Hardest mantle in the USA?

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bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Original Post - Feb 22, 2007 - 01:27am PT
I know you're gonna think I've lost my mind but doesn't anybody mantle anymore?

What ever happened to the "mantle specialist"? You remember those guys - they couldn't climb worth beans but damn could they mantle...

Is it a lost art?

Post some pics if any exist!
Russ Walling

Social climber
Out on the sand.... man.....
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:30am PT
Shawn Curtis.... mantle king....

I have seen pics... Tarbuster I think has them.

Hardest Mantle: hmmmmm...... one of them camp 4 things just off the trail... no idea on the name. Or was it Swan Slab.....? seen tons of shiit hot climbers flail on the Stem Gem mantle.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:37am PT
"death vomit", f.a. rick allenby, mt.woodson.

uNrepeated.

wooDSon B1++.

pc

climber
East of Seattle
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:40am PT
Mountain Room Bar - "hood" thingy? More yoga for me...
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2007 - 01:42am PT
Yeah, I haven't seen any of the newest testpieces out there but the "Stem Gem" mantle has to be up there - even though it's only 12a old school.

"Purple Barrel" near Curry Village is pretty stout as well (12a).

That one below the "Wineglass Traverse" is pretty stout as well (Camp 4, 12a).

Kauk's old buddy, Tony, used to crank those things. He was like the Bay Area's version of Shawn Curtis (multiple one arm mantles = no sweat).

Death Vomit ??? hmmm..when was that one done? Didn't Shawn Curtis have some badass mantles down at Woodson?
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:48am PT
john -- woodson has a whole slew of sick mantles from the mid-80's.

rick allenby --semi-pro arm wrestler -- did the sickest of 'em.

"death vomit" -- his opus -- is still unrepeated, 20 years later.

dude was SWOLE.
Russ Walling

Social climber
Out on the sand.... man.....
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:49am PT
hahaha! I've done the Mt. Room bar hood mantle.... trick is to find those two little divots and then spit on your forearm, to make it extra sticky or clean or whatever.... then claw on up there.... Mucho hard. Back when the Cliff Room was that whole area you could work on it without security getting on your case.

Done the Purple Barrel, but have never done the Stem Gem mantle, but I've only tried it 2000 times. Used to watch Lechlinski do it like 4 or five times in a row while coaching me... damn, he could press it out!

The Nicopress (or was it Smoke Detector?) out at Josh is pretty darn hard too.....

Press it out edit: Isn't "pebble without a cause" some sort of jingus mantle too???
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:52am PT
"Butterfly Mantle" (V7), the Beak, Castle Rock State Park? FA: Rick Reider, late 70s.

"Planet Caravan", original way, V9, back side of Goat Rock, Castle Rock SP. FA: Jeremy Meigs, middle 90s.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:53am PT
when I looked up "swole" I found this picture...


pc

climber
East of Seattle
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:56am PT
Creepy. Why mantle when you can crush the rock and walk over it.
WBraun

climber
Feb 22, 2007 - 01:58am PT
There is one here in the Valley behind C4. Dale bard is the only ascent ever. This mantle has no name.
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Feb 22, 2007 - 02:05am PT
Squamish is known for its slopers, so there's probably some horrible mantles amongst its boulders. I don't boulder much, so can't say more. Of course, it isn't in the U.S.A....

Dick Cilley had the fireplace mantle wired, pre-bar days.

Someone authoritative once commented about the bouldering near Camp 4 as being almost entirely mantles, most of which were of little relevance to training for Valley climbs.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2007 - 02:09am PT
All right, we'll include Canada....and Mexico too, what the hell.
Loomis

climber
Blava nie, ty kokot!
Feb 22, 2007 - 02:51am PT
Have done the "Stem Gem" mantle over 20 times, way hard press!
This thing I found on a trip to the wind rivers ( around 19 years old ) seemed much harder.
"Butterfly" mantles place strange forces on the body, felt like my shoulders would pop out of socket after placing my arms straight to finish the problem.

Edit: The secret to the Mt. room bar mantle. Wash your hands with cold water before and wipe the edge with a bar napkin. But that was long ago...

Edit2: Perhaps the hardest mantle in the US is to do the "Stem Gem" mantle " Meg Mets" style? ( for those who know )

HighDesertDJ

Trad climber
Arid-zona
Feb 22, 2007 - 03:12am PT
Which aspect of the Stem Gem does one mantle? I'm assuming we aren't talking about the actual Stem Gem problem but some contrivance of it?
Lambone

Ice climber
Ashland, Or
Feb 22, 2007 - 03:14am PT
whoa! WTF!?
Loomis

climber
Blava nie, ty kokot!
Feb 22, 2007 - 03:18am PT
High Desert: One mantles the sloping dish to the right, that you finish the "Stem Gem" from.
James

climber
A tent in the redwoods
Feb 22, 2007 - 03:19am PT
The hardest mantle ain't in Squamish though Tim's Sloper problem is kinda burly. I'd have to say that some of the US's hardest mantle problems are out in Castle Rock. There's a couple that even Joe- a Castle Rock king who can invert his elbows- hasn't managed to send. Think double digit mantles.
426

Sport climber
Buzzard Point, TN
Feb 22, 2007 - 06:13am PT
Interesting question...mebe better to ask "hardest left coast" rather than drummin up a "turf war"
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Oakville, Ontario, Canada, eh?
Feb 22, 2007 - 07:19am PT
It's spelled "MANTEL" damnit! As in the mantelshelf above your fireplace.

Geeeeeeeez......
426

Sport climber
Buzzard Point, TN
Feb 22, 2007 - 07:37am PT
mantle wins by attrition on d.com...

quartziteflight

climber
Feb 22, 2007 - 08:02am PT
stem gem spanked me. I thought my left shoulder was going to explode while starting that thing. What's it rated?
Roger Breedlove

climber
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Feb 22, 2007 - 08:09am PT
Hey Pete, John didnt misspell the word. Everyone just misunderstood the question. John wants to talk about heavy metal fashion.
426

Sport climber
Buzzard Point, TN
Feb 22, 2007 - 08:30am PT
"One person's V6 is another person's V2"-


qflight, you might try the "Uncle Tusi" beta (backwards--bonus points if you riff some bass lines). In a way it's easier than facing forwards. I always think the "slab finish" on SG is the crux, but my slab skillset isn't the solidest....


Mantlin' def. not a lost art in the SE. Usually "the crux"...
Hootervillian

climber
the Hooterville World-Guardian
Feb 22, 2007 - 10:05am PT
'EZ's mantle' at black mountain. gotta be a V8 mantle. sit start to it hasn't gone yet i don't think. kk?



no mantlin' in the SE, just a bunch o 'slab dyno's'
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Feb 22, 2007 - 10:21am PT
426 makes a good point. I think we need East and West division finals. Then an ultimate pushdown in an undiclosed venue in the Midwest featuring a glass mantel structure, combining the features from the other winners. Maybe set between the Lions in front of Chicago's Art Institute.


In my mispent youth I pursued mantels, the slounge fireplace hood, Stem gem Mantel. Thank Gawd, OW came along to take me away from that foolishness.

-a mixed technique wide crack/Mantel is the move into the no hands rest in Trench Warfare. Not as hard as some of those mentioned but hard enough.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2007 - 10:26am PT
Oops...mantle or mantel? Who knows? Our climber usage is not really in the dictionary from what I can tell. We get to make up our own rockspeak...I'm all in favor of letting Russ figuring out the proper spelling. If he isn't up to it, maybe Largo could help us out.

