How To Make a Rope Rug

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Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Original Post - Dec 23, 2006 - 05:11pm PT
Hello everyone,

First let me say thanks to everyone for a year full of entertaining posts. I work on the computer programming all day, so Supertaco has certainly been a pleasant diversion from work for me. Here's my gift to you: instructions on how to make a rope rug. I figure some of you may be needing last minute gift ideas that don't cost anything. This is a real tied rope rug, not one of those lame glued rugs like they had in Climbing magazine. This takes some skill to tie.

I had always wanted to know how to tie a rope rug and set about learning this year. I was shocked that Google would not divulge the secret of the art. The best I could find was reference to Ashley book of knots. I found a copy at the library and tried a number of his knots, but many of them are too small to be called a rug. The relevant knots are #2268-2276. #2273 seems to be the biggest and most complicated, so that's what I've been tying. The directions are fairly simple, but tying the knot is not. The first couple of rugs took a couple hours, now that I know what I'm doing it takes about 45 minutes.

 Start by making an enlargement of the diagram. Go to Kinkos if you're not sober and have them do the dirty work. It's pretty tough to do by hand. To make the drawing by hand, start by drawing a 2" grid, then trace the diagram on the grid. The quality of the drawing will affect the finished product. I'm using a 16" x 19" diagram which is working well for a double weave of 10.2 mm rope x 30 meters. That means I can get 2 rugs from one rope. Leaving the weave a little open will mean the dirt will fall through the cracks. I think this diagram will work for a tight tripple weave, but that will probably take 40 meters of rope.

 "Pin the cord along the line in the direction of the arrow." I used scotch tape to hold mine down while laying it out, just like the old ocean going sailors used to do.

 As for tying, Ashley says: "Wherever a cord lies across the path, at a point that is marked with a circle, tuck the working end under the cord at that point. Disregard the circles if no other part is already there". It looks like a bunch of spaghetti to start with, but comes together on the last few passes. If you're not going "over-under" on the last few passes you probably did something wrong. Also, you will want to watch out for twists and keep it nicely dressed as you go a long.

 Retrace your knot, if you've made it this far, that should be easy.

 After you're done with the weaving, figure out something to do with the ends. I'm going to weave a little in and cut it off and burn the ends.

 Good luck!

Here's the diagram:
Rope Rug Diagram
Rope Rug Diagram
Credit: Crag Q

Picture of working on the layout:
Picture of working on the layout
Picture of working on the layout
Credit: Crag Q

One pass complete:
One pass complete
One pass complete
Credit: Crag Q

Second pass complete:
Second pass complete
Second pass complete
Credit: Crag Q


If you're using a 8.5 or 9mm rope x 30 meters you can do a triple weave. You'll want to start with a diagram a couple inches smaller.

Happy Holidays!
-Craig Q.
pFranzen

Boulder climber
Portland, OR
Dec 23, 2006 - 05:51pm PT
Wow, that's awesome! I have an old 10.5x50m that I've been saving for a rug. I guess I can do a 3x weave with it using this pattern?

Thanks for the inspiration!
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 23, 2006 - 06:20pm PT
Peter, I think it would work fine. You might want to go a pinch bigger on the pattern. Post up if you make one!
Blinny

Trad climber
NorthWestMontana
Dec 23, 2006 - 07:02pm PT
YAY!

What a cool thing!

I've seen these rugs and always wondered how in the frickity frack anybody would go about "weaving" one. . . they are the epitome of the Celtic Knot, which Blanchard - that would be theRealBlinny, has inlaid on guitars. . but to see it done with rope is Sofa King Cool!

There have been some cool threads here about them - but nobody has ever posted up the method by which they cranked those particular rads!

NICE WORK!

Keep the MAGIC alive!

eKat
Aya

Uncategorizable climber
New York
Dec 23, 2006 - 08:39pm PT
AWESOME!!!
I'm totally going to go do it with the old 60m 10.2 I've been saving for exactly this purpose! Yay!
MZiebell

Social climber
Prescott, AZ
Dec 23, 2006 - 11:05pm PT
Nice work!

I'd recommend Hervey Gerrett Smith's "Marlinspike Sailor" for an easier version.

It's at Amazon.

M
john hansen

climber
Dec 23, 2006 - 11:12pm PT
Thats alot of rope pulling!! Like belaying twenty pitches.
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 27, 2006 - 10:34am PT
I experimented with a number of methods to finish off the ends and the best one seems to be melting the ends together. The trick for doing this is to cut the ends 1/2 and inch longer than you want. Do a quick burn on the sheath ends so it doesn't fray. Then, pull back the sheath and cut the extra half inch off the core. Lastly, melt the sheaths of both ends over a candle simultaneously. When both ends are molten stick them together and hold them until the cool.

BTW, burning nylon is hot. It seems I always get a reminder of that when melting nylon.
feelio Babar

Trad climber
Sneaking up behind you...
Dec 27, 2006 - 11:07am PT
Smear a thin layer of liquid nails on the back to hold it together, and a create a no slip, no mar backing. NICE!
pFranzen

Boulder climber
Portland, OR
Dec 27, 2006 - 01:12pm PT
I'm almost done with mine. I did a triple followthrough with a 10.5 50m and it worked great!

