What is it about Arch Rock?

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Messages 1 - 141 of total 141 in this topic
caughtinside

Social climber
Davis, CA
Topic Author's Original Post - Apr 3, 2007 - 02:42pm PT
that makes the climbing so good, and so stout for the grades?!?!

I've been there 3x now and gotten my ass kicked every time! When I hike down that talus I'm always bleeding and babbling incoherently!

You tell other climbers you're heading to Arch, and they wish you good luck!

what is it about that place? sandbagged? physical? mandatory wide? few face features? My first trip there left me dry heaving after doing the first pitch of Gripper--on toprope!

And why do I like it so much???
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Apr 3, 2007 - 03:09pm PT
It's so sunny. Best to climb there in the mornings in August to gain a real appreciation of the place.
the chemist

climber
Palo Alto, CA
Apr 3, 2007 - 06:22pm PT
I went there for the first time on Saturday, and I'm not sure I like it. But I definitely intend to do a bit more research before making a decision. Somehow I feel like Arch might taste a bit better if I was wearing knee pads.

Evan
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Apr 3, 2007 - 06:25pm PT
Arch Rock sucked the first few times I went, and then it got fun.

We usually eat breakfast at the entrance station. More than once someone has gone up and come back down before we were done w/ breakfast.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Apr 3, 2007 - 06:42pm PT
nuthin' better than arch rock on a sunny day in february. used to go there a couple times a week. grades always seemed pretty right-on to me, with the possible exception of the first pitch of new d which seemed harder than the last pitch by a country mile and got 10b in the '86 meyers' guide. my vote for best crack crag in the valley...i liked it even more than the cookie, probably because the climbs were well spaced out and the crag didn't feel as "crowded" as the cookie...and the shape...like a small monolith...damn, arch just about has it all. all killer, no filler.
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Apr 3, 2007 - 06:51pm PT
Great lines, south facing, great winter area. As for the 'ass kicking' most of the lines were established a long time ago and standards are softer, now.
caughtinside

Social climber
Davis, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2007 - 06:52pm PT
jaybro, so are the climbers, if I'm any example! sheesh!

I liked the Warbler's list though, bvb's too.
Mimi

climber
Apr 3, 2007 - 06:55pm PT
Right on descriptions Kevin et. al! Arch Rock is such an awesome place to climb.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 3, 2007 - 06:56pm PT
Arch is great.

The left side however has a bad vibe.

Bad things have happened there.

My partner came about as close to serious head injury as possible and still walked, on the left side of Arch.

All I can remember, except for that day, is really liking it there,
the routes and the place.
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Apr 3, 2007 - 06:59pm PT
Caught, oh yeah!- Jay-soft-bro.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 3, 2007 - 07:17pm PT
yeah I led Torque Converter and thought it was stiff - high quality though, harder than 1st pitch of Blind Faith.

here's a pic of the main - note dark evil vibe left side...
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Apr 3, 2007 - 07:24pm PT
yeah joe, me and tom lindner did goldfingers in '87 and wound up at the scariest hanging belay EVAR. buncha tiny stoppers that would all rip with a good upward yank, and no decent directional down placements to protect against that. lindner led the next pitch and i spent so much time moaning about the belay i think i psyched him out. he led the next pitch feeling like he was soloing. dicey. grade seemed about right but that hanging belay...oooomph. never again.

prolly bolted by now.....
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 3, 2007 - 07:29pm PT
bvb - there were discussions about installing a proper belay there in the late 80's - I wonder if it happened?
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Apr 3, 2007 - 07:31pm PT
Hey, caught...let us know if you think Goldfingers is a 12b or is really more like a 12c, m-kay?

:-p :-p :-p
caughtinside

Social climber
Davis, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2007 - 10:10pm PT
I will, um, get right on that.
tom woods

Gym climber
Bishop, CA
Apr 3, 2007 - 10:21pm PT
How 'bout the gripper? One the best climbs of its grade anywhere.

Tom
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 3, 2007 - 10:43pm PT
I like your killer prose Kevin.
No filler.
Mimi

climber
Apr 3, 2007 - 10:55pm PT
Ditto Roy.

Ray, what's with that bad vibe at Arch? Been there done that.
bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA
Apr 4, 2007 - 12:11am PT
Three of us did Anticipation once. The guy who led the 5.11b layback pitch brought the two of up and then announced that the next pitch was loose 5.10 and he was rapping off and it was our responsibility to finish the climb and bring down all the gear.
Fun route.

Bruce

ps - does anybody(else?) ever do Sidetrack to get off from Midterm? Another cool Arch rock pitch!

Edit - changed Applicaton to Anticipation. Minor brain fart.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:02am PT
for my money, midterm is the best single-pitch route 5.10 route in the valley, and the standard for 10b. prolly climbed it 50 times. had it so dialed i'd do it on with pieces -- a #3 freind in the hands, and a #4 friend right before the one or two move OW section exiting into the bomber "chimmney" (which is a cheater's chimney compared to the 2nd pitch of manana -- that squeeze is stout)...

got SO pumped. plus the absence of pro...
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:06am PT
screw permission.

this is the inTARDweb.

give it up, babe!
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:10am PT
RE:
"Ray, what's with that bad vibe at Arch? Been there done that."


There is a history of near miss action in the recess (dark rock) on the far left side - no joke it's kinda bad juju over there. Karine and I were climbing Anticipation and she had a really close call.

the recess is distinctly different than the rest of the crag with it's "happy vibe" , IMHO.

The story of Karine's close call still gets my pulse going.
Mimi

climber
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:17am PT
Would that be Anticipation?

Wow, that's spooky. I had a similar experience on Gripper.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:29am PT
I think New Dimensions is my favorite 11a crack route in the entire universe. Midterm is the cleanest and varied 10a/b around and the last pitch of Gripper is all time. The other stuff is harder but not as classic IMO.

You know anyone who ever led Quicky Quizes?

