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S.Leeper

Sport climber
Austin, Texas
Topic Author's Original Post - Oct 21, 2008 - 12:01am PT
What is your favorite method for brewing coffee and why? I'm using a cheap drip coffee maker now but I'm thinking of turning into a coffee snob.
east side underground

Trad climber
crowley ca
Oct 21, 2008 - 12:07am PT
I've got this cool plastic french press for the backcountry,eliminates the paper filters and bulky melita filter I used to carry and works as cup and bowl.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Austin, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 21, 2008 - 05:53pm PT
How does the taste of french press compare to other brewing methods. What are opinions of stove top espresso makers?
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Oct 21, 2008 - 05:59pm PT
When I'm in the backcountry or on a wall, I just filter it through a sock. It cleans the sock, and adds body to the coffee.

This method usually works best with prospectors' coffee.
ryanb

climber
Seattle, WA
Oct 21, 2008 - 06:01pm PT
French press coffee with some good cream or whole milk is tasty. Stove top espresso makers are OK but the french press is as good or better and much easier to clean up after.

A buddy has this system and it might make a good cup in the backcountry:
http://www.aerobie.com/Products/aeropress.htm

I use a jetboil french press attachment personally.
dsqrd

climber
Oct 21, 2008 - 06:01pm PT
I've been using a stovetop espresso maker since I broke my french-press, the stovetop makes a rich cup, but you have to watch it closely to not boil it after. Outside I'm a fan of the single cup drip method since there's less to carry, but it's kind of a pain.
Strider

Trad climber
one of god's mountain temples....
Oct 21, 2008 - 07:23pm PT
French Press - tends to have more body and flavor than other brewing methods. Also tends to have more bitterness and acidity since there is no filtering medium. The grind of the beans is most important with a french press. Grind it too big and you won't get all the flavor, grind it too small and it will steep for too long and you will have a very bitter and strong coffee. Using a drip grind for a french press will give you some of the worst coffee you have ever had. I suspect that most people who try french press and don't like it probably didn't have the grind and time in the proper ratios. For a full flavored brew, french press is the way to go. This is the second hardest method.

Drip - Drip method tends to have less bitterness and acidity but also less flavor. The easiest of methods, it is kinda hard to screw up if you know a little of what your doing. The grind does not have to be as precise as with a french press and given the automatic coffee makers today are cheap and plentiful, this is the easiest way to a cup o joe. If you prefer milder tasting coffee, this is the way to go.

Hybrid drip - Chemex - This is my method when I am at home. Here is a link: http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/ The Chemex method uses a drip filter cone but you only drip about half the amount of water through the filter. The rest of the water you pour directly into the brewed coffee. With the proper grind, the coffee will come out of the filter stronger than normal drip coffee and since you don't over-brew the coffee you lose all excessive acidity and bitterness. In my opinion, the best method hands down.

Stove-top espresso - This method will generally give you 1.5-3oz. of espresso depending on the maker. To make "coffee" you need to add hot water to the espresso giving you an Americano. This method also requires a perfect grind to ensure no bitterness and you also need a perfect tamp on the grinds so you get the perfect creme and creme is the holy grail of espresso. Without the creme you will have a VERY bitter and acidic brew. If you know what your doing this method will give you an excellent STRONG cup of joe. But you need to practice, this is the hardest method. From when the espresso first starts to come out and until it is finished, the total elapsed time should be around 18 seconds (for 1.5 oz). Faster and you will have a watery brew, slower and it will be VERY bitter. Creme is the light brown foam that comes at the end of the brew cycle. If you don't have it or if your brew time is not around 18 seconds then you need to adjust your tamp and grind to the proper ratio. smaller grind/harder tamp = longer brew cycle and vice versa. A shot os espresso will last 10-20 seconds in the open air before it starts to lose it creme and full flavor. Either add hot water, hot milk or drink ASAP.

Other notes - The "official" measurement is 2 tablespoon of ground coffee per 8 oz. of water. Using different grinds (drip, french press, espresso, etc..) gives you different amounts in a tablespoon so you need to fiddle around for the perfect amount. A lot of this is to personal taste.
You should also never actually boil your water, you want it just a few degrees from boiling (at sea level). This will prevent your coffee from having a burnt or smokey taste.
Clean, pure water is the second most important element to great coffee. Always fill from the cold water tap (the hot water tap has built up minerals and sediment) and also clean your teakettle regularly.
The most important element is the coffee itself. Fresh beans are the best. You can freeze an UN-OPENED bag of coffee but once you open the bag, do not place it in the freezer. Keep it at room temperature in a AIRTIGHT container. For best results, grind your beans as you use them. This will ensure the freshest, best tasting cup you can have.

i think that about covers it....

-n



JesseM

Social climber
Yosemite
Oct 21, 2008 - 07:29pm PT
I thought this would be a thread on how I missed the Camp 4 coffee this week!

BTW, I think the best way to brew coffee is in a giant percolator and then to bring it to climbers at Camp 4!

Actually, check out the cold brew method Toddy has. Very smooth, with all the full body taste of a good brew, and none of the acidity. Plus you still get all of the caffeine.

Jesse-
Yosemite Climbing Ranger
scuffy b

climber
On the dock in the dark
Oct 21, 2008 - 07:36pm PT
If you go to Peet's and get a cup, it's drip.
Seems to have flavor, too.
Low maintenance with a cone.
Strider

Trad climber
one of god's mountain temples....
Oct 21, 2008 - 07:36pm PT
Since Jesse brought it up...

Cold brew coffee - This method requires prior preparation but can give you an excellent brew. Essentially you will use cold water, coffee grounds and a large vessel with a very small drip hole. This is left overnight and the coffee will slowly drip out of the vessel in a concentrated form. Then all you do is add hot or cold water for your cup of joe. Very little bitterness and acidity with full flavor are the benefits. Extra long prep time is the main drawback.

turkish coffee - similar to cowboy coffee, this method uses an espresso (actually finer) grind and you boil the grinds with the water and pour the whole mix in a cup. It is generally pre-sweetened while it is being made and when you drink it you need to let the dregs settle first. This method will give you a very full flavor but it will be bitter and it will taste VERY strong. This is more of an acquired taste.

-n
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Oct 21, 2008 - 07:53pm PT
very informative

gracias


still don't mean I won't leave my ground beans in a plastic box in an not very airtight container using whatever possible means (typically in the past a lexan french press, now using glass and stainless) I can find to make any kind of coffee, short of killing a person for their mug.



oh, and i like a bit of sugar to level off the bitterness since I boil my water all the way baby!!!


S.Leeper

Sport climber
Austin, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 21, 2008 - 07:56pm PT
Great info! How often do you buy your beans?
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Austin, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 21, 2008 - 07:59pm PT
Also what grinders do you recommend?
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Oct 21, 2008 - 08:06pm PT
http://www.makegoodcoffee.com/

http://www.bestcoffeenews.com/

And there are zillions others - google "make good coffee". I wouldn't be surprised if there are forums where people talk about buying and making coffee, too, plus maybe a little politics.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Austin, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 21, 2008 - 08:07pm PT
Yeah I checked out some of the coffee forums , but I trust climbers more than anyone else..
Trippel40

Social climber
CO
Oct 21, 2008 - 08:15pm PT
If you use a coffee press, Ive fount that a piece of closed cell foam taped around it helps keep it warm longer.
Mtnmun

Trad climber
Top of the Mountain Mun
Oct 21, 2008 - 08:15pm PT
Peet's, fresh ground, in a cone dripper. I make it thick and rich. The first cup in the morning is black. If I have a second cup I add cream.

