Honnold Free Solos El Cap !

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Messages 1 - 297 of total 297 in this topic
aldude

climber
Monument Manor
Topic Author's Original Post - Jun 3, 2017 - 11:10am PT
The ultimate ascent....well done Alex !!
DMBARN

Trad climber
Eagle, ID
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:16am PT
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/features/athletes/alex-honnold/most-dangerous-free-solo-climb-yosemite-national-park-el-capitan/

caughtinside

Social climber
Oakland, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:16am PT
WOW.

Curious, is there any solo history to the Freeblast?
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:22am PT
Wow.
SC seagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, Moab, A sailboat, or some time zone
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:23am PT
Oh my.



Susan
Rhodo-Router

Gym climber
sawatch choss
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:24am PT
reeling.


I'm guessing this will not become a regular thing.
rwedgee

Ice climber
CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:27am PT
Everyone assumed the 1st route soloed would be Freerider and if it was going to be done it would be him. Wow, how do you top that ?
The Nose
looks easy from here

climber
Ben Lomond, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:29am PT
To paraphrase Supertopo's Freerider beta page:
Free Rider is currently the easiest and most popular way to say proudly "I have free soloed El Capitan"

:P
Studly

Trad climber
WA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:35am PT
Alex the Warrior, one of the most amazing athletic feats this earth has ever seen.
HighDesertDJ

Trad climber
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:46am PT
Truly astounding. Mostly glad he made it safely down.
Jim Clipper

climber
from: forests to tree farms
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:46am PT
Considering that he will be, in a way, the international face of climbing, I'm happy to hear that he isn't a dick.

Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:47am PT
Mostly?
john hansen

climber
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:47am PT
Wow,

Wasn't there a tread where people were predicting who would do it and when
it would happen.

Tried searching for it but could not find it.


Edit: Thanks, Looks Easy From Here.
Rock!...oopsie.

Trad climber
the pitch above you
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:49am PT
Somehow simultaneously "inconceivable" and "inevitable" - but both words fail.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:50am PT

Amazing...
looks easy from here

climber
Ben Lomond, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:51am PT
@john hansen: The day the Nose gets free soloed
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
From Panorama City, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:52am PT
MOM! That's WOW upside down. The Bruce Lee of climbing.
Gunkie

Trad climber
Valles Marineris
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:53am PT
Amazing. I'm having trouble getting my head around this. Completely spectacular. Caldwell called it, "the moon landing of rock climbing." Gotta agree.
Spanky

Social climber
boulder co
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:54am PT
Wow! Totally mind blowing!
Happy Cowboy

Social climber
Boz MT
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:56am PT
Astounding!!
I wonder if he even bothered to step onto the Spire?
Killer K

Boulder climber
Sacramento, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:57am PT
Wow. CRAZY. COOL.
ClimbingOn

Trad climber
NY
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:00pm PT
That's the final jewel in the all-encompassing climbing crown. Honnold is unmatched. The most impressive sports achievement of all time, of any sport.
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:13pm PT
Puts a whole new spin on the term, "big time."

Caldwell called it the "Moon Landing" of free soloing. I see it more like the Big Bang of a whole new world of adventuring. Probably not sustainable, but...
Cole

Trad climber
los angeles
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:21pm PT
Holy smokes!! I just can't fathom...speechless pretty much.
the goat

climber
north central WA
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:27pm PT
Unreal. Well done Alex.

Is the "Endurance Corner" comparable to the Salathe Headwall? Will that be the next free solo objective?
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:27pm PT
It's obvious that aliens from a universe with multiple dimensions (non of them horizontal) have taken over a human........that's easier to believe!!! Astounding to say the least, here's to AH!!!
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:28pm PT
He should put himself out to pasture and start charging a large stud fee.

aldude

climber
Monument Manor
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 3, 2017 - 12:30pm PT
Can you imagine the crux dyno unroped? Talk about low probability - dire consequences*
steve s

Trad climber
eldo
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:31pm PT
Amazing! Totally amazing!
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:34pm PT
How long before it gets repeated and by who? Is there anyone else in the same league as Alex?

What an amazing feat
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:35pm PT
The one thing I've admired about climbers they're funny...


He should put himself out to pasture and start charging a large stud fee.

Thanks clinker
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Denver CO
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:37pm PT
Incredible accomplishment, he's a generation ahead of whoever is #2. Hope he doesn't die posing for the cameras, though.
nah000

climber
no/w/here
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:46pm PT
nothin' but respect.

respect as a person's gotta do what a person's gotta do... and he just did something... that's for sure.

at the same time, i'm not sure i feel comfortable contributing to any celebrations until his primary job becomes reminding us we are all "stoopid gross materialist americans" or some such, in the supertopo virtual reality old folks home circa 2050 or so...

until then: all the best alex... and in the word of ali g... respek.
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:51pm PT
Can't think of anything bolder in climbing. Or any sport. Nicely done!
Fogarty

climber
BITD
Jun 3, 2017 - 12:57pm PT
SPEECHLESS!
looks easy from here

climber
Ben Lomond, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:11pm PT
Can you imagine the crux dyno unroped? Talk about low probability - dire consequences*

Nope, since I don't even know what it's like roped. Anyone have a video clip of it?
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:12pm PT
WOW, congrats Alex way to follow your dreams!
BrassNuts

Trad climber
Save your a_s, reach for the brass...
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:16pm PT
Alex is truly a brother from another planet. Truly amazing!!! Just the thought of soloing the Freeblast face pitches is enough to make me soil my trousers much less the harder pitches!! Fantastic achievement!
Roger Breedlove

climber
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:22pm PT
Hey Alex, congratulations. Incredible achievement. And in my lifetime.
Michael Hjorth

Trad climber
Copenhagen, Denmark
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:22pm PT
Amazing feat, congrats!

Here is Alex at the brigde explaining Nose speed stategy at the AAC International Meeting in 2014. Hard to hear all the words, sorry about that...!

https://vimeo.com/220145924
ec

climber
ca
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:27pm PT
“When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.” – Jimi Hendrix

Alex loves to climb!

 ec
WBraun

climber
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:38pm PT
And......

They thought there is no Superman .....
Beta-Boy

Trad climber
da Gunks
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:39pm PT
This is easily in the running for "single greatest feat of rock climbing in history" along with The Dawn Wall and Lynn Hill's free ascent The Nose and her free ascent of The Nose in under 24 hours.

Though I have to ask the question ... since free-soloing anything of this magnitude is so far beyond the rest of the climbing world ... does this simply exist in a category all its own? Like, there's "the single greatest feat of rock climbing" and then there's this free-solo which exists in a universe all its own? Maybe I'm climbing up my own butt with semantics here ... but it expresses just how far beyond all the rest of us this climb is.

Anyway, from what I've read Freerider is rated 12d, but it sounds like Honnold elected to climb the 5.13b variation on the headwall.

The two sections that sound mind-numbingly insane to free-solo are the Monster Off-Width and the Teflon Corner. From what I've heard and read, the Teflon Corner has a 12d crux. I cannot even begin to imagine free-soloing a friction crux of that difficulty. I remember doing one pitch of 11c friction at Suicide Rock ... and I called it "science friction" ... it was that insubstantial. To climb enormous lengths of 5.11 friction 600-1000ft up on El Cap ... with a 12d crux ... that's just unfathomably insane.

Looking at the topo there appears to be a 12d Huber variation to the Teflon Corner. Anyone know if this is also friction climbing -- is it still in the Teflon Corner? From the NatGeo article it's certainly described that he was doing major friction climbing. Similar question for the Monster Off-Width ... there appears to be a 13c variation for this pitch, but it sounds like Honnold did the off-width. Anyone with more specific info ... would love know the particulars.


//Apparently he rapped the route and chalk-ticked some key holds before making the free-solo.

Does anyone consider this "cheating?" I don't. I think it's self-preservation. But I have a feeling some purists out there might consider it a little less than fully on the up and up//


Still ... this is without doubt the most outrageous, mind-blowing bit of climbing ever accomplished.


Love this photo below ... the two giants of two generations of free-soloing.



Also ... now that the deed has been done ... this article from Australia about Honnold considering doing the free-solo of Freerider two years ago is fascinating to read in retrospect:

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/life/weekend-australian-magazine/alex-honnold-el-capitan-and-the-most-dangerous-freesolo-mission-in-rock-climbing/news-story/5d2c1444a9176e1d9d7b665e0ad78ee0



looks easy from here

climber
Ben Lomond, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:49pm PT
Apparently he rapped the route and chalk-ticked some key holds before making the free-solo.

Does anyone consider this "cheating?" I don't. I think it's self-preservation. But I have a feeling some purists out there might consider it a little less than fully on the up and up.

If any "purists" think they can do it in what they consider better style let 'em try. Otherwise they're just blowhards blowharding. It's not like he was even being secretive about the scouting and ticking.
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Jun 3, 2017 - 01:52pm PT


Excellent Adventure is out there too!
Beta-Boy

Trad climber
da Gunks
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:01pm PT
If any "purists" think they can do it in what they consider better style let 'em try. Otherwise they're just blowhards blowharding. It's not like he was even being secretive about the scouting and ticking.


Agreed. It's probably a BS question on my part. Obviously a free-solo of this magnitude requires several recon climbs and I think any and all prep to pull it off is fair game. I was particularly impressed with Honnold's pre-inspection on rap to make sure the route hadn't gotten wet and that his chalk ticks were still in place. Especially with those friction sections, laying out a few chalk ticks is probably all that separates life from death.

The question probably only entered my brain because I'm old enough to have experienced the "purists" of the bolt war days and a few of the most extreme were so "pure" they hated chalk and guide books anything else that wasn't absolutely ground up, no pre-inspection climbing. Thankfully, it appears those "purists" have died out.

I think we can simply look at the chalk ticks as further proof of just how BEYOND this ascent was.

I'm still trying to get my head around it.

mike a.

Sport climber
ca
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:13pm PT
Congrats Alex you are on top of the climbing world this is the greatest athletic achievement in history, you have sure come alone ways since I first saw you climbing at Jailhouse, the climbing world takes it's hat off to you today wow!!! Amazing stuff!!!
stevep

Boulder climber
Salt Lake, UT
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:16pm PT
Holy banannas! Makes my palms sweat just thinking about that. Congrats to Alex.

