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Messages 881 - 900 of total 901 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
thekidcormier

Gym climber
squamish, b.c.
Nov 19, 2012 - 06:38am PT
I climbed half of the south gulley once, then retreated. There's a brand new fixed line in there to help get haul bags up the crux.

EDIT; I meant the south south gully, oops
MH2

climber
Nov 19, 2012 - 08:30am PT
Good to see this thread, again.


Somewhat off the Squamish track, but speaking of physical evidence, and maybe it leads back to Squamish, has anyone seen one of these markers, or know who P. Brown is?



Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 19, 2012 - 09:41am PT
That sort of looks like a survey tag, although it'd be unusual to attach one to a tree/stump. As it's near the Camel, perhaps something to do with the old watershed boundaries?

As for logs being sent down along Olesen Creek, it seems possible. There was logging in upper Olesen Creek, before World War II if not earlier, and if you hike to the third (fourth) summit and Slhanay, you see evidence of it - big stumps, old cables and so on. (The logging in 1991-92, on the upper southeast side of the valley, was done with helicopters.) FWIW, there doesn't seem to be any physical evidence in Olesen Creek of old flumes, or of logs being skidded down. Even after 60 or 80 years there'd be something - loggers very rarely cleaned up after themselves. Maybe the Ministry of Forests office has some information?

The origins of the trail up Olesen Creek are an interesting question, although there was recorded hiking on the Chief from at least the 1930s, probably much earlier.

Considering the amount of rockfall and debris flow in the gullys at Squamish, I doubt I'd ever trust a "fixed" rope in one of them.
MH2

climber
Nov 19, 2012 - 10:26am PT
Interesting thought. If it was a surveyor, perhaps surveyors made early climbs on the Chief. Another look at where the tag is:

Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 19, 2012 - 11:01am PT
Good point, Andy - IIRC, there is a Geodetic Survey benchmark near the top of the Malemute, and another at the Chief's second summit. Must check on their dates, but a long time ago probably. Tricouni may be able to help with this.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Nov 19, 2012 - 11:02am PT
The geodetic people got around, but that is not one of their markers, at least not anything like any I've seen before.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Nov 19, 2012 - 01:10pm PT
Crown Mtn was a popular objective for hiker-climber types in the 20's-30's-40's. It's really visible from Vancouver and access from the Grouse Mtn cabin community was fairly easy. The Camel was very popular as well.........

P. Brown ? Anybody by name of Brown climbing with ol' Tom Fyles ????

I wrote to my mum asking what she might remember.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 19, 2012 - 05:10pm PT
Another sort of marker, placed by the Mountain Access Committee/Mountain Rescue Group in the mid 1960s.
Credit: Mighty Hiker
The tree has done a fine job of growing around the sign, "Baldwin-Cooper" meaning that it is for the path to the base of the Grand Wall.

Going back to Andy's tag/marker, it's interesting that it has "P. Brown" stamped on it three times. Also that it's screwed in, not nailed. What metal is it made out of? Size? Perhaps there's someone named "P. Brown" who liked to "tag" things he went to? Although it looks old and weathered, as apparently corroborated by it being in a dead-looking burl.
MH2

climber
Nov 19, 2012 - 05:40pm PT
Now that you mention...

When I go back and look, "P. Brown" is also stamped 3 times along the edge of the dog tag. I suspect that P. Brown was an eccentric who may have done this for reasons known only to them.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Nov 19, 2012 - 07:18pm PT
"P Brown" is stamped FOUR times into the top of it. Look in the middle of the thing, it has a P Brown shadow in there. But what are the messy chunk-marks on it in addition to the multiple P Brown marks ?

Looks like a soft metal like it has lead in it & non-galvy flathead screws.

A great mystery !
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 19, 2012 - 09:44pm PT
Still trying to figure out the hand-engraved letters on the tag. I blew Andy's photo up a bunch, and looked at it from different angles, but couldn't figure out what the four symbols are.

Not to mention the location, the need to stamp his name seven (7!) times on it, etc etc.
thekidcormier

Gym climber
squamish, b.c.
Nov 19, 2012 - 10:39pm PT
Is it just me or was Perrys free ascent of 'commando crack' in '72(according to the newest select in front of me) WAAAAAY ahead of its time. I mean mercy me only got freed 3 years prior.

