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Messages 1 - 34 of total 34 in this topic
WBraun

climber
May 2, 2005 - 09:40pm PT
Oh I have to say .........so sorry all mushrooms no good. They grow in dark dank places, bad karma. Big ugly mold.
waterchossguy

Trad climber
brk
May 2, 2005 - 09:41pm PT
Top mushroom could be Amanita magniverrucata


"edibility :unknown -do not experiment !it belongs to the lepidellas a sub group of AMANITA that contain both poisonous and harmless species"

2nd mushroom looks to be either on older dried up version of the above or an Amanita sp. which again is one you do not want to experament with ..as u might or might not know Death Caps mushrooms (amanita phalloides) are also in the same family and are considered very deadly.


could you please take some photos of the underside of the bottom mushroom and if you would could you slice it open in the center and take a photo and post it ,i will do my best to tell you what that one is ..oh yeah please take photos of the underside of the first two so i can make sure i have the right identification ..thanks..

bob

Okay i might be wrong about the top one ..You need to post a photo of the underside . It could be a calvatia sculpta (the sierran puffball)which are edible when they are immature ,

Blinny

Trad climber
NorthWestMontana
May 2, 2005 - 10:50pm PT
Eric,

The Miwok in Yosemite Valley had a tried and true method of telling whether a mushroom was edible or not; if it was "hollum malla mazhoy" or "maggoty and full of worms" it was safe to eat! They figured if the maggots and worms could handle eating the 'shroom, it probably wouldn't kill a human being.

My apologies to the Miwok for completely bastardizing the spelling of that statement.

I credit the great Mather District Naturalist, Bob Roney, for that tasty morsel of Miwok/mushroom history. He was my mentor when I was an Interpreter in the Valley, back in the day.

Kath
MissesBlinny
http://blanchardguitars.com/

P.S. I will add, that my all time favorite college prof insisted that the ONLY mushroom he'd eat would have to come from SAFEWAY! And he was a brilliant botanist!
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Oakville, Ontario, Canada, eh?
May 2, 2005 - 10:58pm PT
I remember reading in 2003 or so about this wild mushroom expert from Michigan who ate a new delicacy, and ended up dead. He thought he was sure....

Perhaps you should feed one to your climbing partner first. [Oh right, you're a soloist] Sorry.

Why not soak it in Olde E.? That might kill anything nasty.....
addiroid

Big Wall climber
Long Beach, CA
May 2, 2005 - 11:25pm PT
Funny a drug post would appear on a climbing forum...

So I was playing Scattegories with some friends of mine. You have to name 10 things under the category listed. So she goes, "Paul, you're a climber, you should get this!!" The category was "Illegal Drugs" GO!! Ok, so I got all 10 and even got all of the ones in parentheses that are alternate names for the ones listed (about 14 total). This was about all in 15 seconds without really even pausing to think about it.

And to think that I have never done ANY drugs and still got this right!!

Shack

Trad climber
So. Cal.
May 2, 2005 - 11:39pm PT
I like the ruler in the photo.
Makes em more like crime scene photos.

They don't look like any "good" ones I've ever had.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
May 2, 2005 - 11:42pm PT
I remember when I first moved here my thesis advisor's wife was doing a rotation in the UCSF organ transplant ward during her internship. FWIW, she was really busy during that rotation b/c it was poison mushroom season in Marin. Eat them, and your only hope is a liver transpant asap. They tended to do a few emergency liver transplant for this reason each year. I guess you have dibs on Tuolumne*rainbow's, so you should time your mushroom feast to coincide with her ascent of the Punch Bowl.
zardoz

Trad climber
Wheat Ridge
May 2, 2005 - 11:50pm PT
Mushroom hunting is a very popular pastime in the Czech Republic, so my wife enlisted me in a romp or two. It's great fun. We seek the many varieties of the boletus species. Here is a coveted one with the red head:



These mushrooms tend to grow in the midst of aspen groves. You can find them in Colorado in the late summer. The gills are spongey and yellow, rather than ribbed. We still have a huge jar of dried ones we collected last summer. Damn tastey. These mushrooms get pretty big, too. Look at this specimin!


TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 07:00am PT
Seek out a mycological organization near you. They can teach you enough to be safe. There are also some standard books available on amazon (example Mushrooms Demystified, ... by David Arora), but it would still be advisable to find an organization to help you get started. Reading this will probably get you to seek out some live experts.