I'll post pictures later.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Dec 27, 2006 - 04:46pm PT
Bravo!
The Celtic decorative allusion is a nice twist...
Hahaha.

I've been holding out with my old cords for the cue to an interseting weave.
I'm on it,
Cheers.
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Bodega, CA
Dec 27, 2006 - 05:20pm PT
I sketched the pattern on cardboard and used duct tape to hold the rope in place along the edges. This really helped keep things straight, but I still managed to mis-thread a couple spots. Used an old 100' x 11mm rope. I had extra rope after two passes so just kept threading until I ran out. Wife was pretty skeptical, but her help made it go a lot faster. Yeah, it was like belaying 20 pitches. Cool though.
pFranzen

Boulder climber
Portland, OR
Dec 27, 2006 - 06:18pm PT
I started with it really really big, then tightened it up after each pass:


Here it is after the first run through. Two followthroughs to go!




Well that was a pain in the ass. I still need to even out a couple of the loops and figure out a good way to deal with the ends, but overall I'm pretty impressed.

It's the biggest damn knot I've ever tied, that's for sure.
darshahlu

Trad climber
Irvine, CA
Dec 27, 2006 - 07:13pm PT
So you think it could take a factor 2?
TradIsGood

Happy and Healthy climber
the Gunks end of the country
Dec 28, 2006 - 07:22am PT
Nice picture. The carabiner and floor boards for scale tells it all!
http://www.neropes.com/splice/

I guess when people say rope rug, they really mean rope welcome mat (or big fat knot)!

So let's just play with the math.

60 m x 10.5 mm = 0.63 square meters. About 3' x 2'.

But that did not allow for any overlapping rope. That was just the area of the rope. If you look at the picture above, you will see that almost every part of the "rug" has a top and bottom layer of rope, except for small portions of the edge.

That reduces the area of the rug to approximately 0.32 square meters, or about 1.5' x 2'. So a nice little 4' x 6' rug will take about 8 60 meter ropes! :-)

Maybe we need a knot that can grow outward every year or two as we replace our ropes, so that eventually the mat can grow into a rug.

(BTW. It looks like there is just one misweave. I am estimating that it will take about 15 meters of rope and about 40 separate unweaves and reweaves to correct. How long did it take from start to finish?)
Wade Icey

Social climber
Dec 28, 2006 - 01:15pm PT
how much rope are you guys leaving at the beginning? looks like a lot. why huh?
davidji

Social climber
CA
Dec 28, 2006 - 01:19pm PT
To get a bigger rope rug, lay the rope out in a spiral, and hot melt glue it. Then flip it over. Not the most rugged. Probably if you hot melt glued it to round backing it would be stronger.
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 28, 2006 - 01:32pm PT
Wade,

For a double pass I start with the middle of the rope on the "feathers" of the arrow in the diagram that way you don't have to pull as much rope through. In the "starting the layout" picture I have extra rope because I'm not done tracing the pattern, plus there's a bit more rope than I need. If you're doing a triple pass you'd want to start at one third of the way through your rope. Otherwise you have to pull your entire rope through the pattern when you're getting started.
Wade Icey

Social climber
Dec 28, 2006 - 01:50pm PT
thanks-makes sense.
del cross

climber
Bay Area
Dec 28, 2006 - 03:10pm PT
Those woven rugs are pretty and I can understand the dislike of using glue. But after making one with glue I think I like the results better.

First of all, it's a lot larger: 45" x 27", a tight oval made with a 60m rope.

Second, it lies perfectly flat and feels great under my feet. It's right next to the bed and I step on it all the time.

And although not as intricate looking as the woven rugs, it is attractive. If I get a chance I'll post a photo of it. I just need to use a better glue next time.

Now I just wish I could lay out one of these nice, flat, comfy rugs the next time I'm forced to sleep on my rope in the backcountry.


edit:
moclimb

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Jan 5, 2007 - 03:46am PT
A flat rope rug can be made without using tape and glue. The guys at http://oldropes.com/ sew theirs. My 60m roped turned into an nice 35" wide circle.
TradIsGood

Happy and Healthy climber
the Gunks end of the country
Jan 5, 2007 - 06:04am PT
35 inch diameter = 0.67 square meters. Just what was predicted above!
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Jan 5, 2007 - 07:49am PT
Cool


Damn, I threw away my old rope some time back and didn't even think about making a rug/matt out of it.
moclimb

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Jan 22, 2007 - 02:59pm PT
Here is a picture of my rug, from http://oldropes.com


ghand

Sport climber
Golden,Colorado
Mar 10, 2007 - 09:48am PT
Here is a picture I took last week of a mosaic at the Sanctuary of Pan in Athens, Greece. Discovered in 2002 and created in about 490BC. Seems to look like the rug in this topic.
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 10, 2007 - 10:09am PT
ghand,

That is absolutely cool. I was comparing the strands and I think the pattern is slightly different, but certainly the same idea.

