Demon's Delight 5.11a - Anyone Been On It Lately?

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Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 30, 2009 - 07:44pm PT
Demon's Delight is a classic arching route which is located left of the Moratorium on Schultz's Ridge. Ed Barry and Dave Hitchcock 9/78. Nice find!
The last pitch has a very memorable 10d block edge mantle well above a fixed Arrow. Is that section still protected? I would like to get out on that one again sometime but the elevator ride if the pin is missing could be monumental! The rest eats gear if I recall.

From Meyers' guide.

hooblie

climber
Mar 30, 2009 - 08:07pm PT
sorry, can't really say anything current, but recommend the route for sure. a handy little gem. pettigrew and i did the second ascent while ed and hitchy returned to the scene with that pin which i was pleased to clip. we at least shared in the buzz of the fa. my favorite silly position was kneeling on the slope of the little flaring alcove with head tucked under the roof to gather myself for the pullout above it. seemed like something i've seen done in a mosque but snug in a steep little pea pod. i spose you could skip the rest and wonder what the hell i'm talking about.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 30, 2009 - 08:16pm PT
Pedal to the metal underclinging and lots of it. Was that a short or long medium Arrow that went in?
hooblie

climber
Mar 30, 2009 - 08:36pm PT
hey i just clipped it, it was you that reminded me why they were going back to do, maybe a little cleaning too. as in many things from thirty years ago, i stand ready to be corrected on the details beyond lost arrow, and that they knew what it needed. oh ya, and that halloween was at hand, eddie's wicked little giddy snicker. that's what the name means to me.
James

climber
My twin brother's laundry room
Mar 30, 2009 - 08:45pm PT
Funny, I was talking about this route today. I did it a couple years ago and the protection was fine. Some thin nuts make it good to go. I think they call that mantle 11a now- it is a bit fierce. One of the best short routes in the valley. I heard it was a favorite of Yabo's.
hoipolloi

climber
A friends backyard with the neighbors wifi
Mar 30, 2009 - 08:46pm PT
not sure about the arrow, K-man is the guy to ask, he was up on it not so long ago. We wanted to get on it one day, I was to chicken. I want to now though.

I think you pro it with small cams. purple TCU?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 30, 2009 - 08:47pm PT
I was out there recently; like 1981.
Didn't actually do that bloody mantel, or top out even.

Another case of Rudeye McStinkstain getting all Snail Eye on me because he realized we could rappel to the ground from the station before the mantel.

On subsequent routes when he would pull that routine on me, I'd tried everything including flat out tantrums to get him to let me complete the darn route of the day...

Just ask Mimi.
She knows and feels my pain on the matter.
Greg Barnes

climber
Mar 30, 2009 - 08:51pm PT
No pin anymore, my partner who dragged me up it a couple years ago blew a piece falling from the mantle. Luckily I had just extended myself off the anchor and swung out of the way, because he fell right to the belay. I think it was a small cam placed semi-blindly, and I didn't expect it to hold. He then took a lot more time to get a medium size HB offset nut in and that was solid. Funny thing is that we haven't climbed together all that often and the only other time he'd blown pro was with me at the Needles (yep, the 10d corner on Spook Book).

I had horrendous rope drag at the top of the first pitch. The rope was nearly stuck coming around the corner/block thing, and I had to yard really hard to get it to move. There were old fixed slings around a suspicious block at the top of the first pitch.

edit - I belayed too high that pitch (top of the corner), should have belayed near the corner as shown in the topo.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 30, 2009 - 08:55pm PT
It's been twenty five or so for me and I am trying to piece it together again so I don't have to haul a bunch of pins all the way up to pitch four! Nice solid Arrow at the time so it wasn't a thin one which doesn't give you that nice cozy feeling as you wrestle the refrigerator door.

Edit- Glad to hear the pro is there!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 30, 2009 - 10:06pm PT
Mimi is laughing about your story, Tar! That ole sidewinding route does let you off the hook! Better bring the micro-McNuggets and screamers!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2009 - 10:34pm PT
Demonic Bumpature!
Greg Barnes

climber
Apr 3, 2009 - 10:59pm PT
When you rap, don't toss the ropes out into the trees...

Anyway, I noticed that the rap stations were ASCA bolts and we don't list it on our website - anyone know who replaced it?
Brock

Trad climber
RENO, NV
Apr 4, 2009 - 07:24am PT
I do not remember any pin. Nor do I remember any tough mantle. I remember some small nut placements in the last few yards of the route and it being a bit dirty (only the last part of the route). I imaging the route should be dripping wet right now in early Spring. We did this after Moratorium one day and I thought the route was so-so.
Riotch

Trad climber
Kayenta, Arizona
Apr 4, 2009 - 07:39am PT
I know the mantel you are referring to. I took repeated whippers on that move, falling on to a bomber nut.