Any one know who got the 2nd free ascent of commando?

Another proud line freed in the 70s, seemingly ahead of its time, The left side, by Nicholas Taylor and Pete Pearl in '75, the same the right side was freed. Where did these dudes come from.

Sorry to disrupt a great discussion of those mysterious metal markers.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Nov 19, 2012 - 10:46pm PT
Luke - Anders' guide mentions Nic Taylor and P. Peart but with 1975 having a question mark. I have a note in both my old Smaill guide and Anders' guides that Bill Price led the L Side free in the summer of 1978. He rated it 5.11d. Bill would have been 17 yrs old at the time. He came to Canada to visit with Mike Boris - a friend of Daryl.

Bill was a really great guy - still is from what I hear :-). He'd be about fifty now......... grin.

Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 19, 2012 - 11:18pm PT
The FA of Commando Crack was by Peter Peart and IIRC Brian Thompson, in 1972. The FFA was by Perry and Tim Holwill - the select guide is a bit hard to read.

Peter was an Australian who came here in about 1970. I knew him through the BCMC, and later we were in classes together at UBC. (He became an engineer.) Anyway, Peter was well connected to the Australian climbing scene, and in 1972 Chris Baxter came and climbed here as part of a tour. In 1975, Nic Taylor was here for a few days, and they did the left side of the Pillar, plus Split Beaver. There has been some skepticism regarding this, but then or soon after Nic was one of Australia's leading climbers. Anyway, something I'll talk with Peter about - maybe he even has photos.
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Nov 19, 2012 - 11:50pm PT
This is a rehash of ancient history.
Re Commando Crack
I think Smaill was referring to this climb when he described an enjoyable climb "if you like cream with your manure." I didn't know what it was called when I freed it as the first pitch of what would become Movin' to Montana in 80-81? with Tim Holwill.
If TCU's were around then, I didn't have any and I'm not sure if they'd fit anyways.
After a couple tries I led it clean with a fistful of green and blue RPs and thought it was hard 5.11 at the time.
It's a great pitch during the few weeks of the year that it's dry.
The Select Guide doesn't accurately reflect this pitch as part of Movin' to Montana.


Re The Left Side
Nic gets credit for the FFA, presumably from the hanging belay under the roof.
Although the veracity of this claim has been questioned, I don't think it was beyond Nic as that was the same year he freed Country Road (24/25) at Buffalo. He was all over The Valley's hardest cracks of the time.
The start of the Left Side was choked with dirt and grass when Daryl and Mike Boris cleaned it out so Bill could lead it free in 77.
(Credit for reaching the Left Side free from Merci Me at 11a/b goes to some tall skinny guy in 79/80.)
harryhotdog

Social climber
north vancouver, B.C.
Nov 20, 2012 - 06:56am PT
What ever happened to Tim and Stew,anybody know. Hey Perry why don't you post up some pics on the coast range thread, I'm sure you have alot, Cheers!
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Nov 20, 2012 - 08:15am PT
Credit for reaching the Left Side free from Merci Me at 11a/b goes to some tall skinny guy in 79/80.)

Too Tall wasn't around then, so that leaves you or Randy.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 21, 2012 - 09:48am PT
Thanks, Perry! It will be interesting to learn how Tim and Dick (1972), and then Nic and Peter (1975) got to the start of the left side. Dick was involved in Ten Years After, which is the first half of the Mercy Me to Grand Wall linkup. I wonder?
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Dec 9, 2012 - 05:01pm PT
No climb from Squamish was included in "Fifty Classic Climbs of North America", published in 1979. It was a book somewhat oriented toward long alpine, and alpine rock, climbing, and to the USA. Still, it contains a number of rock routes. At least a few existing routes at Squamish as of say 1977/78 were of comparable quality to some of those included in the book, such as University Wall.

There is somewhat more about Squamish in "Climbing in North America", published in 1976, although mostly relating to the Grand Wall, and climbing up to 1970.

It's an interesting sidelight as to how Squamish was seen by some at that time.

And there's #900.
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Dec 11, 2012 - 07:11pm PT
How is Squamish viewed now I wonder? Most people I met on my trip down south knew where Squamish was, but not many had been here or knew anything about the climbing.
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