Gooooooood shweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Oct 22, 2008 - 01:05am PT
hey there s.leeper... say, i LIKE that...

your quote:
"but i trust climbers more than anyone else"


... say, my mom taught us the ol' drip coffee, into a glass ceramic type pot..

but through the years we DO meet up with many a "coffee ways"... i like nearly all ways... but---NOT on the weak side, ever...


not sure, yet, if i have a fave...

thanks for the share all...
officerugg

Social climber
maine
Oct 22, 2008 - 01:17am PT
you're all too good for folgers crystals?
drljefe

climber
Calizona
Oct 22, 2008 - 02:40am PT
LA LLAVE. CONE. CREAM.
Preferrably as part of the "hippy speedball"
davidji

Social climber
CA
Oct 22, 2008 - 03:11am PT
Strider wrote:
"turkish coffee - similar to cowboy coffee,"

Definitely one of my favorite coffees. Well that and this...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-DT_zdj4vg
Nohea

Trad climber
Aiea,Hi
Oct 22, 2008 - 03:16am PT


This champ works great in my home and at work. I use a snow peak press when on the trail.

Hey if anyone in the Tacostand was to buy the $200 Kuerig for $100 let me know. They gave me a save $100 note but I am not sure if I can transfer. Email and we can try.

Aloha,
wil
Strider

Trad climber
one of god's mountain temples....
Oct 22, 2008 - 03:36am PT
Don't get me wrong...I will drink any of coffee, no matter how it is made. Especially if I am not the one making it; never look a gift horse in the mouth! But if you go by the rules you can get so much more out of your coffee!

For example. Peet's makes a blend called Major Dickenson's. Probably my favorite blend so far. When I use my large french press, a 8-9 second grind and 6 tablespoons of coffee, I can make it taste almost like chocolate. Amazing? No, not at all, but it makes for a great cup of coffee. And once you know how, it is easy to make your coffee taste good.

Trippel has a great idea of wrapping a french press in foam. I hadn't thought of that and would be great when I am camping. But also remember that the longer you leave coffee in a press, the more bitter and acidic it becomes.

How often to buy beans? When you use up the last of your current batch.

Oh, and if you put cream and/or sugar in your cup, then forget 90% of what I said. Cream and sugar negate the bitterness and acidity of over-brewed coffee. You can actually save a little money if you like to use cream and sugar. Try making your coffee any way you normally would but just make the grind of your beans a little finer and use less. You should be able to get the same strength and volume of coffee and use less beans at the same time. The coffee will be more bitter but you are covering that up with cream and sugar anyway. Might be to your taste or it might not, just a way to stretch your supply if your running low.

happy drinking
-n
climbrunride

Trad climber
Durango, CO
Oct 22, 2008 - 04:17am PT
Generally, the longer the water contact time, the coarser the grind should be, and vice versa. It has to do with surface area, and the water pulling out the good parts only. Leave it in contact for too long and you get past the best parts and start getting the nasty, bitter aspects. So for a French press, use a coarse grind and leave it in for several minutes. For a Melita-type drip, use a medium grind. And for espresso, use a very fine grind, as the steam passes through the grinds quickly.

And avoid percolators if you can, even if they do look neato. They just keep recycling the water/coffee and leach out everything from the grounds, including all the stuff you don't want.

If you are eally adventerous, try roasting you own beans. There are lots of places on the internet to find green beans. My favorite is Sweet Marias. You can buy a home roaster for about $80, up to many hundreds of dollars. But you can also do a somewhat decent job with a popcorn popper. That way you get to control the roast and find out just the way you like it. Most commercial roasts are done too dark and you lose the subtle, complex flavors found in the finer beans.

And as for brewing methods, my favorites are a French press or a Melita cone filter. Both work great for camping and make a great cup.
adatesman

Trad climber
philadelphia, pa
Oct 22, 2008 - 10:13am PT
Spot on with the home roasting thing, Climbrunride. I've been doing it a couple years and there's no comparison. I've found the Sweet Maria's quite helpful, with good selection and good prices. I started out with the DIY hot air popcorn thing, but after burning out 6 of them (overuse) I gave up and bought a proper roaster. Much less work that way.

And you're right about overroasting too.... Starbucks is way overroasted and tastes like charcoal.

As for method of making the coffee, my preference is for French Press although I've been very tempted by the Chemex brewers. Vacuum brewers look pretty neat too.

But depending on my mood though, I'll occasionally do Vietnamese or Indian coffee, which use a small drip contraption that sits on top of the cup and is filled with an ungodly amount of grounds. Both use twice the amount of grounds or so and usually have sweetened condensed milk. Indian usually gets spices added as well (cardemom is my favorite).

Anyway, I'm thinking its coffee-time.
Tork

climber
Yosemite
Oct 22, 2008 - 10:40am PT
Thumbs up on the home roaster, best coffee I have ever had. It's kinda cool to roast your own and the variety is endless. It does take a bit of prep and our roaster is a pain in the ass cause we have to do it outside or we smoke up the house.

Jeff
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Oct 22, 2008 - 10:50am PT
French press is caesome. Lot's of body, acidity.
No need to doctor it with milk or sugar. MMMMMMMM GOOOD.
And then I put the grounds into my compost pile.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Austin, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 8, 2009 - 10:38pm PT
Can anyone recommend an espresso machine for under 200$?
Fletcher

Trad climber
a buttery white sand beach
Jul 26, 2009 - 03:15am PT
How did I miss a coffee thread?
Fletcher

Trad climber
a buttery white sand beach... I wish!
Jul 26, 2009 - 03:22am PT
Under $200? A stovetop?

Long ago, I had one of those home Krups jobs. I eventually got the job done with it, but it was kind of like doing a hand stand with my arms and legs doing all kinds of funky contortions.

Get thee to a good resource like wholelattelove.com and you might find some good options there.

I've pretty much reached the point where, for me, the grinder, is as key, if not more so than the machine. I have a Gaggia MDF. It ain't cheap, it took me a while to a save my pennies, but it's worth every one of them. Especially when I can get a perfect grind for everything from French Press to espresso and even a bit finer than that.

On another note, my Hong Kong buds just gave me a bag of Bali coffee (as in Bali style). Just add hot water to the grounds and go. Simple and love that stuff. Brings back the memories of Ubud and all the lovely wildlife there.

Eric
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jul 26, 2009 - 03:24am PT
hey there fletcher, say... well, you found it, now, and that's what counts...

so does:
a good cup of coffee....

god bless and may you enjoy one, come sun-up...
:)
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Jul 26, 2009 - 03:35am PT
update on methode... jetboil french press mostly

I should pay attention to my grind, but sipping the coffee is almost just an excuse to have a morning in the mountains.

Fletcher

Trad climber
a buttery white sand beach... I wish!
Jul 26, 2009 - 12:20pm PT
I happened to do just that! Thanks neebee!