490BC. Wow. And they didn't even have old climbing rope back then.
ChrisW

Trad climber
boulder, co
Mar 10, 2007 - 11:26am PT
Nice Craig. Thanks for the beta. These would make good gifts. After washing the rope first.
ogobogo

climber
varna
Sep 6, 2007 - 05:50am PT
there is lots of info regarding the art of knotting. there is a knotting forum in the yahoo groups - knottyers.
what you are speaking about in this forum is called a mat and there are various kinds of mats shown in Ashley's (also if you do a research on Celtic knots on google you'll se various patterns).

However, some of Ashley's pictures are very difficult to understand and many people give up after the first unsuccessful attempts.
so my advice to you if you want to know anything more - just go to the group i gave you and ask your questions - people are willing to help

enjoy matting
ognyan
Anastasia

Trad climber
California
Sep 6, 2007 - 05:59am PT
Someone once told me that you can take the core out and use the sheath to make a flatter/softer rug.
Is this possible???
Anastasia

Trad climber
California
Sep 6, 2007 - 05:59am PT
Someone once told me that you can take the core out and use the sheath to make a flatter/softer rug.
Is this possible???
Anastasia

Trad climber
California
Sep 6, 2007 - 05:59am PT
Someone once told me that you can take the core out and use the sheath to make a flatter/softer rug.
Is this possible???
Delhi Dog

Trad climber
Good Question...
Sep 6, 2007 - 07:30am PT
At the risk of sounding like a wet rug... my brother-in-law who is a fellow climber living in S.Colorado has a side line buisness making rope rugs (as well as other goodies). You may want to check out his site:

http://www.roperugs.com/

I am all for do-it-youself kinds of things and I think this is a great post. But, you may still be interested in what he has/does for inspirational ideas, or you just may want to have someone else do the tango..er tangle ('ling) for you.

DD

ghand

Sport climber
Golden,Colorado
Sep 23, 2007 - 12:57am PT
I followed Craig Q's directions and finally got around to making a pattern and below is the rug I just made. It is 19" x 24". It is easy once the pattern is made. Thanks Craig.
yani1shu

climber
Dec 13, 2007 - 03:51pm PT
Does anyone have a copy of the diagram picture. I just got an old rope and want to make a rug but the image with the template isn't showing up in the post. Thanks.
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - May 26, 2008 - 10:59am PT
Sorry, the diagram has been MIA for a while. I finally found it and reposted it.

I also found some other directions which include a link to the turks head mat knot. With the information about the turks head you could tie an even bigger one.
boognish

Trad climber
SF
May 26, 2008 - 02:11pm PT
I made a nice flat coil rug with 2 60 meter ropes. I took one rope and coiled each half in opposite directions so it looks like a number 8. Then I wrapped the other rope around the outside. I stitched a few of the main joints with upholstery thread (this was probably unnecessary). Then I glued a rubber non-skid pad to the bottom with 3 tubes of caulk.

Without the stitching it would probably take less than 2 hours to make. It has an ovalish shape and because the backing is glued on, the strands don’t separate when you pick it up. Someone posted a tip about pulling the core out of the last inch or two of sheath and melting it in place to give a nice finish.

If anyone is interested I can try and post some pictures in a week or so when I get home.
MZiebell

Social climber
Prescott, AZ
May 26, 2008 - 02:14pm PT
Interested in all things ropish?

Look up The Marlinspike Sailor on Amazon. Cheaper and a lot more fun than Ashley's...
nature for kids

Sport climber
utah
Jul 10, 2008 - 10:36am PT
What a great post! Thanks for the info. I've been wanting to do this for a while after seeing a picture of it done in the Title Nine Catalog I recieved. Is it okay if I do a post on my blog natureforkids.net with a link to this? I have some readers that take their kids climbing. I'm sure they'd love to also have a new rug for their kid's room! Thanks again.
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 20, 2009 - 10:07pm PT
I uploaded the pictures for this post to SuperTopo and I thought I'd give this a bump in case someone needs a last minute gift idea. I'm going to try and crank one out this week.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Dec 20, 2009 - 11:10pm PT
I built a loom out of an old door and a couple of scraps of 1/2" EMT

Use the rope you want for color for the warp and a skinny rope for the weave.

They are much more durable and hold their shape better than the Tadded version.

Not as large as the glued version though.

My prototype ended up as my car floormat, is over ten years old now and will outlast the car.

Next time I weave one I'll do a series of "how to" photos
jvr

Social climber
India
Dec 25, 2009 - 10:48am PT
i am located in eastern part of india and started making fixes length ropes using ployester film rejectiond from slitting lines. i was planning to do some value addition to my product this may provide some more employment potential at low skill levels which is very much need in my country.
i am looking at various possibilities and the pattern and method of achieving it suggested appears to be interesting and will provide an answer to my problem. it may take about two weeks to impliment the idea and if successful i wil post the pictures there after.
i am grateful to the author and his generosity i appreciate very much
Michael D

Big Wall climber
Sorrento Mesa
Dec 25, 2009 - 11:48pm PT
This is one of the best revival posts ever! Thanks
crackclimber

Trad climber
Missoula, MT
Feb 18, 2010 - 03:41am PT
Thanks for the great beta!

