Ned Gillette and Ellesmere Island

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Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Original Post - Dec 7, 2007 - 12:22pm PT
I posted the following on the Telemarktips forum and am posting this here by suggestion of one of the responses.

For some years I have been searching for a published account of Ned Gillette's Ellesmere Island expedition and to date my search has turned up nothing outside of a few passing comments. Does anybody know of a published account of that expedition and, or have an idea as to anybody else who may know? I would love to get my hands on a copy if anything was published. The Ellesmere Island expedition has always intrigued me and every year as the seasons change I renew my search for information. Thanks for any help you are able to provide.
SteveW

Trad climber
Denver, CO
Dec 7, 2007 - 12:39pm PT
I thought he wrote a book about it. . .
You might check with Outside magazine or National Geo Expolorer.
They might have had an article on it. I remember reading an
article in Outside a loooong time ago that was about his
planning for the trip, but not the trip itself.
I was lucky enough to meet Ned after he & Rowell & ?
just had climbed Mustagatah (the first western climbers in
China) in '77. I did a pretty neat radio story on it--he was
quite a gentleman, and a great explorer. Too bad bandits killed him in Pakistan.
Good luck.
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Dec 7, 2007 - 12:54pm PT
There's a good book by a Canadian traveller, Jerry Kobalenko, about adventures all around Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands. He's travelled there perhaps 20 times over the last two decades, in spring and summer. The book is called "The Horizontal Everest". It's not what you're asking about, but a good on topic read.
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 7, 2007 - 02:20pm PT
Thanks for the help. All of my online searches have turned up nothing. I've found articles on various other expeditions by Gillette, but all were after Ellesmere Island. Next week I'm going to try the library and see what their periodical databases turn up. I may need to then search for a hard copy, back issue of a magazine. That seems so old fashioned.
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Dec 16, 2007 - 10:35pm PT
Hey FB, here you go!
Ned was my uncle – my Mom’s brother. We sifted through her file of Ned stuff (mine’s in storage…) and found a couple of articles. I don’t know exactly when they were published, but it was in the late 70’s in a local Vermont newspaper (as you can tell by the type-set…). I had to chop both pages of the first article in half because Photobucket only allows 800 pix max… I would have posted larger images that would be easier to read, but the site wouldn’t let me… I left the Nike and Volvo adds in because they show the era. Hope you can read this and it helps your search! If the text is too difficult to read, I can email you larger versions.













Ellesmere - Not the greatest scan, but you get the picture.
I found this photo in a more recent (1990) article on Ned in a Dartmouth alumni magazine.
Photo by Ned Gillette.





This article has nothing to do with the Ellesmere trip, but I like it and decided to include it here.
The last line is rather ironic…





Now I’ve got to go get another beer to say “cheers” to the greatest hero a kid could ever have. I wouldn’t be a climber if it weren’t for him. We love you Ned, and we miss you a lot!
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Dec 17, 2007 - 03:26am PT
Wow, ask an yea shall receive. He was your uncle, minerals? I remember him from those badger pass xc touring races, he once gave my dad a bottle of champagne for coming in last. (he'd had the flu)
Big Kahuna

Ice climber
Hell Hardest climb I did was getting out of bed.
Dec 17, 2007 - 03:41am PT
Dam B! Put that goat on him that you sport and you are his mini me! As well as a dam fine climber in your own right.
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 17, 2007 - 11:15am PT
Thank you so much for the response, great articles. I picked up this information from the telemark tips forum.

"The Magazine your looking for is Mariah winter issue 1977, Vol. II
Number 4. I know this is the one because I'am looking at it as I type. Ned is on the cover sking on light weight 75mm gear, with those crummy light weight ankle boots I first tried to tele in.
This was the original Outside Magazine."

The poster mentioned he will attempt to get the article scanned and posted somewhere.

I'd love a copy of this emailed to me, thank you. I can read the text, but larger is better in my advanced age.

Got to love the Nike shoes!
Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Muir Woods National Monument, Mill Valley, Ca
Dec 17, 2007 - 02:11pm PT
I sent a link to this thread to a friend who worked in The Valley in the Winter of '75-76.
They did a lot of running together, and he mentioned that he tried to keep up with Ned
on X-country skis - Ned had been an Olympian in the 30k. I remember him telling me
stories about Ned at the time of his senseless death several years ago.

captain chaos

climber
Dec 17, 2007 - 04:14pm PT
Minerals.. your uncle was a very good friend of mine, and we did two great trips together, one was the Everest Grand Circle with Jan Reynolds, Steve McKinney and Jim Bridwell, and like all those kinds of trips there were some interesting times. The other one was on Aconcagua with Pete Patterson and Earl Wiggins, as a matter of fact when we were on our way to Aconcagua from Santiago we got stuck in Portillo for the night due to a slide over the pass. The Portillo ski area had just closed but there was still lots of snow and so we went out and tried our new skis and packs full of new gear. Ned wanted to try the lake run even though it was half water now, Pete and I knew the area well from past trips there and didn't recommend doing it, as we knew of people falling in even when it was frozen. Ned really wanted to do it badly and so finally we agreed to give it a go with the plan to hug the bank to get around the lake, if it would be possible anyway. I got to the bottom of the lake run first and when I looked up, Ned went blasting by me skating across the lake, I almost sht but then thought well if he falls in I'll know its not cool and so I followed in pursuit, about 200 meters out he broke though and disappeared I couldn't believe my eyes, then out of nowhere he popped up and was screaming for help. I looked back and saw that Pete & Earl were skirting the bank, I had two choices, go and try to save Ned and drown with him if it didn't work, or get my ass out of there before I broke though as well. In the end, I knew I had no choice... I had to go over there and try and pull him out as it was clear that he was going to drown if I didn't. The surface I was on was about 6 inches of wet snow with 3/4 of an inch of slush ice at the bottom and it was moving like swells in the ocean from Ned's thrashing to keep afloat with skis on and pack now full of water... so without hesitation, I went forward and spread eagled out and stuck my pole out to Ned, although he only managed to grab the tip of the pole, I got him half way out and then with no warning he lost his grip and down into the darkness he went... all I could see were bubbles and an eerie quite, suddenly he burst to the top of the surface with an wild electric type force I have never seen before... screaming bloody murder for help, I reached out with my pole and told him to grab around the basket, which he did, I gave a huge tug and yanked his ass out, skis, backpack full of water and all... which of course added a huge amount of weight onto the fragile surface we were on. I mean it didn't hold his weight when he was moving across it 60 pounds lighter (or more), before I could say anything he blew out of there like a bolt of lightening and was on the bank on the other side of the lake before I could blink. I put on the after burners and got my ass out of there as well, it was an intense situation and one that I'll never forget. The next trip Ned had planned was the row boat trip to Antarctica from Puenta Arenas, of course he asked me to go, I gave it a thought and said I don't know... I really have no experience with that kind of thing, he assured me I had the right stuff and would be OK, and so he took me out rowing so I could see what it was like, the first results were disastrous as I sunk his rowing scull out in the middle of some lake not far from his place in Stowe. I continued rowing and managed to keep the thing afloat but it wasn't enough for me to think I was the had the right kind of experience in the big seas like that to be of much help should something go wrong and so I declined. Anyway, I have many good stories of the two trips I did with Ned, so should you or any of your family wish to hear some, let me know, OK... I really miss Ned, he was a good friend, a great person with a spirit this earth does not see very often- Craig
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 18, 2007 - 01:00pm PT
Thanks for the emailed articles - my email reply got bounced back. All the best, Alan
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Dec 19, 2007 - 01:33am PT
Alan, glad I could be of help. My Mom seems to remember that issue of Mariah, and thinks that she has a copy buried somewhere. She has also enjoyed reading this thread. Thank you. If the article is posted, could you post a link to it on this thread?