JL
chappy

Social climber
ventura
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:30am PT
Go for it Joe...I had my own near death experience there...other than that Arch Rock is an awesome crag. I actually met Largo there. Don't know if he remembers but it was in the spring of 73. I was doing the Gripper and he and some of his buddies showed up and were inquiring about Leanie Meanie which Donini (that sort of rhymes) dragged me up the previous fall.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:30am PT
Karine was trying to lead the second pitch (Anticipation), not moving great - clipped the fixed nut, made a move placed a piece, moved up and tried to place again.

I saw it was not going well. She blew the clip, (slack out) and moved to down climb (slipped), reached down for the nut above the fixed copperhead - shakey - lifted the nut out and was off - over backwards airborne..

Her back arched and she started to swing head first toward the corner - upside down - sailing through the air in a surprisingly big arch.

I went into auto - all the slack, the corners, I yarded in the line one two three, and caught her bare handed. Shortened her fall as her head hit (hard) the wall with a loud pop.

I figured that was it. Dead or major trauma - I planned the lower and piggy back carry to the Ranger Station but - she was "ok".

Big bloody lump. Her retina's were fine. I kept checking, finally let her drive home. She came back and got the gear later.

Scared the pee pee outa 'ol Raydog.
WBraun

climber
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:31am PT
You know anyone who ever led Quicky Quizes?

I never led them, just free soloed.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:38am PT
Watched Eric Goukas solo Leanie Meanie one day, I think I turned away as he started the OW. Pretty Burly man.

Sorry if I misspelled his name.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:44am PT
Mark wrote: "Arch Rock is an awesome crag. I actually met Largo there. Don't know if he remembers but it was in the spring of 73. I was doing the Gripper and he and some of his buddies showed up and were inquiring about Leanie Meanie which Donini (that sort of rhymes) dragged me up the previous fall."

Dood, I have a memory like an elephant for that kind of shite - can't remember other stuff at all. Couldn't tell you why.

So of course I remember metting you. But I'm pretrty sure it was '72, not '73. You were there with George Meyers. We'd all grew up together in the Valley.

I always liked Arch Rock because aside from a few moves on Ant., there's nothing there where my fat fingers would hold me back. I could pull good jams on most everything there.

Warner, I walked below Quicky Quizes 1,000 times and never did them. Don't know why.

JL
Mimi

climber
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:45am PT
Ray, must've been the summer '86 that you watched Eric in action?
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:52am PT
RE:
" Ray, must've been the summer '86 that you watched Eric in action?"

yeah it must have been - I recall being pretty blown away.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:59am PT
Wow - another barehanded grab.

I have often wondered how much harder Karine's head would have hit the cliff had I not taken in so much slack and caught her fall with my hands. I will never forget the sound her head made when it hit the cliff - or how the situation felt - way way close.

Mimi...the Gripper story?

Mimi

climber
Apr 4, 2007 - 02:26am PT
Good thing Karine has such a hard head.

A hip belay got away from me on Gripper. Partner took a big one, only dinged her knee, and as Werner said that day, "It was not her day to die." Weird circumstances led me to think we shouldn't go out that morning or to that climb. Black luck day.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 02:34am PT
Ah, good ol' hip belays.

There was once maybe twice where I at (then) 125-129lbs thought that maybe I was hosed catching and holding dudes checking in at like 180 plus. Times when I really had to hang on hard. Times when I thought the frickin' rope was gonna slice me in two.

Ever get your brake hand mashed into a corner while catching/holding with a hip belay?

Hip belays and swamis.

PS Glad you're still with us Chappy.

Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Apr 4, 2007 - 02:36am PT
Remember in the late 1980s that the left side of Arch Rock was a lot of fun, especially in February. Went up there and did "The Bin" (5.10d OW) with Greg Murphy and then went back and repeated it quite a few times. The crawl through the cave filled with bat guano at the top wasn't too enjoyable, but the overhanging OW to get there was terrific. Nice orange rock.

Then, Elliot Robinson got into the act & did SAT and GRE, a pumping thin 5.12a and a great 5.11 OW roof just to the left of "The Bin".

What's wrong with the left side of Arch exactly? Does anyone ever go up there?
Mimi

climber
Apr 4, 2007 - 02:38am PT
I don't think it's just Arch Rock. I think there's powerful good and bad juju in the Valley as a whole. My nickel's worth.

Yeah, really Mark. Good catch Bruce!
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 02:41am PT
Nothing Bruce - I recall those climbs you mention looking really cool. A few bad things happened there and for a few people the place has taken on a mystique.

RE:" I think there's powerful good and bad juju in the Valley as a whole."

Native American burial ground juju. Strange sh#t - Yerian is a good one for those stories.

There's some weird energy around the theater, too.



John Moosie

climber
Apr 4, 2007 - 03:02am PT
Sounds more like good juju then bad. Two hand saves keeping people from serious injury after heinous falls. Scary falls, no serious injuries= good juju in my book.

I tore my achilles tendon dancing in church with a 70 year old woman. I would trade a 150' fall that you walk away from for my torn up achilles tendon anyday. Might scare the bejeebus out of you, but he walked away.

Moosie
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 03:04am PT
RE:
" Good thing Karine has such a hard head. "

someone had to say it
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Apr 4, 2007 - 10:51am PT
Ray said: "Ah, good ol' hip belays." and I couldn't resist adding a graphic:


TwistedCrank

climber
Hell
Apr 4, 2007 - 11:14am PT
Ah yes the Arch Rock memories:

For reasons I still don't understand, on my first time on Gripper on the third pitch I started to babble and whine uncontrollably. I went back the next day and fired it. I think that was a watershed day of climbing for me because I (almost) always felt solid on 10+ handcracks after that.

Was it just me or was Klemens Escape not really an escape after all? As I recall, my partner and I got pretty disoriented in the talus on the way down from it.

Arch Rock is a great "welcome to the valley" crag.
johnboy

Trad climber
Can't get here from there
Apr 4, 2007 - 11:14am PT
^^^

"hip" belay?
poop*ghost

Trad climber
Denver, CO
Apr 4, 2007 - 11:32am PT
Arch Rock always seems to have a moat of poison oak surrounding it. I have always been spared - but partners have gotten it bad.

New D is definitely five star.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 4, 2007 - 12:03pm PT
Nope, that would be the hipster Off White himself hiding behind that robber's bandana. Nothing hip about the old California Belay!