And there's a part of me that hopes he sees this as a high point and doesn't continue to push even harder.
BruceHildenbrand

Social climber
Mountain View/Boulder
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:30pm PT
I am ranking this just behind the immaculate conception of the Virgin Mary.
JLP

Social climber
The internet
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:35pm PT
Amazing, the game has been changed forever, congrats.

However, I hope he retires from this activity, as his odds of living to old age just went waaaayyy down, time to walk away.
Tom Bruskotter

Trad climber
Seattle
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:37pm PT
Congratulations Alex!
This is the greatest athletic achievement in history.
dourbalistar

climber
San Jose, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:41pm PT
Can you imagine the crux dyno unroped? Talk about low probability - dire consequences*
Nope, since I don't even know what it's like roped. Anyone have a video clip of it?

Is it this sequence, starting at the 3:43 mark?
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Or a more static variation of the sequence, but still looks hard as hell, starting at the 3:09 mark:
[Click to View YouTube Video]
SalNichols

Big Wall climber
Richmond, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:42pm PT
I am both stunned, and more than a little nauseous. I honestly want to be happy for Alex, and yet at the same time, I want to duct tape him to a tree or something.
The Dak

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 3, 2017 - 02:44pm PT
I watched this morning from the meadow as it went down. Interestingly enough there was essentially no one else around. Not surprising, as the crew kept it pretty under wraps. I couldn't help but smile watching hundreds of tourist-filled vehicles passing beneath, unaware of what was happening thousands of feet above. A breath of fresh air (IMO) from the craziness I remember from watching Alex and Hans set the Nose speed record almost exactly 5 years ago.

He was motoring. Didn't stop at the end of "pitches" from what I could tell. I spotted him just after the Boulder Problem and watched until he disappeared out of sight over to Roundtable Ledge. There were at least three cameramen dangling from ropes right around the top of the second Enduro Corner pitch/Salathe Roof. Seemed like he had to climb through one of their ropes as he did the traverse, which made me chuckle. I'm sure the footage will be incredible.

To clarify a few people above discussing difficulty, which variations he took, etc:

Instead of climbing the incredibly insecure 12d Teflon Corner (where Skinner/Piana went), he climbed the 13a Boulder Problem pitch, which was established by the Hubers at 12d, but has become harder since a key hold in the sequence broke. It is a fairly insecure V6/7 slab boulder problem.

I believe he climbed the Bermuda Dunes entrance into the Monster Offwidth, which avoids the difficult 11d downclimb into the Monster, and in doing so tacks on an extra 30ish meters of hand-to-offwidth solid 5.11 crack climbing. Far more secure.

He didn't appear to stop at the hanging belay that breaks up the two Enduro Corner pitches high on the route. Going at 11d and 12b respectively, most people consider that pitch 12d if you link them. The beginning of the second pitch (or middle of linked pitch) is far from secure, usually climbed with insecure knee bars and tips locks.

But of course, all the grades should be knocked down a bit since he didn't have to climb with the weight of a harness, gear, or rope to weigh him down. Though maybe that gets offset by the huge set of balls he had to drag up the route? :)

Wowzers. What a feat.
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:05pm PT
Not just sporting but one of the all time achievements in any field by a single human
The Isaac Newton of climbing
Beta-Boy

Trad climber
da Gunks
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:09pm PT
Surfing around the net today ... trying to get some more context and perspective on this free-solo ... stumbled upon this article by James "Peaches" Lucas.

It's about his arduous journey to free climb Freerider.

It includes his 90 foot fall while free-soloing a J-Tree 5.9 ... his unprotected and semi-protected falls while working Freerider ... his teaming up with Honnold who was doing recon ascents of Freerider. Also provides a lot of the specifics of the route I was looking for. I've found out that the NatGeo article when talking about all the friction climbing was likely describing the Freeblast section of the route. I'm still not 100% solid on the Teflon Corner -- it sounds like the Huber variation to the Teflon Corner is the Boulder Problem that used to originally go at 13a but is now supposed to be harder ever since some Australian climbers ripped off a jug with their haul rope -- but it's supposedly the part that most climbers will go for. I'm guessing that Honnold probably did the Huber variation to the Telfon Corner. (Also discovered from a different article bby Oli Lyon that there's a wild dyno in the Teflon Corner/Huber Pitch -- but that Tommy Caldwell has beta that allows for a climber to avoid the dyno with a "karate kick.")

***EDITED TO ADD: Was simul-posting when SomebodyAnbody and The Dak provided some helpful clarity on these pitches. Thanks!

Anyway ... the Lucas article is wonderfully written and really provides some thought-provoking reflection on what happens when a free-solo goes bad ... and what it takes to come back from something like that and what it takes to prepare to be able to climb a route like Freerider.

James Lucas article:
http://eveningsends.com/the-day-i-sent-freerider-in-a-day/



Oli Lyon article:
http://olilyon.com/trips/journey-to-freerider/




majo

climber
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:11pm PT
Very well done.
Glad he came back in one recognizable piece
Is anyone from the first El Cap ascent team alive to bear witness to this amazing feat? Milestones still to be had. Pretty impressive
matty

Trad climber
under the sea
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:11pm PT
Wow. Speechless.

Clark Kent lives in a van down by the river!
yanqui

climber
Balcarce, Argentina
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:12pm PT
I was sounding like the guy in this video, after I started reading this thread

[Click to View YouTube Video]
HeldUp

climber
Former YNP VIP Ranger
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:15pm PT
Simply incredible. Well done, Alex.

My wife tends to find rock and mountain climbers as reckless daredevils (she's been reading too many Jon Krakauer books). When I shared the NatGeo article with her, her opinion changed. The preparation - both mental and physical - is quite impressive.

Definitely a feat for the ages. Maybe free-soloing DOWN El Cap would top it. :)
looks easy from here

climber
Ben Lomond, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:28pm PT
Going at 11d and 12b respectively, most people consider that pitch 12d if you link them
And what do most people consider it if you link all 37 pitches? ;)
MikeL

Social climber
Southern Arizona
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:32pm PT
A supertanker's worth of respect. Makes me queasy. Wow, wow, wow. Amazing.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:33pm PT
Good Guys sometimes do finish first.
Gail Hightower

climber
SE
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:37pm PT
Wow, unbelievable. I'm sure he doesn't read supertopo, but if he does: You're an inspiration man! Great work!
Einar

Trad climber
Reykjavik, Iceland
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:44pm PT
Fantastic! And, this has to be enough, please, don't push it all the way over the edge!
diggler

Trad climber
Frisco, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:44pm PT
AMAZING doesn't begin to describe. CONGRATULATIONS, ALEX!!!!

Couldn't have been done by a cooler person.
Doug Robinson

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:45pm PT

Congratulations Alex!

Just speechless.
norm larson

climber
wilson, wyoming
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:51pm PT
Alex,
How do you think that makes us feel?. As if we didn't feel mediocre and insecure already!

All I can say is BRAVO! Unbelievable really.
I remember many years ago, the only time I climbed ElCap,and feeling like Iwe were in outer space (and loving it) and realizing so few would ever experience anything close to it. Now Alex goes without a rope or partner.

BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:53pm PT
I remember saying that this would happen, and Werner shut me down saying it would not happen any time soon. This was 2 or 3 years ago.

For a guy who can solo The Phoenix on his days off, this was well within his abilities. Which are superhuman, obviously.

I never thought it was even possible back in the old days. Then routes started going free only 15 years later. Yosemite wasn't a popular place for the best free climbers, because most of the hardest routes are in caves these days. El Cap requires a totally different skill set. Hard cracks and micro edges.

I wonder how long it will be until this is replicated? I doubt there are very many other climbers lining up to do it.

Honnold really is in his own class as a soloist.

Freaking amazing.

Honnold now has his spot on the Mount Rushmore of greatest climbers ever.
john hansen

climber
Jun 3, 2017 - 03:59pm PT
"Is anyone from the first El Cap ascent team alive to bear witness to this amazing feat? Milestones still to be had. Pretty impressive "


Wonder what Tom Frost would have to say, or Fossil Climber (Wayne Merry)
though Merry was on the Nose FA.
Michelle

Social climber
1187 Hunterwasser
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:12pm PT
I could do that. You know, if I wanted to. But I don't.

Pretty awesome stuff
Binks

climber
Uranus
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:14pm PT
I want Burt Bronson's take on all of this. Where is the ultimate hardman's sage voice on this pressing matter?
Tom

Big Wall climber
San Luis Obispo CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:27pm PT
Anybody want to buy an old man's ropes, chocks and cams? For display in an Ancient History Museum? That "trad" stuff is now officially obsolete.


I suppose it was inevitable. And, it could not have been done by a nicer guy.

Way to go.

micronut

Trad climber
Fresno/Clovis, ca
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:32pm PT
Breathtaking. I'll probably always remember where I was today when I heard the news. It just feels like one of those things.

NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:36pm PT
What can anyone say that would do justice to such a feat?

I wonder how many people can come back from elite level performance in such committing endeavors, and find satisfaction in a quotidian life? How to manage the urge to keep pushing the envelope, not get depressed or bored with a mundane existence where death is not on the line?
wilbeer

Mountain climber
Terence Wilson greeneck alleghenys,ny,
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:38pm PT
Congrats,Mr.Honnold.

" I want to duct tape him to a tree or something."

lol.
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:47pm PT
So much respect. Congratulations Alex.
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:49pm PT
HOLY FRIGGIN CHEESEBALLS!!!'

I'd imagine link ups are next,eh!
Levy

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Jun 3, 2017 - 04:53pm PT
So badass! I can't help but admire the courage to punch up on the cruxy sections ropeless! Bravo!

Mad respect! 😐👍👍
Jeff Gorris

climber
Not from Portlandia
Jun 3, 2017 - 05:18pm PT
Cannot process. Not enough wow.
MH2

Boulder climber
Andy Cairns
Jun 3, 2017 - 05:21pm PT
Thank you, The Dak, and all others.

Too bad we have diminished "awesome." Would have been appropriate, here.



Sierra invited him to come back to Squamish for his 40th birthday. Looks like he might make it.


Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Denver CO
Jun 3, 2017 - 05:48pm PT
I wonder how many people can come back from elite level performance in such committing endeavors, and find satisfaction in a quotidian life? How to manage the urge to keep pushing the envelope, not get depressed or bored with a mundane existence where death is not on the line?

You just have to find something that doesn't require you to be in top athletic shape. For me, it was working in war zones as a human rights lawyer. (in fact, I am writing now from Apartado, Colombia, where the Clan del Golfo has been assassinating police officers continually) As JB once said, you go to the mountains to find yourself, and then one day you find that you don't need the mountains for that anymore.

As for sports, there is paragliding, kayaking (Royal Robbins), and others that don't require you to be in top physical shape. But I think that the skill of dealing with extreme danger and fear is best applied to things that have a more lasting value.
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:01pm PT

Before he taps up...
martygarrison

Trad climber
Washington DC
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:10pm PT
Incredible!!
Mike.

climber
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:20pm PT
Monumental anti-pussification surge.
Norton

Social climber
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:26pm PT
I cannot get over how unnaturally powerful and calm Alex's mind is...
WanderlustMD

Trad climber
New England
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:28pm PT
I was getting tires put on my car in a busy local shop when I saw the notification pop up. After letting loose with a series of expletives, I had to politely explain to several staring people what exactly was happening.

Way to go, Alex. Mind-blowing!
jgill

Boulder climber
The high prairie of southern Colorado
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:34pm PT
there is more beyond climbing that would fill many many human lifetimes with discovery

Good point, but whereas some have the intellect to make substantial contributions in science, say, others are more talented in extreme sports. Probably not a lot of overlap.
drF

Trad climber
usa
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:37pm PT
I don't want to take anything away from Alex's climbing achievement...

BUT, I'm a tiny dicked ol'man

Poor Queentoot.....so Jelly

Nevermind Queen's nonsense.

I was hoping he'd solo no more. But secretly waiting for his next beautiful achievement.

Alex is pure Samurai.
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:54pm PT

I'm drinking a glass of chard, waiting on the coals to get white. The family is arriving for the barbecue. Tomorrow JC and I are off to attempt a new pinnacle. I worked today and finally am able to read the NG article.

It is hard to fathom. Holy flocking sheep Alex! Drop anchor and celebrate dude!
Avery

climber
New Zealand
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:56pm PT
Can someone show me his exact route please!

drF

Trad climber
usa
Jun 3, 2017 - 06:59pm PT
I think someone needs to look in the mirror and see just what is there.

That was the memo to you Queen. As always, you don't get it. Mirror mirror on the wall.....lol
crankster

Trad climber
No. Tahoe
Jun 3, 2017 - 07:37pm PT
Avery, from the NG article...
rodrigo MUJICA

Mountain climber
chile
Jun 3, 2017 - 07:38pm PT
Simply Amazing!
Mike Bolte

Trad climber
Planet Earth
Jun 3, 2017 - 07:43pm PT
Wow - this must be one of the outstanding human athletic achievements of all time. A few weeks back scoping things out in the Meadow. I thought it was odd that they were so mum about what they were planning.


mike m

Trad climber
black hills
Jun 3, 2017 - 08:36pm PT
Congrats to Alex!!!!!!!
ß Î Ø T Ç H

Boulder climber
ne'er–do–well
Jun 3, 2017 - 08:43pm PT
Had things been different, Dean might have beaten him to it
Dean would be proud, RIP
Glad you said that Kevin.
JLP

Social climber
The internet
Jun 3, 2017 - 08:59pm PT
Potter was not strong enough to have any margin, IMO, it would have been a suicide mission for him. The Boulder Problem V7, free solo 1/2 way up El Cap, is no BS. It's a low % section of climbing even for the pros who have it wired. The upper enduro corner and through the traverse, after freeing all the way up there in just a few hours, is a testament of insane climbing endurance and efficiency - it's 1-2 hanging belays in the middle of a bunch of hard 12 for most, that is among the very few even capable of climbing it at all.
WyoRockMan

climber
Grizzlyville, WY
Jun 3, 2017 - 08:59pm PT
Incredible accomplishment, I can't think of anything as comparable.

Now with that off his hit list, he should work on that farmer tan!
aspendougy

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 09:12pm PT
The National Geo. link has some focus on Alex's exceptional ability to control fear:

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain." (Litany against fear from DUNE)

Some questions come to mind: At age 31, has Alex peaked as an extreme athlete?

Will there be a repeat by another climber eventually? How long? I suspect quite some time.

How about a female repeat? Will that happen?
aldude

climber
Monument Manor
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 3, 2017 - 09:21pm PT
Or an onsight free solo ?
johnr9q

Sport climber
Sacramento, Ca
Jun 3, 2017 - 09:24pm PT
Alex, Alex, Alex, Alex, Alex Honnold
WyoRockMan

climber
Grizzlyville, WY
Jun 3, 2017 - 09:25pm PT
Or an onsight free solo ?

The only attempted onsight free solo of El Cap didn't go so well.
[Click to View YouTube Video]
aspendougy

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Jun 3, 2017 - 09:30pm PT
This guy was pretty gutsy too:

http://www.timescolonist.com/man-who-mowed-lawn-with-tornado-behind-him-says-he-was-keeping-an-eye-on-it-1.20394290
rick sumner

Trad climber
reno, nevada/ wasilla alaska
Jun 3, 2017 - 10:13pm PT
No extra weight to carry

No gear to place

No room for error
true whether your 25' up or 2500'

Mind boggling.

What's next?

paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Jun 3, 2017 - 10:23pm PT
What an amazing achievement. Mind control and physical perfection... an inspirational gift to anyone who's ever climbed. Bravo!
mcreel

climber
Barcelona
Jun 3, 2017 - 10:28pm PT
Well, I'm impressed.
the goat

climber
north central WA
Jun 3, 2017 - 11:02pm PT
I'm curious, did Alex stash water or an energy bar or two along the route or did he climb continuously without hydration or some caloric boost along the way? Not that it matters, but it seems incredible exerting that much that he wouldn't require something during those 4+ hours.
Wen

Trad climber
Bend, OR
Jun 4, 2017 - 04:35am PT
I wonder what he feels like the day after? Dreaming of the next goal, reliving every step, 100% satisfied in body and soul? I hope he is at peace with himself, that his mind is quiet and happy.
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jun 4, 2017 - 04:52am PT
I wonder what he feels like the day after? Dreaming of the next goal, reliving every step, 100% satisfied in body and soul? I hope he is at peace with himself, that his mind is quiet and happy.
The Fist

Trad climber
reno,nv
Jun 4, 2017 - 05:23am PT
Alex proposed to El Capitan and the monolith accepted, tying the knot (reported to be a Perlon follow-through savoy knot) with a 3:56 pre-event ceremony that began in El Cap Meadow and officially starting at the base of the route Freerider at 5:32am. After bold climbing of every variety Alex finished on El Cap's summit in time for breakfast at 9:28, having kissed (and probably impregnating) the world-famous granite beauty. Dress was casual with Alex rocking a favorite pair of shorts and a red short-sleeved shirt, and El Cap in grey granite attire.

Alex's mind-bending ascent reduced the Big Stone's 5.13 and 37 pitch, Grade VI climb to a 5.13 single pitch, Grade III, also reducing many climbers, former climbers, and never-been-climbers to a state of stunned hypnotic awe and respect. Speaking for myself, I've spent the day in shocked, slack-jawed amazement.

Congratulations to Alex Honnold on the boldest feat and peerless accomplishment in rock climbing history.
hobo_dan

Social climber
Minnesota
Jun 4, 2017 - 05:51am PT
Wow just became a brand new word
Sweating as I type this
I hope he puts it in the "What did you climb today" thread
SC seagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, Moab, A sailboat, or some time zone
Jun 4, 2017 - 06:31am PT
^^^^^ oh that's too funny. "what did you climb today" classic.

Susan
Roger Breedlove

climber
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Jun 4, 2017 - 06:49am PT
Good one, Fist.

I also liked the certainty of the lawn-mower given that he had watched storm chasers on TV.
mastadon

Trad climber
crack addict
Jun 4, 2017 - 07:00am PT

Here's a video of TM Herbert explaining why all the speed ascents of El Cap don't count.

[Click to View YouTube Video]

Brent Mattix

Trad climber
Roseville, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 07:36am PT
The mouse and the rat and the raccoon tried. The deer, and the grizzly, and even the mighty mountain lion tried. But, they thought it impossible.

Long live Tu-Tok! He did it because he knew he could.



bootysatva

Trad climber
Idyllwild / Joshua Tree Ca.
Jun 4, 2017 - 07:40am PT
Can't even imagine soloing the slab pitches down low! Fingers sweating at the thought of it!
It's a new world now.
Congratulations brother Alex!!!!
Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Mill Valley, Ca
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:29am PT
Outdoorvangelist

Trad climber
San Juan Capistrano, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:35am PT
Hm, I thought he was just another suit lobbying in D.C.
sean_barb

Trad climber
Suburb of Moore's Wall
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:41am PT
The mouse and the rat and the raccoon tried. The deer, and the grizzly, and even the mighty mountain lion tried. But, they thought it impossible.

Long live Tu-Tok! He did it because he knew he could.

I used to read this story to my son, thanks for that!

Honnold is our astronaut, his breathtaking courage and the deep well of commitment he posesses, is inspiring.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:49am PT
WOW...just plain WOW!

"One of the things that I like best about climbing is that about every ten years or so the roof blows off. Every now and then an old soul in a young body comes along and really shakes things up. And with that in mind please bring to the stage Alex Honnold." My introduction at the Oakdale Climbers Festival in 2013.

Alex gave a really entertaining inspiring talk about his activities and lifestyle. When I thanked him at the end, I sang a little song that Alex Lowe used to sing from time to time with a crazy big grin on his face because he know it would eventually come to pass.

"If you're solid and you know it solo Phoenix. If you're solid and you know it solo Phoenix. If you're solid and you know it, sure that you will never blow it. If you're solid and you know it solo Phoenix." And this young man did that very thing. Now El Cap too...amazing!
hobo_dan

Social climber
Minnesota
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:52am PT
The first ascensionists should offer to change the name Free Rider to "The Honnold Route"
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:57am PT

A link from the NG first post thanks eKat...

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/160103-honnold-climb-mountain-solo-adventure-ngbooktalk/
the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Jun 4, 2017 - 10:01am PT
One word...

