Serious Question For All You Colorado Climbing Experts!

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survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 13, 2008 - 09:44am PT
Hey guys and gals,

I have been told that July is a good time for RMNP and the Diamond.

A friend of mine who used to be a climber e-mailed me and suggested that Colorado had so much snow in the high country that the Diamond wouldn't be in condition until August.

What do those of you who really know have to say about this?
Thanks for the input you hangdogs!!!!
Bruce
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 11:35am PT
Randy Leavitt once called The Diamond: "a seeping gash".
He must've caught it a little early...
(in truth I think he said it never dried out one particular year)

Hard to say for sure from where I'm sitting (on my asss).

I'm no expert on The Diamond; only been up it once, but I was in the high country yesterday and yes there is good snow accumulation, but I'd wait and see what kind of spring precipitation we get.

As the summer develops, I'm sure you could monitor the situation through Mountain Project.
(plenty of "experts" over there).
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Mar 13, 2008 - 11:39am PT
I've been snowed off the diamond in June, July, and August. I have climbed it as early as first week of June and as late as first week of september. It's the mountains, hard to make generalizations, but July tends to be a likely time window.
goatboy smellz

climber
colorado
Mar 13, 2008 - 11:43am PT
A couple of linkys to check before your visit.

NOAA's site at 12,000' on Longs.
http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?site=BOU&llon=-106.62&rlon=-105.25&tlat=41.22&blat=39.86&smap=1&mp=1&map.x=184&map.y=179

Updated conditions through out the park.
http://www.totalclimbing.com/page.php?pname=rmnp&archive=1
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 12:03pm PT
Thanks a lot you guys. I thought I was gonna have to bump myself, no bites for awhile...

Tar, I knew I could count on you for something wise and wise ass!!

Jaybro, That's about what I expected, but thought if it was unusual "deep like" up there that it might be hard to even get started.

Goat, those are cool looking links, I'll keep an eye on them.
Bruce
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Denver, Colorado
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:17pm PT

photo taken 5 days ago of the "cables" route, Diamond peeking out on the left.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 12:18pm PT
Thanks stich-
Further input is welcome you all!! This ol' hound needs all the beta he can get!! We are looking at a trip on the Diamond, but also some of the long moderates in there.
Bruce

Edit: Wow, that's a bitchin' photo..
Those little tiny specky things appear to be humanoid in shape..scarey! Maybe homie's not supposed to be inna first grade...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:23pm PT
That is a really cool photo.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:30pm PT
Judging by what I can see in that photograph, that doesn't look like excessive accumulation for The Cables route and the summit area above The Diamond.

We've had quite a lot of wind this year; very strong and persistent, so certain aspects are stripped clean, while lee slopes are loaded, a scenario which isn't necessarily unusual.
eeyonkee

Trad climber
Golden, CO
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:31pm PT
I'd say that August is probably a little better than July. Colorado typically sees a monsoonal weather pattern with a lot of moisture from the south in July. It typically ends sometime in early August.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder Colorado
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:34pm PT
maybe I'm wrong but
it kinda seems Longs is the epicenter for changeability
regarding weather/climbing conditions,
in the Range.
Euroford

Trad climber
chicago
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:40pm PT
awesome photo!

i'm no expert, but i've been spending about 2 weeks a year for the last 5 in RMNP.

we were up there in mid july two years ago and had a week of rain/nastyness followed by 5 days of -perfect- weather with temps in the 70's during the day and 50's at night with no storms. on day 6 we got -slammed- with a nasty storm that lasted for hours, machine gunned the mountain with lightning and hailed/rained for hours. after that, it slipped into the normal afternoon thunderstorm pattern and moderate summer temps. we were on the wall, but i guess they had near 100's down in the estes valley.

that was the single best weather window i've experienced out there. i've gone later in the season and had it more stable, but much cooler. overall, later june through early august seams to be the best, but expect daily but brief storms.