Way back before I had any crack technique, I took a true fifty footer on the ever greasy Midterm! It was the last day of a mid-seventies Valley trip and a rather hot one. I had been climbing without a helmet for most of the trip to be a little more comfortable but I was intimidated enough to wear one on this particular day.

After working out the start, I moved upwards to a small ledge about thirty feet off the ground. Above the crack widened to fist but I could see a cigarette pack sized chockstone that someone had jammed in where the crack was hand sized. I reached the rock chock and slung it before moving by. As the crack widened and the sweat flowed, I reached a point where a sloping shelf appeared to allow me to stop swimming in the wideness for a moment. Though a little runout, I began to half mantle onto the shelf when my fist jam squirted out and I was airborne!

I struck the sloping rest ledge with both heels and continued to fall on rope stretch. The ground kept on coming and I began to wonder what the hell was going on. Finally, about ten feet from impact, the rope caught me and flipped me over violently. The helmet that I almost didn't wear slammed hard into the wall saving the back of my skull from certain injury.

I looked back up the pitch to try to sort out what had happened. The chockstone caught the fall which should have been about thirty feet in length. Instead, I had gone for fifty! Had it failed, I would have been talus food. A brand new Edelrid rope was the cuprit and had contributed about twenty feet of stretch to the fall. Last Edelrid chord for me!

Well, we collected ourselves and I hobbled down to the car and crawled in for the long drive back to Tucson, stone briused heels and all. "Got to get better at crack climbing, somehow, some way" was my mantra all the way home.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 12:58pm PT
"Ther's definitely some very powerful unseen forces at work in the Valley. As silent and powerful as the granite."


"It's the bottom of a staircase that spirals out of sight...."

Genesis

chappy

Social climber
ventura
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:22pm PT
Good stories all. Joe: I remember your fall so clearly. As I was rapping down I remember suggesting you wait for me and we rap together as I was almost there. You decided to continue and then you were off. It was like watching the old wide world of sports intro of the "agony of defeat" as the ski jumper became a rag doll. I thought you were dead. For that matter I kind of thought I was dead on my big fall...Largo it was 73 and you are right I was with George. We did Gripper and then one of the Quizes on the way down. Fun little routes. I have a funny story from my learning how to climb days as a youngster in the Valley. It was October of 72. Ed Barry, myself, Jim Donini and Steve Wunsch were all cragging together at Arch. I used to tag a long a lot with Jim and Steve back then. They were my primary climbing mentors. Jim, in particular, used to enjoy--or so it seemed--scaring the crap out of me when ever possible during my apprenticeship. This hand jamming thing was difficult for me to grasp and I used to struggle mightily. Ed was having a similar difficult time of it. This day Ed backed off Gripper at the roof and lowered to the ground. Jim snarled, "What you couldn't do the Gripper!" He grabbed the rope and ran up the route, perhaps placing three pieces on the entire pitch. It was my turn. I did OK on the lower section of the route as I could climb wide stuff fine. I arrived at the roof and my troubles began. I remember this smooth, holdless, flaring corner which is exactly what it was if you didn't know how to jam. I fought with all my might but couldn't get any where. I called for tension. Jim shouted, "Tension!!, You don't get any tension!!" Instead he fed me a bunch of slack, I'm sure with the intention of motivating me further. His motivational ploy didn't work and I hurdled into space. This was the ongoing theme of that fall: Trying to climb some of the most beautiful and intimidating cracks in the world without any idea of how to do it. It wreaked havoc with my confidence. One day we were at Reeds to do Stone Groove. This was the first time I had seen the route and it looked easy enough. I thought finally a climb I could do. Jim led it with customary ease and set up a top rope. I climbed, struggled and failed again. I was in tears at the base. I wanted to succeed so badly yet it all seemed immpossible. Jim, like any could mentor could be hard with me, but when the time came for support and consolation he was there as well. "Mark", he told me, "Its only climbing". My apprenticeship continued. Later that fall Jim, Rab Carrington and I were back at Arch Rock. Jim was going to attempt the FA of the Leanie Meanie. Rab and I were his support group. Jim led up the lower section, bridging past the initial bulge, and proceedding up to the base of the steep section where he lowered off. I had a go, expecting the worse, as usual, and to my surprise I managed to reach his high point. I couldn't believe it! Jim, tied on again and sent the pitch. Rab followed removing all the gear. It was my turn again. I was very intimidated. The rope, an old 9 mil that Rab said he found in the Alps, dangled in space. I started up and once again, to my surprise I was climbing it. I bridged over the bulge, liebacked up the next section and then headed up the steep hand crack above. I was jamming and climbing up one of the hardest routes in the Valley! I was doing it but still couldn't grasp the reality of my efforts. I made it all the way up to the final inversion where my feeble mind finally cracked and I grabbed the rope. Though I didn't quite make the entire route it was a day that changed my life. It gave me hope. It was a day that changed my perspective on myself and my climbing abilties. The following year it all came together for me. Early one cold March day I found myself back at Stone Groove, this time on the sharp end. Remembering my failure here the year before I had come to confront my deamons. I led up, got to the crux and fell. I lowered to the ground and rested. Doubt creeped in. I had a second go and made it. From this point on there was no stopping me. The routes began falling like dominos. My life as a Valley climber began in earnest.
bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA
Apr 4, 2007 - 01:41pm PT
Mark, your Gripper story reminds me of my first time up Gripper. It was 1976 and I was serving my crack climbing apprenticeship with Carla Firey and Julie Brugger, two of the best women climbers of that era. Carla led the first pitch, back then there was a fixed #6 or 7 hex with a long sling at the crux. You fired the hands section and then got standing on the chickenhead where you could clip a fixed Lost Arrow. Anybody remember the little plastic gorilla in the crack you could see when standing on the chickenhead?

Anyway, when it came my turn to follow, I could not hand jam to save my life and literally got pulled up the crux. And by a girl! Once I fugured out how to hand jam, that became one of my favorite climbs!

Carla (and Julie) taught me how to climb cracks and I returned the favor by turning them onto the evil deamon they called Gymnastics Chalk (at least that's what they claimed!).