Honnlove
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Jun 4, 2017 - 10:05am PT
Thanks for posting the article. That's a great piece.
John Black

Social climber
Boulder, CO
Jun 4, 2017 - 10:33am PT
C'mon Alex... auction off the shoes and chalkbag you used! And give the money to feed starving dirtbags who live in a van (ie, yourself).
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:10am PT
I just had a conversation with Jimmie Dunn, who as many here know did the 1st solo ascent of a new route on El Cap- The Cosmos; as well as many legendary routes elsewhere.

He feels that Honnold's ascent marks the greatest single athletic achievement of all time-period, and I agree. You simply cannot equate what Alex did to anything done in any other sport.
The general public doesn't have a clue, and the few climber's among us who occasionally free solo, close to their limit, understand what motivates Alex and others to push the envelope out even farther.
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
From Panorama City, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:15am PT
Did this get posted yet?

http://elcapreport.com/content/elcap-report-6317-special-edition-honnold-free-solo-elcap
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
From Panorama City, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:36am PT
I think this means that now we all get to live forever.
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:36am PT
^^^^
WOO DOGGIES!!!!
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
From Panorama City, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:39am PT
I'm OK with it - I don't have to do scary climbing anymore.
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
From Panorama City, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:48am PT
That would be cheating ;>)
divad

Trad climber
wmass
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:50am PT
Badass has a new definition..
MH2

Boulder climber
Andy Cairns
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:52am PT
can I hit RESTART so I don't have to be 67 forever?


Hit RETURN TO FORUM LIST.

If you can keep doing it you will live forever.
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:58am PT
From FB...
hellroaring

Trad climber
San Francisco
Jun 4, 2017 - 12:02pm PT
For a nation so into their sports & hero worship of athletes (multimillion $ contracts, product endorsements, etc), don't think too many felt or realized the magnitude would the earthquake that just ripped through the world of athletic achievement. Way to friggin go dude!...
MX

Trad climber
Bellevue, WA
Jun 4, 2017 - 12:04pm PT
Hard to imagine an encore to this amazing achievement. I've always wondered what would come first, the sub 2 hours marathon or this. Alex tops out, again! A once in many-generations climber....
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Jun 4, 2017 - 12:28pm PT
I was at a sports med conference all weekend listening to how great the ball and stick athletes are and how great "we" all are for helping them achieve. When I got word of this yesterday morning, I just wanted to stand up and announce what had just been done in the world of sport....no one would have got it!!! Unbelieveable is all I can say. Last time I can remember being so blown away was when Bachar told me so casually, he and Peter just climbed The Nose and Half Dome that day! I laughed and said, "Right John", then word got out.
How can you compare this to anything else in sport??
Peace
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Jun 4, 2017 - 12:30pm PT
I think that's right... it IS the greatest singular, individual, and simply hardest-to-believe athletic achievement of all time. Truly historic!!!!

Proud to be human, this week!!!
John Ely

Trad climber
DC
Jun 4, 2017 - 12:35pm PT
quite amazing. now might be the time, like Sandy Koufax, to retire at the very top....
DCFrench

climber
San Francisco, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 12:45pm PT
Tom Evans' fantastic documetnation of Alex's climb.

http://elcapreport.com/content/elcap-report-6317-special-edition-honnold-free-solo-elcap
murcy

Gym climber
sanfrancisco
Jun 4, 2017 - 02:00pm PT
Boulder problem at 3:15 here:
[Click to View YouTube Video]
divad

Trad climber
wmass
Jun 4, 2017 - 02:06pm PT
This would compare to breaking 50 in golf...

in a thunderstorm...

using steel clubs...
Nkane

Trad climber
San Francisco, USA
Jun 4, 2017 - 03:26pm PT
I only have one thing to add. And that is that conditions in the Valley were not totally perfect yesterday morning. It was not a crisp November day; while temps weren't super hot, there was some humidity in the air. I was chalking like crazy across the way on Middle Cathedral.

Still can't get my mind around this.
JOEY.F

Gym climber
It's not rocket surgery
Jun 4, 2017 - 04:45pm PT
Can't help but notice no congratulatory tweet or call or anything from the White House as KJ & TC got for the Dawn Wall...
Hi Murcy thanks for that!
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
Sands Motel , Las Vegas
Jun 4, 2017 - 04:56pm PT
Joey F... Trump doesn't know Yosemite exists let alone El Cap...
TripleS_in_EBs

climber
Poulsbo, WA
Jun 4, 2017 - 04:58pm PT
Wouldn't we all really like to hear some perspective from the ones who lived through everything from the Half Dome first ascent until now, e.g. Frost, Roper, Robinson ("speechless"), Steck, Chouinard, Herbert, etc.? Maybe we'll get that later as more is published.

A partial list of what they've seen:
First ascent Half Dome
First ascent Nose
First ascent Salathe
First clean ascent Half Dome
First Half Dome in a day
First Nose in a day
First free ascent Rostrum
First free ascent East Face Washington Column
First 5.11 free solo
First Nabisco Wall fee solo
First Nose and Half Dome in a day
First Nose and Salathe in a day
First Rostrum free solo
First Astroman free solo
First free ascent Salathe
First free ascent Nose
First Watkins, Nose, Half Dome in day (team and solo)
First free ascent Dawn Wall
Sub 2 1/2 hour Nose ascent
Free solo Phoenix
Free solo El Cap, Freerider

All of the above were surely at some point deemed impossible in their lifetimes, and now they've seen all of those impossibles become reality. Salute.

fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Jun 4, 2017 - 05:04pm PT
Looks steep.
WBraun

climber
Jun 4, 2017 - 05:34pm PT
Just think ...

His mom must be the most relieved and simultaneously the happiest .....

(I believe it also takes the support of a good mom to make it happen.)
ruppell

climber
Jun 4, 2017 - 05:45pm PT
I was thinking the same thing Wbraun

Imagine that conversation:

Hi Mom

Hi Alex, how are you?

I'm great.

You sound really happy. What did you do today?

Soloed El Cap.

donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jun 4, 2017 - 05:51pm PT
Seems like it's been a question of when not if.
JOEY.F

Gym climber
It's not rocket surgery
Jun 4, 2017 - 06:28pm PT
Photo credit Jimmy Chin.
SC seagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, Moab, A sailboat, or some time zone
Jun 4, 2017 - 06:30pm PT
His mom

I've wondered if the apple doesn't roll far from the tree. She must be as resilient as they come.

As a Mom I frequently wondered, "how does she do it?"

Susan

Wen

Trad climber
Bend, OR
Jun 4, 2017 - 06:30pm PT
Imagine being those dudes on the ledge he cruised past. They won the climbing lottery with their timing!
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Jun 4, 2017 - 06:46pm PT
Kingtut-I don't want to take anything away from Alex's climbing achievement...

AS IF DUDE! As if you could. What makes you think you have the means to "take anything away from Alex's climbing achievement?

You are completely powerless and Alex is your Father. Go wash his socks or something.
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Jun 4, 2017 - 07:17pm PT
Joey, no tape either.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 07:27pm PT
an amazing achievement and a testament to what can be accomplished with dedication and hard work... sounds cliche, but that's what it is...

congratulations to Alex, he certainly earned it.

and it is an amazing continuation of other bold solos and the climbers who had that vision as to that future of climbing, total commitment. Here we are, looking at it, stunned perhaps, but not surprised.

I missed the whole thing, I was climbing in other parts of the Valley, and only learned about it this afternoon when I checked in with Tom out in El Cap Meadow.

Mei

Trad climber
mxi2000.net
Jun 4, 2017 - 07:56pm PT
Many quoteable lines from the interview, but what I'd remember for a long time is "it's the other day."

Mark: A normal person would probably take the afternoon off after they free-soloed El Cap.
Alex: But I’ve been trying to hang board every other day, and it’s the other day.

Bonus:

Mark: Does your mom know you free soloed El Cap?
Alex: I haven’t talked to her yet... She might think I’d already done it. She’s really bad a differentiating between free climbing and free soloing.

OP, aldude, can you please include the link to the interview in your first post so it's easy for people to access? Nice to edit to make it a compilation post with all relevant links (including the BREAKING NEWS story by NG) for the future readers. Thanks.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/features/athletes/alex-honnold/interview-rope-free-solo-climb-yosemite-el-capitan

JOEY.F

Gym climber
It's not rocket surgery
Jun 4, 2017 - 08:49pm PT
Yup hfcs no tape!
Still reeling...
Mei

Trad climber
mxi2000.net
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:04pm PT
I posted the link to the NatGeo article as the 2nd post in the thread. It should be pretty obvious.

I saw that, and that's why I didn't ask to link to that article. I'm talking about the interview piece. It's a different link. I liked the interview piece even more.

If I were the OP, I'd just keeping editing the first post to include all references to the historic event.
brotherbbock

climber
Alta Loma, CA
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:08pm PT
That El Cap report was Badass 🤘🏼
m_jones

Trad climber
Carson City, NV
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:19pm PT
Pretty astounding conclusion to what we knew was bound to happen some day. Still, my god...

Kind of takes the wind out of the sails for the eventual first onsite of an el cap route.
Marshall

climber
bay area
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:20pm PT

Q: Do you feel the world kind of needed something cool like this, at this moment in time?

Alex: What the world needs is for the U.S. to stay in the Paris Accords.


So classic. What an unbelievable achievement.
andrew_g

climber
Ulm, Germany
Jun 4, 2017 - 09:51pm PT
Incredible and for most of us an incomprehensible achievement. Congratulations to Alex.

Very much a singular event. Why do we feel the need to rank it?

At the risk of inciting just that ;-), to me similar achievements have happened, at least they blew my mind: Alexander Huber’s free solo of the Hasse-Brandler or Hansjörg Auer’s free solo of “Der Weg durch den Fisch” on the Marmolada with minimal rehearsing. True they are easier and shorter, but have few rests, are complicated, some chossy, and are certainly singular deeds as well.