Craig, that is a great story! I remember seeing pictures of you in the Everest Grand Circle book… and I think we’ve been on El Cap at the same time. I would love to hear any more stories that you might have about Ned and I appreciate you taking the time to write! So, why is it that he kept falling into trouble and you guys kept plucking him out? :)

Yeah, I probably have a few stories that I could share…


I found these two on a poster:







Though it wasn’t a summit, I think this is kinda cool:





My hero:



I think this was on the Karakoram traverse in 1980 – a 300-mile winter ski crossing with Galen Rowell, Kim Schmitz, and Dan Asay.
Photo by Galen Rowell.



-Bryan Law
captain chaos

climber
Dec 19, 2007 - 11:21am PT
Bryan, its really good to see all these things on Ned... they bring back great memories, and its nice to see the photos of Ned in his element. Ned was a very passionate adventurer, and he was also smart enough to bring solid people on his trips, he never let his ego get in the way when others voiced their opinions and or made critical decisions, which I always admired, it was one of the main reasons things always worked out. I was floored when I got news of his death the entire situation and circumstances were unbelievable. I couldn't even imagine how wild and bizarre that must have been for both Ned & Suzie... like a nightmare that didn't go away when you woke up. The thing which really got my attention was that Ned got out of the tent and fought them off to protect Suzie you can't be any more noble then that. Ned was truly bold right down to the biter end, there are not enough words that I can come up with that show my respect towards Ned, his last moments were truly heroic, I can only hope to handle things the same way should I be confronted with something like that.

Riley, nice to hear that the Everest Grand Circle was a good motivator for you... the trip was pretty wild, it was all our first time over there, and to top it off it was in the middle of the winter, on the Nepalese portion of the trip anyway. We all got our eyes full to say the least... lots of close calls with some big old monster sized avalanches, and rock fall on Pumori that seemed to picked me out of the bunch for some reason, as every time I went across this one ice face, I would have these football to TV sized rocks come off from above me and beeline it straight at me going Mach 1... I would watch them until I saw their final line and then would dive and duck in the opposite direction, we were 3rd classing in this particular area and directly below was a big old cliff, you know the kind you don't walk away from. Anyway, this one day about 30 of them came off all at the same time, I couldn't follow them all and so I just dove down face first stuck my ice axe in and hung on hoping I wouldn't get hit... and by luck I didn't. I guess it was the Himalayas way of welcoming me, same type of thing happened on my first climb on El Cap and with Speed Skiing. It seems the spirits of these of things wanted to drive it home to me what was involved when you venture into their territory, and believe me, I got a full dose.

Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 20, 2007 - 12:14pm PT
Here is a link to the telemark tips Mariah article and the link to my photobucket account also. If I ever get my hands on the original article I'll rescan it in higher resolution. As it is the print is a bit tough to read, although I can make out most of it.

Got to love Camel sponsoring an expedition. Thanks for posting.

edit - forgot to post the link

http://www.telemarktalk.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=40141&start=45
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 20, 2007 - 12:21pm PT
Speaking of posters - any chance you have the Epoke 900 posters of the Ellesmere or Denali trips? If so, could you post a picture? When learning to cross country ski for the first time, the rental shop had these posters hanging on the wall. This was the first time I had heard of Epoke 900 skis, Ellesmere Island and Ned Gillette. I had to look up Ellesmere Island in an atlas. I feel old.

edit - I just noticed on the skis in the photo - remember the heel locators on the back?
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Dec 20, 2007 - 10:52pm PT
Jaybro, my Mom seems to vaguely remember Ned telling her a story about that day at Badger. Nothing like a good bottle to cure the flu, aye?

Yeah, Riley… EGC… a good book with great photos and some neat stories, for sure! It’s definitely an inspiration to read. He was an inspiration to many. Glad you enjoyed it.

Thank you for your kind words, Craig. Yeah, he was an amazing person in many ways, to say the least. It’s nice to hear about those days. If you’ve got more, we’re all eyes.

Alan, the first Ellesmere article that I posted was published in the Times-Argus (?) on 4/10/77 (or at least that’s what is typed on a second copy of the article that I found). Thanks for posting the link – that’s quite a long article! Neat snow formations… and I remember seeing the birthday party photo in another article or a slideshow a while back. The first photo of the guy on his belly is typical Ned humor – they were always clowning around, always having fun. Speaking of clowning around… reminds me of hearing about the stories of “The Great Canadian Food Fight” and such other infamous fun and games… Maybe someday Mom will dig out her copy of the Mariah issue. I looked through a few posters, but we have more somewhere. Susie also has a bunch of stuff… maybe one of the Epoke posters…? I’ll keep an eye out.