I've got 2 ropes I'm retiring. I think I'll weave one into a rope and send one in to have it woven.

You've gotta check out this site, if you would even consider paying to have someone make you a rope rug. Cheaper than RRR and way nicer! Or if you just want to see a cool rope rug.

round Celtic knot pattern rug: http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaunCraft
jvr

Social climber
India
Apr 6, 2010 - 11:00pm PT
Bold Text
how to extend the size of rope rug.
any readymade graphic?
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 6, 2010 - 11:13pm PT
I'm glad to see this post still has some legs and more rope rugs are coming into the world because of it. If you want to go bigger you really need more bites and leads. Check out the info here to find out how to expand the bites and leads and then let us know how it goes!
froodish

Social climber
Portland, Oregon
Dec 12, 2010 - 07:02pm PT
Finally got around to doing one of these. Did a 6x10 with 5 turns with a 60m 10.5 rope - ended up with about 10m left over. Finished size about 21" x 17". The kitty approves (I think.)

Rope door mat.
Rope door mat.
Credit: froodish
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 12, 2010 - 07:34pm PT
Nicely done froodish. Your cat will enjoy clawing it too I bet.
del cross

climber
Dec 12, 2010 - 08:45pm PT
WBraun

climber
Dec 12, 2010 - 09:53pm PT
Actually when I look at your above rope rug it has a nice pattern .....
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Dec 12, 2010 - 10:18pm PT
I've made a few (at least 20-30)... I think I've posted here before that I collect ropes from friends, gyms, guides, etc. and weave rugs, then sell and donate the money to the Access Fund or give as wedding presents.

I have the following notice up at local gyms and outdoor/climbing stores, and local climbing forums for collecting ropes. I keep it local because of the cost of shipping ropes:
Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Credit: Naitch

Etc., etc....


OK, a couple of people wanted to know about patterns and making rugs. So here goes...might be more than you wanted to know (then again it's not everything there is to know so I spared you some! :-)

The following pattern provided the basis for my loom. It can be adjusted to any size rug. The pattern came from the site listed and provided some of the ideas that I have incorporated.
Credit: Naitch

Particle board for loom-pattern. I drew the patterns so that the sides of each square are 2 1/8"" and the diagonals are ~3". I found this to be about right for weaving 10.5mm ropes. An 11mm rope would be extremely tight and difficult to weave, while 10 mm and under would give a looser weave with this size of square in the pattern.
Credit: Naitch

The pattern is used to show the first circuit of the weaving (all my rugs so far have been 4 rope widths wide - 4 complete circuits). The "bridges" shows that that piece goes over the perpendicular strands underneath it. After the first circuit, on subsequent circuits you just follow the first circuit and the pattern becomes redundant. On the first circuit, even with by trying to follow the pattern, it is easy to make a mistake. It’s best to catch any mistakes right away because the more you do, the more you’ll have to undo to fix it.

The pattern is also used to establish the end points (bights). At each end point I hammered in nails with the heads cut off. There are two nails for each end point so that it will “pinch” and hold the rope during the process of weaving. This allows rope to be pulled snug and held while weaving. The end result is there is little or no need for tightening up of the weave once the pattern is finished. When the rug is finished, it is easily pulled up, off the loom.

You can also just draw the pattern on a piece of paper or cardboard as others on the web have demonstrated. However, it is much more difficult to weave and takes lots of tightening of the when the basic pattern is finished to to take out slack. I've found it fairly difficult to make a nice uniform rug this way. If you're looking for unique "character", go fer it!
Credit: Naitch

On two sides I drilled slightly over-sized holes so that the nails could be easily removed and repositioned to adjust it for different sizes of rugs.
Credit: Naitch

When weaving the first circuit, left-hand turns around end points go between the nails. Right-hand turns go on the outside of both nails. This helps keep evening even in the end even though it will seem uneven during the process. Weaving always starts in the middle of the rope so that less has to be pulled.

When weaving patterns with different colors of rope, a nice side benefit is there is less rope to pull, however it gets a bit more complicated figuring out exactly how to do it and there are more ends to secure or join. I’ll leave that to you to figure out! :-) It would take more space and time than I have right now.
Credit: Naitch

The following chart is what I use to remind me of the size of the rug and the amount of rope needed. If the # of end points (bights) on one of the side of the rug is a prime number, then the rug will be one long continuous closed loop (5 x 6; 5 x 7; 6 x 7; or 7 x 9). If the number of end points on one of the sides is a composite number (able to be divided by something other than 1 and itself – e.g. 4, 6, 8, 9), then there will be more than one closed loop in the rug pattern (see chart - i.e. a 6 x 9 has 3 closed circuits/loops).
Credit: Naitch

I secure the ends by melting with a propane torch and pressing flat against the other perpendicular strands on the backside. I use a small piece of a yogurt plastic container to do the pressing to keep from getting burned from the melted nylon.

If a rug is in a high traffic area and gets dirty, I take it to a do-it-yourself car wash and power wash and rinse them, then put it out in the sun to dry. All ropes are washed in a front load washer prior to weaving them. It's a pain in the butt but it's nice weaving clean ropes and they end up looking much brighter and nicer.