Eric
Tami

Social climber
Vancouver, Canada
Jul 26, 2009 - 02:00pm PT
Okay so here's a question for you coffee geeks and I'm not gonna go lookin' fer the answer by googling it c'os I know I can but I might not be the only one with this problem so..........it would be nice to have the answer posted on ST

:-D

I can't drink coffee. I have a heart condition. 'Sides.....coffee kick starts perstalsis in me to such an extent I nearly crap myself. Too much information? Yah, I wrote that so some wag doesn't just tell me to SUCK IT UP BUTTER CUP DRINK YER BREW AND SPEW SPEW SPEW

What is the bestest tastiest decaf out there?

And is decaf REALLY decaf? I"ve heard some caffeine remains. If so how much ( c'os I still seem to hafta poo right after a my weekly decaf latté )

Too much poo; not enough fun buzz
Tami

richross

Trad climber
Jul 26, 2009 - 02:06pm PT
quietpartner

Trad climber
Moantannah
Jul 26, 2009 - 02:11pm PT
One of my favorite river muds is espresso Medaglio D' Oro. It's not bad in decaf either. Hope that helps, Tami.

Still, ya can't beat a french press with fresh-ground beans.
Timid TopRope

Social climber
Paradise, CA
Jul 26, 2009 - 02:17pm PT
Heresy to this thread but for ultra-light stoveless overnighters; take two caffeine pills first thing in the morning. You'll forget about missing your coffee about a half hour later.
ryanb

climber
Seattle, WA
Jul 26, 2009 - 02:17pm PT
Tami,

The only true pro-foodie I know (the chocolatier at seattle's best chocolate factory, also a boulderer) drinks the decaf from light house coffee roaster's in seattle... might be worth checking out next time you pass through:

http://www.lighthouseroasters.com/

I'm working on an aerobie press cup of brew at the moment...you guys got to check this thing out...30 buck press that makes a pretty damn good shot of espresso in 30 seconds with no electricity once you get the hang of it.

http://www.aerobie.com/Products/aeropress_story.htm






perswig

climber
Jul 26, 2009 - 05:44pm PT
Ha, that little glimpse into Tami's plumbing (gotomyhappyplace, gotomyhappyplace, makethebadmangoaway) reminded me of working up in the Northeast Kingdom of VT just out of school.

Most of our dairy clients worked small farms, some trying to modernize and many not very interested. Before I got to know the area, the only hint of what kind of operation you'd find was whether the sick cow listed on the day's schedule was called #1439B or something like Sweet Emmylou. (As an aside, the farms still raising and treating their herd like members of the family were generally the places that would slip a jug of maple syrup or some home-made jam into the truck as a thankyou if you'd been called out at 0200 in February to pull a calf.)

One of the places we'd very rarely get called to was a tiny, falling-down barn, maybe 12 or 15 milkers at any given time. Dirty, dark place, cows thin to the point of emaciated; the farmer was probably pushing 70 and the most modern piece of equipment I ever saw him use was a rotary phone. He was also as bleak and dour as the barn, and poor as a pauper.

Visits to this place were always last-ditch events. If it was a calving problem, there'd be ruts behind the cow where the guy parked a tractor to anchor a comealong. If that didn't work, he'd call us.

Anyway, I only did surgery on his cows a few times, but each time, as I was up to my elbow in the abdomen, in the neardark, trying to reposition the abomasum and tack it in place without letting too much of the chaff sifting down from the hay mow work it's way into the 'surgery field', the whole stomach would slosh and slop like a keg half full, and I swore I could smell coffee coming from somewhere.

Eventually, I asked my boss, who didn't have a good answer, but a little later I was drawing blood from winners at the local fair racetrack with the retired vet who started the practice and I remembered to ask him. He laughed and said only a real old farmer would try that trick. At the first sign of a cow going off feed, they'd start drenching her with quarts of coffee, on the principle that caffeine increases G.I. motility and many issues with cows start with the gut. From the feel of things, I'd guess this guy was treating his sick cow for nearly a week before giving us a chance to do something.

What I don't know is how often this actually worked and kept him from having to call us at all.

Jingy

Social climber
Flatland, Ca
Jul 26, 2009 - 06:49pm PT
Some of the best coffee I've ever had was my last trip to JT to the Fish Compound. Had this stove top espresso/mocha maker. Put water in the bottom, put some milk in the top, add heat, let cool, and savor.


Tami

Social climber
Vancouver, Canada
Jul 27, 2009 - 02:22am PT
perswig - moooooooo

Thx fer the suggestions. Will try them :-D !!!!
Fletcher

Trad climber
a buttery white sand beach... I wish!
Jul 27, 2009 - 02:43am PT
Hey Tami,

I'm pretty much a decaf drinker myself (anything too caffeinated after 2 pm and I'm staring at the ceiling at 3 am!).

I don't think there's any decaf that has zero caffeine, though I could be wrong, but it's pretty low. Some processes get more out than others from what I understand. I have found I'm much happier without the caffeine and love drinking a wide variety of grinds for the interesting flavors.

Thanks for sharing.... uh... your gastrointestinal tendencies... I think? :-) The caffeine isn't what's going to clear out the plumbing, it's something else in the coffee, so I'm not sure what to say about that.

There are so many small and local roasters out there... it's kind of like wine. You'll find someone who loves a label and another who hates it. Trick is to find your preference. Check out what others suggest here and elsewhere and you'll find your groove in time.

If you like your brew's flavor on the rather strong and intense side, check out Peet's (peets.com). They are an old time company (for the US) and have stayed pretty much in line with their roots. I like their Decaf French Roast, which has a pretty burly flavor. They also just came out with a decaf version of their long time classic Major Dickason's Blend.

Good luck... you live in a place where coffee would definitely lift my spirits if I lived there... it's a sunshine inducer for me!

Eric
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jul 27, 2009 - 03:38am PT
hey there say... fletcher, just dropped in again to see if you had your coffee... nice to know you did...


say, saw someone had mentioned the mountains and coffee... they sure do seem to go together...

and look what else i've learned... oh my...

all aboaut perswig and cows... oh my.... :)


and tami... say, hoping and praying you find the best coffee, or coffee tricks, to work for your systems.... coffee is just so much fun..... at least half the fun, is the smell too:

and coffee pills.... wow, what will folks think of next...
thanks for the share, with that one, timidtoprope...

oh my.... but me, i reckon i will keep to the ol' mug-coffee, for the drinking-style kind... :)
perswig

climber
Jul 27, 2009 - 07:33am PT
Um, any resemblance between the subjects of my last post and a certain Cannuck climber are purely coincidental.








The cows can't draw.
Dale
Dingus Milktoast

climber
Jul 27, 2009 - 08:00am PT
Enjoy yer coffee snobery addictions while you can. When you eventually extrude from the other side, when the giggle is gone from your coffee?

You're lookin at whatever's on sale at Safeway... and your wife's 15 year old Mr Coffee with the brown stained pot.

(bloody HELL!)

I use the top selling coffee pot of all time, to make MY coffee:

Bialetti Mocha Express, 6-'cup' model (4 shots of spro).

I nuke 1 inch of a special misture of half and half and 1% milk in a plastic press pot (cream tastes great but won't foam worth a damn and 1% tastes horrible in coffee, but foams great), then use a press pot plunger to foam er up. Let it sit while the coffee boils and presto quicko, stove top espresso.