From Merriam Webster's online dictionary thing:

Main Entry: mantel
Pronunciation: 'man-t&l
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, mantle
1 a : a beam, stone, or arch serving as a lintel to support the masonry above a fireplace b : the finish around a fireplace
2 : a shelf above a fireplace

Edit: There's got to be a "Mickey Mantle" somewhere, no?
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Feb 22, 2007 - 10:31am PT
Bachar had a nasty hard mantel on the back of Stoney Point, where you'd have to get both arms cocked on it and your face plastered right up against the wall. By the Hot Tuna Traverse. Powell has some hideous ones out at Roubidoux, on dimes. Purple Barrel isn't in the league of the really hard ones because you can kick your feet and sort of kip up the thing.

How about the mantel at Suicide Rock above the ledge on The Hernia, 5.12 with an anchor-breaker fall. Hard and worthless.

JL
Hootervillian

climber
the Hooterville World-Guardian
Feb 22, 2007 - 10:32am PT
i'm thinking the direct on 'dangerously cheesy' could have a double diggy man.....er....press out. go down your road and take a left when the snow melts mr. B.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 22, 2007 - 10:42am PT
Jaybro's got a good idea, but I think the venue should be to mantle on The Bean!
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Feb 22, 2007 - 11:27am PT
It is somewhat of a dying art, at least among the modern folks unlike us dusty old farts around here. Let me tell you a story...

I have a crag in my yard, old sandstone quarry, with maybe 35 routes on it. Some online friends, a couple from Portland OR dropped in for a visit and to check it out. They're pretty strong sport climbers, 5.12 is no big deal kind of people, logged stacks of hours at Smith, and genuinely sweet and wonderful individuals. So the female half waltzes up this nice 11a without breaking a sweat, snaps through the titular Manly Wham lunge without hesitation, gropes through the blind reachy delicacy crux without pause, and then blows off of the 5.8 mantel at the top because she just doesn't know how to do it! Made me reflect on the virtues of a well rounded education.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Feb 22, 2007 - 11:34am PT
I think most old timers have lost the fire to push the envelope of mantling and have chosen instead to invest heavily in Mantle Insurance. You will see the insured at all the popular crags proudly displaying their policy and actively seeking to expand their personal coverage. Beer guts to some, a spare tire to others, to the insured that precious frontal lobe fulfills the simple promise that comes with every policy.

"Once your belt hits the lip, it's toward success you'll tip."

While not so hard, the 5.10d mantle on Demon's Delight has always been a favorite. You get an elevator ride if that one bucks you off!
G_Gnome

Boulder climber
Sick Midget Land
Feb 22, 2007 - 11:34am PT
Bachar, did you ever do 'The Nostrils' mantle on Lion's Head at Stoney just past Turlock? Pretty damn hard, much harder than Stem Jem.
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Feb 22, 2007 - 11:45am PT
Also, sit down starts seem to lose their allure increasingly after the age of about 40, or so I am told.
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Feb 22, 2007 - 12:03pm PT
I'm thinking Russ's "Speed of Leather" problem at Josh, but I don't think the mantel is the crux of that rig.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 22, 2007 - 12:09pm PT
Per Russ's earlier post reference to the Sean Curtis collection; man I wish I had some shots of Sean "pushin' down"...

That was his deal to be sure, 'speshly at Woodson.
chappy

Social climber
ventura
Feb 22, 2007 - 12:49pm PT
There were so many hard Mantels in the Valley. Lots of good mantelers as well (is this how you spell mantelers??)Hard to tell what was the hardest or who was the best though. I do remember Dale was pretty damn good at them. Purple Barrel is more of the one arm mantel while using a little crimper near where you set your palm (or so I remember)type of Mantle. There were many others that you had to c*#k both elbows at the same time. Werner remember that one right behind the rescue site that you have jump for...the mantel is respectable (not super hard) but if you don't stick the jump you can get hurt. Didn't you pop your knee out on it once???
Blowboarder

Boulder climber
Back in the mix
Feb 22, 2007 - 04:03pm PT
Pig Pen into the NicoPress exit is a really cool problem.

nate23

Trad climber
c-ville, virginia
Feb 22, 2007 - 04:04pm PT
two-pop in boone is a pretty famous hard mantel. boone lends itself to that particular style of climbing.
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Feb 22, 2007 - 04:38pm PT
Posted this on rockclimbing.com awhile back on a sandbag thread:

"Mantle Variation" at the City of Rocks. On the King on the Throne. Was rated 5.8 in the old Bingham guide.

Newer guide calls it "Rap and Pillage" and it sprouted bolts and is rated 5.12c, or something.

Looks so innocent, too. Man, I waisted a bunch of rubber on that route...

Pretty fun, though. Low to the ground, not too much chance of gettin' hurt on it, which makes it a fun sandbag...

I think its an old Yaniro problem.

-Brian in SLC
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2007 - 04:58pm PT
G gnome - yeah the "Lion's Head" had some bad ass mantels. I was able to do 'em all but Jim Wilson was the master at those.

Chapman - Hell yeah Dale could mantel! Kauk's friend Tony too...so could RK himself, and you too if I remember correctly.

Largo - remember the "V" mantel in C4 ? - I think that was yours. Not the hardest press , but weird on the elbows and palms.

What about those old school Pratt mantels on Columbia Boulder? Way ahead of their time!
kk

climber
overrun with traffic and people land, aka S.D.
Feb 22, 2007 - 05:25pm PT
yeah hoot, the EZ mantle at black mountain gotta be up there in the "hard mantle" ranks




the sit start still has no send as far as i know.

Tahoe climber

Trad climber
a dark-green forester out west
Feb 22, 2007 - 06:28pm PT
I think that sit starts begin loosing their appeal at 30, jaybro, not 40

FWIW, I've seen some incredibly hard mantels in gyms, too.

One really fun mantel is on Stranger Than Friction 5.10, out at Enchanted Rock in TX.
Not as hard as many of these mentioned, but it's definitely thought-provoking your first time to lead it!

-Aaron
aldude

climber
Monument Manor
Feb 22, 2007 - 07:11pm PT
Check out " The Velodrome " just north of the parking area @ Echo View in SLT. V 5 ?
bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Feb 22, 2007 - 07:13pm PT
Pinch Overhang!
Tahoe climber

Trad climber
a dark-green forester out west
Feb 22, 2007 - 08:04pm PT
which one's velodrome?
I've climbed damn near everything within my limit at Echo View, but don't have my guide book handy...
-A
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2007 - 08:11pm PT
kk - Killer photos, thanx. Looks classic.

The EZ mantel eh? Gotta go back down there - they're must be tons of new stuff since I last went there with Largo...speaking of which, what about that Largo mantel? the one they printed the photo of him manteling with a cigarette in his mouth...
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Feb 22, 2007 - 09:20pm PT
Yo, Bachar, I remember the V mantle and the Pratt mantels as well. The V mantle was a joint ripper and you had to swim your way over those Pratt mantels, which got so greasy by mid-summer they became virtually impossible, at least for me.

The mantel on the Pinch Overhand is not a true mantle in the purest sense because you can reach up and pinch that flake. The stuff John B. is talking about are pure, gnarly presses, usually on totally sloper surfaces with almost no friction coefficient. I was never flexible enough to c*#k both shoulders like Dale and John and RK and Chapman et al so it was just brute force for me and I really hated it sometimes that I weighed so much. Those guys could just float that stuff while I was blowing a gasket.

That mantle you (JB) mentioned (cig in mouth) up at Black Mountain is like easy 5.12 and not in the league of these others. Like I said earlier, some of the dime mantals Powell and Henny did out at Roubidoux were fricking grave. And those Lion's Head mantles at Stoney were also super strenuous and Jim Wilson really had them dialed. In the early 70s that guy was really one of the best boulderers in the US. Crazy strong and he'd go WAY high sans cordage.

Funny thing is that manteling was huge back then and I can remember when I was climbing all the time I always had a huge callous on the palm of my left hand.