A few stories from a while back…

I had the chance to hang out with Ned a little bit over the years – both in the house where I grew up in California, and back East, when we went to visit him and my grandparents. One time, when I was a little kid (maybe around 8 or 10 years old) Ned let me loose in a candy store. I forget exactly where it was, but probably in Stowe. It was just like the saying goes… I was in heaven! And of course, this was the kind of thing that my parents or grandparents would never do (they knew better). I had a big bag and kept pilling on more and more candy. Ned paid for it, we got back in his car, and I proceeded to scarf down candy like it was my last meal. Life was great! We laughed and laughed. Anyways, he had to drop me off with my grandmother later that day and I was going to ride with her to Montpelier or down to Cape Cod (don’t remember exactly). By that time, I had eaten so much candy that I was absolutely WIRED! (Like I wasn’t a hyper kid to begin with…) My poor grandmother had to put up with me “bouncing off the walls” for a couple of hours, which she wasn’t very happy about. I don’t think Ned ever heard the end of that one! But we sure had fun!!! And that was Ned. He was a best friend.

Ned used to take me out around Stowe and we’d find all kinds of fun stuff to do. I remember driving out to one of the local ponds, with a kayak strapped to the top of his Subaru. I got in the kayak with its nose in the water, and he would pick up the back end of the kayak, hold it over his head, and then give it a good shove forwards. The kayak would go shooting out into the pond and I would laugh and say “Do it again, do it again…”

Another time, while in Stowe, we had to run a load of junk down to the local dump. When we were at the dump, I noticed an old pair of alpine skis that someone had discarded. I asked the guy at the dump if we could have the skis and he said “Sure, go ahead and take ‘em.” I’m not sure if I had any idea of what I wanted to do with the skis, but by the time we got back home, we had an idea. We were going to build a bobsled! So, we sifted through Ned’s woodpile, found a few scraps of lumber and went to work. We basically built a crude wooden box and then nailed the skis to the bottom of it (after we took the bindings off…). The cockpit was quite small – just big enough for a little kid. It was then time to take it for a spin (in the middle of summer). Ned lived in a neat house in the woods outside of Stowe and all of the local roads had a dirt surface. He grabbed a 20-foot section of an old climbing rope, tied it to the front of the bobsled, and then tied the other end to the rear bumper of his Subaru. It was time for a test run!

I climbed into the bobsled while he fired up the Suubie with the back hatch open and started towing me down the driveway. Then we headed down the dirt road in front of his house. He kept an eye on me out the back and I kept yelling “Faster, faster!” We got up to 22 mph and I was bouncing all over the place, with sparks flying off the ski edges and the biggest grin of my life on my face. At one point, the bobsled hit a pretty good size rock that tipped it over onto one ski for a quick moment, until it tipped back onto both skis. Laughing ecstatically, we zoomed around for a little while before heading back to his house. Test run number two never happened. When we got back, we took a look at the bottom of the skis… they were toast!

Thinking back on that day I realize how dangerous that bobsled ride was. We weren’t going very fast, but my shoulders and head were exposed above the top of the bobsled cockpit and I didn’t have any sort of helmet on. If that thing had tipped all the way over, it wouldn’t have been pretty… And my Mom probably would have killed him. But I survived and we had a great time. I couldn’t have had a better teacher to teach me how to have fun. Ned was an expert on fun.



Here are a few more images that I scanned:



Ned in his element, doing what he loved to do – Karakoram, 1980.
Photo by Galen Rowell



A classic photo from the New Zealand trip.
Photo by Jan Reynolds



The Sea Tomato, pre-voyage. This photo was taken in the evening, just offshore of Cape Cod. Ned let me tag along for this photo shoot, which at 14, was like another trip to the candy store. The photographer had a pretty neat setup going, with an assistant to hold lights and a flash. I had to hide inside the “padded cell” when it was time for the real photos…
Photo by Gregory Heisler



The Mad Rower.
Photo by Gregory Heisler



Another fun day in the Drake Passage.
Photo by Ned Gillette




Ned is on the right, my grandfather on the left, and I’m the dorky looking kid in the middle. Summer, 1984 – Ned was 39 and I was 12. Figured I’d throw this one in to go with my stories above.



I found a few things on Ned with a Google search…


An article on the tent designer, Bob Howe, with a blurb on Ned and the use of Bob’s tents on Ellesmere:
http://www.oregonphotos.com/Tent-Designer1.html


Highest point ever ascended on skis, Muztagh Ata:
http://www.skimountaineer.com/ROF/ROF.php?name=MuzTaghAta


“In Passing” …scroll down.
Hey Craig, you’re in this one too!
http://www.expeditionnews.com/Archives/EN9809.html


He was inducted into the National Ski Hall of Fame in 2000.
http://www.mtexpress.com/2000/08-09-00/8-9fame.htm


Here are a couple of AAJ covers with photos by Ned…

This one also has a cool Bradford Washburn Ama Dablam photo.
http://www.americanalpineclub.org/AAJO/pdfs/1983/00_cover_aaj1983.pdf#search="linck"

This one includes an Ed Cooper El Cap photo.
http://www.americanalpineclub.org/AAJO/pdfs/1981/00_frontispiece_aaj1981.pdf#search="linck"



An old article from the NY Times on Ned’s death:
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A04E4D8133AF937A2575BC0A96E958260

He took a round or two of buckshot in the stomach from a 12-gauge in the middle of the night and didn’t die (due to blood loss) until later the next day.





Hope that wasn’t too much for one post…
WBraun

climber
Dec 20, 2007 - 11:23pm PT
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Dec 20, 2007 - 11:25pm PT
Thanks, Werner!!!
Mtnmun

Trad climber
Top of the Mountain Mun
Dec 21, 2007 - 01:06am PT
Ned was an inspiration to anyone who loves adventure. Thank you for this insight to a very cool man.
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Dec 21, 2007 - 01:19am PT
Great stuff, minerals, those reminices bring so much more to the story...
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Dec 21, 2007 - 12:07pm PT
Hey Alan, Mom found some more posters… One has three photos, a “Mount McKinley Circum Navigation” logo in the center, and across the bottom it says… "Nortur distributors of: Epoke Skis, Rottefella Bindings, Suveren Boots, and Janus Clothing." There is also a short quote from Ned. We have three of the posters – one for Mom, one for me, and an extra. It’s too big to scan. Email me a mailing address and I’ll send you one! It might take a while because I’m back in my truck later today and won’t get a chance to be in front of a computer very often.