Been using a Bialetti for going on 15 years now.

Back country and what have you - cone. Press pots produce poorly heated coffee. I can't stand luke warm coffee when I'm standing there with a pot of boiling water. WTF???

Press pots are a goddamn MESS, in the bc, besides. ANyway, I left mine in Shangri La and the f*#king marmots are using it to get high.

DMT
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 5, 2011 - 07:11pm PT
yea i forgot about this post i started.

what do you think of this machine?

http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?SKU=16141461&RN=278&
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 3, 2011 - 05:58pm PT
some awesome coffee:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/43796124?slide=6
TwistedCrank

climber
Ideeho-dee-do-dah-day boom-chicka-boom-chicka-boom
Aug 3, 2011 - 06:53pm PT
Starbucks VIA is the t!ts if you want to go backcountry superlight! Mix it at least triple strength.

Stainless french press, Costo French Roast beans and a grinder for the home brew.

I tried the cold-brew method but found that it has waaay too much cafine. Crack levels.

A quad shot shot-in-the-dark aka depth charge aka eye opener from the local barista if I want to drop coin.

Coffee talk. If I drink enough coffee I can talk for days.
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Aug 3, 2011 - 07:12pm PT
Oooh, a coffee thread.

I guess it doesn't help to say I don't have a single favorite way to prepare coffee. Mostly it's a drip maker, but I also like the french press, expresso and greek coffee. We have one of those backpack expresso makers, they work fairly well but make sure you use a hot stove. A week stove will take the water too long to boil and result in a nasty bitter brew.

Two important things, start with good freshly roasted beans, and match your grind to how you'll be making coffee. French presses require a courser blend, if you put in a find blend the coffee will be harsh and bitter. I like a fine blend for drip, expresso blend for expresso, and I have a hand grinder for greek coffee.

If you really want to be a coffee snob, you can get your own roaster and roast your own beans, but that's a whole nother subject.

Tami, according to google foo the US guvment sez to be decaf, a coffee can have no more than 2.5% of it's original caffeine. But caffeine only makes up ~1.5% of a coffee been, so a 99% caffeine free coffee is the same as 97.5% of the caffeine being removed. I generally don't drink decaf, but did get some Mexican decaf green beans that roasted up and made a superb coffee.
David Knopp

Trad climber
CA
Aug 3, 2011 - 07:33pm PT
s leeper, we coffee snobs here in SF love what we call pour over style coffee, aka, one cup at a time.
Look for hario brand cones and filters and buy your single origin (that would be non blended, lighter roasted coffee from one hacienda or farm or whatever) from one of these places:
Sightglass, Ritual, 4 Barrel, Scarlett City, Blue Bottle.
It'll cost you but that sh#t is delicious!
There is also a great contraption called a clever dripper-combo of drip w/ a gasket so it steeps a bit. It too makes killer one cup at a time style coffee.
The places i mentioned above, if you are in the bay area you should visit em all-temples of diferent style.
reddirt

climber
PNW
Aug 3, 2011 - 07:44pm PT
this is what's getting used 3x/day in our household

http://aerobie.com/products/aeropress.htm

Aerobie® AeroPress® Coffee & Espresso Maker

S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 5, 2011 - 07:05pm PT
Here's the machine I bought. Makes an awesome espresso!

http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-EM-200-Programmable-Espresso-Stainless/dp/B000O3PS5K
murcy

Gym climber
sanfrancisco
Aug 5, 2011 - 07:31pm PT
Lazy and thrifty, we use store-bought beans that are not particularly fresh-roasted, especially by the time we're at the bottom of the bag. But this week I have experimented by toasting the coffee once it's been ground. I spread it on foil in a toaster oven and toast until it just starts smoking. It really seems to wake up the flavor.
ladyscarlett

Trad climber
SF Bay Area, California
Aug 5, 2011 - 07:48pm PT
A multi-cup/day kinda person, I take my coffee how I can get it. Free is nice, but I've also turned down free coffee that was crap.

At home, I use a french press. I like it cause an old housemate left it when she moved, and it's big enough for two-three cups. Pretty tasty actually.

Camping - drip cone, less messy then a french press and I can vary the strength to suit my whim. In the past when I don't want to deal with the cone, I use a stovetop espresso maker that is a token from some time in italy. It's fussy, but strangely sturdy, easy to clean, and low on bulk. I use this less now because I like the volume of the drip cone better. Sometimes a girl just needs more...heh! I have recently been shown the value of a dash of half and half in the morning cup.

Road trip - Pilot drip. There's worse, there's better, but I like Pilot, reliable.

Dehydrated - Donut Nation (Los Banos) coffee. Yeah, when I'm feeling thirsty, but don't have room in the bladder for coffee AND water, Donut Nation comes up on the left coming from The Valley. A 24hr joint, their coffee is juuust weak enough that it actually quenches my thirst.

My favorite way so far is sipping a steaming hot cup while sitting in my sleeping bag and having a smoke...mmmm

Cheers

ls

sullly

Trad climber
Aug 5, 2011 - 10:35pm PT
This thread title reminds me of Paul Baldwin and Linda Richmond. "Give a call, we'll talk, no big whoop."

I'm down to six cups a day. I'd like to quit, but love that zing in the morning.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 5, 2011 - 10:40pm PT
That's where I stole the quote from ^^^
Norwegian

Trad climber
Placerville, California
Aug 5, 2011 - 10:41pm PT
im sometimes taking it like chewing tabacco,
put a pinch in me gob
and go to generating saliva for the steep,
stains the teeth all to hell, this method.

f*#k it, though im god.
Norwegian

Trad climber
Placerville, California
Aug 5, 2011 - 10:42pm PT
im sometimes taking it like chewing tabacco,
put a pinch in me gob
and go to generating saliva for the steep,
stains the teeth all to hell, this method.

f*#k it, though im god.
sullly

Trad climber
Aug 5, 2011 - 10:44pm PT
S.Leeper, was that the same sketch where they pahked the cah in Hahvahd yahd? That was some funny shite, as was Dieter's dance party (Sprockets).
Norwegian

Trad climber
Placerville, California
Aug 5, 2011 - 10:44pm PT
..did i said that twice, or more?

bit jittery, over 'ere.
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Aug 5, 2011 - 11:00pm PT
About to hop on the bike to pick up a half elbow of fresh locally roasted med/dark.
Always have a doppio con panna while I'm there.

"Talk amongst ya selves"
Captain...or Skully

climber
or some such
Aug 5, 2011 - 11:58pm PT
Dig that Lady Scarlett. I hear ya, M'Lady.
tonesfrommars

Trad climber
California
Aug 6, 2011 - 04:45am PT
Can't believe Hudon hasn't hit this thread yet!

Some good info from Strider up near the top.
Re: how often to buy beans..

They say that after approx. 2 weeks they begin to go stale.
For sure keep 'em out of the freezer, especially after you've opened the bag once. Treat them the same way you would home grown tomatoes. No fridge, just werecks 'em.

When buying, I always look for a roast date on the bag. Without it, you could be buying month-old beans.