Some memorable mantels were ones that weren't max hard presses but were very balancy, like that one on the Amazon Face over by Curry Village. You had to palm off this little bullshit rill and reach way up to an edge and man, you really didn't want to pitch off from there 'cause bones would be showing if you did.

Just some rambling thoughts. . .

JL
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 22, 2007 - 09:38pm PT
i'll never forget the first time i bouldered with KP. mike paul had dragged him down to santee, or, as henny penny would call it "rubidoux light". this would be early '76 or so.

anyway. we take him to shockly's lunge and he glides it in his tennies. i mean, he literally floated it with no visible effort. i was like..."whoa...he flashed it.....in tennies....and made it look like 5.3..."

the rest of the day went like that. towards the end of the sesh, kp started eyeballing these two half-dime edges on the back side of the black dot boulder that we'd never even noticed. he reaches up, locks his nails down, yards up and OVER the edges, presses OUT on the edges, gets a foot up and stands. swear to god, i was f*#king slackjawed. speechless.

and this was at the end of the day, on his first visit to santee.

i spent the next 20 years trying to repeat that sucker before i gave up. never saw another soul get on the thing. KP didn't even name it. he was off to the next problem without batting an eye.

i shudder to think what the guy did at roobeedoux when he was projecting....KP and henny were the best dime climbers i've ever seen, and i've seen 'em all. too swole, i say.

grave, indeed.
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Oakville, Ontario, Canada, eh?
Feb 22, 2007 - 09:51pm PT
For a brief period of time, I was winning. Largo noticed, but then he regressed.

How many times do I have to tel you how to spel the word?!

Sheesh.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Feb 22, 2007 - 10:51pm PT
So Right
"On the 6th pitch climb up, then left to the base of a very intimidating corner. Surmount this (5.7) by a wild mantel maneuver, then step right and climb a long enjoyable face to the top of the rock." The Nutcracker Roper's guide 1971
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Feb 22, 2007 - 11:17pm PT
Split Rocks, CO. Late 70's.

Me doing it the easy way, with a heel hook. Still have to pop into the press, but pulling on the heel makes a lot of difference.

Mike Weis doing it the straight-forward (harder) way. Just prior to popping his elbows vertical for the press-up.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2007 - 12:06am PT
Hey Jello - Using your brains (heel) counts more than using your muscles in my book. Killer pics BTW.

Mike Weiss - yeah baby,,,he could mantel - couldn't heel hook though. Nice EB's!

Etymology: Middle English mantel, from Anglo-French, from Latin mantellum (Merriam-Webster).

Largo could outpress anybody in his prime on a pure "gnarly" press out type mantel.

Come on, I know somebody's got some Largo mantel pics...
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 23, 2007 - 12:21am PT
speaking of mantles...

FULL COURT PRESS!!!

bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2007 - 12:24am PT
bvb - Looks like an easier but enjoyable MANTLE...nice pic too.

bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2007 - 12:43am PT
Holy shizzle - our spelling dilemma might be over...check this out.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantle_%28climbing%29

Anastasia

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Feb 23, 2007 - 12:43am PT
I am guilty of stealing this from the Stoney Point website,
Bob Camps is mantling on Turlock.

Hootervillian

climber
the Hooterville World-Guardian
Feb 23, 2007 - 10:05am PT
sheesh is right. aid climbers can't even spell mantle.


i thought that largo ciggy photo was of the openers to boneheads?
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Feb 23, 2007 - 10:12am PT
i'm gonna chalk up the bean.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Feb 23, 2007 - 10:59am PT
Ament turned me on to mantling in the 60's. I'm surprised no one has mentioned him yet; he was a master. I remember one in C4 (but can't remember where) that Ament did as a double mantle with a really beautiful weight shift from one hand to a higher hand. Inspired, I think, by Rearick, Ament was a proficient hand-balancer and so had a great combination of pressing strength and body awareness on his hands.

With no climbing gyms (even hangboards hadn't been invented yet) a lot of us tried to emulate Gill by doing gymnastics. After Ament told me about it, I too learned to do a slow symmetric muscle-up on a bar. Then I started mantling on every idiotic sloping ledge and protuding bolt in the gym, eventually working up to repetitions of one-arm mantles (on a ledge with vertical wall below for foot scrabbling). How many years of use this took off my now continually aching shoulders I guess I'll never know.

I did some pretty hard mantles in the Gunks when I was at the peak of my one-arm mantling and slow muscle-up power. (This is now---ahem---a good 35 years ago..) They are on popular boulders that see a lot of traffic, but they never made it into the bouldering guides and I've never seen anyone doing them.

One was hard enough for me that I could only do it in the spring or fall; the additional humidity in the summer made my palm friction insufficient. I walk by it often. The rock is often surrounded by boulderers slapping their way up other problems, but it sits there unnoticed and unattempted, having faded into an obscurity that is the universal fate of fads in our world.

If mantles for their own sake have more or less disappeared from the bouldering circuit, they are still sometimes required at the top of your favorite overhanging crimp fest. And here I cannot help but be a bit amused at how weak some of today's fantastic boulderers are when they have to use pressing muscles. It is not uncommon for me to see people fire off moves of a difficulty we couldn't even have imagined back in the day, and then they totally stall on finishing mantles that we used to do with ease.

So next time you see some doddering old farts in diapers walking by your bouldering sess with toothless grins, you'll know what its about.
BlazeOn

Trad climber
Asheville, NC
Feb 23, 2007 - 11:24am PT
I think "Nate" said it a while back that lots of stuff in the boone area lends itself to hard mantels (mantles). Slopey topouts. Always trips me out when some sik strong gym kid comes out and casually cranks difficult problems only to get to the mantle topout and whimper, cry, fall off and then claim "Nice send" ha ha ha. At Hound Ears Comp its like every 3rd person. Its a trip!
crunch

Social climber
CO
Feb 23, 2007 - 11:31am PT
My vote goes to mantel. A mantel is a shelf. The original climbing term I remember hearing back in the 1970s was to do a "mantelshelf" move.

A mantle is a cloak, a coat.

Here's Adam Wainwright cruising Pinch Overhang at Horsetooth. It might not be a mantel, but it ain't no mantle.



Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Feb 23, 2007 - 11:33am PT
Bachar wrote: "Largo could outpress anybody in his prime on a pure "gnarly" press out type mantel."

Mighty gracious of you John, but Shawn Curtis could out press me any day of the week. I bouldered with Shawn a lot during the early 70s and it was simply ridiculous what he could press out. How about those super nasty sloper ones that turned a lip, where your legs were tucked under the overhand and you'd get a horrendoud cramp in your quad. On those, Shawn would just turn sideways in the air and hoist it like a flag going up. Then he'd pack the bong . . .

Another thing, those pics just above on the Pinch show how climbing technique has changed over the years. In the early 70s we used to mantle that sloper THEN put our foot up. Now the foot goes up and the modern climber rocks over.

Oh, and what about that weird mantel (mantle, as in cloak) at the end of the Acrobatic Overhang (a problem that pre-crash pads used to rarely get done owing to the nasty fall off said mantel at the end). Not super duper hard but don't fall.

JL
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Feb 23, 2007 - 12:01pm PT
Another "King of the mantles" was (Dr.) Dick Schockley. Back in the day he probably rivaled (Sean)Curtis.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Feb 23, 2007 - 01:00pm PT
Johnny, if it's a pure mantel I'm guessing that NO climber (ancient or modern) can throw a foot up first. That Pinch problem above looks to be a kind of lieback, not a press-out mantel. Remember how Ben Borsen used to press-out the Rubidoux mantels and, then, carefully put the foot BETWEEN the two hands to finish up? The Berkeley Style thing...

