why not just get the work done instead of having to come back? :)
Greg Barnes

climber
  Mar 5, 2013 - 12:55am PT
Yeah I used to do 3/8 all the time...then this little thing called tendonitis caught up with me...
S.Leeper

Social climber
somewhere that doesnt have anything over 90'
  Mar 5, 2013 - 01:07am PT
great job guys! entertaining write up too.
QITNL

climber
  Mar 5, 2013 - 03:03am PT
Bitchin!
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
  Mar 5, 2013 - 09:45am PT
How long per bolt, Bob?
I'm hand drilling 3/8 in granite around here but I'm sure that Tuolumne stone takes way longer.
mikeyschaefer

climber
Yosemite
  Mar 5, 2013 - 11:23am PT
Way to go Bobby J!!!

Look rad up there. If I ever make it back to the meadows I'll try and check it out.

And as far as placing 3/8" on lead that is super bad-ass. I don't have the patience for that. One of the benefits of 1/4" split shaft is you can pull them super easy and move the bolt if you need to. I try not to do that often but occasionally I'll straighten things out a bit.
ruppell

climber
  Mar 5, 2013 - 11:58am PT
The best protection rating ever. No shit!

I love hand drawn topos
I love hand drawn topos
Credit: ruppell
bob

climber
Author's Reply  Mar 5, 2013 - 12:40pm PT
Jefe, it can take 10 minutes if the stance is good enough and I'm scared just right.

It can take 45 if the stance isn't good enough and I'm scared just right.

Does falling, gathering your sh#t together and heading back up only to repeat the process count in this time frame? Seems to add length to the process sometimes.....

Greg, I have considered the 1/4's for sure. Its not the replacing of them that's my biggest concern. My biggest concern would be whether I actually would get back up to replace them.
Not to sound big headed, but a lot of us here have clipped, and fell on rusty 1/4's for years before you ASCA folks started doing the whole replacement thingy. THANK YOU by the way.
What I'm saying is a stainless 1/4 inch bolt, to me seems bomber for at least another 20 years. If I clipped and fell on 30 year old rusty crap for years why on earth would I go back and replace a perfectly sound stainless 1/4 incher?

What would people think if 1st ascent parties placed stainless 1/4's for the climbing and 3/8 for the anchors if bolts are needed for them?
If, say , Mikey put up Border Country in that style I would have no less psych to get on the route and face whipping all over the cruxes. I mean, a 1/4 inch stainless? I'll fall all over that thing for years if well placed.

3/8's will last that much longer, I know.

Bob J.

Joe

Social climber
Santa Cruz
  Mar 5, 2013 - 12:46pm PT
proud Bob...great job, nice write up, very inspiring...
RyanD

climber
Squamish
  Mar 5, 2013 - 03:34pm PT
Wow, one of the best reports i've seen. Great adventure, thanks for sharing.
brett

climber
oregon
  Mar 5, 2013 - 03:44pm PT
Your name seems familiar. Did we climb together once in JT circa 1999/2000? You led (onsight?) the 5.12 to the right of Illusion Dweller. Well, someone named Bob did; I think it was you.

nice climbing.
-Brett
Greg Barnes

climber
  Mar 5, 2013 - 03:54pm PT
Hey Bob, they don't make stainless buttonheads, stainless is too soft. Other stainless 1/4" bolts either pull like butter or are too skinny and can snap (like 1/4" stud bolts). Stainless hangers plus carbon steel buttonheads should last a while, but depends on the freeze/thaw cycles.

If you're worried about getting back up there, 3/8" from the get-go is great.

Greg
nutjob

Sport climber
Almost to Hollywood, Baby!
  Mar 5, 2013 - 05:17pm PT
Gnarly. I've never been comfortable falling, and can't seriously consider run-outs with repeated falls while trying to get in a bolt.

Maybe it's one of those contagious things, where it seems more plausible and less stupid if you're with someone else and you convince each other that it's a reasonable thing to do? In any case, y'all are awesome.

Flouride, nice pic! Looks like an instant classic, fits right in as something geezers will be admiring 40 years from now dreaming about the good ol' days.
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Aurora Colorado
  Mar 5, 2013 - 05:20pm PT
Yeah I would have backed off too, lol. I wonder how many new routes are done like this every year, multipitch 5.11 bolted on lead. Maybe one every few years?
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
  Mar 5, 2013 - 06:34pm PT
I wonder how many new routes are done like this every year, multipitch 5.11 bolted on lead. Maybe one every few years?

Mikey put up Border Country (5.12, 11 pitches) in 2009, and Father Time (5.13, 16 pitches) in 2011-12, both drilled on lead. Plus Bob's other routes, just to name a few.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
  Mar 5, 2013 - 06:10pm PT
Saweet JERB DOOODS! Classic chyt!
bob

climber
Author's Reply  Mar 6, 2013 - 12:57am PT
Hey all. Thanks for the kudos. We really had a good time up there. The route is fun and I believe is another good addition to the others I have been a part of there. Captain Fairview and Lyme Line. That side of Fairview is such a different experience than the Southwest side. Good stuff.

Beth, that pic is rad. I don't think I'm as relaxed as I wanted to be because I was consumed with the fact that I wouldn't settle until there was a more direct line for the 3rd pitch. I was thinking, already, about when we were going to establish that. Such is the life of one of those types,,,,,,

Brett, yes that was me! Long time ago eh? Hope you are well. Great day by the way. As I recall we both performed on what we chose to lead. Clean and Jerk was a big one for you as I recall. You were psyched! Great partner. Me = spaz You = mellow. Worked quite well together.

Greg, you are THE bolt man. Damn you know your sh#t. As far as the physical issues from bolting 3/8's I believe you have drilled FAR more than I have or ever will. The Dark Side does keep a constant shadow I must say honestly. I just have to think about it more. .......