overall through, i've not planned my RMNP trips around the weather, if i had time to get out, i've gone in march through october, and i've had both good and bad weather at any time. maybe their is some science to that, and i'd have to reckon it has allot to do with the snowpack, but i wouldn't necessarily stress it too much. plan for the worst, hope for the best, just go out and get some.

depending on what you plan to do on the diamond, you can go pretty light, and bail pretty quick. or cowboy up and arm yourself to deal with it. YMMV

if your up in RMNP and the weather is total suck, you can always hop in the car and drive down to eldo and still get some climbing done.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:42pm PT
Per optimal conditions, ditto what eeyonke said.
August is typically a drier month.

That's a good generality for overall expectation.
The secondary issue, this idea of snow load on the summit melting into the cracks on The Diamond, you will have to wait and see...
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Denver, Colorado
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:46pm PT
Anything up high in RMNP is always an "alpine experience" along with all of the inherent dangers involved. I'm sure that any of these guys on here can tell you stories of sudden snowstorms, lightning, hail etc. in the summer (especially hail and lightning that time of year). But, that's the beauty of it, keeps ya closer to your maker, not a sport climb experience.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 12:52pm PT
Ain't that the truth ydpl8s.

Best way to stay out of trouble on The Diamond is to plan on topping out not much later than, preferably before 12 noon.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 12:59pm PT
Yeah, I can dig the closer to my maker aspect...never was a sport guy. I just may not have the option to bump it into August anyway. Too many stars and planets aligning for July. I like the suggestion of bailing to Eldo if necessary, but we will be armed and psyched as the group of us are all "mature"
(ie.. old!) and experienced, I just haven't done anything up there.

What's the best guidebook???

Bruce

Edit: I may be too "mature" to get up it by noon Tarman....
Euroford

Trad climber
chicago
Mar 13, 2008 - 01:03pm PT
i prefer the gillet guides, but also have the rossiter guides. i'd buy both really. they both split for the high peaks and the estes valley, so its 4 books in total. make sure you hit up lumpy ridge for a warmup. my favorite crag!

when you have limited time, you may or may not get the weather you want. all ya can do is go giv-er, but its so damn cool being out that, that even if you bail its still a good day. be keanly aware of your retreat.

survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 01:08pm PT
Euroford,
Yikes, I don't know if'n I wanna buy four books. Can I narrow it down? Guess I'll buy four if I have to.
I will definitely plan on hitting Lumpy Ridge. I've heard others mention it. Moderate route names?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 01:09pm PT
All joking aside, I really mean it about the 12 noon thing.

By one o'clock in the high peaks in Colorado, it's not uncommon, in fact almost the rule, to be toasted by hail and lightning, (especially on The Diamond as Ray alluded), when just an hour earlier everything was peachy.

Definitely less serious at Lumpy Ridge.
klk

Trad climber
cali
Mar 13, 2008 - 01:14pm PT
that photo is really cool.

based on my past experience, your best bet for a weather window is to be there when i'm not there. either a week before i arrive or the week after i leave should be perfect.

three summer trips, three brutal monsoons. and i mean 830 AM and already lightening up high stuff. next time im just going to the frickin alps.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 01:17pm PT
Yeah, I'm fully aware that you weren't joking Roy. Seriously, I'll do my best...:) I'll bring my Hardman suit if I can still get into it!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 01:23pm PT
I would recommend purchasing the 2 Rossiter guides; I think he puts out a better product with near art quality topos.

I have an old Gillette guide which you can borrow when you get here.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 01:27pm PT
Uh...you can bring your book and keep it in your back pocket when we rope up together!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 01:30pm PT
What do these photos have to do with climbing in RMNP?
Not much really, I just had a hankering to post some photos.