Gotta add my vote for Largo for mantels in his prime. ...one of the best. I recall how Peter Haan (many moons ago) praised JL as being one of the "most powerful climbers he ever had seen in the Valley" after showing me one of those obscure pure mantels of Largo's behind C4. (And Peter was no stranger to pure power...)

Other obscure mantels? How 'bout Fool On the Hill up in Baldy Canyon? (I'd add Gibo Mantel to the list, but I just saw Henny crank that off last Fall so maybe it's not that hard. He's old! (Duck, cover and hold.))
NinjaChimp

climber
someplace in-between
Feb 23, 2007 - 03:21pm PT
There's a problem in C4 that I've heard refered to as "the pit stop mantle" it is just left and uphill from Ament Arete. there is a faint "knob" in the middle of a blank slab that caps a short overhang, thing is des-pirate. Did purple barrel second try for comparison, I've got many goes and zero progress on this rig. Anyone know what I'm talking about or have any luck?

There are some difficult presses in the southeast as well. Stingray comes to mind at HP40.

-Justin
Dimes

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Feb 23, 2007 - 04:11pm PT
Largo, what about the bowling ball mantle in telluride. do you remember that thing. I show up there in 79 when you and "Mama" are guiding for Robbins. You take me to this overhanging boulder dotted with cobbles, some as big as bowling balls. You start throwing this hugh double handed dyno for the "bowling ball" and after a few attempts somehow hold on to the big sloping bowling ball and then if I remember correctly, turn over some burly ass mantle. I will never forget that whole experience. To this day I still cannot believe what I saw. Hoo maannn!!! As for Rubidoux, go try the Muzzle Loader. Can't remember for sure but, the C*#k may have been the first one to do it. You pull down on an edge and then turn it over, mantling on the edge of your left little finger. Then step onto the same edge and stand up. Poor landing and no pads allowed. For real entertainment, take Bolton down to the Wall of Glass and ask him to Roll Up The Window (old school 10b) for you. Powell
L

climber
The City of Lost Angels
Feb 23, 2007 - 04:31pm PT
My vote's with you, too, John.

When I first started climbing I bought that "How to Rock Climb" video and there you are, mantling some chunk of granite in Yosemite like the laws of gravity weren't part of your culture.

Only after I learned how to climb somewhat did I come to understand just how incredibly superhuman that little mantle of yours was.

Yowza!
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Feb 23, 2007 - 04:34pm PT
KP said, "...take Bolton down to the Wall of Glass and ask him to Roll Up The Window..."

Actually, I think that's a Rubidoux 10a, Kevin. (Maybe 5.10 minus, on the outside.)
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Feb 23, 2007 - 04:59pm PT
EASY, Powell...

You're gonna have to wear the dress and dance again.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Feb 23, 2007 - 05:09pm PT
Boltman said, "You're gonna have to wear the dress..."

Can we get some video, this time?! Huh? I understand there's this thing called YouTube where you can post .avi files or summat. (Damn. I bet people would pay to see that!)

Henny and I'll bring the camera...
Robb

Social climber
Under a Big Sky
Feb 23, 2007 - 06:02pm PT
Hardest?
Anything Altman said was hard.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Feb 23, 2007 - 06:27pm PT
Talking about the Wall of Glass, how about the Surrealistic Pillar, done by Paul Gleason in about 1909 in those hideous red PAs. Hard ass mantel on that one.

And Damn, I forgot about the Gibo mantel. Very, very slick. You had to press it out about a centimeter at a time or you'd ping off.

And Powell, or course I remember the Bowling Ball mantel. I'd been trying it for like a month straight before I finally got it that day with you and "Mama." That one was extra burly, and very difficult to stick. So far as I remember I only got that one the one time, and not for lack of trying.

Also, someone mentioned that super slick mantel by Ament's Arete. I could get that about once out of a thousand tries. My hand would always slip off the bugger.

Lastly (I could go on and on here), Ben Boreson (circa 1971/2) could also do those hideious fingertip dime mantels like nobodies bidness.

But how about Gill's Acrobatic Overhang up in Boulder Cyn.??? Nobody is speaking up about that one.

JL
t steele

climber
bish
Feb 23, 2007 - 06:30pm PT
I can't believe nobody has mentioned midnight lightning's mantle yet. It isn't the hardest, but it sure spits enough people off and it is harder than purple barrle.


As for planet caravan, I sent that rig not long after jeremy did it, and there was no real mantle going on that I can remember. ALso, I don't think it was ever called V9.

In bish, I'd say the most classic mantle challenge is at the top of pope's prow. 5.10+ in the old guide...
James

climber
A tent in the redwoods
Feb 23, 2007 - 08:07pm PT
There's a saying I heard at Jailhouse last weekend. Pretty close to verbatim but not quite-here's the gist. "In the seventies there was the mantle, the eighties the rose move, the nineties had the drop knee, but it's the kneebar that brought us to the new millenium."
desert dirtbag

climber
crested butte, co
Feb 23, 2007 - 10:15pm PT
Don't have any photos, and don't know if it's the most difficult, but the "Wilson mantle"(or "mantel") at Big Bend, is one of the most unique moves I have ever seen. Word is it's only been done by a few people. Won't give away the beta.
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Feb 24, 2007 - 02:04am PT
Not the hardest by any means, but an integral part of the route (and the crux), is the mantel on the first pitch of Athlete's Feat, Castle Rock, Boulder Canyon. I think it got harder over the years as little flakes to pull on broke off, forcing a more pure mantel technique.
henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 25, 2007 - 11:33pm PT
Bolton: The next time Powell tries to get you to go to the Wall of Glass - tell him you'll do Roll Up the Window if he shows you how to do A Perfect Stranger first.
Watusi

Social climber
Joshua Tree, CA
Feb 26, 2007 - 12:05am PT
God Blessed be! That darn Shawn Curtis could virtually dis-locate his shoulders to to press out some petty sick shite........
henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 26, 2007 - 12:20am PT
One of the most exiting mantles I've witnessed on a route would have to be Powell on the FA of El Goucho in the Whitney Portal. About 30' out on the second pitch he found a small pothole and mantled into it. After matching a foot in the hole he started to leg press, only to come to a complete halt. Seems he had inadvertently stepped directly into the sling around his neck that had the drill on it and couldn't finish standing up. There he was, looking at a huge fall, trying to reach down and half reverse the mantle so he could get his foot out of the sling. Fortunately he remained totally calm (yeah, right...), never raised his voice (yeah, right...), and was able to recover. Quite an exiting mantle, that one was.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Feb 26, 2007 - 03:52pm PT
Yes, there is a "Mickey Mantle" - near Eightmile Rock in Leavenworth, WA. It's misidentified in the old Smoot guidebook - it's up and right from the main rock. I'm not sure if it's shown correctly in the Kramar guide.

"Retable" is another term which is sometimes used instead of "mantelshelf". There's an old route in the Quincy Quarries called Double Retable. Apparently a retable is a small shelf on an altar:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retable
Apocalypsenow

Trad climber
Cali
Feb 26, 2007 - 04:45pm PT
The hardest I have ever seen is, "Eli Can't Pushup," in Tahoe. Never repeated.
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Feb 26, 2007 - 07:54pm PT
There is a Mickey Mantle route in Vedauwoo. 10d, hee hee
scooter

climber
B loop site 15
Feb 27, 2007 - 03:03am PT
Behind Puppy there is a mantle that my buds and I all call the Bachar Mantle. Off two knobs, a little guy and a flat one. All with a nice little jump to start 'er off. I think it is way harder than the c4 mantles. Plus the fall is not clean. J.B.- do you know the mantle? Is it truly a Bachar Mantle? Or just something with your name ascribed to it.