Well, that's the basics and a bit more. I’ve learned lots of other tips and tricks but need to leave something for your to figure out!

Credit: Naitch
WBraun

climber
Dec 12, 2010 - 10:19pm PT
Very nice ....
Jay Wood

Trad climber
Fairfax, CA
Dec 14, 2010 - 09:32pm PT
Those ropes are retired? They look pretty new.

No core shots at all!
mucci

Trad climber
The pitch of Bagalaar above you
Dec 15, 2010 - 01:18am PT
Here is a recent one, and YES there is some core showing on the backsi...
Here is a recent one, and YES there is some core showing on the backside!
Credit: mucci

I use silicone piped in every wrap, then a layer of mastic, followed by one layer of gorilla tape. Flip it over when finished.

Bomber.

I dig the weave, maybe the next time?

Mucci
froodish

Social climber
Portland, Oregon
Dec 15, 2010 - 02:55am PT
Naitch, those are fabulous! Amazingly even weave.

That pattern you have looks like the ticket. Could you by any chance take a top-down shot of that and provide the dimensions?

Mucci,

Love the 'biner center on yours.

-S
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Dec 15, 2010 - 05:54am PT
Froodish - Thanks! I'll try and take a shot tonight. Off to work soon...

Jay..some of those ropes have had sections cut out of them and the pictures might make them look better than they really are. Since most of them I collect from other people, I don't know all the history of them but they range from: "Hmmm...maybe I should use XXX's rope for another year or two before I turn it into a rug!" ...to..."can't believe that someone was still climbing on this thing!" They are all washed so that also make them look better.

The wild colored one is made up of remnants of ropes that were really ratty or ends of ropes that were left over.

Whenever i buy a new rope the wife is more concerned about what color and pattern it is than the climbing characteristics of it! :-/
Muddud

Social climber
the Cruz of Santa, CA
Dec 15, 2010 - 03:47pm PT
i've seen many a rope rug, but a lot of these are new.
can't wait to see what i get to churn out once i retire mine!
thanks for the step-by-steps, guys - this is gonna be fun!

also, for the non-woven ones, is there any way to glue without having it one-sided with the other covered in backing? or did i skip something?
del cross

climber
Dec 15, 2010 - 05:19pm PT
Muddud, you could sew it together if you have the patience. Or check out roperugs.com. They'll do it for you, but it isn't cheap.

I used superglue on my last one, a drop in numerous key places to keep it from coming apart, kind of like a frame for it. Then I backed it with silicone caulk to hold everything in place. Just the caulk alone doesn't result in a very good bond. I suppose if I had enough superglue I could do the whole rug that way and skip the caulk. It would take a while and be pretty expensive. Maybe some other cheaper glue bonds nylon as well?
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Dec 16, 2010 - 11:30pm PT
OK, a couple people asked me for a few more details regarding my pattern and method. I just added them to my original post up above...
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Dec 17, 2010 - 12:39am PT
Great Thread

I have 300ft of 1" triple strand nylon line that we use for towing a sea anchor, I think it would be more useful as a rope rug. Might need Andre the Giant to carry it!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Dec 17, 2010 - 01:50am PT
What fun!

And if you don't want to make a rope rug, or something similar, then for the next while see http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1347451. An alternative way to sensibly dispose of old ropes.
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Dec 17, 2010 - 09:28am PT
> I have 300ft of 1" triple strand nylon line that we use for towing a sea anchor, I think it would be more useful as a rope rug. Might need Andre the Giant to carry it!

Wow! That might make a really great spiraled rug. Probably too thick to weave (it's be 2" thick where the pattern crosses in the woven version)
Crag Q

Trad climber
Louisville, Colorado
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 18, 2010 - 05:46pm PT
Naitch. Thanks for posting up your details on getting professional with it. It makes me want to come out of retirement and tie up another one. That's very cool that you are donating the proceeds to the Access Fund!
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Dec 19, 2010 - 09:04am PT
Thanks for starting thread! Nice to see other patterns and ways of doing it. Will help expand my horizons with some new patterns. I've gotten the process fine tuned for the woven rectangular rug but now it's time to try some new things...
Muddud

Social climber
the Cruz of Santa, CA
Dec 23, 2010 - 04:08am PT
grazzi del - i shudder to think of how much super glue that would be, but at least i know my Velocity will have an afterlife!

super grateful to everybody that posted info on the how-to!
Jay Wood

Trad climber
Fairfax, CA
Dec 23, 2010 - 11:58am PT
I wonder if you could make a round spiral rug using a pneumatic staple gun...




Thinking of fastening edge-wise, but I suppose you could also make a fixed rug by stapling it to the floor!
bradskis

Sport climber
Denver, CO
Feb 15, 2011 - 11:29am PT
Naitch, thanks for posting your detailed info. I'm going to follow your instructions with an old rope I have. I just made a loom following your general instructions. The pictures of the mats you've made look so good - I think having four turns looks the best, as you have done.