French press is my fave (would be espresso if I was enough of a geek to learn how to do it properly at home, but that's a projecty and gets expensive!@)
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Aug 6, 2011 - 11:29am PT
I just got back from a few days in Italy. They have this totally wired. If you really want to become a coffee snob you start by getting a grinder.

I recently got one and it changes everything. Way better aromatics!

Then you get a REALLY expensive espresso machine, hopefully with lots of chrome and maybe even with colored lights and stuff. All the good ones are made in Italy. (I actually have a really cheap plastic espresso machine which works pretty well.)

Then you figure out how to optimize temperature (by "temperature surfing", pressure, grind, etc. Then you finally get a couple of oz. of really good dark brown stuff.

Homebarista.com and coffeegeek.com are really great, a bit over the top.

Have fun!

Fred
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Aug 6, 2011 - 11:34am PT
This was completely typical. No matter where you went they had these r...
This was completely typical. No matter where you went they had these really cool machines and they all knew how to use them. I visited a research institute over there and this was just their cafeteria.
Credit: FredC
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Aug 6, 2011 - 11:37am PT
Wow. I gotta get one of those!

I need to snob up for a while I think, been slumming with grocery grind for a while. Decent brew mind you, decent beans... but I ain't kidding myself Its like the difference between some really good gold and some really really good skunk....

Oh well, gotta whistle the kettle one more round then its out for a lap or three on some granite.

DMT
wbw

climber
'cross the great divide
Aug 6, 2011 - 12:11pm PT
Jeebus FredC, there's cars in Boulder that aren't as big as that rig in the photo.

The first cup of each day is an opportunity. Mess it up, and the day is sure to be long and difficult. The simple Melita cone and filter set up has done me right for decades. In fact, I've kept the same plastic cone for more than 20 years. (Some folks might also say I should change a few pieces on my climbing rack for some newer ones.)

It's probably rude of me, but I insist on refreshing the cone and filter with newly ground beans, and not forcing a second cup from it. I'm pretty territorial about that first cup, which has occassionally caused some "uncomfortable" dynamics in certain social settings.

A little dash of something white, preferrably heavy cream, a seat outside in the morning sunshine, (in the perfect world, no noise, which with small children never happens) and the makings of a great day start to unfold.
philo

Trad climber
Somewhere halfway over the rainbow
Aug 6, 2011 - 12:45pm PT
I like coffee.


I like coffee so much I'm...
... too Verklempt to tawk about it. Tawk amongstya selves.
Here's a tawpic, Cawfee.
Kalimon

Trad climber
Ridgway, CO
Aug 6, 2011 - 12:50pm PT
Hippie speedball BUMP!
the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Aug 6, 2011 - 01:41pm PT
Coffee quality vs. money/effort runs on a bell curve to me.

Start at the bottom with low cost crappy canned grocery store grind, throw it in a dripper. Cheap, easy, but crappy.

Put in a little more effort, get some good beans, brew in a decent way. Very good coffee.

Spend a lot of money, grind it every time, use an expensive brewing system or worse go to an expensive coffee shop everyday and it's only marginally better (if at all) than the last option.

I buy a big bag of organic beans from costco. Grind about a weeks worth at a time. I use a plug in espresso maker and I ..gasp.. microwave some milk instead of steaming it, and it makes a great cup of faux latte with just a little effort at a low cost.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Aug 6, 2011 - 04:09pm PT
As an experiment, go out and buy some coffee you know is fresh. (if you get it in a grocery store it could easily be three weeks to a month old. If it's from any of the nationally know roasters (starbucks, green mountain, peets) and is in a foil bag with a breather valve AND you live no where near where those company roast the coffee, you can bet it's older than three weeks). If you don't buy the coffee from where it's roasted, you have no idea how old it is.
Go buy some fresh coffee from a nearby roaster. At home, open the bag and put as much of the coffee (beans) as you can in a peanut butter jar or mayonnaise jar. Write the date on it somehow. Put the jars in a cool, dry place. In two weeks go out and buy some more coffee you know is fresh. Get the old coffee and brew two cups, one old and one new, exactly the same way. Let them cool off a bit and then taste them.
Report back here.

If you buy your coffee from me, you'll know you're always getting fresh coffee.
http://www.hoodrivercoffeeco.com
JOEY.F

Gym climber
It's not rocket surgery
Aug 6, 2011 - 05:02pm PT
Cwoffee Twalk yeah...
Believe it or not, roadies, McDonalds coffee is surprisingly really good. I read it in Consumer Reports and gave it a try. Cheap too, 1.50 for a large. But I know it's McDonalds and expect commentary.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Aug 6, 2011 - 05:16pm PT
I had some whack-job walk into the Coffee Co. a few years ago and tell me that he had friends who called coffee anymore than two days old "simply putrid". I laughed and told him that I'd give his friends $100 if they could tell the difference between a fresh roasted cup and a cup two weeks old 3 out of five times.

He never came back.
tonesfrommars

Trad climber
California
Aug 6, 2011 - 05:26pm PT
^^^ haha!

Isn't it true Mark that the freshly roasted coffee needs to off-gas for a day or two before you really wanna start using it anyway? I think i might have read that somewhere.

Good to support local roasters for sure.
If you're in the sticks and don't have any nearby, you can purchase via mail from places like bluebottle in SF and they time their shipping around the roasting schedule, so when you get your pound it's "post marked" and usually only 2-3 days out of the roaster.
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Aug 6, 2011 - 06:54pm PT
I think coffee stores pretty well until it is ground. Even ground I have done some simple flavor tests and it is hard to tell.

Recently though I did buy a grinder. I did a series of shots with different grinds to optimize. I think it matters that you get your grind to "match" your espresso machine (or whatever). I would go to Peets and then to Verve and I'm sure their typical grinds varied all over the place. In fact, a couple of years ago Peets went from 5 to 3 (finer) for their espresso grind. Nasty man, at least on my machine.

I guess I am a convert to grind and then shoot. Like that lady in Italy.

Your personal machine really doesn't need three heads. A really good machine with one head will cost plenty.

In Italy we trust. Heck they invented most everything beautiful the worls has. Lamborgini, Ferarri, Sophia Loren! Sheesh!

Prego, presto, pronto! (I have no idea, but people say stuff like that over there)
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Aug 6, 2011 - 07:14pm PT
The valve on the bag is a one way valve. Gas can go out but air cannot go in. Coffee de-gasses for up to ten days after it is roasted. If there were not a valve in the bag it would blow up tight like a balloon.
Certainly, the coffee tastes different right out of the roaster than ten days later after it has off-gassed. That might be the "leftovers taste better" kind of thing but "putrid", I don't think so.

If you store your coffee correctly (airtight container in a cool, dry place) after, let's say a month or so, and then if you brew that coffee alongside some coffee you know is fresh you'll think, "hmm... that's interesting, the older coffee has lost a bit of it's sparkle but it's certainly not "bad"". You won't spit out coffee even six month old, it will still taste like coffee but it won't have a lot of individual characteristics, high notes or low.

All in all, your method of storing, grinding and brewing will matter more to the taste of your coffee that how fresh it is.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 6, 2011 - 07:34pm PT
Decent brew mind you, decent beans... but I ain't kidding myself Its like the difference between some really good gold and some really really good skunk....

Great analogy, DM!!

Spent 200$ on my machine and it's been great.