Avoid advice like some of what you see above. For example, boletes do not have gills, they have pores. I have not seen or heard advice about maggots or worms before. Certainly there are edible species that "worms", insects, or slugs will be eating.
Laetiporus sulfureus (chicken mushroom) seems almost always to have other critters dining before you do. But I would be very wary of the converse of that statement. Omphalotus illudens (Jack O'Lantern mushroom) might look similar to the Laetiporus to an untrained eye and is deadly poisonous. The two are very easy to distinguish.

Most mushrooms should not be eaten uncooked. I have heard an expert say that none should be eaten raw. Some do not mix with alcohol.

The best rule is "Do not eat a mushroom unless you can identify it." You might miss a few edible ones, or ones in which edibility is unknown. But you really do not want to roll the dice (probability mentioned in earlier post) on edibility. There are some which will only cause mild to severe gastric distress. Others for which that may appear to be a temporary symptom, prior to liver failure.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
May 3, 2005 - 10:32am PT
best rule is "Do not eat a mushroom unless you can identify it."
it sounds like a special case rule that I had when eating in diners around Brookhaven National Laboratory taking shifts on experiments: don't eat anything you cann't positively identify... generally sound advice.
Jonny D

Social climber
Lost Angelez, Kalifornia
May 3, 2005 - 12:23pm PT
Hey Zardoz,

Those photos are making me drool... nice specimens of Boletus (aka Porcinis, aka Ceps). On a good year I use to pick'em up by the bucket loads in Santa Fe when I use to live there. Coming from a country of shroom pickers, I get the jones when the late summer rains hits in the mountains.
dirtbag

climber
May 3, 2005 - 12:43pm PT
There are old mushroom pickers, and there are careless mushroom pickers, but there is no such thing as an old careless mushroom picker.
dmitry

Trad climber
Chita, Russia
May 3, 2005 - 01:03pm PT
hey, klaus

I ate a lot of wild mushrooms growing up in Siberia.
None of the mushrooms that you found look edible.

In the US, I've found only a couple of varieties identical to the ones I'm accustomed to. I'm still alive.

dmitry
TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 01:07pm PT
Picking is perfectly safe. But you probably know that. You can smell and probably even taste (spit afterward) (Not recommending tasting here. And not mycologist myself). Ingesting is what can be dangerous.
waterchossguy

Trad climber
brk
May 3, 2005 - 01:16pm PT
hey dmitry,

The top shroom could be edible, its most likley is a calvatia sculpta (the sierran puffball)
http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Calvatia_sculpta.html

I wouldnt eat it unless i could look at it up close cut it open smell it identify the location where it was found and compare it with the info in the bible of mushroom books
dmitry

Trad climber
Chita, Russia
May 3, 2005 - 02:39pm PT
that's cool; i just know that i am alive for the lack of experimenting: i only eat those mushrooms i know from my childhood days (based indeed on the smell, the way the skin peels off from the top, the underside appearance etc.)
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
May 3, 2005 - 03:11pm PT
LOL...I'm pretty handy in the lab, and I know that I screw up a fair number of my experiments and don't always realize it until later. I always wondered why more people didn't drop dead from botched homemade drugs.

The same boss that had the wife working in liver transplant had a classmate get booted from his grad program for making acid. This guy would only sell to other chemists and he would provide his raw QC data with his product.

T*R...not wishing you any bad luck. Sorry for the gallows humor regarding klaus having two reasons to need a new liver in the same day.
TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 03:22pm PT
"I always wondered why more people didn't drop dead from botched homemade drugs. ..."

Maybe they do. But the manufacturers probably do not see the need to report this to the FDA. They might make them take their products off the market. That kills income, ask Merck. :-)

I guess if there were any "magic berries", we might have a parallel thread on eating wild berries. Oops, is that another liver opening?
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
May 3, 2005 - 03:31pm PT
"I always wondered why more people didn't drop dead from botched homemade drugs. ..."

Maybe they do. But the manufacturers probably do not see the need to report this to the FDA. They might make them take their products off the market. That kills income, ask Merck. :-)



Let me rephrase then..."I wonder why I've never known anyone who dropped dead from botched homemade drugs."
TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 03:58pm PT
Melissa, now I am wondering if you think the sample of people you know is a population particularly likely to have had that problem. Nice on the QC data though. Maybe that is the factor. Population with tendency but knowledgable.
dmitry

Trad climber
Chita, Russia
May 3, 2005 - 04:00pm PT
Well, in my innocence, i considered this thread to be non drug related.

My comments thus related only to eating wild mushrooms for the sake of nutritional enjoyment.