Ultimately, it is a very intimate experience between the climber and the climb.
Do we diminish by trying to relate?
What is the way to celebrate such an event?
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jun 4, 2017 - 10:59pm PT
hey there say, DCFRENCH... say, thanks for the tom report...

and wow, and oh my...

i have no words...

heard of this, from lacey... been so busy, but i have
read the shares, by now, on facebook, and here... oh my, :O


GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:19pm PT
Pretty cool that almost 60 years after it's first ascent El Cap still remains the main stage of adventure climbing in America.
F

climber
away from the ground
Jun 4, 2017 - 11:20pm PT
Respect.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 12:17am PT
For people who are curious about how Alex's mom handles it,
in this video she said she had to stop worrying about it years ago.
[Click to View YouTube Video]
She's also posted a few times on this forum:
http://www.supertopo.com/inc/view_forum.php?dcid=Pjw5NDo9PCc,
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Jun 5, 2017 - 12:26am PT

Pretty cool that almost 60 years after it's first ascent El Cap still remains the main stage of adventure climbing in America.

On the flip side, maybe 60yrs of climbing(possibly other sports!) has kept Emerica on the main stage⁉️
tarallo

Trad climber
italy
Jun 5, 2017 - 02:01am PT
He is the best!
Just curious: he bypassed the ear to get in the monster?
In the picture he seems very low.

Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 02:30am PT
Just curious: he bypassed the ear to get in the monster?
In the picture he seems very low.
Yes, that is correct.
See The Dak's post (62) from June 3, 2:44pm:
I believe he climbed the Bermuda Dunes entrance into the Monster Offwidth, which avoids the difficult 11d downclimb into the Monster, and in doing so tacks on an extra 30ish meters of hand-to-offwidth solid 5.11 crack climbing. Far more secure.
Bushman

climber
The state of quantum flux
Jun 5, 2017 - 05:47am PT
Congratulations to a dedicated and courageous man, Alex Hannold, setting the bar for generations to come.

-Tim Sorenson
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:01am PT
The idea of being ropeless 2,000 feet up El Capitan is something many climbers have pondered while resting in El Cap meadow, smoking weed, and staring transfixed up at the granite monster towering over them. For most, those moments were nothing more than ass-puckering fantasies that would spur uncomfortable fits of laughter. For Honnold, it was a serious project to be tackled.

BY ANDREW BISHARAT JUNE 04, 2017
yanqui

climber
Balcarce, Argentina
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:20am PT
Just read the interview with Synnott. It was pure gold. Honnold hypothetically talking to his grandkids when they first see El Cap: "Kids that thing takes about four hours to climb by yourself—after years of effort."
SC seagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, Moab, A sailboat, or some time zone
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:44am PT
Thank you Clint for those links. Very gracious of you to post them up.
I recall seeing the video a while back but had never seen the posts.
So an El Cap climb with his Mom in the future!!!!! That would be another uniquely special event.
Just from seeing her talk again "I had to give up worrying along time ago" reinforces my belief the apple didn't roll far from the tree". The kernel of that tenet seems to allow both of them to accomplish what they do and how they approach truly living in the present.

I think there are many that could train their body to do what Alex (and his Mom) does, but it's the deeply disciplined mindfulness and profound ability to transcend fear of mortality for a sustained period of time that allows the achievement of something so rare.

I hope she finds her jugging partners and I hope to hear about them climbing together this fall. "Your heart has to decide" She certainly passed that on to her son.

Susan
Todd Eastman

climber
Bellingham, WA
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:52am PT
Mr. Honnold seems to be having more fun than the average climber...

Stewart Johnson

Mountain climber
lake forest
Jun 5, 2017 - 07:22am PT
The Stone Master!
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Jun 5, 2017 - 08:14am PT
Sorry King
SC seagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, Moab, A sailboat, or some time zone
Jun 5, 2017 - 08:20am PT
^^^^. My best wishes for your Moms recovery. I have a hip that's headed to no where good.

I feel differently about what climbing, and by extension Honnold's accomplishment, may mean to some and the motivating effect it can have on individuals.

Several years ago I was in the throes of a life limiting illness. I recovered (obviously) but during the darkest times much of what got me through were climbing metaphors...crux, whippers, falls, staying in the moment, hand holds and foot holds that aren't there but then others appear. Chalking up sweaty hands to keep going. Pushing myself when retreat was not an option. Then the summit. Regardless of what the outcome was to be I had a vision of what I wanted the journey to be. I was going to be the one in control of ME.

So in the grand scheme of things, the Big World may not have shifted because of Alex's accomplishment, but many indivual worlds have shifted and once again many individuals are confronted with the realm of possibilities that may just expand their horizons a little bit, even if it doesn't come close to Honnold's achievement.

Just my thoughts about how a grand achievement can have significant trickle down effects.

Susan




jplotz!

climber
Wenatchee, WA
Jun 5, 2017 - 08:35am PT
Everyone is in a state of stunned awe, while Alex shruggs it off as, "Four hours of light exercise, you know?"
Sula

Trad climber
Pennsylvania
Jun 5, 2017 - 09:02am PT
I'm thinking that to do this, he had to get his mind into a place that no human mind has ever been, and keep it there for four hours.

Not something that mere words can encompass.

Delhi Dog

climber
Good Question...
Jun 5, 2017 - 09:12am PT
Words seem inadequate at this point.
I've been pondering this since it happened and still am grasping at the technical + mental strength. Sure HE can say it was light exercise, but we all know (including him I suspect) what an accomplishment it is.

As to this:
he had to get his mind into a place that no human mind has ever been
I was thinking the same thing until the image of those soldiers on Omaha Beach pushing forward despite almost assured death...that also had to be a whole 'nother level of mental strength.

Congratulation Alex!
Truly amazing.
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Jun 5, 2017 - 09:22am PT
I get slack jawed just thinking about this....

It IS the ultimate human athletic achievement...

maybe when somebody swims from California to Japan it will be equaled.

slack jawed and speechless.

respect
paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Jun 5, 2017 - 10:14am PT
Speechless is right. Imagine if you could go back in time and tell Harding and his fellow Nose climbers that in the relatively near future someone would climb this big stone in only four hours and they wouldn't even use a rope. I wonder what their response would be? Staggering.
Roger Breedlove

climber
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Jun 5, 2017 - 10:18am PT
Well Paul, we know what one of the first Nose ascent party said after the fact, "Beautiful."

Wayne Merry's thanks to Tom for the Honnold Freerider photo essay

I am guessing that up until about 1967 the answer from everyone would have been, "You are crazy!" Then climbers starting showing how free-climbing could be expanded, and eventually even free-soloing became normal, so to speak.

I have noted that the older the climber posting on this thread, the seemingly more their posts reflect "when, not if" to capture the moment. I have been pondering this and I think that the more impossibles you have seen fall the more inevitable they become. With the videos of the free climbers struggling to get across the Great Roof pitch, I cannot image a free-soloist doing it. I am certain I am wrong. Not because I can envision it, but because I know that the future always comes. Just as Alex' smooth dispatch of really hard climbing makes it look like 5.6, someone, maybe Alex, will push to find a way to make 5.14 seem effortless.

I was not close to Warren, but my guess is that he would not have dismissed as impossible a free-solo out-of-hand: he had done the impossible.
gonamok

climber
dont make me come over there
Jun 5, 2017 - 11:10am PT
un f * # k I n g believable. People searching for some comparable achievement, give it up, there is none. I'm astounded even tho I kind of expected it. Gad, everything on the cap is steep, awkward, greasy n heinous, just thinking about being in one of those slimy wide cracks ropeless, with the next ledge 2 or 3 pitches away makes me wanna puke. You go Alex, you are THE man!
G_Gnome

Trad climber
Cali
Jun 5, 2017 - 11:16am PT
I just finished reading all the links for the achievement and I can't get my sweaty hands to stop. Amazing! I can't wait to see the film to watch how calm and relaxed he was. It is always remarkable to watch him climb.
shady

Trad climber
hasbeen
Jun 5, 2017 - 11:26am PT
Way to go Alex!
Ha Ha! Your name's a superlative!
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jun 5, 2017 - 11:42am PT
Most people when asked to imagine the future are locked in the present and therefore almost always underestimate the change that will occur.
Conversely, people who have done something in the past when presented with the present are almost always shocked.
Salathe, a little hard of hearing, when told that the Steck Salathe had been climbed in two hours said, and I paraphrase...Two days! Three days maybe but not two days.
JLP

Social climber
The internet
Jun 5, 2017 - 12:16pm PT
I'm thinking that to do this, he had to get his mind into a place that no human mind has ever been, and keep it there for four hours.
People solo things that feel easy and familiar to them all the time, the trick nobody had pulled off until now is to make that happen on the side of El Cap.
AKDOG

Mountain climber
Anchorage, AK
Jun 5, 2017 - 12:35pm PT

Inspirational on so many levels!!
Soloing is the most pure form of climbing and Alex is a true master….

Here is hoping Alex continues to be safe as he continues a journey, that few have the mental or physical capacity to follow.
fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Jun 5, 2017 - 01:12pm PT
The Nose still awaits a free solo I believe......

Unless someone here has done it and just not said anything.
Roger Breedlove

climber
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Jun 5, 2017 - 01:26pm PT
So Jim, and Kevin, since you guys were climbing hard before big walls were free climbed, what would you have thought if someone had said that in 50 years the Captain will have multiple free routes and someone will free-solo the easiest one? Think back to a time before the East Face of the Column was all free but after you had climbed "The Crucifix", for Kevin, and "Basket Case" for Jim.
NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 01:27pm PT
I've had a smile in my face for a while, looking at people around me as I exited an airplane or waiting for a ride- how to explain it to them? People who don't climb can't really form a frame of reference to imagine how gnarly this is. Just climbing El cap is way gnarly for most people, but it's hard to appreciate the distinctions of gnarliness. I'm sure I can't really appreciate it because I can't free climb at that level, and just aiding the thing would be a proud achievement for me.

Many of us can relate to feeling in the zone and climbing something that seems reasonable, when screwing up would mean death. But taking it to so much of a higher level in terms of physical and mental strength and endurance... man oh man... and the pics make it more visceral how audacious this is.

Still dumbfounded and searching for words when I think about it.
tradmanclimbs

Ice climber
Pomfert VT
Jun 5, 2017 - 01:37pm PT
no one at work can even begin to comprehend how high of a bar was set, how stunning the achievement actually is.
TLP

climber
Jun 5, 2017 - 01:40pm PT
Imagine if you could go back in time and tell Harding and his fellow Nose climbers that in the relatively near future someone would climb this big stone in only four hours and they wouldn't even use a rope. I wonder what their response would be?