Yesterday in the Indian Peaks, just south of RMNP.
The Arestua hut:




From the summit of Guinn Mountain, looking west toward the divide and Rollins Pass:

survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 01:35pm PT
Niiice! It all helps me psych up!
Seriously Roy, I would love to borrow that book, but even better to have you around for a few days. I think you know all the sorry players.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 01:39pm PT
I'm planning on it.
I'm having Lisa polish up my walker.
(I'd do it but I get too big an arm pump).
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 01:53pm PT
30 years later, you're still cracking me up.
I'll see if I can get mine polished up too, so I look good as I retreat!
Ouch!

climber
Mar 13, 2008 - 01:53pm PT
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 02:11pm PT
Not a good place for a giant in shorts!!!
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Denver, Colorado
Mar 13, 2008 - 02:32pm PT
"based on my past experience, your best bet for a weather window is to be there when i'm not there. either a week before i arrive or the week after i leave should be perfect."


Too funny!!! Would be even more funny if I didn't relate so much to that experience. One time I was down in the Sangre's on the Crestone Needle climbing the Ellingwood Waterfall (AKA the Arete)
ADK

climber
truckee
Mar 13, 2008 - 02:44pm PT
Ive never been up the diamond, but Id shoot for July and if its too snowy, Id look further south to the sangres. Its far removed from the front range crowds, and the range collectively has enough moderate alpine routes to keep you busy for weeks.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 02:53pm PT
Are the Sangres covered in the aforementioned guide book?
steelmnkey

climber
Vision man...ya gotta have vision...
Mar 13, 2008 - 02:55pm PT
Hey, that looks like my buddy Bill in the snow up there in that picture!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 03:03pm PT
No, they are not.
I think you gonnah be plenty busy with RMNP.

I have the guidebooks for the Sangres too...
bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 13, 2008 - 03:03pm PT
I climbed on the Diamond as early as late May to later to early September...depending on the route and which side of the wall you climb on. The lower east face doesn't dry out till mid-July, the left side of Upper East face dries out earlier and the right side later due to seepage.

You can expect storms at any time and crowds on the weekends on the popular routes.

Go to Mountainproject.com for more information on routes.

The Yellow Wall.


Aslo...the Chasm View Wall has two really classic routes, easier approach and get the sun longer. You might want to check it out before to the Diamond.

The Red Wall.



survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 03:16pm PT
Thanks Bob.

Yeah, we will definitely be into some warm up action. Thanks for the feedback.
bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 13, 2008 - 03:27pm PT
survival...call me if you like to get out when you get here...the Black Wall on Mt. Evans is also another great alpine area.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 04:55pm PT
Bob, sounds great, where is that?

bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 13, 2008 - 05:09pm PT
Survival...here you go:

http://www.mountainproject.com/v/colorado/alpine_rock/mt_evans/105745699
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Mar 13, 2008 - 06:09pm PT
Survival, if July is your window frame go for it, just watch the daily patterns. If you extend the quest to Lumpy and the rest of RMNP you'll pretty much have something cool to climb every day.

-The Bowel of the Owl
-rat/tigers tooth
-Turnkorner (they tell me)
-J Crack, mega-star dick wrenching classic!
-don't even go if you don't climb Crack 'o'Fear (kidding, sorta)

-There are worse days than jogging up the keyhole and down the cables, or viesaversa.

or you could drive 100 miles north to vedauwoo and climb every day; june through August. If you make it that many days you will be dead or the strongest climber on earth.
Euroford

Trad climber
chicago
Mar 13, 2008 - 06:59pm PT
lol, toproped crack of fear a couple of years ago. haha, yeah right. i'd die if i tried to lead that thing!

vera climbing that in front range freaks is one of my favorites.

bummed that they moved the parking lot at lumpy. after a day on the rock we'd sit at that picknick table, drink a six pack and get whiplash from looking back and forth between the owls and the diamond.

well not too mention, after a day on kors flake walking any further is kinda a bumber...


i'll be out in boulder in a couple of weeks, doubt I'll get up to the high country though!
bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA
Mar 13, 2008 - 07:05pm PT
From my experience it really depends on the route you want to do. There is a big patch of snow at the start of the 4th pitch of the Casual Route that can hang around well into July if the spring is wet and cold. So, I don't think you make a blanket statement about the condition of the Diamond.