They are very good; far better than any store variety.
David Nelson

climber
San Francisco
May 3, 2005 - 04:08pm PT
I collected some Amanitas this year, several specimens were destroyed prior to full drying by what appeared to be fly larvae (maggots). They may not have been poisonous Amanitas, but they definitely had the veil and volva characteristic of the genus. I would not recommend relying on the fact that they don't kill larvae.

As for collecting mushrooms that are similar to ones that you have eaten in other localities, the most common reason for an Amanita death is that the collector knew from experience what was safe in another country (often from Asia) and thought that the knowledge could be applied here. The mushroom books are very clear on this: poisonous US mushrooms look very much like edible ones from other countries.

Give the cost of mushrooms at the store, and given the cost of eating the wrong one from the field, I do not eat what I collect, I only admire. If you are not an expert, eating anything is essentially being "off belay", and even "experts" are "off belay" fatally at times. We had a local expert (professor of mycology) here in Marin, California, get very sick (luckily did not die). Caution, caution, caution.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
May 3, 2005 - 04:09pm PT
Dmitry: My comments didn't concern why one was eating the mushroom...just what often happens when the picker's mushroom identifying skills aren't honed.

TradlsGood: I don't think I know any more party people who have enjoyed a wide variety of synthetic fun than any other person who went to school in SF whilst raves were all the rage. Sure, lots of them were chemists and whatnot, but the stuff that the were taking came from who-knows-where. The QC data was a friend-of-a-friend story. That guy was probably out of business before I finished junior high. Never been my cuppa tea for the very reason that I said above.
dmitry

Trad climber
Chita, Russia
May 3, 2005 - 04:14pm PT
Thanks for the warning, David.
I am sure that it's warranted and well meant.
D
maculated

Trad climber
San Luis Obispo, CA
May 3, 2005 - 04:36pm PT
Ahh, this reminds me of a night I spent at the SAR camp in Tuolumne. Stories about random mushrooms consumed and blacking out on the shores of Tioga Lake.

Or maybe the time a couple ate random mushrooms and all of us could see them starting to lose it.

Oh yes . . .
David Nelson

climber
San Francisco
May 3, 2005 - 06:40pm PT
As long as we are talking poisonous mushrooms, it is fun to ponder why they are so poisonous.

Remember, mushrooms are fungi. This kingdom is mostly composed of multicellular organisms (the yeasts are the unicellular fungi) whose bodies are comprised of linear chains of cells, rather like a train. The mushroom is the fruiting body, ie, the reproductive structure, but represents a very small fraction of the total of the body of the mushroom. Fungi are rather fragile, can't bite or run away, and so have developed a variety of mechanisms to ward off competitors, usually soil bacteria. The most famous mechanism is the secretion of molecules that kill the competing bacteria, and the most famous of these molecules is called penicillin. Common bread mold is penicillium, and the Scotsman Alexander Fleming, upon returning to London from a vacation in Scotland, noted some of his bacterial colonies were destroyed by fungi. Luckily for us, before he tossed them, he realized that the fungi had killed the surrounding bacteria.

The Amanitas kill us for probably the same reason as the penicillium helps us: chemical warfare in the world of fungi. Ain't life grand?
waterchossguy

Trad climber
brk
May 3, 2005 - 08:29pm PT
Remember though ,not all Amanita's kill. Many in that species are safe to eat and easy to identify . Its up to the person who's interested in mushrooms to take the time and learn how to identify them properly.

I've had alot of luck being in Oakland and finding lots of edible mushrooms in and around the tilden park area . So far i only eat the mushrooms that feel i have 100 percent identified and so far im still alive. King Boletes, Queen (white king) boletes, and lots and lots of Chanterelle's (cantharellus cibarius). There are so many places to find Chanterelle's in tilden after the first big rains of the season ..Yummy . i havent found any Morels yet ive looked and looked ..i think there going to be popping in the mountains this year though .
Especially in areas that have had recent forest fires .Maybe sugarloaf area ? Im rambeling ...


bob
zardoz

Trad climber
Wheat Ridge
May 3, 2005 - 09:43pm PT
TradIsGood remarked, "Avoid advice like some of what you see above. For example, boletes do not have gills, they have pores."

So the structure that functions as the gills on other mushrooms on the boletus is called the pores. It is in the same location, so I hardly think this would confuse anyone. Your gripe is purely academic. Like I said, this structure is yellow and spongey.

Now there is just something not wholsome about this man posing like that.

TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 11:47pm PT
zardoz, meant no offense. Those are clearly boletes. But who knows knowledge level of Klaus. And I suspected that insects could eat 'shrooms poisonous to humans, would have been surprised if it weren't true, but could not point to an example from my limited knowledge. Further, like someone else posted, what looks like a species in one area could have subtle differences in another. Do not have to change continents to get that differentiation.