Patrick
Dick_Lugar

Trad climber
Indiana
Feb 27, 2007 - 12:42pm PT
Hardest mantel in the USA and that I've ever done...hmmm? That would have to be my wife's taught bum...it usually takes two hands and I have push down really hard on while I pull the move:)
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 27, 2007 - 01:46pm PT
Patrick - Behind Puppy Dome? hmmm...I'd have to see it (or a pic). I did a lot of problems there back in the day and I can barely remember the ultra classics!

Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Mar 3, 2007 - 12:13am PT
Bachar - of course you've lost your mind - years ago as I recall -
the best and hardest mantels - and all the mantel kings are, of course, AT WOODSON.
NinjaChimp

climber
someplace in-between
Mar 3, 2007 - 05:34pm PT
"Behind Puppy there is a mantle that my buds and I all call the Bachar Mantle. Off two knobs, a little guy and a flat one. All with a nice little jump to start 'er off. I think it is way harder than the c4 mantles."

scooter, I know of what you speak. That one is not so bad (albeit incredibly fun), the one to the right is much harder. I couldn't even pull my weight of the ground for more than a few seconds let alone begin to mantle it out. Have you tried it? It begins on piss poor slopers at about head height.

-Justin
Karl Baba

Trad climber
Yosemite, Ca
Mar 3, 2007 - 05:56pm PT
I wanna know about this frustrating mantle over at Swan Slab that's maybe 50 feet left of Grant's crack near that 5.9 lieback.

It's right in front of your face, looks like a mini-stem-jam, and there just ain't enough there to claw onto. I heard Werner can do it.

Peace

Karl "don't do mantles" Baba
happiegrrrl

Trad climber
New York, NY
Mar 3, 2007 - 06:33pm PT
I saw guys trying to do the Stem gem mantle all week long last trip to Jtree(my favorite campspot, for it's sociability, is #23). Some good tries, but no takers.

I like mantling, myself, but can't do anywhere near the stuff you guys are talking about. But! There is a mantle move at the Gunks on Hans Puss, 2nd pitch, mid route, that gave me pause last fall. That route earns it's stars, mindf*#king you along the way, and then...you see the belay. Right there, above you. Except..... you have to mantle up this move. It has a thin ledge, maybe half a shoe's lenght deep, with the rock wall continuing right in your face above the mantle section.

On mantles, it has always seemed to me like they're in the bag once you've gotten your center of gravity over the edge. Not on this one. You get up there, there's no tipping forward to help roll up a leg. In fact, I think I had to turn my head sideways in order to give me that little extra bit of room where my nose had been.

So, you're up there, pressing out, nose to the side, and feeling like the rock is about to push you backwards. You get the viscerable sensation that you'll be going right over backwards and rolling into the abyss if you blow it. Despite that, you have to reach hiiiiigh to get a little crimpy type of hold for balance and pull so you can get your foot to the ledge.

At least that was what happened to me. Your experience may vary.
Jefe'

Boulder climber
Bishop
Mar 7, 2007 - 07:06pm PT
Juan, hows about those slopers at Baldy.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Mar 7, 2007 - 09:34pm PT
BVB, Largo, Fish and Watusi are right - mantel king status may well have to go to Shawn Curtis.
Leroy

climber
Mar 26, 2007 - 05:44am PT
I remember Bachar and I did ahard mantle somewhere left of the stemgem camp.Proof that it was hard ....Lechlinski had to come back the next week.Shawn was the best.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Jan 2, 2008 - 04:36am PT
bump for mantles
Watusi

Social climber
Newport, OR
Jan 2, 2008 - 04:54am PT
Bump for my man Shawn...(Curtis)
Dick_Lugar

Trad climber
Indiana
Jan 2, 2008 - 08:31am PT
For the record..my wife's bum!
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Oakville, Ontario, Canada, eh?
Jan 2, 2008 - 10:37am PT
It might not really be that hard - 5.10? - but you're risking a hundred-foot fall doing the mantel on the runout bumpy rock pitch of Jolly Roger. It's around the fifth pitch or so, you can see it just left of the fixed ropes going up to the base of the Heart.
Ihateplastic

Trad climber
Lake Oswego, Oregon
Jan 2, 2008 - 02:35pm PT
First, let's go back to a definitive source: Basic Rockcraft. Robbins spells the word as MANTLE. Okay? Enough of that.

Second, and for no particular reason since he was relatively unknown, I believe the "Tony" that Bachar is speaking about when he speaks of Kauk's old friend, Tony is Tony Lynott.

Tony, Blinny and I spent many a day at Castle Rock (Bay Area) setting and struggling on problems. Tony was a master boulderer whose ability to mantle was second-to-none that I had seen. I am not even sure where it came from since his shoulders were not bulging mounds of steel. Castle Rock has many fine mantle problems and Tony mastered them all. He went on to fame and fortune in the art world with his unbelievable stained and etched glass creations and his sculpted rock art. However, along the way he made up a little song that sits in my memory even today. He would sing this while fingering his way up some devilish testpiece:

I like cracks,
Cracks like me,
We get together,
Naturally.

Yea, I know it is childish and makes no sense, but it was fun to listen to him sing it while we squirmed in our boots at the belay.

A while back on another thread Blinny (Mark B.) posted these pictures of Tony doing his Castle Rock creation called The Cartwheel. It involved great balance and sort of an upside-down mantle.

bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA
Jan 2, 2008 - 03:31pm PT
Bachar mentioned Ron Kauk's friend Tony. Yes, he was one great mantler! I remember one time at Castle Rock when Tony was doing laps on the front face mantle, one-handed, a guy wanders up and says "hey! You can get your other hand up there, too!". Cracked me up!

Bruce
Batrock

Trad climber
Burbank
Jan 2, 2008 - 04:04pm PT
Mikey Waugh has to be one of the best mantle masters that I have seen. In fact I think he is one of the great under rated climbers of our day. He seemed to do it all with perfect ease.
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Jan 2, 2008 - 05:12pm PT
Funny British article about Mantling:
http://tinyurl.com/33k8ut

Anybody here ever done the Piano in Fontainebleau? Pure two handed press from above your head down to below the waist.
Oli

Trad climber
Fruita, Colorado
Jan 2, 2008 - 07:24pm PT
Thanks Rich Goldstone for the kind words. I worked very hard at manteling and, during my gymnastics days, as a University of Colorado gymnast, practiced on the two-inch wide wooden ledge that ran around the inside wall of the gym. I got to where I could mantel that with one hand, starting in a hang from fingertips, pulling up, hopping the palm into mantel position, and pressing up with one arm into an elbow lock. I managed to find a few boulders like that, on Flagstaff and elsewhere. John Sherman writes about one such route in his book "Stone Crusade."

I went on tours of the Yosemite boulders with Pratt, Robbins, Bridwell, Kamps, Higgins, and others, and I managed to repeat all of Pratt's mantels (I was told many of these were second ascents, as no one yet had been able to do them, although Royal had done a few, what with his great elbow and shoulder flexibility). I put up a few of my own that no one knows about anymore, because in large part no one seemed to care in those days about mantels. I recall doing a couple Pratt showed me that he wanted to do or hadn't gotten to yet, and I did one on the Wine Boulder that was the equivalent of a hollowback off the floor, or something similar.

I used to practice mantels by doing pure muscle-ups on a bar. Anyone can do a muscle-up on a bar, but for this kind one must slowly begin to pull up (no jerk or jump to start) and, without generating any upward momentum, continue slowly above the bar, without bringing one elbow up ahead of the other, and without shifting the hands at all. Start in the best false grip you can get, to begin with, with the heels of the hand on top of the bar, then simply pull in very slow motion and press up and over evenly, with both elbows going up at the same time.