Anyone in the Austin, Texas area that can recommend a good source for roasted beans?
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 7, 2011 - 07:46pm PT
has to be espresso, or why bother?
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Aug 7, 2011 - 08:46pm PT
Jiff, why's that?

You can't mean caffeine. Espresso has less caffeine in it that regular brewed coffee and far, far less than coffee brewed via a percolator.

French Roasted coffee had less caffeine that a light roasted coffee also. So an "espresso roast", a dark roast, maybe a french roast, brewed as espresso had even less caffeine.
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Aug 8, 2011 - 09:59am PT
Turkish, easy peasy and if you don't get a jag then you need to go to ...
Turkish, easy peasy and if you don't get a jag then you need to go to N.A
Credit: TrundleBum
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 8, 2011 - 08:41pm PT
Mark,

I was refering to the brewing method, not the roast.

I have not found a brewing method that gives the depth of flavor I get with espresso.

I did switch from an espresso roast to a medium roast to get a bit more caffeine, though.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Aug 8, 2011 - 09:42pm PT
I don't drink that much straight espresso. If I'm out and about I'll usually have an americano. I know what you're saying though, certainly more full flavor.
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 9, 2011 - 12:51am PT
no big whoop

no big whoop
no big whoop
Credit: jiff
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Aug 9, 2011 - 01:11am PT
I'm f*#kin spraakked!
beluga

climber
Nowhere
Aug 9, 2011 - 02:30am PT
I do not care for coffee. Nor does it care for me.
corniss chopper

climber
breaking the speed of gravity
Aug 9, 2011 - 03:12am PT
instant for the approach
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 9, 2011 - 11:24am PT
What is it in coffee that makes my bunghole play the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto?
It has to be more than the caffeine.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 9, 2011 - 05:39pm PT
bump for the good stuff
sullly

Trad climber
Aug 9, 2011 - 05:41pm PT
Hilarious Linda Richmond shot! "Like butta."
npslatte

Sport climber
Sunnyvale, CA
Aug 9, 2011 - 05:58pm PT
I switched to starbucks VIAS. They weight almost nothing and last for a long time without going bad, plus they include sweetener inside and I don't have to worry about bringing anything else.

While I do like good brewed coffee, my laziness wins out when it comes to backpacking/climbing.
VID

Trad climber
baltimore maryland
Aug 10, 2011 - 05:04am PT
check out www.brewmug.com reg lake invented a cool unit filter is stored in wall of the mug -really simple and great coffee vid
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 11, 2011 - 12:02am PT
had 2 espresso shots 4 lunch. nice and tidy!
sullly

Trad climber
Aug 11, 2011 - 01:01am PT
Paul Baldwin of Coffee Talk. (Dig the Ansel Adams print and sweater.)
photo not found
Missing photo ID#212230
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 11, 2011 - 05:18pm PT
my espresso had a strange taste today, bad milk?
ladyscarlett

Trad climber
SF Bay Area, California
Aug 11, 2011 - 05:28pm PT
today I had a soy latte to start out the day.

Right off the bat, soy lattes are different when it's fresh made steaming coconut soy milk right out of the maker.

That aside, I came to the realization that its ACTUALLY a caffeinated blended bean juice drink.

Bean juice...yum!

LS
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 11, 2011 - 06:50pm PT
ahh soy lattes, my daily fix!
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 15, 2011 - 06:26pm PT
Had an americano today. Good stuff when you add primo espresso shots.
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Aug 15, 2011 - 07:35pm PT
Just got back from a week in The Meadows. We used one of those "stovetop espresso makers". It was ok but it was really good to grind that Verve this morning.

I tried to buy a cup of espresso from the very cute young girl at the grill. She asked me if I had ever had "gas station" coffee? I took my eggs and ran.

FC
Spider Savage

Mountain climber
SoCal
Aug 15, 2011 - 08:49pm PT
Just put down a sweet double espresso, medium dark house blend Supreme Bean. Now I can pay attention the rest of the day.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 15, 2011 - 08:54pm PT
yup that definately fits the bill ^^^^
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 15, 2011 - 11:35pm PT
"gas station" coffee

run away, far far far away.
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Aug 16, 2011 - 12:49am PT
That dang machine has a pretty nice photo on the front, it looked like the stuff I got in Italy. I did not do the experiment. Eggs in the meadow, no coffee.

I bet if I learned to make really good coffee I could make it from a disguised VW van and make a fortune just driving around the campground and the turnouts where climbers park. (possible retirement strategy!)

I guess I would have to compete with all those "power" drinks that are on the market. There is something ominous about the small cans they come in. Monster, etc. Hmmm. Maybe not such a good retirement strategy.

ladyscarlett

Trad climber
SF Bay Area, California
Aug 16, 2011 - 06:28am PT
Discovered this weekend that Sprouts Cafe makes a pretty smooth 6pm double shot mocha that floated me all the way home.

My car mates were pleased.

Cheers

ls
Norwegian

Trad climber
Placerville, California
Aug 16, 2011 - 11:02am PT
elate in a whisper.
contrive in silence.
toil in circles.

live without violence.

fvck the world donning a spiritual condom.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 16, 2011 - 07:40pm PT
not seeing the coffee connection
Norwegian

Trad climber
Placerville, California
Aug 17, 2011 - 12:59pm PT
sleeper, that's the echo inside of the bean.

gesus krist how can you pen an inquiry upon coffeee if you've never been inside the bean?

tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Aug 17, 2011 - 01:53pm PT
A question about expresso. It's been stated it has less caffeine than drip coffee. But if you make a cup of coffee in an expresso machine, does that have less caffeine than from a drip machine?

Lately I've been making my morning cup of coffee from our basic two shot braun. I must say the rich full bodied taste is a great way to start the morning!
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 17, 2011 - 11:12pm PT
Mark H.?
Swami Jr.

Trad climber
Bath, NY
Aug 17, 2011 - 11:34pm PT
for real men, just drink coffee.

to snob it out, single pour drip, with filtered water, freshly roasted beans.


but be a real man, eh?
Captain...or Skully

climber
or some such
Aug 17, 2011 - 11:45pm PT
I'm down with the gas station stuff. Guess I trucked too long. Ruined me for coffee snobbery. Hehehe.
Hot & black, baby. Maybe a bit of sweetness.
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Aug 17, 2011 - 11:53pm PT
At home i drink dakine.
If forced to drink gas station shwah, i have to foof it up majorly with the french vanilla " cappucino" machine, half and half, the works.
Heresy? Not when in the middle of BFE.
And the sh!t can actually be pretty strong.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 18, 2011 - 01:03am PT
Credit: S.Leeper
gf

climber
Aug 18, 2011 - 01:40am PT
http://www.innate-gear.com/product-info/americano/americano-tumbler

hey i'll be happy to donate a set of these to the person voted as having best road trip brewing setup by taconians -open source come one come all with votes to be tallied based on those cast on this thread between now and oct 30th (to cover fall road trip season
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 25, 2011 - 01:38am PT
dammit i need coffee...now!
Captain...or Skully

climber
or some such
Aug 25, 2011 - 01:47am PT
Well, I'll make some in the A of M.
You're welcome to a cup or two.....
jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Aug 25, 2011 - 01:50am PT
Why, thank you sir!
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Aug 25, 2011 - 10:15pm PT
No doubt at a premium price, but only needs yer Jetboil:

http://downloads.growerscup.com/Booklets_files/TheCoffeebrewer_EN.pdf

[Moved here from a separate posting after a response from the OP]
NotIt

Trad climber
SF, CA
Aug 25, 2011 - 10:25pm PT
tolman -

espresso has less caffeine than coffee when consumed in the average "drink" for each: roughly 8 oz of drip coffee vs. 2 shots of espresso.