Write a book? Whew… dunno about that. I might be able to come up with enough for half of a chapter… Interesting idea, though. Thanks, Riley.


Nice to hear that you guys have enjoyed this thread.

Maybe we should thank Alan for starting the thread...? Thanks, Alan!
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 21, 2007 - 04:09pm PT
Thanks so much for the poster offer, I'll frame the poster and hang it in my gear room/gear museum. Among other things I collect old packs, stoves and assorted bits of vintage gear. I happen to have a pair of Suveren ski boots, still use them once in a while.

By the way, if anybody out there has a Paul Petzoldt Wilderness Equipment wool shirt that is gathering dust, let me know. I also need the issues of Wilderness Camping magazine from 1977.

I noticed someone linked Bruce's Oregon Photos web site to this post, I've been helping Bruce hunt down information for the site as well as scanning old catalogs and the like.

Ned's rowing trip is an amazing adventure. The thought of being in rough water on the open seas in anything smaller than a nuclear aircraft carrier scares the crap out of me.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Dec 21, 2007 - 04:26pm PT
Man O Man!
The Minerals makeshift Gilette sled story was really somethin'.

FB:
Your collection sounds cool.
A while back, you showed us a Rivendell Bombshelter right?
Very nice.

I had 3 Fisher Europa models:
the 88's, the white/red with aluminum edges
green 99's w/alum edges
and blue 99's w/steel

Traded them with Gary Neptune for a new set of new Tuas a bit ago, which get some good mileage...

Tom Carter still has a pair of those red Kastle LW's rat holed away.
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 21, 2007 - 04:43pm PT
Yes I did post the bombshelter photos, good memory.

Latest acquisition, the Class 5 Quim rucksack.

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Dec 21, 2007 - 05:43pm PT
That pack looks mint.
But waidaminute, those ain't stock bindings on them Epokes.
So you must be skiing them with newer nnn shoes?
Shoot, why not.

Would love to see a link to your collection.
captain chaos

climber
Dec 22, 2007 - 03:27pm PT
Great story about the bobsled Bryan... I can just hear Ned's laughter, its possible he was having more fun then you, let's keep in touch... and more stories later-

Those were some wild pictures of the boat trip, pretty unbelievable... Craig
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 27, 2007 - 03:28pm PT
The pack is nearly new, I snagged it from a Craigslist ad. The ski bindings are NNN BC and obviously not vintage. I found Merrell boots on a clearance rack and had corresponding bindings mounted on the 900's. Although I love vintage gear, I'm also frugal, some would call it cheap, and I could not resist the bargain.

I do not have my own website and actually don't have a lot of my gear photographed. Someday I would like to create a site, but for now here are a few shots of assorted pieces.
Hine Snowbridge (my favorite pack maker) Tamarack


Optimus 111C with Optimus mini oven.


Optimus 111T and Optimus 199


Cannondale tents - they made four models and I have three. I do not have the version with snow flaps, I believe the name was the Lackawanna.


Rivendell bombshelter in the rain.


Me on the Superior Hiking Trail with a Rivendell Giant Jensen and Hine Snowbridge fanny pack.


Same trip with a Sierra Designs Starflite.


Class 5 magazine ad from Backpacker.


Monte Dodge's website with vintage gear.
http://www.pbase.com/mad_monte1/_retro_outdoor_gear
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Dec 27, 2007 - 05:14pm PT
Thanks for those shots.
Man oh man, that Monte is a white gas burnin' archivist!
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 7, 2008 - 05:50pm PT
Minerals, did the email I sent to you ever get through? I tried a couple of different ways and the first one got bounced back.

Best regards,

Alan
tom woods

Gym climber
Bishop, CA
Jan 7, 2008 - 09:14pm PT
I'd always heard the name, but this thread has been a blast. Ned Gillette sounds like a extremely fun guy. Has anyone written a book about him?

The one thing that I am struck by is that his end came by human hands, not nature. People....f-in people. We just can't keep it togther can we? Rockfall, the ocean, avalanches they're all scary, but people take the cake for dangerous. What a terrbible shame.

Tom
Double D

climber
Jan 7, 2008 - 09:41pm PT
Brian,

Even though I only met Ned a couple of times and didn't know him that well, he was a great guy and always a crack-up.

You should write a book.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 8, 2008 - 01:02am PT
Right after they did this thing, I saw the Jan Reynolds slide show. Beautiful image after beautiful image. From the 1985 account, here are a few. Great read too!








Jim leading out of Camp I, in the "hole" as Jan (center) belays and Steve (left) waits his turn.


Veranda view of Everest (and Ned) from Camp I.




Craig (left) and Jan on Mingbo Glacier, below the Mingbo La.











Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 9, 2008 - 11:13am PT
Photo bump!
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Jan 9, 2008 - 01:01pm PT
Good bump! Thanks 144man!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 10, 2008 - 11:09am PT
Anytime, Ned was one of my heroes too! Grace flowed through everything that he did.
captain chaos

climber
Jan 10, 2008 - 12:13pm PT
Thanks for posting up some of the photos from that book Steve... they bring back some good memories. The passes were a pretty good hump for example, since we didn't have any Sherpas to accompany us, we had full loads. I remember climbing up and over the top of Mingbo pass on our first day with that full load. Ned tied in short and was climbing about 30 ft. behind me as he wanted to speed things up a bit. It was a steep hard snow slope and I couldn't get anything in that would hold much of anything and so I just ran it out, all I had was one ice axe and so it was a balancing act between placements... Jan was tied off to a rock the size of an hand frozen in the ice and that was it. If anything went wrong, we were out of there. When I got to the top, there was a cornice and so I had to chop a hole through it (which took forever) so we could get up and over, just when I was making the move to go over the top one of my ski poles sticking out of my pack caught the edge of the cornice and consequently I came really close to getting knocked backwards off my front points which would have resulted in a really bad scenario, basically we would all gotten chopped as we would have gone the distance. Due to knowing the severity of the outcome, I fought with everything I had to keep from being launched backwards and powered over the top, which of course was followed by the appropriate sigh of relief. The following words describe these situations well. "Life is a series of narrow escapes with sighs of relief in between" I believe many of us here can relate to that one- anyway... thanks again for posting up the pics- Craig

Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 10, 2008 - 11:10pm PT
Awesome story Craig. The classic Kor quote,"don't fall now or we'll both go!" has come into play for me too! What an awesome adventure to reflect back on.
I remember Jan telling a classic Bridwell story about one incident. Your party hadn't seen anybody in quite a while and stumbled upon some poor fellow, dazed by the dayglow outfits and all. Jim, being the point man, tried to engage him in conversation with predictable results and so he began to progressively raise his voice in repetition well past the point of embarassment for everybody else. All to no avail, of course!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 15, 2008 - 11:51am PT
Story bump!
Fat Ba$tard

Social climber
St. Paul, MN
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2008 - 09:42am PT
I've been a bit busy as of late, but wanted to post a photo of the poster Minerals sent me. I have not yet had a chance to get the framed poster on the wall so the photo is at a wierd angle. The size of the backpacks they used makes my back hurt just looking at them.



The local frame shop did their typical excellent job, I am quite pleased how it turned out. I think it looks really cool - the glare in the glass is just from the lighting, not part of the poster. I swear a similar poster from the Ellesmere Island expedition was done as well. If there is, I'll find one someday and hang them side by side.

Thanks again Minerals for the poster and to everyone else for sharing stories.



Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Feb 25, 2008 - 11:56am PT
Cool. Looks great, Alan!
tom woods

Gym climber
Bishop, CA
Feb 25, 2008 - 12:33pm PT
I went out and bought the grand circle book because of this thread. I'll let you know when I finish it.

Tom
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Feb 25, 2008 - 03:38pm PT
I've carried and hauled a few loads with Minerals. Now I understand. It's genetic!
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Feb 28, 2008 - 07:53pm PT
on topic
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Aug 22, 2009 - 11:28am PT
True adventure Bump!!!
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Aug 22, 2009 - 02:31pm PT
Bump for one of the greatest adventurers the
United States ever produced--Ned was on par with Eric Shipton.

A gentleman and just an incredible person.
You're missed, Ned.
mooser

Trad climber
seattle
Aug 22, 2009 - 04:24pm PT
Never met the man, but he was definitely a hero from a distance. A very sad, sad day when he died. This has been an incredible, redeeming thread. Thanks!
Fuzzywuzzy

climber
Aug 24, 2009 - 12:10pm PT
Hey -

Great stuff on Ned "the old stump-grinder"!

Capt C - excellent stories!! How are you -sound great. Classic photos of you all.

Patterson is still the mt monkey as usual.

Minerals - Is Debbie Law your mom?

If so I skied with her in the Rubies this past winter.

More info about Ellesmere can be gotten from Gary Bard. He has been there (done a traverse) and has Allans information/photos etc.

If you need his email write me.

Check out the PACKS in the Mac/Denali Poster!!!!

Allan Bard called it "the upside down ski tour".

Meaning they had HUGE packs and tiny shoes instead of small packs and big boots (which they had to carry along for the alpine sh#t anyway!!!

That Rowing trip turned Charlie Porter onto the ancient coastal migration routes of the early Americans - he is still down there doing archeology as far as I know.

Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Aug 25, 2009 - 10:55am PT
Fuzzy- You must have cut some turns with Ned as he was everywhere BITD! Any tales???
Fuzzywuzzy

climber
Aug 25, 2009 - 11:32am PT
Oh Yeah!

He was an outstanding man - as a friend, employer, you name it, Ned totally supported you.

Like a true friend he wasn't afraid to take a risk on you.

He hired me impromptu at the Camp 4 gas station in November of 1977 - asked me what I was doing that winter.

I figured I would make a plan eventually and he says, "What to teach skiing?"

When I replied that I had never taught anything he laughs, "Ah but you love it you'll be fine, come on out to Trapps". So Bardini and I drive the orange Opal Kadette to Vermont and skied our butts off under his gracious and generous command.

He was a character and an outstanding skier. Strong as a bull - but smart tactically and not above using the entire "tool-box". I have some pics of him skiing some demanding "deep yogurt in NZ somewhere- I'll look around.

Super open and innovative -He would instigate these great bull-sessions everynight exploring what worked during the lessons (this was all xc tract skiing) and we would howl at some of the techniques offered up. But he would seriously support us and urge everyone to try anything and to shun the then rigid PSIA models. Quoting Adi Yoerg, He would say, "Oh you boys you are using all that language - it is much easier to trick them into doing it"!!!!

He was essentially fearless, but not in an unfounded manner. He did his homework and knew how to put a team together. Understood what/who was needed and how that kind of coordination would contribute to the success of the venture. Look at those teams in the above trips- shitdala- those cats were the cream dela creme!!

Beyond all that he truly loved and encouraged spontaneous individuals - he preferred the company of men "With the bark on".

I think of him alot.

TC
oldcragster

Gym climber
WA
Aug 26, 2009 - 12:15am PT
fuzzy - you're right, working at Trapps with Ned and all the others, yourself included, was remarkable. I always tell folks Ned was the best boss I ever had. Absolute trust in people to come thru, and he raised the bar, so you did too. I was devastated when I heard the news of his death...same with Bardini. Those two years working with Ned and company were full of fabulous memories. I was invited to go on the ski around Denali and punked out.

Minerals, that picture brought back memories of Ned's parents, who visited enough that we got to know them a little and could see where Ned got some of his class. We were a rough crew of Californians recruited by Ned, yet his folks were gracious despite probably wondering what their son was up to bringing us all out to Vermont to teach xc-skiing.