Warbler nails it: Harding would have said, hey pass that over and let me have a swig of what you're drinking!

I think the wall pioneers would have had an immediate gut reaction of no way, ever, but that would be quickly replaced by knowing it was inevitable, since they saw standards zoom upward much faster in their era than they ever have since. They saw Sacherer and Pratt do incredible things right then.

Still, it is really hard to get your mind around the idea that somebody just walked up to that rock, and then climbed right up the side of it, no muss no fuss. It's a landmark in human achievement, both mental and physical.
Curt

climber
Gold Canyon, AZ
Jun 5, 2017 - 05:23pm PT
Hm, I thought he was just another suit lobbying in D.C.

That's merely his Clark Kent persona.

Curt
DaveyTree

Trad climber
Fresno
Jun 5, 2017 - 05:26pm PT
Hard to fathom but completely RAD!

Love the pic ^^^^. Suit and approach shoes.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
Terence Wilson greeneck alleghenys,ny,
Jun 5, 2017 - 05:28pm PT
I hope the man starts mountain biking and skiing and going to jam band shows.
Really.
Cole

Trad climber
los angeles
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:06pm PT
Article by Tommy Caldwell really puts this into perspective, Honnold tells him that he's NEVER fallen unexpectedly in his entire career, I just can't even undertand how much of a master you have to be for TC to be mind boggled.

https://www.outsideonline.com/2190306/why-alex-honnolds-free-solo-scared-me
Cancer Boy

Trad climber
Freedonia
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:06pm PT
Like most, this is completely outside my realm of understanding, and I've soloed a little bit.

It's kind of bittersweet to say that most of the folks who can truly appreciate the achievement are no longer with us to bear witness or weigh in. These include Derek Hersey, Charlie Fowler, Dean Potter, Ueli Steck, Patrick Edlinger; possibly Walt Shipley and Dan Osman. Maybe Yabo. Most poignantly (for me) are John Bachar and Michael Riordan.

Those still alive are few: Croft, of course (yay), and I'd say the feat is probably also within Werner's wheelhouse. Sorry if I missed any of you other badass Zen masters.
labrat

Trad climber
Erik O. Auburn, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:18pm PT
Somehow the write up from Tommy for Outside makes Alex's free solo seem so much more scary and real than all the other press about it.

aspendougy

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:21pm PT
For some climbs, such as Bachar Yerian, a free solo is not recommended, as the climb has a history of holds breaking off. I guess in this instance, Honnold felt that all the holds were secure................. I guess he doesn't think like I do!
le_bruce

climber
Oakland, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 06:27pm PT
Sula:
I'm thinking that to do this, he had to get his mind into a place that no human mind has ever been, and keep it there for four hours.

Not something that mere words can encompass.

Thank you for articulating it. That's it, that's exactly it.


Marshall:
Q: Do you feel the world kind of needed something cool like this, at this moment in time?
Alex: What the world needs is for the U.S. to stay in the Paris Accords.

So classic. What an unbelievable achievement.

You cannot get more classic. Alex is so f*#king good. Just when Synnott begins to wax grandiose in his line of questioning (and who wouldn't given what Alex had just done?), No Big Deal Alex snaps his perspective into focus. Good god is he a classic figure, of cloth unknown.


Finally, let us shout out the badass monkeys who were up there on lines and ledges waiting for Honnold's approach. No small deal to agree to witness something like that.

From the post-climb interview, it sounds like Honnold hand picked that crew. From Chin on down, I imagine that they each went on their own journey of the soul in being up there. To be witnesses to a feat like this with an unknown life-or-death outcome for any fellow human being, not to mention one you love and care for...

I think that if I were up there waiting at Sous le Toit, or even alongside Tom looking at the viewfinder, there is zero chance I'd be able to watch as he went through, say, the Enduro or the Boulder Problem, unless I'd gone through some serious mental work to come to peace with both possible outcomes.

Since I can't fathom the place within human consciousness that Honnold's level of mastery can be found, I find myself thinking about what those monkeys were feeling on Friday night and into Saturday morning, in caves and vans and lying in the dirt behind quiet boulders around the Valley...
WBraun

climber
Jun 5, 2017 - 07:27pm PT
I'm thinking that to do this, he had to get his mind into a place that no human mind has ever been.

Various individuals minds in the past have been into a place far far beyond even that.

If you only knew ......
zBrown

Ice climber
Jun 5, 2017 - 08:22pm PT
Welcomed historical perspective Warblie!

As Mr. Honnold is rumored to have said, "America is truly great again, now I'm going to the gym to work out".

And that first trip up Señor Capitan took how many months..?

JLP

Social climber
The internet
Jun 5, 2017 - 08:25pm PT
Somehow the write up from Tommy for Outside...
Who is Tommy? Oh yeah, right, almost forgot...
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
From Panorama City, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 08:26pm PT
Somehow the write up from Tommy for Outside makes Alex's free solo seem so much more scary and real than all the other press about it.

At least in the story Tommy mentions that Alex has climbed the route at least 12 times. It helps a little to know that - LOL.

https://www.outsideonline.com/2190306/why-alex-honnolds-free-solo-scared-me
thetennisguy

Mountain climber
Yuba City, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 09:51pm PT
Truly stunning! Breathtaking and incredible! Wonderful work, Alex!
MikeL

Social climber
Southern Arizona
Jun 5, 2017 - 09:52pm PT
I’m re-reading notebooks of articles I’ve read. Honnold’s solo of El Cap could be informed by something that pertains to mind and its state in extreme sports.

Quality of Experience and Risk Perception in High-Altitude Rock Climbing
Antonella Delle Fave, Marta Bassi & Fausto Massimini
Journal of Applied Sport Psychology
Volume 15, 2003 - Issue 1

Abstract:

Six climbers were monitored during an expedition in the Himalaya, comprising 13 days of traveling and 26 days of mountaineering. The aim was the investigation of the quality of experience and risk perception associated with high-altitude rock climbing. By means of experience sampling method, participants provided on-line repeated self-reports about activities carried out, and the associated quality of the experience, in terms of mood, intrinsic motivation, potency, confidence, engagement, and risk assessment. The experience fluctuation model was applied to identify experiential profiles on the basis of the perception of environmental challenges and personal skills. When both challenges and skills were positive, flow experience was reported. In particular, we found that the opportunity for experiencing flow can motivate climbers to take part in a risky expedition. The results showed that risk played a minor role in climbing, in line with a goal-directed approach to risk seeking. These findings have two implications: (a) Studies on motivation in sport should distinguish between risk and search for challenges and opportunities for action, especially in dealing with extreme sports; (b) In the recreational domain, outdoor programs, among other things, should aim at providing opportunities for flow and personal development.

Findings or claims made from the article:

• Activity distribution of the climbers (of 26 days): climbing 2.2%, maintenance 36.8%, other 6.2%, interaction 10.7%, thinking 2.4%, leisure 13.3%, traveling 1.9%, camp activities 26.4%. N=1033 self-reports
• Intrinsic motivation is essential to “flow”; people chose to take part in spite of objective danger; it is unrelated to external material rewards.
• The reports of anxiety were extremely low; climbers must master it.
• Risk was not a goal but a means to experience “flow.”
• The more experienced the climbers were, the more they searched for autotelic (flow) motives: the sharper their skills, the more it was a dynamic process that fostered personal growth and development of individual life themes.
NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
Jun 5, 2017 - 10:29pm PT
I'm thinking that to do this, he had to get his mind into a place that no human mind has ever been.

Various individuals minds in the past have been into a place far far beyond even that.

If you only knew ......

Imagine how many people who did not want to die, but who had the courage to face situations that they thought were certain death outcomes, or at least low probability of living outcomes. The soldiers in the boats waiting to reach the beach in the first wave of the Normandy invasion. They had time to think about what was coming, to plan for it, to wait for it. A child standing between an attacker and his or her mother. Less time to think there, more time to just act in spite of knowing that one's efforts aren't enough but trying anyway. Young black Americans sitting down while the full weight of the government in the guise of huge angry white men armed with weapons beating them within inches of their lives or beyond. And not fighting back, to make a point, enduring unspeakable fear and pain and death to make the point that love and compassion and justice will prevail. Jews in concentration camps that managed to cheer up their fellow torture-mates even after watching wave after wave die of emaciated over-work and under-nourishment, or gas chambers when they clung to life but were no longer able to work.

Humans have shown remarkable and humbling levels of strength in the face of circumstances that are not possible to bear, except they bear them because there is no other choice. Maybe that is part of what makes this case so special. It is not a decision how to act in the face of an unavoidable situation. It is a decision to willingly enter a situation that would crush everybody else, and for what? His fortitude has some similarities with what soldiers or people in life-threatening situations have endured, as sort of victims of circumstance, rising to unbelievable challenges, but here it's more like what a spiritual adventurer might do in exploring the boundary between life and death. It calls to mind that Bridwell quote, "my best vacation is your worst nightmare."

Maybe there has never been a better embodiment of it.
ß Î Ø T Ç H

Boulder climber
ne'er–do–well
Jun 5, 2017 - 10:50pm PT
Touron question: How did he *not* get the ropes up there?
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Jun 5, 2017 - 11:04pm PT
If you've free soloed much at all then you know it's a matter of comfort, familiarity, conditioning and just plain buzz of being in the groove. Do it long enough and have it saturate deep enough into the right character and you get a Reardon or a Honnold. I've done a bit of it over the years and have also free rope-soloed thousands of pitches. Even roped-solo gets pretty damn serene after a decade or two of doing it to the point where climbing with other people just isn't the same experience - not better or worse - just entirely different. Climbing alone is just a space unto itself.

And while I can't relate to the scale or sustained nature of the endeavor, I've had enough of a taste to know just how "necessary" the feeling can be. Proud and I hope he continues to find the place where he and it can co-exist over the long haul.

k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Jun 6, 2017 - 07:33am PT
aldude, can you please include the link to the interview in your first post so it's easy for people to access?

What I'm trying to figure out is how does some old dude living in a shack in the desert get the scoop on the biggest climbing story of the century, and beat all the others to the SuperTaco post?