Melissa, do not know you, but you put up funny posts. Sometimes my humor is too subtle (or not funny, or whatever). No aspersions intended, just lame humor. And what you did or didn't do at parties isn't any of my business. But I am not donating my liver. It is too old for anyone to want anyhow.

Klaus, you could probably learn how to grow Oyster mushrooms or Shiitakes on the internet. Hundreds of sources out there. Well actually you could learn on the internet how to grow them at home. Keep the oysters outside though. You don't want them growing on your framing.
zardoz

Trad climber
Wheat Ridge
May 4, 2005 - 04:06am PT
I'm with you on the general caution one should take in hunting mushrooms. I let my wife do the determinations, as she has done this her whole life. I don't intend to become an enthusiast myself. I did have a mushroom book at one time with nice color plates to show you each species. One day two guys I knew showed up at my house and pretty much jokingly demanded the book, as they were off on a hunt themselves in a field of cow manure. I glumly handed the book over, not wanting them to pick the wrong ones.
LEB

climber
Glen Gardner
Nov 6, 2005 - 10:27am PT
This thread was active at a time when I did not know much about the forum (don't remember when I joined). In any event I am PASSIONATE about hiking to and photographing wild mushrooms and it seems a few others are as well. Accordingly, could we please reactive this thread and post a few more mushroom photos. I absolutely LOVE the one ones which went up so far. Any mushroom commentaries would be welcome, as well.

I call it going out "shrooming" and I call the mushrooms, themselves, "shrooms" It is so exciting to find a new and unique one esp if it is very showy and/or pretty. I'll hunt up a few of my better "shroom shots" but meanwhile if folks have more mushroom photos could they please go up here. It is so great seeing what folks have found. I'd also like to start a wildflower, cactus and herptile photo thread for said photos as well but I don't know how much interest there is. Some of you guys (like Karl, for instance but there are MANY others) are great photographers. For now how about posting a few more of your better "shroom shots."

Lois
kimgraves

Trad climber
Brooklyn, NY
Nov 6, 2005 - 11:12am PT
My understanding is that the only positive way to identify mushrooms is to knock their spores out and compare them under a magnifying glass. Identifying them by eye is not reliable. And the potential consequences are remarkable: serious to mortal liver damage in a matter of hours after ingestion.

I love to eat wild mushrooms. Top chefs say there are only five-six really good ones: morels, chanterelles, truffles, cepes, porcini, shiitakes. I've had some of the others (hen-of-the-woods, oyster, black cap, puff balls, etc.) and find them of lesser culinary interest. Luckily, all of the above are easily available commercially. At this point I would never eat a mushroom I found. It's just not worth the risk. Still it's always been something I wanted to learn about. There is a guy in the farmers market who has baskets of beautiful wild mushrooms he's gathered off his land. Some sell for $25 per 1/2 pound!!!! We bought some once on a lark. They weren't very interesting.

Best, Kim
LEB

climber
Glen Gardner
Nov 6, 2005 - 11:27am PT
Kimgraves,

I agree. I purchased several books on the subject and I was amazed at how complex the whole thing is. Spores apparently are the key. My interest was not so much in the eating of them (I would like to keep my liver and kidney intact to the degree possible) but rather to identify them and "collect" them in the form of photographs. I was TOTALLY overwhelmed by the vast numbers of species shown in the book and it was not even complete! Sort of gave up on that task but still love to go out and photograph then go back to compare what I got in the book.

What I would LOVE to do is grow those "mushroom" logs e.g. the shitake logs. I downloaded some info on the internet as to how to do it and it seems pretty straight forward. I happen to have the perfect logs, as well since we had to take down a very large tree years ago and the logs are very well rotted by now. I hated taking it down because it was several hundred years old but it was dying and the first two (3 limb trunk) took out the roof and the dog run/shed respectively. The third was dangling precariously over the area where we park our vehicles and three or four pancaked autos would just not do us any good. With much regret, it went - now the area is a flower garden.

Lois
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Nov 6, 2005 - 04:31pm PT
Every year here in mushy Oregon we end up shipping a half dozen folks off at a time to other states in the hope of an emergency transplant which I believe most don't get. They are usually immigrants from Asia or Eastern Europe whose families said the mushrooms were a dead ringer for the ones they ate at home, but weren't once they all sat down to dinner. The doppelgangers were instead poisonous and quickly destroyed their livers. Caveat Fungi...
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