I remember Ned showing me his collection of polar expedition, etc. books. It was quite extensive and he loaned me 'Endurance' on Shackleton's voyage, which I later purchased and still have. He had books on all the great polar explorers and studied them. I first met Ned thru Bev Johnson, fall of '75 in Yosemite. He and Doug Weins had climbed the Nose. Next year I was working at the Village Store as custodian where we saw each other often. Similar to you, fuzzy, he asked me if I'd like to teach x-c skiing in Vermont. Boy am I glad I went, for two glorious winters. It was indeed a privilege to know him and be inspired by him. So full of energy, much like Galen. It wasn't a surprise when those two went up Denali in a day.

Gene Drake
Reilly

Mountain climber
Monrovia, CA
Aug 26, 2009 - 12:31am PT
On a trip from Seattle to the Valley I looked up Ned after reading his story of kayaking in Glacier Bay if I recall rightly. I was thinking of doing the same to get to Mt Abbey. He was very friendly, helpful, and encouraging to a total stranger.
Nohea

Trad climber
Sunny Aiea,Hi
Aug 26, 2009 - 05:14am PT
This was one of my favorite reads of the day! Brian that is so coll how you helped out on the search. Reading about Ned gives insight into your passionate ways.
As I sat in the ER and a Dr’s office for a ridiculous amount of time I have read through this on my tiny BB screen. This is fantastic stuff and the reason I am part of this campfire. Thank You! What a great thread!

Aloha,
will
Fuzzywuzzy

climber
Aug 26, 2009 - 01:11pm PT
Gene!!!!

So glad you are still on the planet!

Remember those parties with Walter bouncing on the couch and deck diving led by Ned. All within the gaze of Johannes Von Trapp??!!!

Best boss I ever had - absolutely - no question.

I think I remember you being awarded the "Silver C" once or twice?

Hey going to the YMS Reunion Saturday in Tuolumne- Coxy and Asay should be there - we will lift a toast to you, those times and all that have left!!!

TC
oldcragster

Gym climber
WA
Aug 27, 2009 - 11:12am PT
TC - guess I'm on the planet if you count the Olympic Peninsula. Don't remember to much of the partying for some reason....though I do remember Dudly and Ned always extending themselves. Think of it...great boss and great party animal....rare combination.

Was remembering the tepee party too....anyway, I was just in YNP last week. Camping near TPR with friends and then in the Valley with my son and his family....3 grandaughters...oldest 13.

Say hi to YMS 'lads'. Remember Ned always used that description for us.
email me: ded10a@gmail.com GD
Todd Eastman

climber
Bellingham, WA
Aug 27, 2009 - 12:41pm PT
Fuzzy, our parties at the Sherman House were always viewed with a degree of apprehension by Johannes after his experiences with your crew. He often showed up and we tried to fulfill his worst expectations. Thanks for setting a high bar!
Fuzzywuzzy

climber
Sep 15, 2009 - 12:10pm PT


Ned Gillette and Doug Wiens aka "The Piston" in the Ruth Gorge in 1978. Sheldon Hut.



Ned in during Southern Alps Traverse in 1979. Airing his prodigious glutes?
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Sep 15, 2009 - 01:14pm PT
CLASSIC! Great stories! Great photos! THANKS!!!

Yeah, Tom; Debby is my mom. Sounds like you guys got some good skiing in this past winter. Too bad we didn’t get to meet up at the YMS party… Maybe next time?
Fuzzywuzzy

climber
Sep 15, 2009 - 01:22pm PT
Minerals -

Yes I did miss that opportunity. Had a great time visiting and skiing with Debby. I was up in TM this past week lurking in the bc looking around the Nelson Lake area etc. Should be in the valley a bit this fall. I would really enjoy meeting you. I will post up a whole show of NZ, Trapps etc eventually. Right now I'm drawn to climbing before scanning!!

Are yo in the Valley now?
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Sep 15, 2009 - 01:38pm PT
Tom,

In Lee Vining right now, but will be back up in the Meadows in a bit… until they kick me out for the season! I think we met in Tuolumne back in the 90’s(?) – Ned introduced us and I think Susie was around too. If you are going to be passing through at all, we should hook up and drink some beer! Yes, climbing should always take precedence over Internet time, but some days one just has to rest… or wait for the sun to get to one’s favorite wall. Cheers, Bryan
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Sep 15, 2009 - 01:42pm PT
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Sep 16, 2009 - 11:13am PT
Hey, Ned your class is showing! Nice one Peter!
powderdan

Social climber
mammoth lakes
Sep 16, 2009 - 11:51am PT
ned was THE man...my favorite thread yet!
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Sep 16, 2009 - 03:40pm PT
Thanks everyone for an inspiring thread !
I just ordered a copy of Everest Grand Circle.
beanchef

climber
Kansas City, KS
Oct 14, 2009 - 11:42pm PT
It was really good to come across this site. I have been looking for this type of info for a long time. Doug Wiens is(sorry, was) my uncle. I never got to meet Ned, or any of the other crew, but heard a lot about them from my uncle. Uncle Doug was with Ned on the Baffin Islands trip, Mt. McKinley trip, they kayaked from Seattle to Juno together, and were in National Geographic together. If I can ever get those photos from my folks and scan them, I'll try and remember to post them here.

Wish I could have spent more time with my Uncle Doug, but he lived in California and we in Kansas, but I loved all the stories. They also worked together at the Trapp Family Lodge where Maria asked him to teach her how to X country ski or ride horse when she was 80. He told her NO, as he was afraid she would break something.

Doug died in 1983 doing what he loved - working in the outdoors on the avalanche control crew. The sucky thing about it was the two people who were supposed to be around the howitzer were decimated when the rocket blew up in the launcher, but the 6 others hanging out were barely scratched.

Thanks again for the pictures.
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Dec 25, 2009 - 06:02am PT
I just finished reading Everest Grand Circle which I learned about on this website. I can't imagine why I hadn't heard about this expedition before. I've also walked from Khumbu to the Arun river valley though at a lower altitude in early spring. We had enough trouble getting lost and running out of food ourselves in the remote regions of the Arun, that I could really appreciate what it must have been like up above in winter!