Bruce
chappy

Social climber
ventura
Apr 4, 2007 - 02:10pm PT
bhilden,
I remember Julie. She could crank! And yes I remember the gorilla. Learning how to crack climb was a challenge but well worth it. In the years since I have introduced so many people to crack climbing. Including Jobee and Alex Huber. I always felt it took me so long to learn how to do it that I was a good teacher. I made Jobee learn the wide stuff too. I knew having such tiny hands, she was going to have to learn. One's entire perspective on the Valley changes when you learn how to jam. Alex was a very eager and attentive student. Successful as well I might add! Jobee, Sean Myles, Alex and I all traveled to Josh together. I showed the technique to Alex on this 20 ft hand crack on the Old Woman?? (The crag with Double Cross on it)It was late in the afternoon. He set up a little top rope and practiced until it got dark. To all you want to be crack climbers out there: We all had to learn. Its a right of passage, and well worth the effort. By the way the most challenging thing my mentor Jim taught me wasn't crack climbing but rather realizing that it is JUST CLIMBING. Something we all need to remember, practice, and live.
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Apr 4, 2007 - 03:28pm PT
It seemed like you got to see the plastic gorilla just after you finished the Gripper crux and the thing was in the bag. Kind of a symbol of achievement. Who stole it?
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Apr 4, 2007 - 04:25pm PT
you mean to say there are actually people in the world who don't know how to climb cracks??

the horror, the horror.....
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 04:32pm PT
For me Stone Groove was symbolic as well - I enjoyed safely exploring my limits as a lower mid-level activist and climbed up to the crux unroped three - count 'em three - times tying to solo. Never could commit to the short thin section. I'd reach up and set the jam, wanting it pretty bad but, hey, that was my limit.
G Murphy

Trad climber
Oakland CA
Apr 4, 2007 - 05:01pm PT
The Cookie is to the Rostrum as Arch Rock is to Astroman.

Greg
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Apr 4, 2007 - 06:01pm PT
I totally remember that gorilla in the Gripper. It was stuck in there sideways.

Mark, I'll take your word on it we met in '73 but I sort of wonder how I could have gone the entire '72 season without meeting you in Camp 4. And I was there the whole summer, I think.

Anyhow, I can remember doing an early repeat of Leaning Meanie with my girlfriend at the time and it was about 100 degrees (late afternoon in August or something like that). The opening was bouldering and not bad and even the hand and lyback stuff seemed okay but as I remember (very imperfectly) there's some weird offsize moves up there somewhere, I didn't have the right gear, had to run it a bit and was greasing like crazy and scared shitless that if I greased out my girfriend couldn't hold the whopper I was certain to log. Not a good time at all.

I must have visited Arch rock many dozens of times over the years and yet I never did English Breakfast Crack, nor that .11 undercling finish to Midterm, and those both looked pretty good.

JL
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 4, 2007 - 06:12pm PT
RE:
" there's some weird offsize moves up there somewhere, I didn't have the right gear,"

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Apr 4, 2007 - 06:16pm PT
EBC is as classic as the others...And crazier to look at from the trail. My first time up there I wondered if any human alive could climb it! (Of course the part that I was looking at with saucer eyes is probably 5.7 or 5.8 w/ a 5.9 exit move.)

Classic quote re: Arch rock...BF (hi, Sooze) looks up at rock w/ binos. "There's a guy on Leanie Meanie." I say, "How's he doing?" He says, "He's getting a no-hands rest at the crux." It took me a minute to get it...
caughtinside

Social climber
Davis, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2007 - 06:16pm PT
speaking of leanie meanie, we went up to do it in '05. We have our trusty copy of supertopo.

Now, not being real smart, I send my buddy up with the supertopo recommendation of gear to 2". Which naturally put him in a similar situation as Largo was! thank god it wasn't my lead. Lesson learned, look at the crack!

However, no heroics this day, he built a mini anchor, tied off, and I tagged him some bigger stuff, I know I sent up a 4" cam, maybe even a bigger one.

Fantastic line though!
G Murphy

Trad climber
Oakland CA
Apr 4, 2007 - 06:47pm PT
The undercling second pitch to Midterm passes some poison oak and finishes in some dirt and branches that funnel down.
Classic old school.

Greg
caughtinside

Social climber
Davis, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2007 - 06:52pm PT
hmm, don't remember slings on the chockstone, and I remember the last part of the first pitch opening up to 5 or 6 inches?
bobmarley

Trad climber
auburn, california
Apr 4, 2007 - 07:59pm PT
anybody else epic'd getting off arch? one time after gripper, one time after new D. late in the afternoon. "c'mon just a couple of pitches - naw we don't headlamps!" next thing i know, it's pitch dark and downclimbing that sketchy gulley off new D, getting nabbed by ants, and rapping off a tree, and then some sh#t-for-anchors. i'm sure there's a better way, but that's how we went that time.
chappy

Social climber
ventura
Apr 4, 2007 - 08:03pm PT
Largo,
I always thought it strange that our paths didn't cross sooner as well. Funny that. Hedge you are right about the top of the Meanie. You sling the chockstone and can pretty much run it from there. Its a bit wide but you can get decent jams deep in the crack. Depending on ones nerve you might want a fist sized friend or chock. Another cool pitch is that flakey thing between English B Crack and Entrance exam. Kev didn't you and I clean that out one day? Did a very young Kauk show up with Tony to do EBC that day??
caughtinside

Social climber
Davis, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2007 - 08:07pm PT
Blotto? aka Axis? (per the guide) Haven't been on that one. Always kind of mean to, but then I get my ass kicked on something else and well, don't quite get around to it.
scuffy b

climber
The town that Nature forgot to hate
Apr 4, 2007 - 08:20pm PT
Actually, the name Blotto was in currency before it was climbed.
Barber's name was Axis, I think. A rare instance of the first
ascentionist's name not being honored. I think it was a case of
Barber snagging somebody else's project, like Fish Crack and
Butterballs.
WBraun

climber
Apr 4, 2007 - 08:21pm PT
On the first pitch of the gripper coming out of that alcove do not go right. Go straight up and that is called gripped. A variation to that first pitch.
Roger Breedlove

climber
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Apr 4, 2007 - 08:35pm PT
I had an instant memory flash when Bruce mentioned the gorilla on the Gripper. Anyone remember who put it in there?
scuffy b

climber
The town that Nature forgot to hate
Apr 4, 2007 - 08:40pm PT
Schmitz told me that they used aid on the first ascent of
English Breakfast.
WBraun

climber
Apr 4, 2007 - 08:55pm PT
One day we took monkey from Gripper.