This is one of the most unique and spectacular routes in the Valley, IMO. Go for it.

The second pitch is freakin' awesome!





Dude, no worries, IF you know how to find and place good pro. Like I said, I took repeated whippers on that mantle on the last pitch. Like 4 or 5. (I know - pretty lame. I'll definitely get on that thing again though)
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2009 - 07:53am PT
No worries, indeed. If the placements are there, I'll be savoring them before the main event! I really like the singular character of this sideways route.
Riotch

Trad climber
Kayenta, Arizona
Apr 4, 2009 - 08:56am PT
On the third pitch the leader has a TR, and the second takes the risk. So make sure the leader places pro leading down and out of the second belay. Not all the belays were fixed when we did it, either.


Yeah, that topo isn't very accurate.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2009 - 10:51am PT
None of the belays except possibly the third had any fixed pro as I recall. Certainly none implied by the topo as a modern route.
hooblie

climber
Apr 4, 2009 - 01:32pm PT
i've got a slide stamped '77 and i know for sure that i was unaware of this route before ed revealed his discovery so i wouldn't have photo'd it till after the ascent. wouldn't mention it but that i know you're a documentarian.

the sidewinder nature, where you never get above the deck more than a ropelength made it a candidate if for instance a mobility limited family member had ever wanted to watch that many pitches of the art demonstrated without fading out of sight. sadly it never happened. within the field of movement, such as dance, gymnastics, martial arts, etc. the concept of a recital or performance is not so unusual. it kind of didn't help bridge any generational gap that my dad declined the invitation, and never did see me, or anyone else move gracefully over stone.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2009 - 04:02pm PT
But son couldn't you climb straight up like the other men! LOL
hooblie

climber
Apr 4, 2009 - 06:36pm PT
so you knew the man? upthread i described the route as a "handy" little gem, thus the expanded version of what for. to misquote red green, "if you can't be vertigenious, at least be handy."

further musings; i have an image of climbers as interpreting choreography which the stone has long been exspressing in a braille like language with all the passive authority due a sustaining gravitational planet. we inherit a profound biomechanical and kinesthetic legacy, a visceral response to risk, a knack for cobbling counter measures, and a shakespearean swirl of incentives to take move this monkey where it will.

basis of this sport is so elemental and minimally contrived. to overlay the envelope of our function upon the gift of mother terrain delights the motor cortex. there is a resonant state that bonds us with our comrades when common dance unfolds. does the stone speak through us? would it have been heard by my old man even from the front row?
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2009 - 06:47pm PT
Everything including the name would have made my dear old dad nervous as hell. But it would be a good show with no binos required.

Underclings are pretty damn dramatic.
Greg Barnes

climber
Apr 4, 2009 - 07:47pm PT
Anchors at end of 3rd (just left of the corner of the flake), and at top. Top might have been to save some bush or tree. You wouldn't have been able to rap from the top to the ground until 60m ropes came along (it's about 190' to the ground), so I assume there must have been a fixed station of some sort at the end of 3 (about 130' from there to the ground).
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 29, 2011 - 09:21pm PT
Diabolical Bump!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 29, 2011 - 09:22pm PT
If I climb it, can I say that the devil made me do it?
cmclean

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Oct 25, 2011 - 11:58pm PT
A really fun route! I did this with my friend Keith on Saturday before the Salathe slideshow. The Reid and Meyers topos are pretty inaccurate. Each pitch is ~90' long and all have decent, small belay stances.

Keith on p2
Keith on p2
Credit: cmclean

Credit: cmclean

Keith heading through the quartz band on p3
Keith heading through the quartz band on p3
Credit: cmclean

p4 with the 5.11a mantle shortly off the belay
p4 with the 5.11a mantle shortly off the belay
Credit: cmclean

I thought the crux was immediately starting the second pitch--very thin hands in the roof with greasy feet. The p4 mantle was definitely interesting as well. It can be protected with a gray alien or similar. A red/yellow offset would probably be placed if it were brought. Doing this climb in the morning and the Moratorium in the afternoon was a great way to maximize the shade.
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Dec 21, 2012 - 03:48pm PT
I don't remember any real stance for the first belay.

P4 was a lot of fun the last time I did it. I was talking to somebody who was complaining about the lack of pro before the mantel, and I thought Heck, last time I did it, David had no troubles there...

This time, I led up and placed a purple TCU, sticking out straight sideways. My only piece between the belay and the mantel.

I cranked up on the mantel, then moved back down. Dang that thing is fairly awkward. I moved up again and found an undercling that helped me--I had it in the bag. Until I tried to stand and found I was stepping on the rope. My balance was just precarious enough that it sent me flying, backwards and upside down.

Ha! that dang purple held. Bent the holy ghost out of it though. Now it's a souvenir.

An excellent climb, well deserving of the 3*s. I never found the 3rd to be .11 though.
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