Of course, if you want to know about the immediate conditions, it is Colorado and it can rain, sleet or snow at just about anytime of the year.

Bruce
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 13, 2008 - 08:35pm PT
Here is a short list of the obvious, classic and prominent big rock climbs in Rocky Mountain National Park.
Not trying to trot out a list of hard-man routes here, just some nice introductory moderates.
I would stay away from all of this stuff on the weekends.

The Diamond, Casual Route 5.10-
Hallett Peak, Culp Bossier, 5.8
Petit Grepon, South Face, 5.8 (SW Corner, less crowded, 5.9)
Mount Meeker, Flying Buttress, 5.9 or 10
Notchtop, Direct South Ridge, 5.9
Spearhead, Sykes Sickle, 5.9

Give me a few minutes and I'll come up with a tick list for Lumpy Ridge.
Decko

Trad climber
Colorado
Mar 13, 2008 - 10:09pm PT
Mid to late July you'll be fine. We can have a huge winter with tons of snow, but it always seems like we get a couple of weeks of super hot dry weather and the park and the Diamond dry out.....

But what do I know I just guided in RMNP for 3 years...

Get an early start, like 1st light and you won't have to worry about lightning
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2008 - 11:04pm PT
This is so cool you guys. I go away for a few hours and I just come back to more killer beta. It's going to take me awhile just to digest all this. Books to buy, routes to look up, links to look at. Sometimes I get fed up with what seems to be a whacked political site and then a day like this. My faith in climbers is well placed!!
Bruce
Euroford

Trad climber
chicago
Mar 14, 2008 - 12:33am PT
when given a good topic, this site turns around pretty quick!

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 14, 2008 - 11:09pm PT
Lumpy Ridge

Following a solid experience with Yosemite, I found Lumpy Ridge not to be the most tantalizing granite destination. It sometimes presents incipient, quartz crystal lined cracks. Yet, Lumpy provides lots of variety and it is graced with a superb view of RMNP; after a time, you will warm to it and find the area quite charming.

Conversely, for the trad climber visiting Colorado, especially a climber who has enjoyed extensive benefit from the pristine granite of Yosemite, the California Needles, and Taquitz Rock, the novelty of Eldorado Canyon provides far more stimulating an interesting climbing than does Lumpy Ridge, primarily because the complex, flint-hard sandstone of Eldo represents such an enjoyable contrast to most of what one finds in California.

That said, without a good background in complex moves obtained, say, from bouldering, Eldorado can take some getting used to; so alternatively, Lumpy Ridge comprises a lot of climber friendly granite.

The big climbs in RMNP are typically steeper and more demanding than those found at Lumpy Ridge: they fit into the category of somewhat serious high mountain routes, so that's a treat. Lumpy would be a great warmup for The Park and it certainly does have a handful of terrific routes in its own right.

There are so many routes at Lumpy Ridge I would be curious to see what people put on their list of favorites; here's a handful of multi pitch climbs that I liked.


The Owl:

Crack of Fear, 5.10+
(uber classic for the area: OW probably 10-, while the crux is establishing & exiting the undercling)


The Right Book:

Fat City, 5.10B
(offers a good section of clean diagonal hand jamming)


The Bookmark:

Melvin's Wheel, 5.8
(decent and varied crack climbing)


Sundance Buttress:
(arguably one of the better rocks at Lumpy Ridge)

Grapevine, 5.8+ or 9+
(interesting moderate cracks)

Mainliner, 5.9
(varied and interesting crack climbing)

Bonzo, 5.10-
(just one pitch, leading to some optional harder stuff, with some cool jamming through solid diorite intrusions)

Mr. President, 5.10D
(super neato tight chimney, followed by a section of steep, tricky hands)

Turnkorner, 5.10A
(if overhanging squeeze chimney sounds tasty, this route is a must do, good hand jamming as well)
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Mar 14, 2008 - 11:57pm PT
I'm with Bruce and Bob; depends on the route.
The further right the later in the summer you want to catch it.