My only question (thus far) is it seems like it will be too small to actually be used as a mat. Like you, I am planning on doing 8 bites (8 nails across the top) and 12 leads (6 nails along the side - that is including the ones on top) with 3" squares. This comes out to a mat this is only 21" x 15", does that sound about right to you? Could you measure you mats for me?

Also, the link to the page on summit post doesn't have the nails lined up as (it appears) you do, or I do, which way should I do this to get the best (most similar to yours) result?

Here are pictures of the loom I have constructed.

Credit: bradskis

Credit: bradskis

Credit: bradskis
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Feb 15, 2011 - 04:56pm PT
>My only question (thus far) is it seems like it will be too small to actually be used as a mat. Like you, I am planning on doing 8 bites (8 nails across the top) and 12 leads (6 nails along the side - that is including the ones on top) with 3" squares. This comes out to a mat this is only 21" x 15", does that sound about right to you? Could you measure you mats for me?

That size is approx. correct - FOR THE NAIL END POINTS. So the dimensions "grow" be 4x the diameter of the rope or ~2 inches. There is also some fudge factor because of the weave, etc. Remember that two loops will be on the inside of the nail and two on the outside. Have a look at my photos. I really recommend two nails at each point to pinch the rope. They would be separated by slightly less then the diameter of the rope in order to pinch and hold it in place. Also remember that turns in one direction will go between the nails and turns the other direction will go just on the outside of both nails. If you don't do this, the bites will come out uneven as you look down the edge of the rug (I learned the hard way),

You could make the whole thing 7 x 9 which would be bigger, but you'd need a 60m rope (see my chart)

>Also, the link to the page on summit post doesn't have the nails lined up as (it appears) you do, or I do, which way should I do this to get the best (most similar to yours) result?

The other thing that is different, are the end points are further out than just the 3 inches. This shows up clearly in some of my photos. It is function of the weaving pattern being on a diagonal to the edges of the rug. If the weaving pattern is drawn out, the end points are spaced out further than the normal diagonal. It's hard to explain but is easy to see visually if the pattern has been drawn out on the wood. I'm not at home so I can't measure on the loom but I'm guessing it is probably at least 4".
bradskis

Sport climber
Denver, CO
Feb 15, 2011 - 11:03pm PT
//The other thing that is different, are the end points are further out than just the 3 inches. This shows up clearly in some of my photos. It is function of the weaving pattern being on a diagonal to the edges of the rug. If the weaving pattern is drawn out, the end points are spaced out further than the normal diagonal. It's hard to explain but is easy to see visually if the pattern has been drawn out on the wood. I'm not at home so I can't measure on the loom but I'm guessing it is probably at least 4".
//

My rope is 60m, so maybe I should go with the larger pattern. Now, since the side nails are further out, for the 8x12 pattern, how many nails go on the side? is it 4 or 6? Thanks for the help, hugely appreciated.
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Feb 16, 2011 - 02:00pm PT
I always think about it in terms of turning points per side. For a 60m rope according to my chart listed up thread (and which I've confirmed extensive use), it would be a 7 x 9, (7 nails for the short sides (width) and 9 nails on the long sides), with the corner nails being shared by both the length and width sides. The important thing as I mentioned last post, is that the corner nails are not the standard 3 inches away from their nearest neighbor (forgot to measure last night when I was home. By drawing the diagonal over/under pattern on the board, you'll be able to see where the corner nails should be put in.

A 7 x 9 will use up most of the 60 meter rope. You'll probably have 10-20 feet left over. If you do a 7 x 9, then you'll have one long closed loop (circuit) for the rope. Because of that you should start in the middle and put it in the middle of the board somewhere and weave out from that point. That means you'll only need to "pull" 100' at the beginning going each direction out from the center point. It also means, that both ends when you finish the fourth circuit will end up by that center point in the middle of the rug. It's best to try and keep the loose ends as far away from the edges of the rug as possible (even though I melt them and tack them down).

>Now, since the side nails are further out, for the 8x12 pattern, how many nails go on the side? is it 4 or 6?

Hmmm..., not sure if I understand your question
Dorje

Trad climber
Mid-Atlantic
Feb 16, 2011 - 04:26pm PT
Hey Naitch, I've seen your handiwork firsthand at the Gendarme. The pics you posted don't do the rugs justice. Nice work and for a good cause.
bradskis

Sport climber
Denver, CO
Feb 16, 2011 - 05:47pm PT

>Now, since the side nails are further out, for the 8x12 pattern, how many nails go on the side? is it 4 or 6?

Hmmm..., not sure if I understand your question

You answered my question in the rest of your response. Thanks for the help! I'll get the pattern drawn on the loom and go form there.

Thanks for all the help.

Brad
bradskis

Sport climber
Denver, CO
Feb 16, 2011 - 07:48pm PT
Okay Naitch, so I just took my nails out and started over. I drew the pattern out, but what I hadn't thought about or considered, is where to start measuring 3" from, relatives to the corners. I guess I assumed, incorrectly what to do. I somehow came up with 27" x 24" and then started marking every 3" around the perimeter, then made lines diagonal going for point to point, and this left a line going through each corner, perfectly bisecting the corner. What this means is, I did something wrong, because this puts the end points 3" away from the next nails on each side.