Nutjob, we weren't run out when we were falling. No hero sh#t. There were some bolts put in successfully where falling would have sucked a lot more. We were above bolts though. Its that drill and hardware that freaks me out. You know how if the winds etc are just right a pine needle can be driven into a tree? Hurricane style. Takes a lot less for a drill bit to go through pants and leg flesh. Or the privates oh GOD!!!!!!!!!!!! :(
"geezers will appreciate in 40 years." Oh man I'll be 80. You called it with that photo

Don Paul, I believe routes get done like that often. Especially if looking at the US as a whole. Tuolumne asks it of its climbers and many do it that way because the terrain is less than vertical for a big part and the stances are there. Its that steep stuff is when it gets tricky and bolt ladders are less than desirable, but can suffice and bolts can be moved later as Mikey talks about above. Its all good as long as the route is good enough. "good enough" being pretty damn relative though. I don't know.


Peace!
Bob Jensen




bmacd

Trad climber
100% Canadian
  Mar 5, 2013 - 10:11pm PT
So that was what all the racket was going on there in June - Nice work guys, looks like a classic !

Edit: I always thought a holster strapped to your calf or somewhere with the drill would be a safer way to climb with drills.
bob

climber
Author's Reply  Mar 6, 2013 - 12:31am PT
Yeah, a holster would be nice, but the drill can't be in it when you're drilling and that's what I'm scared of.

It was July that we were up there.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
  Mar 5, 2013 - 11:16pm PT
A Very well told TR!!!!
The climb looks fantastic.
Made my hands sweat just looking at the pics.

Are there a bunch of 11 moves on the climb, or is it just a couple places on the 2 pitches, Bob?

Hey Steve L; Do you want to go do that climb with me sometime this year?

Flouride; Make sure Steve sees this.
I'd like to spend bout 3 or 4 days in the Meadows this year in the late Spring, or early Fall.




Great Job on the FA, Bob and ERIK!!!!


Cosmic


donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
  Mar 5, 2013 - 11:21pm PT
Nice job!!! I semi suck at that kind of climbing. My hat is off and i'm waving it big time.
Gal

Trad climber
going big air to fakie
  Mar 5, 2013 - 11:28pm PT
Very cool, excellent write up! Love it out there. Only done RR.
bob

climber
Author's Reply  Mar 6, 2013 - 01:31am PT
Cosmic, the two 11 pitches are fairly sustained for about 4 or 5 bolts each. The first one has a distinct crux and is sustained as well. The second is more or less a lot of little.
Fluoride

Trad climber
West Los Angeles, CA/Joshua Tree
  Mar 6, 2013 - 05:21am PT
Bob - It was a brief meeting but you told us about the route, where it was, etc. Such a proud route. You guys were stoked yet really humble. We'd been hoping to see more info on this route and this TR is well worth the wait.

Congrats again. So well written.
Ezra Ellis

Trad climber
North wet, and Da souf
  Mar 6, 2013 - 06:06pm PT
Hells Yeah!

Great FA and write up!!!!!!
Thanks!!!
NilsDavis

Trad climber
Bishop
  Mar 14, 2013 - 02:38pm PT
Nice work Bob! Mikey and I talked about that exact piece of rock when we were doing Retrospective over between Hemispheres and Plastic Exploding.
I think to this day you are the only ones to have repeated Retrospective.
Super Super cool route Bob and Erik. Great piece of rock and a beautiful line. Nice work.
Mikey, we might have to go check that one eh?
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
  Mar 14, 2013 - 04:26pm PT
Sweet stellar Stupendiosity!!
bob

climber
Author's Reply  Mar 14, 2013 - 09:38pm PT
Yeah Nils there is some good rock up there. The Arsonist isn't like Retrospective in the sense that the climber will never find themselves run out to all hell on a grade one notch down from the crux grade of the route. Retrospective is way more like the older routes on Fairview, and had me thinking! Great route. Its one of my favorites.
We did the second ascent of it when Mikey was guiding right next door on Plastic Exploding. He was psyched! I on-sighted the route, but maybe it doesn't count because I could ask him for info as I went?

HA! Man that crux is thin.

Joe

Social climber
Santa Cruz
  Mar 14, 2013 - 11:06pm PT
it counts...
johnkelley

climber
Anchorage Alaska
  Mar 15, 2013 - 12:28am PT
Nice!
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
  Mar 15, 2013 - 12:32am PT
bob threads rule.
still haven't done any of your routes though brother!
ruppell

climber
  Mar 15, 2013 - 12:43am PT
jefe

That's the thing about Bobs routes. They don't get done as much as they should cause well they're hard. lol Looking forward to the Meadows already.
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
  Mar 15, 2013 - 12:52am PT
i've known bobby J for long enough to know, without knowing....

fukker actually probably owes me a guided ascent of one of these as payback for something heinous he did to me at Streetcar.
Bob...?
ruppell

climber
  Mar 15, 2013 - 12:59am PT
A friend of Bobs for a long time huh?? You must be a pretty good dude. lol If you ever get to the Meadows give me a shout. Bob may or may not vouch for me. lol
Truthdweller

Trad climber
San Diego, CA (stuck in Jersey)
  May 22, 2013 - 11:08am PT
Erik! Wish I was there....too cool.

Erik at one of his gigs on his dobro...


David Wilson

climber
CA
  May 22, 2013 - 02:43pm PT
Bump - I need to keep this up so I remember to read through. Looks awesome Bob !

phylp

Trad climber
Millbrae, CA
  May 17, 2014 - 11:22pm PT
Brilliant! So many gems like this buried in the basement of the Trip reports.
Did you like this Trip Report? Got something to say? Don't hold back...
Comment on this Trip Report
Go