The route at the left edge, Pervertical Sanctuary, is for pussies I hear.
goatboy smellz

climber
colorado
Mar 15, 2008 - 08:14am PT
Ron, I believe the correct nomenclature is "p@ssies that free solo".
Didn't you get the memo about Steph?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 16, 2008 - 01:09pm PT
Before The Diamond dries out,
There's still plenty of snow in the backcountry to slide around on...
Yesterday, heading up toward Saint Vrain glacier, along the southern edge of Rocky Mountain National Park:

Sawtooth Peak from the car:



Add motion:



And Sawtooth gets closer:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 16, 2008 - 01:12pm PT
A few hours later,
Deep into the Saint Vrain drainage:



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 16, 2008 - 01:15pm PT
Add more motion:


Sasquatch tracks:



Elk Tooth sits at the head of the drainage above the glaciers:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 16, 2008 - 01:29pm PT
My turnaround point, at 4:30 in the afternoon:



Sliding back to the car before nightfall:

Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder Colorado
Mar 16, 2008 - 01:35pm PT
really nice Roy

Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Mar 16, 2008 - 02:45pm PT
Quite a trek, Roy! I reckon the roundtrip at over 20 miles, and breaking trail the whole way? Even Lisa would consider that a nice workout.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 16, 2008 - 04:45pm PT
Hi Ricky,

Starting at Beaver Res, well tracked to Cony Flats for the first hour and a half (very popular), then trailbreaking through heavy, wet, sticky snow down the 4WD road into St Vrain drainage, where I met up with about 1/4 mile of tracks, then breaking trail all the rest of the way in.

I usually do it from Peaceful Valley, then past Camp Dick and straight on up the Saint Vrain. Probably the same effort either way, then not quite getting up into the glaciers, my turn around at a small lake in the trees, I figure 16-17 mile RT, usually takes 7.5 hrs going solo.

Left the car at 12 noon, back by 7:30PM. Now if I could roll out of bed before 9am, I might make it all the way in.

No ski poles...Arduous! My hip flexors are toast!!!.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 16, 2008 - 09:04pm PT
Yo Stich!
Here's a couple snapshots from our tour up to blue Lake in January:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 16, 2008 - 09:07pm PT
Mr. Stich, proud and goggled up:



Mount Toll, in winter regalia:



Paiute Peak, laid-back and regal:

WBraun

climber
Mar 16, 2008 - 09:11pm PT
I don't see any skiers or tracks in the above bowel.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 16, 2008 - 09:15pm PT
That's because we spend hours getting to these places and then turn around and go home!
spectreman

Trad climber
Fort Collins
Mar 17, 2008 - 03:55pm PT
Lumpy has some great routes. Here's a list of classics:

Pear Buttress
J-Crack
Melvins Wheel
White Whale
Climb of the Ancient Mariner
Loose Ends
Fat City to Cheap Date (best route at Lumpy?)
Thindependance to Loose Ends to Cheap Date
Stretch Marks
Pressure Drop
Finger Licking Good
Living Dead

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 19, 2008 - 04:47pm PT
High up on Turnkorner, Sundance, at Lumpy Ridge:



Crack of Fear on the Twin Owls:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 19, 2008 - 04:49pm PT
And speaking of RMNP

The Diamond!
I've only been up it once, via the Yellow Wall.

One of my favorite shots of Layton Kor, cruising those finger locks and long reaches on the Yellow Wall:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 19, 2008 - 04:52pm PT
The South Ridge of Notchtop, a high quality RMNP 5.9:



Entering the crux headwall, up near the top:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 19, 2008 - 04:57pm PT
The Petite Grepon:

Pewf

climber
nederland
Mar 19, 2008 - 05:04pm PT
Purty Blue Lake pics!