Espresso has substantially MORE caffeine than drip coffee by VOLUME.

Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Aug 25, 2011 - 10:38pm PT
A question about expresso. It's been stated it has less caffeine than drip coffee. But if you make a cup of coffee in an expresso machine, does that have less caffeine than from a drip machine?

No, there is less caffeine in the coffee brewed in the espresso method. The grind will make a slight difference but not much.

Caffeine takes time to dissolve. When making espresso the water is forced through the coffee quickly thereby not giving the caffeine enough time to dissolve.

Also, the finer the grind the more surface area of coffee available to accept water which dissolves more caffeine.

So, Perc ground coffee (very coarse), brewed in an espresso maker, for one will taste terrible (since the water can't get to enough flavor components fast enough and also since there is less surface area for the water to attack), and will have less caffeine for the same reason.

Espresso ground coffee (very fine but not quite powder) Brewed in a Percolator will, for one, taste terrible since it is over extracted and will have as much caffeine as you can get out of a cup of coffee.

Remember this:

Fast brew methods need a fine grind. Espresso/Fast/Fine grind, not quite powder, grind

Slow brew methods need a coarser grind. Percolator/Slow/Coarse Grind, chunks.

Flat bottomed filters and cone filters give you a different dwell time, the time the coffee is actually involved with the water while it is filtering through.

If you make a cup of "drip coffee" in an espresso machine you have just made a crappy cup of coffee.

Although!

The sentence above is the industry standard line, if you like a cup of "drip coffee" brewed in an espresso maker, than I cannot argue with your tastes.

http://www.hoodrivercoffeeco.com
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Aug 26, 2011 - 12:05am PT
i'm rocking this unit. pulls a good shot, and has paid for itself many times over.

S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 26, 2011 - 12:37am PT
holy smokes, thats a bad ass machine!
apogee

climber
Aug 26, 2011 - 12:40am PT
Dark muddy french press hot steaming morning

Smoothed with milkfat to the color of Michael Jackson's skin ca. 1989
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Aug 26, 2011 - 08:37am PT
I am in central Mexico this week and it is hard to understand how a whole country can treat coffee so badly. it's enough to drive a person to tea (almost).

I like the look of that espresso machine! I have not made the leap yet.

Mr. Airport
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Aug 26, 2011 - 10:00am PT
Yes Mexicans don't understand coffee at all. But they make a wicked salsa!

I had the privilege of calling on the corporate HQ of Juan Valdez, the mighty Colombian coffee cooperative with 20,000 grower/members and a tall office building in Bogota.

The Juan Valdez suites are beautiful so far as offices go. We met many times in a glass walled conference room. During our meetings a, what I can only call a serving lady, brought in a coffee service and as we conducted business would round the table and refill everyone's coffee.

Lol, by noon I was bouncing off the glass walls. That Colombian coffee style is high caffeine and unlike Folgers, the real deal Juan Valdez coffee is very high quality and on par with the best coffees in the world.

But I liked Brasilian coffee best, of those I've tried south of the border.

They made the claim - Juan Valdez brand logo, the dude with the donkey, is the 3rd most recognized brand in the world.


They were opening a chain of coffee houses in Europe and elsewhere (a few in the US) and I was there as a consultant.

Here's the Juan Valdez Times Square store. They operate this location at a considerable loss, its main purpose is advertising and branding....


Here's one in Bogota. At 8000 feet Bogota has a mild climate and lots of open air restaurants like this.


Those Colombians are serious about their coffee!

DMT

ps. LOL I just realized that last pic is from inside a mall haha.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Aug 26, 2011 - 03:57pm PT
I've met Juan Valdez.

He was at a coffee trade show once when Peggy and I first started the Coffee Co. in the early 90s.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 26, 2011 - 05:05pm PT

Yes Mexicans don't understand coffee at all. But they make a wicked salsa!


My bro in laws have a restaurant in Mexico City and they have one of those restaurant grade espresso machines. Their only sin with espresso is they add tons of sugar and lots of milk in their lattes.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Aug 26, 2011 - 05:56pm PT
Their only sin with espresso is they add tons of sugar and lots of milk in their lattes.

Mexicans can't make desserts worth a damn either.

Sure make good beer though!

DMT
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 29, 2011 - 05:23pm PT
you must not be a tres leche fan, I'm not one either. el globo rivals any pastry shop here.
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 31, 2011 - 02:40am PT
phuq, i could use a double shot!
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Sep 7, 2011 - 03:36pm PT
I bought a new pound of Verve coffee beans yesterday, ground some this morning and made a really great strong latte.

That super cool flavor gets lost in storage. I want to store in the freezer but people tell me that cool dark is the best.

Any coffee storage experts out there?

(Verve is a local roaster in the Santa Cruz area, very good stuff.)
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 7, 2011 - 03:53pm PT
Since so many Argentines are of Italian heritage espresso machines are widely
seen even down to Ushuaia. I don't know from whence their beans come but
they generally did them justice. Some very good gelato is also available in BA.
TwistedCrank

climber
Ideeho-dee-do-dah-day boom-chicka-boom-chicka-boom
Sep 7, 2011 - 04:16pm PT
Argentina has the best served coffee I've had, although many Argentines I know claim that the Spanish make the best coffee.

Or was that steak?
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Sep 7, 2011 - 04:48pm PT
I was suprised that the best served coffee I've had was at the hotel I was staying at in Budapest, they also had incredible yogurt.
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Sep 7, 2011 - 05:21pm PT
Don't put it in the freezer. Put it in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Sep 8, 2011 - 09:24am PT
FredC go to your local pots and pans store and get one of these. Doesn't have to be an antique, just needs a good rubber gasket to keep it airtight.



There is a therapy in the ritual of bringing home that warm bag of fresh roasted beans, grinding up a cup's worth immediately and then slowly, luxuriously, pouring the rest of the beans into the jar. The tinkle sound of the beans hitting the glass morphs into a 'sand in the hourglass' as it fills up, the pitch rising with the beans.


Smell...... ahhhhhhhhhh!

Then there is the Addict's Ritual of getting up in the morning, opening the cupboard and seeing that jar is down to one inch of beans. MUSTN'T RUN OUT! Time for a coffee bean run.

Make sure your glass jar is big enough to hold a pound of beans.

Even the sound of popping open the jar becomes part of the gig. And that rush of bean-smell first thing in the morning. Smells like... coffee. Someday that cup's gonna brew.

I bet you want a cup of Joe right now!

"That's a damn good cup of coffee."


Coffee makes me wild at heart.

DMT

Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Sep 8, 2011 - 11:00am PT
Dingus,

Perfect jar, although any mayonnaise, peanut butter, etc, jar will work.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Sep 8, 2011 - 11:02am PT
Yup just not as satisfying to open an old mayo lid.