We brought him to C4 to R.I.P.

Then there was some homo book in the back reaches of the belay on the top of the first pitch. Who put there?
Mimi

climber
Apr 5, 2007 - 12:22am PT
Regular comedians leaving gay porn in a crack.

Dug up my old journal Werner. 7/14/86, Leanie Meanie, one fall at top section, first pitch New D, felt hard, gassed. Werner soloed the rest.
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Apr 5, 2007 - 02:02am PT
I remember that there is a strenuous 5.10a OW section just after the tied-off chockstone on Leanie Meanie. Only had one 3.5" cam left and then had to OW to the anchors, which was fine except that the 3.5" turned upside down behind me. Have never forgotten that I should have brought along an extra 4" piece. What a fall if you didn't make it to the anchors!
bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA
Apr 5, 2007 - 02:37am PT
Back when all we had were hexes and stoppers, I remember on-sighting Midterm with four pieces of pro. Got a #7 Chouinard stopper(old size) just past the crux at the bottom; a #8 hex just before the hands section; a #9 hex just before the fist section and a #11 hex off the ledge on the right before it gets wide.

Nowadays, I don't even get out of the car without doubles on all cam sizes! How did we get up things in those days:-)

Bruce
Salamanizer

Mountain climber
Vacaville Ca,
Apr 5, 2007 - 03:27am PT
Aahh, you're finally getting into the wide stuff.
I knew it was only a matter of time.

You should highlight Cream in your ol Reid book.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Apr 5, 2007 - 09:03am PT
Hi, (Scuffy, Chappy, Warbler)

Right. Schmitz and Fredericks used aid on the FA of English Breakfast Crack way back in the summer of 1966. The FA party as you note, did admit the discrepancy though. The first free ascent was by Bridwell, and the second ascent by me, 1971. It was supposed to be a semi-horror route for quite awhile. The guidebook "error" never seemed to get corrected in the subsequent editions. I liked the route, found it 5.10C at most, and thought it was very interesting and reasonably protected. Liked the trick no hands rest up high too, after the main bunch of liebacks.

Best, PH
scuffy b

climber
The town that Nature forgot to hate
Apr 5, 2007 - 12:09pm PT
When I did English Breakfast, the tricky no-hands rest had just
been "improved" by removal of extra hummock material. So, at that
time, Nov 77, it was a straightforward knee lock for the rest.
chappy

Social climber
ventura
Apr 5, 2007 - 01:49pm PT
Kevin and I were going to call it Axis. Henry's name was Blotto (SP??) or whatever. I never did the second pitch either but I did the first on several occasions and always thought it was pretty cool.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 5, 2007 - 04:56pm PT
It's not Axis?
I remember looking up at that second pitch from the belay atop pitch 1; sort of filled in with dirt and grass and stuff, maybe some FP's.
Incipient cracks right?
The second pitch is not the typical Arch Rock pitch.
WBraun

climber
Apr 5, 2007 - 06:26pm PT
I've done the whole route (both pitches blotto, Axis) several times and it's very good route.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Apr 5, 2007 - 10:55pm PT
Mark/Blinny

Klemens really had back problems by this point, and I've got to add that today he is really debilitated by constant serious back disability down in So. CA. It's true he was not faking a thing on your ascent. The trouble was beginning.

He was a very close friend of Bridwell and mine in those early 70's days, fierce as hell and insanely funny, and really honest with his friends. Since I was a ruthless "nicknamer" I started calling him the Goat, and JB loved that, so we just called him The Goat for years, even to his face. Your story is hilarious, and it tells us a bunch about how direct, witty and practical the SOB was. We loved him; he was brilliant, powerful and subtle. Very cool.
Best PH
WBraun

climber
Apr 5, 2007 - 10:56pm PT
Well you know that back injury actually ended Klemens climbing career. Actually it ended his career completely. He couldn't barely even walk anymore.

He was hosed and ended up in LA at a computer terminal for the last 30 years.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Apr 6, 2007 - 12:55am PT
Where is Marck K. right now? Does anyone know. He was a very gentle soul if you got to know him.

JL
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 6, 2007 - 01:09am PT
Anticipation is pretty cool; definitely some tricky stuff rounding that little blocky thing as I recall.

I like that colorful picture of Spencer on it from George's book.
WBraun

climber
Apr 6, 2007 - 01:11am PT
Largo

I believe Klemens works for Raytheon Corp. in LA.

I have his email address if you want it.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Apr 6, 2007 - 03:03am PT
i don't get it. me and the 'natrix did all that stuff on the left side of arch, many times, and it was all good. no bad juju at all. loved those routes.

would our habit of sacrificing goats and chickens and then having crazy monkey sex on alpine mountaintops as the sun rises on the solstice, and our constant craving for warm lamb's blood, or our practice of hugging trees whenever we got the opprtunity, figure into this??

one wonders......

yosemite is granite. granite is our source. all granite is good granite. juju is a state of mind, not a vibe cast down upon you.

granite saved my life. give thanks.

archrock4EVAR.
James

climber
A tent in the redwoods
Apr 6, 2007 - 03:33am PT
Arch rock has some of the best routes in the park: greased my way up Midterm with Platinum, borrowed Lucho's shoes and thrutched up up Leanie Meanie, watched Sanam send the second pitch of English Breakfast crack because I refused to "take", Lorna showed me how to crack climb on Torque Converter, had one of my most memorable solos on Gripper, also caught a sh#t load of poison oak down there. Not sure if I'm itchin' for Arch or itchin' cause of Arch.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 8, 2007 - 11:06am PT
Concerning EBC and other Arch Rock route development. Were most of these lines cleaned out while on the sharp end or was some gardening or previewing considered acceptable at that time?