As for Lumpy, I remember sore toes from pasting feet into those flared crystal filled things that seemed to look so splitter from the ground. But I also remember Orange Julius (spelling?) being fun, with some sort of cool hand traverse. I liked Fat City crack too.

spectreman

Trad climber
Fort Collins
Mar 19, 2008 - 07:34pm PT

Climbers on Casual Route, Black Dagger, Yellow Wall, and D7. George Lowe is the top climber on D7 (I think that's what they did). He did it car to car that day at the age of 70 something?!!!!!
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Mar 19, 2008 - 07:53pm PT
Spectreman,
you are soooo busted.
Don't know when you were there but today George is 64.
I believe the car to car part though.
spectreman

Trad climber
Fort Collins
Mar 19, 2008 - 07:59pm PT
Thanks Ron, That's why the question mark. I couldn't believe he could be in his seventies but I wasn't sure. Pretty impressive even though he is only 64! What a great guy. He was super happy to be up there and was just having a fun outing on the Diamond.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 21, 2008 - 11:37am PT
From Climbing number 64, January - February 1981



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 21, 2008 - 11:38am PT


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 21, 2008 - 11:39am PT

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 22, 2008 - 12:39pm PT
From Climbing number 48, May - June 1978:



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 22, 2008 - 12:40pm PT


Rhodo-Router

Gym climber
Otto, NC
Mar 22, 2008 - 12:48pm PT
survival-
take note in that picture of all the parties on the Diamond. See how the Casual Route is the only one featuring permanent shade? It's too bad that this is the easiest route on the face, but so it goes. You get a couple pitches in the sun before you traverse into that corner, and then you shiver and wonder what's taking homie so friggin' long to lead that pitch. Possibly it's wet. Likely you are waiting for other parties. Piton Ron's effort over to the left, Pervertical Sanctuary, is a bit harder (sustained but straightforward jamming) but soaks up solar gain as long as it's there to soak. The Diamond Freeway, a link-up involving several routes on the right side of the Yellow wall, is also a good bet for 5.10 crack climbing.

Any way you slice it, the place is rad. I don't even go up there until I see a bit of Canadian clarity sweeping down to push the thunderstorms out in the late summer, cuz it's a long way to go to end up bailing and I've had enough close calls with the lightning for one lifetime. A good strategy for dealing with the likely traffic on such a day is to have a couple of backup routes in mind and the rack to climb them in case someone has beat you to the chosen line. Stuff still falls off up there,
p1, yellow wall

and fighting over one foothold freezing with your partner at a hanging stance is a crummy way to spend a Diamond day.

And then, you look over to the right to see the happy people climbing in the sun on the Red Wall...this is indeed excellent training for the Diamond- same approach, shorter routes, same altitude. I have never climbed there.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 24, 2008 - 02:09am PT
YEAH!! I have been out of town for a week and you guys just rolled it up. It's the middle of the night here, so I'll have to tackle some of that text later. Really got ol' Roy going with posting some ultra cool stuff there. I'm getting psyched but of course won't have time to take in near what I want. Thanks for the great stuff.
B
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Mar 24, 2008 - 02:59am PT
hey there ydp18s...man, WHAT A PICTURE!...

thanks for the share of it....
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Mar 24, 2008 - 03:03am PT
hey there tarbuster... say, great pics, too... i did not backtrack enough....

just had seen that SHEER ROCK... sure like that snow-range, though.. .thanks guys..
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 31, 2008 - 12:05pm PT
We had spring warming conditions for the last week or so.
But yesterday we got some snow, so I decided to go out for a tour and a look see.
I skied the seven miles up Wild Basin at the southern border of Rocky Mountain National Park,
A nice place to end the tour is Thunder Lake, at the patrol cabin just under the east face of Mount Alice.

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 31, 2008 - 12:08pm PT
Poor visibility yesterday to be sure,
But nice fresh snow and a sweet atmosphere:



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 31, 2008 - 12:10pm PT


Euroford

Trad climber
chicago
Mar 31, 2008 - 12:12pm PT
cool map!