And somebody expects him to do more than that? Come on Al, sing us a song, I miss that voice!




I know for sure I'll never understand Alex's mindset when he says, "it's the other day."
jromma

Sport climber
CA
Jun 6, 2017 - 08:18am PT
The New York Times posted an article about it this morning:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/06/us/california-today-alex-honnold-el-capitan-climb.html

I love TC's piece, very well written. Such an unbelievable achievement!
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jun 6, 2017 - 09:28am PT
"Technique is our protection"

A saying attributed to Pratt, who famously asked Chris Fredericks permission to continue up on the First Ascent of Twilight Zone in September of 1965, the question asked after the gear Chris retrieved from the car would not protect in that slot. Those of us who go up to repeat those routes, now with modern gear and perhaps more importantly, with knowledge of what we will find, are often amazed what the first ascent teams accomplished, in their lack of knowledge, and lack of adequate gear, but with their technique and commitment.

It seemed to some I grew up with in climbing that "training" for climbing was cheating. There is a Sheridan Anderson cartoon of Jim Bridwell's "olympic training gym" in the Valley. And while we have the impression that those 1960s climbers somehow disdained formal training, Eric Beck recalled the various regimes he and Frank Sacherer and others would engage in, preparing to do the first free ascents, and those "route in a day" projects that are equally astounding, given their time.

John Gill trained to do The Thimble, a visionary boulder high-ball problem, training tailored to build the necessary strength and skill to pull the climb off. The campus board that Wolfgang Güllich developed as a training tool for Action Directe, familiar to us all.

I recall John Bachar telling the tale of preparing for some solo, in Europe, and wiring the route on lead, getting every detail down. Unfortunately for John the imperceptible drag of the rope was enough to damp his swing on one dynamic move, drag that was absent on his attempt to solo the route and resulted in an injurious fall, so thin a margin. Bachar trained, and Dave Yerrian once told me he knew how to get in shape for climbing, Bachar had taught him.

Even the story that Bachar told of getting into soloing, John Long's question "well did you ever fall?" in reply to Bachar's "without a rope?", reveals the seed of this idea, we reach a level of mastery in climbing where we are not going to fall, everyone of us has a different level for which that is true, and everyone of us are more or less in shape at any given time, that level rises and falls, and we do well to heed where we are.

We train, we get better, and our mastery grows. For me this takes place at 5.10 and 5.11, at 63 I doubt that I would ever do a 5.12, or at least one that I would consider a "real" 5.12. And on easy ground I've soloed, not much these last few tumultuous climbing years that have seen friends hurt in falls.

But the act of soloing is a total commitment to our preparation to climb, the self acknowledgment of our mastery. There have been many many solos, some we will never know about, but we all understand the commitment, it's not like it is absent in our protected climbing, where we commit to our understanding of how to place protection, and when, in order to insure a better outcome in the unlikely event that we would fall.

Where protection is not possible, we either back off the climb or we push through. Whatever the outcome we learn something about ourselves, and we might go back and train a bit harder to improve, at whatever grade that happens, for us.

There is no justification for engaging in the risk of climbing when the consequences are that we might die, whether or not the climb is solo or roped. We climb for a multitude of reasons, none of which are worth sacrificing a life.

But we will continue to climb, and those who are determined and able will push their mastery to greater levels than we could imagine even after this amazing event. And in those feats "technique" will be their protection.

I do not want to see any of you die in any climbing accident, but if we climb we necessarily engage in risk, and the consequences of that can be death. But I also enjoy seeing the mastery of an activity I've engaged in for over 40 years now, and I understand a bit of what goes on to push for those goals, to realize those dreams.

We choose to undertake those risks ourselves, and I believe we are mindful not to do that irresponsibly.

Congratulations to Alex, again, and best wishes for a long life, our time is the only thing we truly possess, and we should have no regrets when that time is over.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Jun 6, 2017 - 10:45am PT
For me the most remarkable aspect of the ascent was, in his own evolution, actually being able to know and recognize with a high level of certainty that it had morphed into a doable proposition. At what exact moment was that decided? Months, weeks or days before? And how did that decision feel standing there with a first hand on the rock?
Keeper of Australia Mt

Trad climber
Whitehorse, Yukon , Canada
Jun 6, 2017 - 10:46am PT

The missing clause in Genesis - ... and then God created AH. Given all the crap in the media on one topic or another it is a breath of fresh air to see such an excellent, down to earth dude imagine the impossible and then just go out an do it. Taking rad to a whole new planetary system. The climbing community and humanity is just so damned lucky to have this guy doing what he does - from Sufferfest 1 & 2 to FS the Nose - how much better does it get.
Rock on Alex. Harding just rolled over and reached for a big jug to join in the celebration!
the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Jun 6, 2017 - 11:50am PT
This is probably my favorite quote from this climb.

Jimmy Chin: "When he got to the top, he looked at me and said “I’m pretty sure I could go back to the bottom and do it again right now.”"
Burnin' Oil

Trad climber
CA
Jun 6, 2017 - 03:25pm PT
Obviously an impressive feat but, on an objective level, why is it more impressive than any other hard free solos? The mystique of El Cap? The length of the climb? As Alex has said many times, the consequences of failure are horrific but the likelihood of failure is remote. The route is will within his capabilities and he had the moves wired.

I am still blown away and wish I could have watched the climb, but think his solo of Moonlight Buttress was on par with Free Rider.
snowhazed

Trad climber
Oaksterdam, CA
Jun 6, 2017 - 03:35pm PT
I can wrap my head around soloing hard finger cracks like moonlight, but slippery el cap granite, and the variety of technical demand makes this one vastly superior imho
JLP

Social climber
The internet
Jun 6, 2017 - 04:53pm PT
Compared to the Freerider, Moonlight is butt easy in every way - there is no comparison. Go even try to free both, you'll quickly see.
rbord

Boulder climber
atlanta
Jun 6, 2017 - 05:00pm PT
Well said. What makes it more impressive is the uncertainty, especially the psychological uncertainty - that you're not sure that you're gonna make it. You can't rely on your physical strength or talent or ability or whatever.

What's most impressive to us is that we have to create that certainty in our heads. That's what we admire - at least if he doesn't fall. If he falls he's an idiot.

Eventually, the ultimate most admirable free solo is just going to be to go play in traffic. Ha truck - missed me! Yea, I'm just that good!

We people are not quite right.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 6, 2017 - 06:17pm PT
Ed wrote:
I recall John Bachar telling the tale of preparing for some solo, in Europe, and wiring the route on lead, getting every detail down. Unfortunately for John the imperceptible drag of the rope was enough to damp his swing on one dynamic move, drag that was absent on his attempt to solo the route and resulted in an injurious fall, so thin a margin.
I'm pretty sure you are referring to Clever Lever, in Eldorado Canyon (Boulder, Colorado).

I agree with your main point that we can each solo at a level we are comfortable with, and Alex's level is simply a lot higher than for the rest of us.
jonnyrig

climber
Jun 6, 2017 - 09:46pm PT
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/05/531584651/alex-honnold-scales-el-capitan-without-ropes-and-the-climbing-world-reels

Apologies if already posted.

Nice going dude. Appreciate your words of advice in passing at a gym, though I'll never really have time to practice. Inspirational though, no doubt. Thanks for that.
BruceHildenbrand

Social climber
Mountain View/Boulder
Jun 6, 2017 - 10:27pm PT
Here's a short video clip of Alex on the enduro corner:

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/news/170606-alex-honnold-el-capitan-vin-spd
MikeL

Social climber
Southern Arizona
Jun 6, 2017 - 10:30pm PT
Clint: Alex's level is simply a lot higher than for the rest of us.

Hiya Cllnt:

I'm not so sure.

Perhaps your turn of words did not quite work out for you not quite as you intended. "Simply" seems so very wrong, IMO.

It's been said that in outliers in the tails of the distribution curve, one is looking at different situations and requirements. The anomalies indicate radical qualitative differences.

I'm sensitized to non-linear systems. At some point, they go ballistic in a way that seems completely unpredictable. The classic example is threatening a dog into a corner with a rolled-up newspaper. The dog will increasingly cower until at some point that it will become totally aggressive. One pushes the variables too far, and the model then presents a new game. New situation. Different reality.

Be well,.
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 6, 2017 - 11:30pm PT
Sometimes extremes in a distribution are fundamentally different from the rest.
But Alex did training to incrementally increase his "envelope" until he felt this climb was within his margins of safety.
So he is not fundamentally different from what he was before.
He might be fundamentally different from some population in terms of his ability to block fear. (But I can do that when soloing at a low enough grade).
Is he fundamentally different from Dean Potter (who soloed Heaven first)?
From Peter Croft (who soloed Astroman first)?
From John Bachar (who soloed Rostrum, Butterballs, New Dimensions, etc.)?
We could pick any lower grade and there are more people who have soloed at that grade.
These people seem more similar than different to me.
But it's a value judgement, of course.
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Denver CO
Jun 7, 2017 - 05:21am PT
The Enormocast interviewed Hansjorg Auer for the next episode. Seems like a comparable achievement, without the fanfare:

http://www.alpinist.com/doc/ALP19/newswire-auer-dolomites-fish-solo
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jun 7, 2017 - 05:42am PT
I much prefer Auer's style. And it was ten years ago!

The cameramen leave a bad taste in my mouth.

Did you lick the cameramen?
mcreel

climber
Barcelona
Jun 7, 2017 - 07:49am PT
Clint's comment about whether Alex is fundamentally different from Bachar, etc., resonates with some of what I've been musing about in the last days, in idle moments. I remember how Bachar used to do "Half Dome days" and "El Cap days", soloing the equivalent number of pitches. So Bachar could keep his concentration going long enough to do the equivalent of Free Rider, in terms of length, if not difficulty and insecurity. Bachar also soloed at least one 13a, I believe. Free Rider has a number of ledges and stances, so it would be possible to call off the solo in many places. I believe that Alex did in fact abort one run. So, I guess what I find most remarkable this solo is the insecurity of some of the pitches or moves, more than the difficulty or the length. Soloing slabs way off the deck does seem to me to be a different ball game. I couldn't even work up the nerve to try to free the slab pitches the time I was on Free Blast!
the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Jun 7, 2017 - 08:56am PT
I guess it's true that climbers who started in the gym don't respect the old ways of doing things.
G_Gnome

Trad climber
Cali
Jun 7, 2017 - 09:30am PT
I guess it's true that climbers who started in the gym don't respect the old ways of doing things.