Like most cracks, I bet EBC had plenty of dirt and munge to greet the FA party and hence the aid.

I had yet another weird Arch Rock occurance on this fabulous line! I was leaning well back onto the anchors at the end of the first pitch while my partner was just about to top out on the second one. I took my eyes off of him and surveyed the splendor all around when suddenly my thigh got slapped by a mysterious piece of fast moving webbing. My partner's hammer had popped out of the holster on the last exit move and the shoulder sling knot had become untied. The weighty little menace rocketed to the ground unnoticed until it passed right between my outstretched legs and woke my ass right up! No brainbucket, of course!
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Apr 8, 2007 - 03:06pm PT
it is a wonderful place with worthy challenges...

caughtinside

Social climber
Davis, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 11, 2007 - 12:28pm PT
a couple recent shots of the New D




I'd only add that I certainly felt like I was in the Old Weak Dimension when I did it.
Alexey

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Jun 20, 2012 - 10:04pm PT
bump, for great place
fsck

climber
Jun 21, 2012 - 01:01am PT
gonzo chemist

climber
Fort Collins, CO
Jun 21, 2012 - 01:51am PT
^^^^That is truly an iconic photo. One of my favorites.


The first route I ever climbed on Arch Rock was English Breakfast Crack. Hot damn that thing is great! What a stupendous climb, with the cruxy bit right near the end! Laybacking, fingers, hands, OW. Its got all the important food-groups.

After that, my partner and I decided New D would be a great choice. We bailed after the first pitch, the heat and humidity had become horrendous.


bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Jun 21, 2012 - 03:03am PT
Anybody else ever check out the Ice Caves in the Talus? We we doing the approach one day and came across a hole in the talus blocks that was blasting out ice-cold air. I mean f*#king refridgerated. Brents Hawks crawled in there and got about 30 feet. When he came out he said he could have gone further but not without a headlamp. His lips were blue and he was shivering. It was easily in the high 80's at the time.
mctwisted

Trad climber
e.p.
Jun 21, 2012 - 11:41am PT
getting closer to the time arch is going to open again, anyone climbed new d in august? might not be to bad late afternoon in the cool corner. i sure miss that route, best little crack climb on the planet.
bvb i always wondered if someone went exploring in that frigid cave
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Jun 21, 2012 - 12:17pm PT
Bulwinkle sandbagged me into leading a 5.8 named Entrance Exam one time.

I was new to the Valley and I thought I was hot shi#....

after EE I was humbled...

hhooman..... good times
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Jun 21, 2012 - 12:20pm PT
That's a nice pic of your bride, Dan. Did Jocelyn catch up with you guys yesterday? She was staying at the Awhanee on the 19/20th, then off to the meadows with the kids and her BF in tow.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Jun 21, 2012 - 12:28pm PT
Here is a question for the masses: does anyone else feel that P1 on New D is the actual crux pitch? It is for me, and always has been. Wierd, can't-quite-get-'em-to-lock fingerjams that make you lean this way then that, awkward, occasionally insecure, never, ever felt easy or wired and I did the pitch a little differently every time I climbed it. The last pitch always felt like a completely locked splitter to me and I'd often do the whole pitch on three or four TCU's, mostly for the peace of mind of whoever was belaying. I'd call the first pitch a very manly 5.11a and the last pitch maybe 10c. Of course, my predeliction for uncomplicated splitter finger cracks figures heavily into this assessment, and that first pitch...I've heard a lot of pretty good climbers say it really got their attention.

I watched Werner solo the route once. '87 or so. He flowed uphill like water. Did the first pitch in about three minutes. Humbling.
caughtinside

Social climber
Davis, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2012 - 12:47pm PT
I've never been able to do the first pitch w/o bleeding. 0 for 3!
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Jun 21, 2012 - 01:25pm PT
Don't know what made me remember but one time I did ND (my favorite Arch route) with Vern Clevenger and we didn't get enough so we dropped down on a TR and started doing laps on the last pitch. We were both real macho and stubborn and always stealing each other's girlfriends and this was going to settle it - whoever fagged out first was the loser, the Nancyboy, the chump. We must have climbed that last pitch like twenty times each and had to hike down in the dark. My hands felt like somebody ran over them with a skiploader. I stumbled down to the Merced and just stuck my mitts in the water but sure, Vern, I'm fine. Couldn't be better. And what was that girl's name again?

Back then, Vern was a stud. I hope he's doing well wherever he is . . .

JL

tarek

climber
berkeley
Jun 21, 2012 - 03:52pm PT
BVB, P1 seemed so much harder than 10b, I've never gone past it...the first time up the sun was shining straight into the crack at around 11am spring or summer. I was second, so there was no issue of being gripped (just humbled). Around the same time, short circuit, felt solid. (Had only been on it once 15 years before as a noob, and had flailed, so there was no issue of having it wired.) Cracks. Go figure.
msiddens

Trad climber
Jun 21, 2012 - 06:51pm PT
softspot in my heart for this place. To me it typifies Yosemite climbing. At the base when you are staring across the valley, it can feel magical.
nutjob

Gym climber
Berkeley, CA
Jun 21, 2012 - 07:14pm PT
A couple of awesome routes:

donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jun 21, 2012 - 07:54pm PT
Just saw this thread, been climbing at COR. Arch Rock was always my favorite cliff in the Valley. Many fond memories of climbing there with Chappy, Rab, Bev, Wunsch, Bragg and others. Tired from driving but I'll post a couple of stories tomorrow.
scuffy b

climber
heading slowly NNW
Jun 21, 2012 - 08:30pm PT
bvb,

I only climbed New Dimensions once, and it was a long time ago, but
when I followed the 1st pitch, I kept telling myself how glad I was not to
be leading it.
When I followed the 4th pitch (I led the 3rd) I was just thinking about how
cool the climbing was. I would have been glad to lead it.
Of course, I had just had the privilege of watching Vandiver stroll up it.
mctwisted

Trad climber
e.p.
Jun 21, 2012 - 08:36pm PT
bvb thats funny you think the first pitch of new d is the crux, for me it seems to be that spot on the second pitch where your just getting out of the chimney (5.10a i guess?)
sure hope arch opens early again, looking at all these pics makes me want to go up there and thrash around a bit
rick sumner