I too traveled as the only woman in a group of men, so I particularly enjoyed hearing Jan Reynold's perspective on the trip. Not to mention we share the same name.

Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Dec 25, 2009 - 03:23pm PT
Jan's slide show was really fabulous and she has a great sense of humor about hanging with the guys. Jim on one end of the alpha scale and Ned on the other! LOL
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Dec 25, 2009 - 04:08pm PT
Bump for Ned, one of the classiest men I've
ever had the pleasure to meet.

Fuzzywuzzy

climber
suspendedhappynation
Dec 26, 2009 - 03:37am PT
beanchef -

Did your Mom spend some time in Africa? Because Doug had the coolest wooden figurine of a skier craved by one of her native friends who had never seen snow. It was a classic one -of- a- kind piece. It used to occupy the window sill of Doug's room at Trapps along with a Piston. His nickname was "the Piston" because he was a machine - he was soooo tenacious. Ned regarded him as the most well read man he ever knew in regards to Arctic History. He was planning on going around Ward Hunt island during that trip to Ellemere but the others, Allan, Ned and the "Turlock Tornado" (Chuck Schultz) had had enough of the pack ice. What a character. I miss him very much.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 29, 2010 - 07:27pm PT
Big Time Adventure Bump!
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Nov 14, 2012 - 12:28pm PT
Mom found another article on Ned’s trip to Ellesmere Island in a magazine titled Contact, published by National Life insurance company in Vermont. The article appeared in the March 1978 issue.

Click on images for full size versions.


Credit: Minerals


Credit: Minerals


Credit: Minerals


Credit: Minerals

SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Nov 14, 2012 - 12:44pm PT

Awesome, Minerals!!!!
captain chaos

climber
Nov 14, 2012 - 02:22pm PT
Nice to see this surface again, thanks Bryan... it brings back some great memories.

I hope your well... all the best, -Craig
zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Nov 14, 2012 - 11:17pm PT
blimp
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Nov 15, 2012 - 12:03pm PT
nice read!
FrankZappa

Trad climber
Hankster's crew
Nov 15, 2012 - 01:27pm PT
Ned was a very inspirational guy. My dad took me to a few of his slide shows when I was a kid and he was somewhat of a local hero as I grew up in the same town as he, and grew up skiing at the same places as he, and met him a few times. (My childhood dentist's office was the house Ned grew up in... how odd) I remember leaving his slide shows wanting to to be the adventurer he was, but not wanting to, as his photos and stories did a good job capturing the danger and remoteness of some his journeys.
tom Carter

Social climber
Nov 15, 2012 - 02:35pm PT
BL!!

Nice article.

Those cats came back with triceps that looked like they had had tennis balls implanted under their skin!!! Super strong from pulling those sleds for months!

Funny about the same food day after day....I remember Allan (correct spelling) never ate oatmeal again!!! They had a cube of butter per man per day too!!

Before they were allowed into Alert a heli landed during their tour many miles and maybe even a week or two from base, took their names and left. They ran security checks and since they all passed - were invited onto the base. They raged, ate steaks and AB became the base DJ for a night. The "station" was named "The Chosen Frozen". You can only imagine Allan at the mic!!!!! I'm sure he gave "The Wolfman" a run for his money!!!!

That pack ice was horrendous!

guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Nov 15, 2012 - 03:03pm PT
Man, I can just visualize Bardini up there with his shuckin and jivin with sweet sounds of The Chosen Frozen and telling everyone to get loose or get lost.

SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Nov 15, 2012 - 09:47pm PT

Bump!
Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Nov 16, 2012 - 12:23am PT
The second year of Yosemite Mountaineering I wanted to start an x-c school in Yosemite. We got Ned and Jim Speck, both US team in Nordic combined, as the first instructors, Ned being Chief. He was great, as you can imagine. He started climbing then too. I think I introduced him to Yosemite rock, and of course he took to it easily.

In ‘72 a few of us climbers decided we wanted to do a real long x-c trip. Ostensibly it was to promote the ski school, but basically it was just because we wanted to do a great trip. Jack Miller, Jed Williamson and I were looking at skiing across Greenland, but the authorities there wanted a $4000 rescue bond each, which would take some doing. So we decided to ski from the Arctic Circle to the Arctic Ocean in Alaska, across the Brooks Range. Ned had been watching all these plans keenly and asked if he could join us. He had no major journeys under his belt yet but he was a powerhouse and a great guy, so of course he could join.

We talked North Face into making our gear to order in exchange for photos for their catalog. It worked for both of us. Of course in Bettles, when we told people where we were going, they looked at our gear and said "No beaver mitts? Yer gonna die out there!"

We left from Bettles. March. Temps down to about -30F. Deep snow, 80 lb. packs. Lots of relays. But great company. One night Ned and I were still feeling good, so left Jack (nicknamed Grinch) and Jed (nicknamed Brillo) to set up camp, and we broke several more miles of trail. Ned’s name was Captain America because of his star-spangled hat, and I was of course known as Grandfather.

On top of the Arctic Divide we became aware of the quickly arriving spring. Ahead lay 100 miles of Arctic plain - flat, deteriorating snow. Beside and behind lay a wilderness of gorgeous unnamed and probably unclimbed peaks. Not too far ahead was Galbraith Lake where there was an airstrip and exploration camp, from which one might fly out. So we had a vote - go for the ocean, or back into the range to climb and fly out of Galbraith.

Brillo and I voted to climb. Captain America - incredibly goal-oriented - voted for the ocean. Grinch wisely abstained. Ned was so pissed off that he hardly spoke for days - often took off before anyone and was just a speck breaking trail in the distance. We turned south from Galbraith Lake, back into the mountains for the last couple weeks. Made some wonderful peaks - all walk-ups, of course. The last day there we did the biggest one. It was a perfect day. You could light a candle on top. Ned went up to the ultimate point and just stood there for a long, long time. White peaks as far as you could see, a hundred miles of Arctic plain to the north. Then he came down and said, “You guys were right. Can’t beat this.”

That was his first expedition, and I think his disappointment in not completing the original plan was a powerful motivation for running his own expeditions in the future. It didn’t take long. He initially got sponsored by a couple of Norwegian ski companies and never looked back.