Largo, I did the second ascent of Gill's Acrobat Overhang at Castle Rock in the late 1960s, and it's a tough overhanging face climb but only looks from below to be a difficult mantel. Where it seems one must mantel, it's not really too hard to make a few face moves at that point, while half-manteling. So that one really isn't a mantel. But Gill has done many fiercely difficult mantels at locations no one would imagine, and most unknown or unrecorded, lost in some forest or obscure bouldering area, and probably more than a few unrepeated. I watched him one day do a mantel at Split Rocks, west of Estes, and in my best shape I had to work hard for a couple days to repeat it.

Rich Borgman, so light and strong, and a world-class side horse man I once competed against in a gymnastic meet, could mantel with amazing ability. I'm not sure I've seen anything like it since, though he long ago gave up climbing and went on some religious mission to Africa...

The route Goldstone speaks about that I did on Columbia, if I recall, was a first ascent, but again it's unknown to most and probably completely lost to history now, as to exactly where and which line it took. I do recall, however, doing four or five mantel routes over the big overhang left of Robbins Overhang, on Columbia. I think at least one or two of those were later claimed by others as first ascents.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 2, 2008 - 07:34pm PT
Tony Lynott - yes!

He was as good as Shawn Curtis as far as I could tell. He could do that pure "butterfly" technique like no one I have ever seen. He was built like Shawn as well. Amazing pressing power. I remember he could do reps on the "Butterfly" mantle on the Wine Traverse boulder - still a pretty hard mantle by today's standards.
PhilG

Trad climber
The Circuit, Tonasket WA
Jan 2, 2008 - 07:54pm PT
This thread, which must have recently been bumped to the front, reminds me of a funny mantel story. One of the best mantel experts I ever saw was my brother. Paul loved to mantel, and he especially loved painful mantels. For him, the harder and more painful the mantel was the better. He found a wicked little problem at Big Rock which required pressing up on a thumb shaped little fin of extruding diorite. To do this problem one had to endure excruciating pain to the palm while trying to lift ones feet to a sloping edge of rock. Few of us could do it once let alone repetitively as he would do. It became a fixture of his boulder circuit, especially when we were out with a new climber.
One day we went out to this problem and someone had either purposefully or unintentionally broken off the small fin of rock. Paul was heart broken. It was one of his favorite boulder problems.
Not one to accept fate without a struggle, Paul found the fin of rock and next visit to Big Rock, he tried to reattach the diorite thumb with some liquid steel. After several attempts he had to accept that the fin wouldnt hold to the matrix. Disappointed at first he discovered however that the numerous globs of liquid steel had hardened into a sharper and more painful spike to mantel on. So painful in fact I dont remember seeing anyone repeat his problem.
This boulder, among many more, was destroyed when they made the present dam.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Jan 2, 2008 - 08:24pm PT
"He was as good as Shawn Curtis as far as I could tell. He could do that pure "butterfly" technique like no one I have ever seen. He was built like Shawn as well. Amazing pressing power. I remember he could do reps on the "Butterfly" mantle on the Wine Traverse boulder - still a pretty hard mantle by today's standards."

JB, is this the same butterfly mantle at Castle Rock State Park, or is this a different boulder? Does it have two names then? We know that boulder with the "Butterfly" mantle as "The Beak".

bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 2, 2008 - 09:01pm PT
Not the same one...there was a "Butterfly" mantle on the Wine Traverse boulder in Camp 4. I imagine there are more "Butterfly" mantles in other areas as well.

I only went to Castle Rock a few times but I do remember some pretty wicked mantles there... I imagine Tony"s testpieces still thwart many an attempt.
wildone

climber
Where you want to be
Jan 2, 2008 - 10:06pm PT
There's a mantel on the middle of t-crack at Gibralter Rock in SB, it's only .11b but goddamn is it hard. I couldn't even get my waist above it.

Also, on the aaproach to Olmstead Canyon (ie. tide line, lord caffeine) there's a boulder with two really hard mantels by the pond. I don't know their names.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Jan 8, 2008 - 01:20am PT
doh, I wasn't keeping up with the thread there. Just re-read it. disregard.
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, Ca
Jan 8, 2008 - 01:24am PT
What is the first problem left of The Ripper, in Josh? It is a mantle, and I've seen some hard climbers fight with it. Never saw anyone win.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 10, 2008 - 11:38am PT
So where does the Chouinard mantle on Columbia Boulder sit in the difficulty spectrum?

How about the Super RR mantle and Rockcraft tips shown below?

Rankin

climber
North Carolina
Jul 10, 2009 - 09:29am PT
bump
Cannon

Trad climber
Wildomar, CA
Jul 10, 2009 - 03:25pm PT
Author:
James

climber
From: A tent in the redwoods
There's a saying I heard at Jailhouse last weekend. Pretty close to verbatim but not quite-here's the gist. "In the seventies there was the mantle, the eighties the rose move, the nineties had the drop knee, but it's the kneebar that brought us to the new millenium."



forgive the ignorence, i am a fan of the drop knee, the heel hook, and the occational mantle, but what is a rose move?
murcy

climber
San Fran Cisco
Jul 10, 2009 - 03:40pm PT
http://www.indoorclimbing.com.au/fac/moves.htm

Cancer Boy

Trad climber
Freedonia
Jul 10, 2009 - 04:21pm PT
me cranking one of these at the gym recently: "Wow a rose move. Cool." younger climber: "I don't think they call them that anymore."

Origin: la rose et le vampire at Buoux, one of the world's harder climbs bitd.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOAEQmgpJqw

For full value, inhale with your nose deeply embedded in your armpit. (The move name was coined in France, after all).

I wonder what the move is now called?
Robb

Social climber
The Greeley Triangle
Jul 10, 2009 - 06:36pm PT
Don't know the name of it(if it even has one), but there's a mantle on Indian Rock in Berkeley that I used to watch Dave Altman do work outs on, up down up down up down etc. "Here, you boys try it".I couldn't even hang on that smooth sloping thing. Then again neither could Harrington & he was much better than I at the time.
Mimi

climber
Aug 25, 2009 - 09:44pm PT
Nostalgia bump!
noshoesnoshirt

climber
Arkansas, I suppose
Aug 25, 2009 - 09:58pm PT
Yer mom
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Aug 25, 2009 - 10:06pm PT
Walleye conquers the notorious mantle on Nutcracker Suite, probably breaker of more ankles than any other mantle in the world.
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
May 29, 2011 - 12:41pm PT
I remember sometime in the mid 70s when I was pretty strong and could do that mantle at Indian Rock up and down and so on. I was in the Valley and bumped into Dale Bard in the boulders by swan slab. He showed me a mantle that was orders of magnitude harder than the stuff we did at Indian Rock. I could barely hold on to do the pull up. He mantled without inverting, just pressed up without moving his hands.

Fred
ec

climber
ca
May 29, 2011 - 02:10pm PT
Besides being talented, Dale weighs in like a feather...
 ec
FredC

Boulder climber
Santa Cruz, CA
May 29, 2011 - 02:33pm PT
I knew Dale from his Indian Rock days. We could tell if he had been bouldering the day before because of the total snow of chalk he would leave in his wake.

I saw him a few times after he moved to Yosemite, I remember one time he was standing around, you could see every muscle, he hardly looked human. I asked how he had gotten so strong and he said "oh, just walking a little chain". He was always pretty funny.

I think he was the strongest looking climber I have ever seen.

FC
jahil

Social climber
London->Paris->WV->CA
Jul 4, 2011 - 03:32pm PT
Just saw this thread for the first time, there are some wonderful stories here. I used to think it would be cool to send some of Bachar's old problems, now I'm thinking I just need to reread all his old threads!

steve
Patrick Oliver

Boulder climber
Fruita, Colorado
Jul 4, 2011 - 03:35pm PT
Wish you good folk would get the spelling right,
as mantel and not mantle. Some, though, seem to insist
on the wrong spelling. They've seen it so much it feels
unnatural to do it right...