Trad climber
reno, nevada/ wasilla alaska
Jun 21, 2012 - 08:51pm PT
It was an evening in fall of 74 or spring of 75, can't remember which. I was playing ping pong in the rec center across from camp 4. I was pretty good at the game having spent many a night playing professors at Chico state instead of studying in my lone year of college.Anyway one young guy, i'd call a kid (hell we were all kids), after repeated losses suggested that we do new d the next day. I gladly accepted, having previously worked hard to lead the first pitch, i was eager to do the stellar stuff above.He introduced himself by saying they call me "fingers".I led the second pitch (both of us opted to skip pitch 1) and got to a belay area just below the overhang leading to the base of the corner. Yabo screamed up his objections through various expletives and i obliged and stretched the rope to the base of the corner.Next up was "fingers" (Yabo) chance to shine and make up for his ping pong losses the night before by easily cruising the crux pitch.I followed barely making the crux. A great route indeed. I also remember getting an hysterical laugh when i came across the plastic gorilla wedged in Gripper in 74
Rankin

Social climber
Greensboro, North Carolina
Jun 21, 2012 - 08:52pm PT
I thought the first pitch of ND was 11a when I did it. Arch Rock rules. Always has made me feel like a Yosemite climber at the end of the day.
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Jun 21, 2012 - 09:50pm PT
I can never think of Arch Rock without being reminded of the quote from Roper's green guide:

The climbing as a whole is neither esthetic or enjoyable, it is merely difficult.
 Yvon Chounard


Well, at least I agree with the "difficult" part!



I later learned that Arch Rock is actually that thing you drive through after entering the park.
Rick Linkert

Trad climber
El Dorado Hills CA
Jun 22, 2012 - 12:07am PT
John-

Vern, as you may recall, was diagnosed with a very aggresive brain tumor in the Spring of 2004. He underwent surgery at UCSF performed by Mitch Berger - one of a handful of people you would want to conduct your brain surgery - supported by a small army of geniuses. The surgery did not get everything and he underwent a Gamma Knife treatment in 2008. Today he is a walking miracle- not a cancer cell anywhere - a very unlkely result given the intial diagnosis. Never a complaint or Why me? Ever. He did the Muir Trail on skis while taking oral chemo - the guy is unbelievable. You can find him at www.vernclevenger.com; he still lives in Mammoth with his wife, Margaret. The kids are grown. I posted a few Vern Clevenger medical updates on Supertopo over the years. It is an amazing story.

I met Vern at Indian Rock when I was a junior at Berkeley; he was still in High School and just getting started. We have remained friends since. Climbing with him was a trip. When he was in a hurry, following him was like a deep water start on waterskis. When we did ND, I pitched on the top section; Vern did laps. You might remember almost getting a 4" bong in the mouth as you were pulling over the crux on the Center of Independence many years ago. The bong was the product of my fumbling on the final off width on the Independent Route that Vern tricked me into leading. I was terrified that it was going to take someone out as I knew there was a party on the Center Route. After the moment passed, I had to re-devote myself to the predicament I had created by dropping one of the last pieces of pro that had a chance of fitting.

Rick
Mark Force

Trad climber
Cave Creek, AZ
Jun 18, 2013 - 02:01am PT
Here's to the Gripper ape chimneying up our finger crack and to the steep, tip of my little finger jam "you've gotta be kidding, this is supposed to be 10C!" lieback on English Breakfast Crack bump
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jun 18, 2013 - 10:56am PT
My favorite single crag anywhere....not a single bad climb. It should be domed and climate controlled for year round climbing.
Rhodo-Router

Gym climber
sawatch choss
Jun 18, 2013 - 11:38am PT
I'm with Jim.

BTW, the Entrance Exam is practically always shady, New D goes in the shade by 11 once you clear the first pitch...I don't know what you're complaining about.


And mcT, great shot of Eliza's very focused look on ND. Glad to hear she's getting after it again.
TeleRoss

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Jun 18, 2013 - 01:25pm PT
Love Arch Rock!






le_bruce

climber
Oakland, CA
Feb 27, 2014 - 08:04pm PT
Great pics, TeleRoss
Alexey

climber
San Jose, CA
Feb 27, 2014 - 08:43pm PT
on day 6 God created Arch Rock and than took a day off
Rhodo-Router

Gym climber
sawatch choss
Feb 27, 2014 - 11:45pm PT
Alexey (or someone) please go climb there and think of me.

And if you're Dan bring that camera!
KP Ariza

climber
SCC
Feb 28, 2014 - 02:20am PT
LoL

Funny sh#t Alexey. Good post.

I'd love to see pics of Torque Converter or Gold Finger on the right side of the cliff. After all these years I still have only my memory to draw from (fuzzy at best) of the day I spent on Torque, and looking over at Gold Finger. Both typical of Arch Rock....top f*#king shelf.

Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Feb 28, 2014 - 02:46am PT
Gripper with Eva, Feb. 2008 (from another thread):
David Wilson

climber
CA
Feb 28, 2014 - 09:31am PT
don't forget Axis / Blotto - one of my favorites at Arch

martygarrison

Trad climber
Washington DC
Feb 28, 2014 - 09:32am PT
I remember the early days, still in high school driving up and leading Gripper. We used to do the first pitch a lot. The Gorilla was there and I remember always using a #4 stopper on purple cord to protect right at the lip. This was some 40+ years ago. Amazing what you remember about certain routes.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Feb 28, 2014 - 11:32am PT
Even the lesser hyped stuff at Arch is quality. Like Supplication, never see anyone on it, but it's outstanding.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Feb 28, 2014 - 01:42pm PT
Depends on the crack. Large parts of the crag bake in the sun, and it's low elev for the valley.
caughtinside

Social climber
Oakland, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 28, 2014 - 03:50pm PT
Great shots of some great routes!
Alexey

climber
San Jose, CA
Feb 28, 2014 - 04:40pm PT
Ken Ariza, I'll take photos of Torque Converter or Gold Finger next time I'll go there.

WML, I would not be worry about Friday-Suturday rain - it will dry in less than two hours.
I would worry more about birds. They probably close Arch Rock again on March1 due to falcons nesting.