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 31, 2008 - 12:13pm PT
The patrol cabin at Thunder Lake, yesterday at 4 p.m.:



The view from Thunder Lake, same time last year:



The view of Mount Alice about 4 miles up the trail, last year, during clear weather.
This is a big face and one of the Southern features in Rocky Mountain National Park:

survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 31, 2008 - 12:18pm PT
WOW! Roy, it's fun to look at that map and your photos and sort out a couple things, awesome.
I've had Buggs and Keith on here looking at this stuff too.
Now if I could quit reading and start getting fit!
bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 31, 2008 - 01:09pm PT
Nice shots Roy....looks like I won't be fishing up Wild Basin anytime soon.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 17, 2008 - 09:12pm PT
We've been getting some good snow-
Enough that I can still grab a few tasty tours.
Today I went up to Heart Lake, just below the broad cirque at Rogers Pass:



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 17, 2008 - 09:15pm PT


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 17, 2008 - 09:17pm PT


survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 17, 2008 - 09:18pm PT
Hey Tarbuster,

Looks good! That is a gorgeous area, I can't wait to see some of it. Soooo.... lemme see a picture from a little higher up ?....

OOPS! You were sliding them in even as I wrote!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 17, 2008 - 09:18pm PT


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 17, 2008 - 09:21pm PT
Looking at the Continental Divide above Heart Lake:




Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 22, 2008 - 11:13am PT
From Climbing number 74, September/October 1982:



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 22, 2008 - 11:15am PT


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 22, 2008 - 11:28am PT
Lots of snowfall in a short period of time this winter,
Coupled with a ton of West wind as well...

You may also choose to notice, in the one self-portrait I took,
I am sporting the inaugural adoption of eKat's hat!!!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 22, 2008 - 11:55am PT
"Tour to turn" spring skiing season is probably just getting underway;
    For the type of ski touring I do, "tour to turn around", we will need a cold snap and a dusting...

And yes, I used a small tripod.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 22, 2008 - 01:08pm PT
Awesome Roy,
I'll just have to print this whole damn thread and bring it with me. Keep it up!
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Apr 22, 2008 - 01:54pm PT
"Bold Adventures, Evanston Illinois"
-unh oh, the until now seceret mecca of midwestern mountaineering, has been -'outed'
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 26, 2008 - 09:58pm PT
Got out today for probably the last tour of my ski season.
The Little Haute Route, starting at the East Portal of the Moffat Tunnel and ending at Eldora:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 26, 2008 - 10:10pm PT
That's eKat's hat, striking a nice profile:



After getting some elevation out of the South Boulder Creek drainage,
You get a pretty good view of James Peak:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 26, 2008 - 10:14pm PT
The Continental Divide above Forest Lakes:



These cornice are humongous!



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 26, 2008 - 10:25pm PT
Heading under the divide towards Guinn Mountain and Yankee Doodle Lake:



Down in Jenny Creek behind Eldora ski area:



Last tracks:

survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 27, 2008 - 12:02am PT
Very cool Roy, I hope the sun shows up and melts some of that stuff before I get there!
Euroford

Trad climber
chicago
Apr 27, 2008 - 12:20am PT
freekin cool stuff.

hoping to hit up lumpy ridge next weekend... never been out there this early in the season, but i hear its in good shape...

Double D

climber
Apr 27, 2008 - 01:18am PT
Nice pics Roy...man that makes me seriously miss back-country skizging!

Had to wonder 'bout this though, "if overhanging squeeze chimney sounds tasty"....seriously? Since when does a squeeze chimney, much less and overhanging one, sound tasty???

I remember BITD doing Hotline,on Elephant Rock, several times and each time, the 10a flared chimney just kicked my arse!

Happy squeezen.
Robb

Social climber
Pick Up Truck Heaven
Apr 27, 2008 - 03:42am PT
Excellent post Roy, looking forward to the late skinny's in the big hills.
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