I did every mantel anyone showed me, Werner, in Camp 4. I was
focused on Pratt's mantels, but there were others. We didn't
always make much mention of some of them, really, because even
back then not many were into manteling. I had that hollow-back
press strength, as a gymnast, and could do a plange on the floor,
so that helped. It always amazed me that Pratt could do mantels
so hard without any sort of gymnastic training. I bouldered a couple
of times with Dale, but he never showed me any mantel, at least
not one I couldn't do... I'm curious about the one you mention...

I got into one-arm mantels for quite a little spell, the dead hang,
pull up by one arm, pop heel of hand onto mantel spot, push to where
elbow locks out, step into mantel, stand up... I don't think anyone
does those these days... can't imagine why they would want to...
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Feb 11, 2012 - 05:03pm PT
Another mantel BUMP!
~kief~

Trad climber
nor-cal
Feb 11, 2012 - 06:57pm PT
just saw this thread for the first time...

original post BACHAR.....MAMMOTH LAKES..07.?

WOW,......rest in peace ,BRO.
Rankin

Social climber
Greensboro, North Carolina
Feb 11, 2012 - 11:27pm PT
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Feb 12, 2012 - 01:25am PT
"Butterfly Mantel" (V7) on The Beak formation, Castle Rock State Park, Ca. Also known as the "Reider Mantel" after the first ascentionist, Rick Reider. Never seen it done again although someone says they have done it, but I think they're confusing it with the Beak Mantel.

Of course, CRSP is the land of mantels, so I imagine there are some V9 mantels out there somewhere in the Park. Does anyone know of some V9s? Must be!
Dr.Sprock

Boulder climber
I'm James Brown, Bi-atch!
Feb 12, 2012 - 02:02am PT
plenty of V9 out at the Green Monster

but we not supposed to be there,

only big kitty cats,

you fall off the monster,

you may as well start going

here kitty kitty kitty, kitty,


heeeeerere kitty kitty,

come and get it, suppa time at the park,
KabalaArch

Trad climber
Starlite, California
Feb 12, 2012 - 03:58am PT
I discovered one small mantle at the front side of Indian Rock which came in handily a few times. At about a full body stretch was a nice horizontal, about an inch wide x maybe 4 inches in length. My deal was to start with a cling hold, rock up feet while extending my fingers full extension on the shelf, to make roof for the feet. An old A1 move at North Yak, in the Pinns required a similar technique, except once you pressed it out and were standing on what was pretty good feet, there was nothing but peanuts for your hands above; the wall was slightly OH too.

Scariest mantle, for me, came while following the 2nd pitch of Orange Peel, on MC North apron. The route traversed left for 50 or 60 feet out of a right facing dihedral, and the only bolt was midway to the anchors, and not intended to protect the follower. After the clip, you'd have to down-mantle a fair distance to gain friction on a steepish slab, then continue exeunt left on sustained 5.10b friction bumps to the belay. So, I'm carefully traversing over to this lonely mank. As a newbie, it didn't occur to me to maybe try some different postures before unclipping from what would have provided me a toprope...I just unclipped, then began to try a couple of really awkward feeling, and blind, positions, halting very abruptly in mid move when I could feel my center of gravity was going to barn door me into a nasty 40 foot pendulum onto the anchors. A wise move, which inspired a more balanced one, and I made my way on tippy toes to the belay.

Most all of the MCR Apron, and GPA, are really stories about mantles, from tips off of dimes, to cozy belay alcoves. Even those low angle but subtle hand inversions - fingers out, elbows in facing stone; press down on heel of hand, in some friction dish.

There can come that moment of truth, though, mid mantle, when you start feeling that "here we go!" sensation from over or undercranking, improper lockoff, underestimated the area of the mantleshelf needed for decent feets, than can be intimidating.
T H

Boulder climber
bouldering
Feb 12, 2012 - 04:01am PT
Can't find the video right now, but on youtube there's a dude who one-arm pulls up on a normal bar, continues - and one arm mantles it (same arm/ no feet), then levers and presses it out to the one arm handstand finish.
Spider Savage

Mountain climber
The shaggy fringe of Los Angeles
Feb 12, 2012 - 11:01am PT
Lion Head rock at Stoney Point.

Anyone ever done it? I've heard about it. Seen chalk on it. Never seen it done.

Prolly not the hardest. Just damn hard.
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Feb 12, 2012 - 01:05pm PT
The 11+ mantel on that first pitch of Athlete's Feat sure seemed hard to me, and I wasn't even leading.

photo courtesy Ron Olsen and mp.com
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Feb 12, 2012 - 02:09pm PT
"The 11+ mantel on that first pitch of Athlete's Feat"

Isn't that mantel supposed to be 5.10c? At least it was back when I did it back in 1977!
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Feb 12, 2012 - 02:23pm PT
Well, depending on who you talk to, the key hold that you go to after the undercling and then match to bring up your feet, has either worn down or broken off. Either way, if you led that BITD, before the bolt, it might have been 10c but you had balls of steel to lead that move without it.
Bruce Morris

Social climber
Belmont, California
Feb 13, 2012 - 12:20am PT
Think the bolt was there back in July 1977. However, it was a real lousy spinner with a sling (maybe?) & must have been replaced by now suppose? Must have been.
Allen Hill

Social climber
CO.
Feb 13, 2012 - 02:19am PT
The bolt wasn't within reach prior to the move. You clipped a fixed knife blade and did the move. It was totally hairy. That pin was driven in upside down and looked as old as Robbins and Ament do now. And that would have been in 1978 as that was the first year I lead the pitch. It's much safer now.
BlackSpider

Ice climber
Feb 13, 2012 - 10:06am PT
What's the hardest mantel in the world period? Dave Graham's problem "From Dirt Grows the Flowers" in Switzerland (done using the original method) supposedly has a V12 mantel crux move. Any other contenders? I remember there being one in Britain that gets a 7b UK tech rating (no idea what it's considered in YDS/V/Font).
T H

Boulder climber
extraordinaire
Oct 15, 2013 - 12:59am PT
Ain't hard, but is chill mantel none-the-less. I set up on it, and a lady approached, and gave me bad beta for my right foot.
T~Rex

climber
NZ
Oct 15, 2013 - 03:39am PT
Looks to be some hard mantles in the states, not sure any match up to the ones at Castle Hill NZ though...
https://vimeo.com/27702238

http://castlehillbasin.co.nz/node/1336

or on a 5.14 route:http://www.flickr.com/photos/10806461@N08/6462411073/
mcreel

climber
Barcelona
Oct 15, 2013 - 04:07am PT
What's that one called Biotch? "Lower than a T party debt ceiling"? Nice outfit.
lucander

Trad climber
Shawangunks, New York
Oct 15, 2013 - 08:54am PT
That opening move on EBGB's at Josh is a helluva shut-down mantle.
Mark Force

Trad climber
Ashland, Oregon
Mar 3, 2016 - 09:30pm PT
"Anybody got pics of Dale Bard mantling?" bump
snowhazed

Trad climber
Oaksterdam, CA
Mar 3, 2016 - 10:25pm PT
what a rad thread- thanks for the bump

Curt

climber
Gold Canyon, AZ
Mar 3, 2016 - 11:32pm PT
At least a couple of the things mentioned here I don't consider to be real mantels since (as others have mentioned) you can basically face-climb past them. Acrobat Overhang and Pinch Overhang come to mind. I've done those problems and I don't mantel particularly well.

Curt
skcreidc

Social climber
SD, CA
Mar 4, 2016 - 08:56am PT
Good thread. There is mantel problem called "speed of leather"? I love some of these names.

Is this thing really a mantle? Death Vomit; photo from MP
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 22, 2017 - 04:38pm PT
Bump for midwinter mantle insurance...
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Jan 22, 2017 - 06:44pm PT
Great bump... I always love it when a JB topic crops up....