Bad Climber

climber
Feb 28, 2014 - 04:52pm PT
Hah, I've only done the first pitch of Gripper--and I was gripped. I got it first try, but not without a serious fight. I still remember that killer knob in the upper corner that saved my bacon. A true THANK GOD! hold if there ever was one. Such clean, amazing rock.

BAd
Alexey

climber
San Jose, CA
Feb 28, 2014 - 07:02pm PT
it was closed last 3 years from March1.
Last year closure was lifted April1
http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1759374/Peregrine-Closures-2012-Yes-That-Time-Again
David Wilson

climber
CA
Feb 28, 2014 - 08:26pm PT
Axis, reloaded ...

Rollover

climber
Gross Vegas
Oct 8, 2015 - 06:27pm PT
BBST
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Oct 8, 2015 - 08:27pm PT
Love Arch Rock. FA's of Leanie Meanie and Anticipation and Miidterm was my first 5.10 solo. Chappy was in all three of those adventures. I led Leanie Meanie, he led Anticipation.
One day Mark and I were at the base of Midterm and I told him I was going to solo it. Off I went and after awhile I looked down and lo and behold Chappy (around 18 at the time) was free soloing about thirty feet below me. Yikes....it's a pretty straight up line, not one to be soloing right below another soloist. Those were the days my friend, those were the days.
I think that English Breakfast crack is a neglected classic and that New Dimensions, while very good, is a tad overrated for quality.
Left to right you have Anticipation, Blotto, English Breakfast Crack, Midterm, Leanie Meanie, Gripper and New D....where else do you get a better lineup than that?
A good day for today's climbers would be to do all of the climbs put up in the 70's in one session.
Hell...with cams and sticky rubber that's a walk in the park.
Branscomb

Trad climber
Lander, WY
Oct 9, 2015 - 07:45am PT
Remember the little gorilla that used to be back in the crack after the crux on Gripper? Made you feel good to see him flexing.
Alexey

climber
San Jose, CA
May 26, 2016 - 12:24pm PT
On some recent treads Jim Donini say that two years ago hi sandbagged himself [LOL] on his own route Book Of Job [he made FFA around 1972]. Curious what he would say about Anticipation if climbed by him in 2016?
I also feel that there in no better lineup of multi star routes anywhere than at ArchRock. Just looking from Parking lot at this place make me happy.
And here is unusual view of last pitch of NewD from the base of Juliet flake
Alexey

climber
San Jose, CA
May 26, 2016 - 12:34pm PT
KP Ariza wrote



I'd love to see pics of Torque Converter or Gold Finger on the right side of the cliff.

here my two shitty photos. It hard to bypass trees and bushes in the base

JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
May 26, 2016 - 12:41pm PT
what is it about that place? sandbagged? physical? mandatory wide? few face features? My first trip there left me dry heaving after doing the first pitch of Gripper--on toprope!

I, too, got up that pitch on top rope the first time I did it, and it gave me all I could handle. The gorilla was still there, and I lost it when I saw that perfect elbow lock.

I think this thread, now nine years old, has legs because Arch Rock's climbing is so pure, both aesthetically and in technique. SO what if I always get thrashed every time I venture there? I always feel like I accomplished something as long as I left the ground.

John
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
May 26, 2016 - 01:40pm PT
My favorite cragging buttress in Yosemite or anywhere else for that matter. Too bad the birds like it too...it's been closed the last few times i've been to the Valley.
You need your crack technique dialed, not a lot of face holds to help you out. I was lucky enough to be climbing in Yosemite when some of those pristine cracks hadn't been climbed yet.
Great crag for cool days. It's low and faces South.
Dan McDevitt

Trad climber
yosemite
May 26, 2016 - 05:17pm PT
Friend

climber
May 26, 2016 - 05:56pm PT
Someone mentioned the Book of Job.  Sleeper gem, another Donini classic. Here are a couple pictures for climbing stoke/spray/etc

Darshan at one of the tricky sections

Here he is cleaning the crux pro from the inside

End thread drift.  Tom cruising at Arch Rock
Mark Force

Trad climber
Ashland, Oregon
May 26, 2016 - 06:15pm PT
Thanks for the pics of Book of Job. That "Wide Fetish" shot brings back memories of tube chocks and thinking "Holy mother..!" when I got my foot up on that big flat hold.
Mei

Trad climber
mxi2000.net
May 26, 2016 - 06:40pm PT
Arch Rock is like an outdoor gym -- easy approach and dense routes. And on the not so many days I was there this February, sometimes, it felt like I was at a gym. Nothing against it, since I'm a gym rat.
Book of Job is good. Recently onsighted it (led all in 3 long pitches). Forgot #5 at the car and made do without. That's my spray . Jim listed it as a high caloric route, but I think the expenditure is mostly in the approach and descent (for a shortie anyway). Arch does not prepare you for that.
Dan McDevitt

Trad climber
yosemite
May 26, 2016 - 06:47pm PT
that book of joab is a great route!
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
May 26, 2016 - 06:53pm PT
One of the best hot day routes in the Valley. Always in the shade with an air conditioning breeze coming out of the crack.
le_bruce

climber
Oakland, CA
Feb 6, 2018 - 02:32pm PT

NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
Feb 6, 2018 - 03:02pm PT
yer such a tease le_bruce, spill some more pics!
Alexey

climber
San Jose, CA
Feb 6, 2018 - 03:27pm PT
Le Bruce and I just two days ago at Arch gossiping about you Nut again!
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Feb 6, 2018 - 08:24pm PT
I heard a story in the 80's about 3 climbers pulling a stunt at the real Arch rock involving a guy dangling above the road holding onto a sleeve of a jacket while a second guy (sitting on top of the cliff/tunnel) held the other sleeve.
Unseen from the road was the 3rd guy hidden at the top belaying with a rope that ran through the jacket sleeves and tied to the hidden swami worn by the dangler.
Lots of kicking and screaming while horrified motorists looked on.
Who did this and is the story true?
TLP

climber
Feb 6, 2018 - 08:28pm PT
If it's not true, somebody has to do it! Hilarious.
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