Here's a picture showing what I mean.

Credit: bradskis

Where do I start the measurement's from? Is my template for 27" x 24" off? (for the 9 x 7 pattern)
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Feb 17, 2011 - 10:06am PT
Dorje - thanks - I enjoy doing them when I have the time and ropes. Right now I have the ropes but other things are occupying my time. Need to get back to it before I start climbing in earnest this spring.

Brad - No I think you have it right. For some reason I think I had my pattern slightly off. I think I'll correct it for future rugs. I think it should work well and the 24" x 27" is correct size for a 7 x 9 rug. The actual rug will end up slightly bigger because they'll be two loops on the outside of all the nails. Probably more like a finished size of 26" x 29" give or take an inch due to rope diameter and how tight you actually get the loops on the loom.
bradskis

Sport climber
Denver, CO
Feb 17, 2011 - 05:23pm PT
Alright, so after figuring some things out and doing and redoing, I finished the first loop.

Credit: bradskis

Now what I'm struggling with, is which end to to continue with (I suppose it doesn't matter?) and whether I follow on the outside or inside.

Thanks again for all the help. Glad to see it finally taking shape.

Brad

EDIT: figured it out. Unfortunately, I found a mistake in the first pass, on one of the corners. At this point I'm not going back to fix it, hopefully it doesn't cause any major issues with the final product.
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Feb 18, 2011 - 10:03pm PT
Looking good. Yeah, it's easy to make a mistake on the first pass. Once you get the first pass, it's easy to follow previous circuits of the rope. Depending upon what the mistake was, it can have an effect on the final product. I've gotten where I'm pretty good at getting it corrected the first pass. Personally, when I make a mistake, I undo it back to that point, or whatever it is that needs to be fixed. YMMV.

Make sure that you end up with the finished loose ends in the middle of the rug somewhere. If they stay on the ends it's harder to secure them and can come undone a lot easier even if melted to secure them

For subsequent passes it does make a difference which strand goes next and whether it goes on the inside or outside of the first pass. However, it's hard to try and explain via writing. You definitely want to use the end that is longer (assuming you started in the middle of the rope, one end should be twice as long). That's the end that you should start weaving next.

If you used the method I outlined earlier in this thread (i.e. you use two sets of nails and right turns should go between the two nails and left turns should go on the outside of both nails - or vice-a-versa - can't remember which I exactly said up thread), your pattern all along the edges to this point will be a little uneven because of this. With the second pass you want weave it so that you are doing the opposite - on the nails where the rope is now on the outside, you want it to go between the two nails and where your first pass went between the nails, you want it to go on the outside of it. At the end of the first pass you might even think that something is wrong. The first and third passes (circuits) will produce this unevenness. The 2nd and 4th will make it even. If you were making a rug with only three passes (circuits) then you'd want the rope to be pinched between all the pairs of nails on the first past. However, this is a 4-pass rug, so the first and third passes need to be uneven.

This is really hard to describe all this in writing. It took me a couple of rugs to get it all sorted out. Anyway, I hope all this is a help, rather than a hindrance. Rugs will come out even if you don't follow the exact instructions, however they may be a little "unique" (a bit uneven as one looks along the edges when finished.) :-) And...who knows, maybe there is more than one way to do it. I certainly don't claim to know it all and sometimes can get get in a rut because i follow a system now and don't put too much thought into the overall method/system of weaving it any more.
bradskis

Sport climber
Denver, CO
Feb 19, 2011 - 07:30pm PT
you can see I marked the corner with the mistake with tape. In order to fix it I'd need to cut somewhere on that strand (probably closer to the middle, pull it out, fix it, put it back in, and melt it back together.

Overall I think it came out pretty nicely, and your method with the two nails worked well. Thanks again for all the help. I look forward to doing this again with another rope someday.

Brad

Credit: bradskis
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
Feb 21, 2011 - 08:05am PT
Not bad for a first effort. It takes a couple to really get the process and system down.

If you do another in the future, pay particular attention to the first pass - it is critical and try and catch any mistake with the "over-under" alternation right when it happens. No matter where I find a mistake, I'll undo it to that point and correct it. It's pain in the butt, but is worth it in the end. Or, maybe I'm just anal about the whole process.

Another tip: try and do the weave as tight as possible as you do it, but also try and keep the tension equal on all the passes and different parts of the pass.

Sometime for the last part of the last pass, I'll slide the whole rug off the loom and finish it so that I have access to the bottom and it's easier to thread it when it gets tight.

Cheers!
Meercat

Trad climber
Seattle
Feb 21, 2011 - 12:42pm PT
I am making my first rug and used the coil method with silicone caulk - but duct tape isn't sticking to it! Anyone else experienced this or know why it won't stick? I saw mastic and superglue as alternatives - any other suggestions?
Meercat

Trad climber
Seattle
Feb 21, 2011 - 02:00pm PT
Thanks - that's helpful info. I'm going to try a few things and I'll keep you posted if I find a better option. I saw your rugs - the bi-colored spiral is inspiring!
ct

climber
CO
Feb 22, 2011 - 03:18pm PT
Inspired by this thread, here is a spiral rug I made as a Christmas present. The coolest part about this gift for me was the meaningful nature behind it. We shared the bi-pattern blue rope in question on a particularly wet and stimulating day on the Diamond, topping out to blue skies and an empty summit. In retrospect that day was the culmination of his career as a rock climber. To be able to give my friend a piece of art made from something we trusted each others lives to was special for me. Thanks for the inspiration and good tips fellas!