With the winter rains, I do police Stoney some. I do stop when I see pads being unloaded and eager young boulders running down to climb.

I try to educate them, most are so new and wet behind the ears they don't know one is not climb on the sandstone when its mud.

I tell them, its ok to walk around and do the mantle problems, things like the Lion Head, the Wilson Mantles the Slant Rock mantles etc....

most give me blank stares and ask "Whats a mantle" .... I kid you knot

I guess those are not Set at the gyms.
ruppell

climber
Jan 22, 2017 - 06:46pm PT
Sometime in the not so distant future:

"Grandpa, what's a mantle?"
jgill

Boulder climber
The high prairie of southern Colorado
Jan 22, 2017 - 08:49pm PT
Owen Glynne Jones may have started it all back in the 1890s when he'd do his gymnastic climbing stunts in the billiard room at Wastwater Hotel in the Lake District. He would mantle on a mantle above the fireplace.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 22, 2017 - 09:05pm PT
The mantle of history surrounding the historical mantel of the mantelpiece.

Before Pete blows a gasket again.

I just picked up a copy of Alan Hankinson's excellent historical examination of the Owen Glynne Jones era, The First Tigers. Quite the amazing climber was he.
Peater

Trad climber
Salt Lake City Ut.
Jan 22, 2017 - 11:45pm PT
Mantling is a very useful tool. I've done some climbs that advertised no rests but I found them holding a mantle. You can unload your feet and shake out a hand.

On the other hand I'd be barfing on a 5.9 off width.

Used to be able to climb a pole like on a volley ball court. Hands as high as they could go then put a foot on top of the pole and stand up. And watch the VB game. Usually the VB game stopped when I did this though.
martygarrison

Trad climber
Washington DC
Jan 23, 2017 - 08:03am PT
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Jan 23, 2017 - 08:53am PT
Nice one Marty! Back in the days when the bar had some class! Sofas and all.
And heck, is that Fish there, having a beer?

Did you ever get on top of that rig?



And I'm not usually into bouldering vids, but this one (reposted from above) is excellent!

https://vimeo.com/27702238

Damn that looks hard!
Mike Honcho

Trad climber
Golden, CO
Jan 23, 2017 - 10:49am PT
Well, maybe not the hardest mantle for certain, but the one I've seen as the most spectacular and ugly if you blow it. The Midnight Lightning finish mantle.
This thing. No other way to pull this mantle off than to 100% commit to the set up, the "kip", and then see it through somehow. If you're truly committed and your foot pops you WILL bounce your face off the granite and with some level of stars in your eyes, you and your now squirting nose will fall like a sack of crap into whatever spot or pads you had at the time. Truly, the agony and the glory in one crux, mantle finale'!
Here's a humorous, yet truthful and funny "pre-mantle prep" pic..

Both pics shamelessly grabbed off of Google.
adenparker

climber
Encinitas, CA
Feb 6, 2019 - 07:37pm PT
Bump for hard mantles!

Here are a few pics of some recent burly ones...

Veins popping and leg cramping.

Birthday Mantle in the Boulder Batholith near Butte, MT. Classic!

This has to be one of the hardest...Curtis Mantle at Woodson. This photo doesn't do it justice...haven't heard of many repeats, if any at all. I know I've been shut down countless times.
mike m

Trad climber
black hills
Feb 6, 2019 - 08:58pm PT
Aiden. Good to see you on here. How did you like the batholith? Very cool place. Tell your dad I said hi. If you are ever in CO you should hook up with my son for a few pitches.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Feb 6, 2019 - 09:06pm PT
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
blah blah blah

Feb 22, 2007 - 07:19am PT

It's spelled "MANTEL" damnit! As in the mantelshelf above your fireplace.
Geeeeeeeez......

Nice to know someone else is a lert.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Feb 6, 2019 - 09:17pm PT
The oft-repeated mantel on Little Columbia Boulder (long may it serve us and peace be on those who climb on it), called The Horn, is one which for me was almost a literal stepping stone in my development as a young climber lacking in significant amounts the requisite upper development to perform the maneuver with great ease and grace instead of thrashing around with feet dangling, trying to get the angle and the thrust upwards and the balance just so and the foot up, and all that technique sh#t.

Or else it was simply a huge ego booster, one. That sounds more like.

And along comes Jerry Coe, the Fresno Flash, to show me the OTHER WAY to do it...upside f'n down, I kid not. He grabbed the greasy horn standing and looking at Big Columia and magically arches and lands atop the would-be mantel like it's no big deal. I cannot adequately recall how he managed it, but he DID, and let's see BURT BRONSON DO IT, YA CANDY-ASS!

Not really claiming this is the hardest in the USA, but it may be if it's done like Jerry done it.

--mfm


God rest ye, John Bachar, wherever you are.
You're in our hearts so you ain't very far.
throwpie

Trad climber
Berkeley
Feb 6, 2019 - 09:52pm PT
The fireplace hood at the lodge? We were all hanging on a rainy day when this kid came in and truly levitated up it. Who was that I asked later. Tobin something was the answer.
micronut

Trad climber
Fresno/Clovis, ca
Feb 7, 2019 - 06:55am PT
Cool old Bachar thread. Nice shots Adenparker. Keeping the lost art alive.

Scott

FRUMY

Trad climber
Bishop,CA
Feb 7, 2019 - 07:06am PT
I think it died with Yabo!
mike m

Trad climber
black hills
Feb 8, 2019 - 02:49am PT
Looks like it is coming back with a new young crew. As a matter of fact I think there has been a new resurgence and appreciation of the old ways. I know in the black hills there is a strong crew that is putting up new ground up routes of extreme difficulty using clean gear and hand drilling on lead when necessary. I am sure hundreds of routes have been put up that way in the last decade after very few going in that way in the 90s and early 2000s. Lots of routes were going in just not in that pure old school style.

Aidans dad was one of those putting up the hardest limestone routes and boulder problems in the black hills in the 90s so I am giving a big shout out to Greg.
adenparker

climber
Encinitas, CA
Feb 8, 2019 - 03:29pm PT
Hey Mike! I told my dad you said hey. He's definitely still into route development, now in San Diego. I'm goin to school in Bozeman, the batholith is where it's at!
aspendougy

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Feb 8, 2019 - 06:38pm PT
Maybe make doing mantles one of the Olympic climbing events? It would be kind of like gymnastics vaulting, you get three attempts. Might be more entertaining than just watching people climb.
mike m

Trad climber
black hills
Feb 8, 2019 - 08:38pm PT
Aidan. Spent a week in the batholith and climbed a bunch ice in bozone over the years. Great peeps over there.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Feb 18, 2019 - 08:16am PT
Looks like it is coming back with a new young crew.
As a matter of fact I think there has been a new resurgence and appreciation of the old ways.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Feb 19, 2019 - 05:29am PT
In the country of old men."Intimidating" and "wild" -- why topos are better than verbal descriptions.

I say leave it to the individual to choose his own thoughts and don't put him off from "just doing it."

FWIW, I've never manteled this move, not because of intimidation but because I didn't have the strength.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Feb 19, 2019 - 07:33am PT
Awesome!
adenparker

climber
Encinitas, CA
Feb 21, 2019 - 07:08am PT
That is a sweet shot of Ament! Looks brutal.
Cole

Trad climber
los angeles
Feb 21, 2019 - 11:08am PT
Looks to be a sorta mantle crux on this V15 boulder problem, not pure though.

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Eddie

Trad climber
San Francisco
Feb 21, 2019 - 12:27pm PT
Fond memories of this unassuming little boulder in NZ.

https://www.mountainproject.com/route/106113898/the-unrepeatable

It had that classic thing where you think you got it (and your friends REALLY think you have it and start cheering)...and then you fall
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