Good coffee beans deserve a little ritual donchya think?

DMT
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Sep 8, 2011 - 11:07am PT
Good coffee beans deserve a little ritual donchya think?

I copy!

This morning's new ritual. . .

1/2 and 1/2
brown sugar
emersion blender AKA MisterStick

poured over MontanaCoffeeTraders' FrenchRoast

OhDaddy!

RuralMontanaMorning!
Norwegian

Trad climber
Placerville, California
Oct 25, 2011 - 04:32pm PT
anywone 'ver sprinkle dry grounds on a bowl?
i brush my teeth with the leftover grounds.
they makes a good exfoliating facial scrub too,
when you got no oxy around.

i wanna wanna wanna be a hobo again.
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Oct 25, 2011 - 04:35pm PT
A friend of mine says the best hitch hiking partner he ever had was a pound of French roast beans.

:-)

He ate 'em like candy.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Oct 25, 2011 - 04:39pm PT
Hey Kathy,

My favorite way to stay awake at the wheel is to nibble on dark chocolate espresso beans.


No scalded crotch that way!
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Oct 25, 2011 - 04:46pm PT
HA!

Good one, Kevvie.

Blanchard and I used to make coffee bean clusters with melted HersheyBars and French roast beans. Copped a gnarly buzz off those puppies.

One time we did a heinous tree felling project where he'd have to spend 6 - 8 hours a day way up in the tree doing the limbing (I had to lower the limbs cause they'd crash into our house if I didn't). . . well. . . to keep him wide awake up there, hanging from Jumars, I'd send a little stuff bag full of coffee bean clusters up to him. He was bright eyed and bushy tailed, for sure!

Just might have to make some for this upcoming marathon of a road trip.

Hmmmmmmmmmmm. . .
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Oct 25, 2011 - 04:59pm PT
Coffee makes me wild at heart.

Agent Cooper sure loves him a cup of Joe.

Personally, I love coffee in almost all its iterations.

I just love a T H I C K cup of joe though. Some of the best coffee I've had is Naked Coffee in Sactown. The coffee is so rich and thick you can literally taste the cholesterol: http://www.nakedcoffee.net/

[reading music calendar]Holy crap, Kevin Seconds is still playing? Time to retire, you old bleached bitch!

ladyscarlett

Trad climber
SF Bay Area, California
Oct 25, 2011 - 05:00pm PT
mmm, I'm going to have to remember the deal about the coffee bean chocolate clusters.

What a great idea!

Do you guys have a preference in beans? And chocolate that has a low melt?

mmmmm....sipping on my bean juice right now and it's just so much awesome.

Cheers

LS
P.Rob

Social climber
Pacomia, Ca - Y Que?
Oct 25, 2011 - 05:16pm PT
“Turkish coffee - similar to cowboy coffee, this method uses an espresso (actually finer) grind and you boil the grinds with the water and pour the whole mix in a cup. It is generally pre-sweetened while it is being made and when you drink it you need to let the dregs settle first. This method will give you a very full flavor but it will be bitter and it will taste VERY strong. This is more of an acquired taste”.

This is the minimalist approach, easily performed and I believe better than espresso or similarly strong brews. Do be careful about the appellation “Turkish” as there might be some historic ethnic sensitivity, and depending on location you might get more than just a cup of Joe. Armenians & Lebanese will often put whole cardamom in as it is brewing as it gives some interesting notes. My experience it is most often filtered through a sieve as it is poured into very tiny, but sufficient cups. If you have the talent around you at the time, emptied cups will be flipped upside down upon a saucer and the dregs/sediment pattern will be read and your future foretold … heh heh just like a scientist
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Apr 28, 2012 - 09:37pm PT
I just love afternoon coffee!
Wait, it's evening.
I just love evening coffee!

Even if it is this morning's dregs nuked up!
Yum!
S.Leeper

Social climber
somewhere that doesnt have anything over 90'
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 12, 2012 - 05:49pm PT
double shot espresso to get the last work day started!
gf

climber
Oct 12, 2012 - 08:22pm PT
the hotel i routinely stay at in yongkang china just added an illy machine -saints be praised!
Kristen

climber
Oct 12, 2012 - 10:32pm PT
I like the aeropress, (http://aerobie.com/products/aeropress.htm);. I hand grind (have an antique burr grinder my partner's grandparents brought from netherlands in the '20's), but easier methods work great with this too. I find it handy that I can make an espresso, machiato, latte, or americano all with this little gizmo. It really does make an amazing cup, imo.
S.Leeper

Social climber
somewhere that doesnt have anything over 90'
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 13, 2012 - 12:51am PT
I've seen that device before, looks handy!
S.Leeper

Social climber
somewhere that doesnt have anything over 90'
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 26, 2013 - 05:57pm PT
I think we need 2 coffee threads because it's Friday.

jiff

Ice climber
colorado
Apr 30, 2013 - 10:31pm PT
nice machine

Credit: jiff
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 6, 2013 - 05:31pm PT
It's now official - y'all are bonafide junkies!

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


Caffeine Withdrawal Syndrome - An Official Diagnosis?

The newest edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) now includes an entry called “caffeine withdrawal.”

Both the DSM-IV and the new DSM-5 contain the category Caffeine-related disorders, however the new edition includes caffeine withdrawal as a consequence of caffeine intoxication. Symptoms of caffeine withdrawal include fatigue, headache, depressed mood and difficulty focusing.

The decision to include caffeine withdrawal syndrome has been met with some controversy since some view the disorder as being transitory. Once a person stops consuming caffeine the symptoms are usually short-lived. However, DSM-5 work-group members have relayed that enough data supports this syndrome and that it is important that mental health professionals be aware of it.

Charles O'Brien, MD, PhD, Chair of the Substance-Related Disorders Work Group reported, “In normal humans, after 2 or 3 cups of coffee even under double-blind conditions where people are given a placebo […] this shows a definite withdrawal.” Dr. O'Brien added that it isn't clear whether caffeine withdrawal syndrome is clinically significant or not so it has been “placed in Section III to stimulate further research.”

Caffeine is a mild stimulant that is commonly found in beverages such as coffee and soda. In May 2013, the FDA announced that it will investigate the safety of caffeine in food products, especially the impact on children and adolescents.

Currently, the FDA has cited 400mg caffeine per day (about 4–5 cups of coffee) as an amount not generally associated with negative effects in healthy adults.

The FDA wants to determine the safe level of total caffeine consumption, and better identify the consequences of all the caffeinated products in the food supply, to consumers who may be at risk from caffeine overconsumption.
hamik

Mountain climber
Pasadena, CA
Jun 6, 2013 - 06:49pm PT
Alpine climbing essentials
Alpine climbing essentials
Credit: hamik

S'all I'm gonna say on the matter.
S.Leeper

Social climber
somewhere that doesnt have anything over 90'
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 6, 2013 - 07:18pm PT
You look set!
S.Leeper

Social climber
somewhere that doesnt have anything over 90'
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 14, 2014 - 06:37pm PT
gawd i need a shot
life is a bivouac

Trad climber
Nov 15, 2014 - 04:46pm PT
Coffee is the Elixir of Truth, Beauty, Life, and all things Good!
That's all I'm gonna say on that.
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