Credit: ct

NigelSSI

Trad climber
B.C.
Mar 8, 2011 - 02:52pm PT
A friend asked me if I had any old climbing rope to make a rug out of, and sure enough... Long story short, she made two. Realized WAY too late that she was trying to show off domestic skills to me or something like that. If I wasn't so clueless I would've boarded that ship before it sailed.


Shown with some old trash so you dinosaurs can see the size. ;)
Oh the memories.
Oh the memories.
Credit: NigelSSI

Should I resole those or use the original rubber? What's the difference in GNAR points?
Josh Ulloa

Trad climber
Turlock, CA
Jul 29, 2011 - 11:34pm PT
Hey, trying to make a rug similar to ones made by Naitch. He posted a chart where some of the patterns require a number of closed loops. The pattern I'm working on has two closed loops but I have no idea how to "close" one and start the other. Appreciate any ideas. Thanks!
froodish

Social climber
Portland, Oregon
Sep 11, 2011 - 12:51pm PT
Just made another:

Credit: froodish
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Sep 11, 2011 - 01:52pm PT
This thread is awesome. Good timing, too. My family and I are going to do a low cost christmas this year-creative presents from the 99cent store, and also homemade gifts. Someone is going to get a rope rug!!!!! Good timing for this thread, going to start now.
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
-A community of hairless apes
Sep 11, 2011 - 02:00pm PT
Nigel, Froodish,

Those look like perfectly good ropes, what's wrong with you. I say sacrilege.

Ditto for ct on the blue.


.....


Very nice craftsmanship, however.
froodish

Social climber
Portland, Oregon
Sep 11, 2011 - 02:28pm PT
HFCS, That rope was at least 15 years old. Alas these days, I retire ropes more from age than from falls.
:-| Erik

Sport climber
Sep 11, 2011 - 09:36pm PT
Awesome rope thread!

I just got a lofted house, and have spent an unproductive afternoon trying to figure out how to build this:
Credit: :-| Erik


Anyone have thoughts? Could I use a single weave with 1-2 long retired climbing ropes and make a loose rug template... or would it get loose?
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Sep 11, 2011 - 09:41pm PT
Fishnet knots.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unc2m4s_6Z8

you're gonna need a lot of rope though!
chrisbaily

Social climber
New York
Jan 12, 2012 - 04:26am PT
All i did is try n try n try..but did not succeed...anyways i will complete it..whatever it takes
crackclimber

Trad climber
Missoula, MT
Jan 22, 2012 - 03:08pm PT
If anyone is interested I have a friend who will weave your rope for you, and for a pretty reasonable price considering the quality you get.
Credit: crackclimber
http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaunCraft
Most places weave your rope for $40 or more, plus shipping and they come out looking kind of sloppy like at this website: http://www.roperugs.com/Rugs.html
Get the sweet pattern above for $45 plus shipping. They will even give you $10 back if you wash your own rope!
Even if you don't have a rope to retire, from time to time my friend sells completed ropes on the website. If there is nothing posted you can email to inquire about what is available. Here is the website: http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaunCraft
dubhouse

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Apr 17, 2012 - 01:11pm PT
Here is a timelapse of me making this type of rug :

RetiedRopeRugs

Boulder climber
Pollock Pines, CA
Apr 20, 2012 - 12:43am PT
Hey Everyone. Retied Rope Rugs offers a Do-it-yourself kit for $25 that includes a full size pattern and written instructions for oval or rectangular woven rugs. The post above shows a customer using the kit and just how easy it is. We also offer coil rugs. Send us your rope or use one of ours. We have a collection of ropes waiting to be re-purposed. www.roperugs.com
guycan

Trad climber
flagstaff
Apr 20, 2012 - 06:53pm PT
I've made several coiled rope rugs. I recommend using a silicone caulking bead between and an old yoga matt or similar behind. I've found that this combination looks and holds up well.
Naitch

climber
Seneca area
May 4, 2012 - 02:07pm PT
I know that list tends to sere the west coast and front range people more than the east coast but if anyone can make it tomorrow (Sat. may 5) to the Gendarme at Seneca Rocks, I'll be giving a rug weaving demo. I've been weaving them for about 5 years and then selling through the Gendarme and donating the money to a climbing organization/cause. However, I'm getting out of "the business" and would like to pass on my knowledge and experience to others.

I'll be starting at 10 am and going till finish or the Cinco de Mayo party starts. Kind of a late last minute notice but...

Just finished the following one which will be sold this weekend and will be doing one more for teaching purposes.

Credit: Naitch
Credit: Naitch
Michelle

Trad climber
the f*#king peninsula.
Sep 27, 2012 - 05:25pm PT
cool rope bump!
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