We had some great non-technical trips in northern BC and Yukon, too. Canoed some major rivers with friends and my kids - he loved the kids and they loved him. He had a knack for making them laugh when they got a bit bored.

Once when we were corresponding during his later adventures I commented to him that I wasn’t worried about him getting killed in the mountains or on the ice, but I really worried about the human element in some of those countries. He said, “A big smile goes a long way.”

When I heard he was killed I was in denial for months. I still have a few of his letters, and treasure them. Great guy, great adventurer, great friend.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Nov 16, 2012 - 12:31am PT
Fossil Climber! Thank you for sharing your great memories, and thank you to all for sharing as well.

Great history on Ned!
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Nov 16, 2012 - 03:39am PT
bump
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 16, 2012 - 10:50am PT
I have had just the best time reading about Neddly here that it strikes me that we have Wayne to thank for getting up the expedition to the Brooks Range, thus giving Neddly his big break, feeding his need to complete "what others can't imagine doing, let alone finishing."

It's all in the spirti of Batso, IMO, because the threads which connect he and Wayne reach out and link with those of Ned. And many more.

I considered it an honor to have skiied some with all you folks at the YMS except for you, Wayne. It would have been an honor as well, not to misconstrue that statement. I simply never had the opportunity. :)

One piece of advice Ned gave me was to organize a moonlight ski through the Valley and take a couple thermosses of hot mulled cider. We substituted hot wine, tooled around with six of us for hours out in the meadows and along the river. Ned and the ski school were great for the lifestyle in the Ditch.

The Rev got his parents, Lem and Betty, to drive up from Merced so he could give them free skiing lessons in the Valley. I don't think they were at Badger or Summit Meadow. So Lem gets going and promptly breaks a bone, maybe trying a step turn. They weren't out maybe half-an-hour, if that. One end of the spectrum (Lem) and the opposite end (Ned).

Exceptional thread. Keep it going.


The catalog which TNF put out following that Brooks Range ski tour had some good photography. I wonder if anyone's got a copy. It's from 1973, I believe.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Nov 16, 2012 - 12:35pm PT
Great story Wayne, thanks for posting up.

I seem to recall you had some bear encounters on the Brooks trip?

if you were invited to row across Drake's Passage, would you have gone?

Is that enough questions for today?

Great to see you at Oakdale.
Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:20pm PT
Guido - I had heard he was planning some seagoing trip down around Patagonia, but thought it was kayaking in the islands. Definitely wanted to go. When he told me what he had in mind I had second thoughts. Had a couple of young kids and was at a low ebb financially.

The only bear adventure on the Brooks trip was discovering smokin' fresh griz tracks in the hoar frost on the river ice going our way. This was in March. We followed them all day, with some trepidation. They finally left the river, and shortly afterward we camped. I had just settled into my sleeping bag when I heard "crunch -crunch - crunch" like something heavy walking through the snow - and as I listened it speeded up - so I yelled "Hey guys - there's a bear out there!"

We all looked. Nothing. They gave me the gears. Slid back into my bag. There it was again! "Crunch - crunch - crunch". Finally figured it was the pulse in my neck rubbing whiskers against the nylon.

Didn't hear the last of that one for a while.
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Nov 18, 2012 - 02:35pm PT
Hey, thanks for all of your replies and stories! Nice to read some more about Ned from his friends.

Fossil climber, did you guys have a rifle or shotgun in the Brooks Range for the not-so-friendly bears, just in case?


Saw a copy of this book at the show on Friday and it reminded me of your post, Tom.



Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Nov 18, 2012 - 03:33pm PT
if you were invited to row across Drake's Passage, would you have gone?

What could possibly go wrong with that?

BTW, there is an interesting article in the Nov Nat Geo about Viking settlements
on Baffin Island.
tom Carter

Social climber
Nov 18, 2012 - 07:27pm PT
Wayne

So great to have your voice here!!!

Have you written some of your adventures down?

I still re-tell the saga you related about going through the ice in that backcountry lake when the dog didn't make it - riveting. I will never forget the look in your eyes when you related the feeling of your feet touching the bottom!!!

Any stories about Ned from back in those days would be much appreciated as well.

So do you recall when you "rescued me" during one of those silly Sierra filmings??? That was when you told me you were headed to Canada, it was your ticket out of the Valley as I remember.

My best!

TC
Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Nov 18, 2012 - 09:11pm PT
Minerals -

Nope, didn't take any serious artillery. Didn't expect bears at that time of year and were a bit shocked to find the tracks. I did take a little handgun, S&W K22 with a Phantom scope with which to add the occasional snowshoe hare to the stew, and did. However, it probably wasn't worth the weight.

Sure enjoyed your long earlier post on Ned, Minerals. Thanks so much for doing that!

Tom - nope, never wrote much down, except a couple articles on El Cap. Wish I had kept a journal - you lose detail so fast. Or I do, anyway. Keep a journal, you guys!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jun 30, 2013 - 02:21pm PT
February 1981 Vol. 159, No. 2, National Geopriapic.
February 1981 Vol. 159, No. 2, National Geopriapic.
Credit: mouse from merced
Neddly.
Neddly.
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jun 30, 2013 - 02:23pm PT
January 1989. Vol.175, No. 1, N/G.
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced
Credit: mouse from merced

Steve, thanks for providing the Circle Tour.

We miss yur style, Neddly!

You WERE "the Ultimate!"

You were chasing yourself
And now we've found
The reward is simply
In covering ground.
Or water, as the spirit moves us.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
May 25, 2014 - 05:33pm PT
My pleasure Mouse!

Nice addition yourself.

Ned was an anchorite in any arena you choose.
Kalimon

Social climber
Ridgway, CO
May 25, 2014 - 06:36pm PT
Awesome stories everyone! One of the best real adventure threads . . . Very hardcore that Ned. Amazing what was accomplished on skinny skis with three pin bindings . . . these planks they use today border on the ridiculous.
mark miller

Social climber
Reno
May 25, 2014 - 10:16pm PT
Pretty cool when some of the classic threads get dug up. Instead of the infernal crap that some unending threads receive, like whats wrong with your favorite toilet paper and others.
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