I guess you never get out in the world where you have to deal with people coming out from the gym or you would never even think this. I realize it was tongue in cheek but my god, the crap gym people actually do when outside is mind boggling. And not in a good way.
the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Jun 7, 2017 - 09:44am PT
My point was you cant stereotype all "gym people".
BruceHildenbrand

Social climber
Mountain View/Boulder
Jun 7, 2017 - 10:34am PT
A very nice interview with Alex on rockandice.com:

http://www.rockandice.com/climbing-news/alex-honnold-el-cap-free-solo-interview

"And now it doesn't feel that big of a deal."
Burnin' Oil

Trad climber
CA
Jun 7, 2017 - 11:08am PT
I would love to watch all of the raw footage.
shipoopoi

Big Wall climber
oakland
Jun 8, 2017 - 10:25am PT
kudos to alex for an amazing ascent that was both beautiful and brave. to walk up to el cap and climb it ropeless...what a simple and hard feat to pull off. i think this ascent ranks with tommy and kevin's dawn wall climb as the new standard of extreme climbing.

i've seen some post about the boudler problem move and a rating of 12d before a hold broke, but i thought this move closer to 12b in its original form for a tallish person(i'm 5'11") to send. i doubt the move is really 13a now if you are tall.

when sean leary and i climbed freerider in 2005, i could not even lead the first pitch off sous le toit clean. i had to rapell and clean and let stanley go to work. he cruised the pitch and i barely followed clean. then he set about leading the pitch to the roof. unlike my desparate efforts, stanley absolutely floated the pitch, with some deft stemming. he had it wired from top rope rehearsal when he was trying to send it in a day. i could see from watching stanley that for a world class climber, which he totally was, that this pitch was not that hard technically if you were dialed in as i'm sure alex was. still, i think the enduro corner was a big deal for alex, and the last crux before he got to easier (5.11d,5.12a) climbing.

steve schneider
Burnin' Oil

Trad climber
CA
Jun 8, 2017 - 11:04am PT
I watched the Rock & Ice clip of Alex on the Enduro Corner. Man oh Man. Yikes.
FredC

Gym climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Jun 8, 2017 - 07:46pm PT
I can't let this thread go past page 1. This is a climbing forum and this is the biggest (if hard to "get") thing that has happened in climbing for a while.

Here I try to make sense of this.

I was a boulderer for many years, I would open the chalk bag and climb unencumbered and freely upward, he just climbed for longer than I did. I might have gone as much as 20' above the ground back in the day.

That doesn't really do it somehow...

Fred
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jun 9, 2017 - 09:28am PT
Like a bigger Indian rock... Style bump
crazytom

climber
Maine
Jun 9, 2017 - 11:33am PT
H* F S*** Are there any humans anywhere in this guys league!
MH2

Boulder climber
Andy Cairns
Jun 9, 2017 - 01:21pm PT
aldude is Alf?

aldude

climber
Monument Manor
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 9, 2017 - 02:49pm PT
Not even ⊙
clode

Trad climber
portland, or
Jun 9, 2017 - 03:24pm PT
Why do you suppose he chose Freerider and not The Nose? Fingers too big for The Great Roof undercling?
WBraun

climber
Jun 9, 2017 - 05:31pm PT
clode

Go free climb the Nose and Free Rider and you'll see why .......
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jun 9, 2017 - 05:43pm PT
When being filmed, do not pick the Nose.
skcreidc

Social climber
SD, CA
Jun 10, 2017 - 06:18am PT
Lol, clinker, badump bump.
kpinwalla2

Social climber
WA
Jun 10, 2017 - 08:22am PT
NYT article on Honnold's ascent:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/09/opinion/el-capitan-my-el-capitan.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-right-region®ion=opinion-c-col-right-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-right-region
Eric Beck

Sport climber
Bishop, California
Jun 10, 2017 - 02:07pm PT
Do we know what shoes Alex wore for this effort?
WBraun

climber
Jun 10, 2017 - 03:13pm PT
Yes .... he wore rock climbing shoes .......
Mei

Trad climber
mxi2000.net
Jun 10, 2017 - 08:36pm PT
Do we know what shoes Alex wore for this effort?
TC Pros.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jun 11, 2017 - 04:45am PT
Fine story here.
Apple pie, mother, America's GWH.

http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/article155534124.html#2

k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Jun 11, 2017 - 09:44am PT
Go free climb the Nose and Free Rider and you'll see why .......


That pretty much sums it up for me.
MH2

Boulder climber
Andy Cairns
Jun 11, 2017 - 04:27pm PT
Fine story here.
Apple pie, mother, America's GWH.


I have those shoes.
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Jun 11, 2017 - 05:32pm PT
Yeah but did he solo Lembert Dome?
Mei

Trad climber
mxi2000.net
Jun 11, 2017 - 05:39pm PT

Nice perspective, but inaccurate reporting bugs me. The author quoted a Sac gym employee, “He finishes El Cap and he get to the top and he says, ‘I just did four hours of exercise; I’m gonna hang glide today,’ ” Duffy said.

Now, AH definitely said he planned to hangboard later in that day, which still impressed me to no end. (I won't be disappointed if he didn't end up doing it having been swept up by the inevitable attentions spawned from the feat; it's the genuine thought that counts.) I wonder if Duffy misspoke or the author honestly misheard, but then, there is a possibility that the author or the editor changed from hangboarding, which can only be understood by part of the rock climbing community, to something -- hang gliding -- that a general public may have some grasp of. If the latter, I give the article an F grade.

Edit: Just saw in the comments following the article (I read it in the morning) that Duffy did not say hang glide.
nita

Social climber
chica de chico, I don't claim to be a daisy.
Jun 11, 2017 - 09:49pm PT
*
*
Crazy ass amazing , incredible mind blowing achievement, still can't grasp it ..
Would love to hear an Alex Honnold Tedx talk...

I want to duct tape him to a tree or something
(-;

Did i read somewhere his next goal is to start a family?.... Lovely and worthy goal.

McHale's Navy

Trad climber
From Panorama City, CA
Jun 11, 2017 - 09:56pm PT
I wonder if in the movie they will have Alex voice over at least some of the more memorable sections or moments and tell us how he felt or what he may have thought......something to make it more personal.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Cascade Mountains and Monterey Bay
Jun 11, 2017 - 10:41pm PT
Very well done, Alex
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jun 12, 2017 - 05:31am PT
Nice perspective, but inaccurate reporting bugs me. The author quoted a Sac gym employee, “He finishes El Cap and he get to the top and he says, ‘I just did four hours of exercise; I’m gonna hang glide today,’ ” Duffy said.

Now, AH definitely said he planned to hangboard later in that day, which still impressed me to no end. (I won't be disappointed if he didn't end up doing it having been swept up by the inevitable attentions spawned from the feat; it's the genuine thought that counts.) I wonder if Duffy misspoke or the author honestly misheard, but then, there is a possibility that the author or the editor changed from hangboarding, which can only be understood by part of the rock climbing community, to something -- hang gliding -- that a general public may have some grasp of. If the latter, I give the article an F grade.

Edit: Just saw in the comments following the article (I read it in the morning) that Duffy did not say hang glide.

Mei, maybe when Alex hangboards he glides along it for the whole session.

The real story; Honnold's Hangboardglide Session makes Bouldering Freerider Look Easy.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jun 12, 2017 - 05:42am PT
One more article, this one from Peter Fimrite of the Chronicle, who many of us see as an enlightened, seasoned reporter of some distinction> (He's not a lame-o noob, in other words.)

There are quotes from "leading soloists."

Check it out, posted today on Google News.

http://www.sfchronicle.com/science/article/Legendary-free-solo-El-Capitan-climb-Cool-logic-11212193.php#photo-13059747

the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Jun 12, 2017 - 10:14am PT
He has a hangboard attached to his hang glider and just flies around hanging on.
WBraun

climber
Jun 12, 2017 - 10:49am PT
He has a hangboard attached to his hang glider and just flies around hanging on.

Isn't that's how it's done?

:-)
rbord

Boulder climber
atlanta
Jun 12, 2017 - 06:53pm PT
Did I read somewhere his next goal is to start a family?.... Lovely and worthy goal.

Right?

It used to be humans started a family, and then went out and used their awesome death-defying mental fortitude to risk death evading saber-toothed tigers and dying mastadon hoofs in order to bring the bacon home to their family.

Now we create these little frivolous mental games to put ourselves at risk of death to show ourselves that yes, we could defeat that saber toothed tiger!, if we weren't actually engaged in putting ourselves at risk for the thrill of it.

And then, sure, a family, why not? This is how humans have evolved to behave. I guess.
Bushman

climber
The state of quantum flux
Jun 13, 2017 - 04:10pm PT
Bump for the man and the 1st free solo of El Cap...still trying to wrap my brain around it.
spectreman

Trad climber
Jun 13, 2017 - 05:30pm PT
I wasn't really sure this could happen in my lifetime. I really wasn't sure that I wanted someone to even try because I thought it would just be too out there and too hard and that someone would die trying.
I am so glad Alex did this and that he waited until he was ready.
What an inspiration!
I have found myself trying harder and dreaming bigger because of his effort. I'm not about to free solo something hard but it's still super inspirational for all of climbing and all of life. You can dream big and train incredibly hard and try for the "impossible".
In my mind this is the biggest event in the history of climbing.
ß Î Ø T Ç H

Boulder climber
ne'er–do–well
Jun 14, 2017 - 12:13am PT
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Jonjurik

Social climber
Wales
Jun 14, 2017 - 09:16pm PT
Honnold is amazing is an understatement.

The fact that I have been lurking for a long time is also a bit understated. I ski some and climb a little. So I have had nothing to add to your highbrow antics

I am posting because I have screen captures of the above mentioned superman.


Not great screen grabs. But the way back machine only got five it seems.
I'm not sure if it's accepted or appropriate to post my screen grabs.

Jon
the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Jun 14, 2017 - 09:35pm PT
It's still hard for me to believe this happened.

10 years ago I would have thought maybe someday someone would do it. Like 15-40 years from now.
F

climber
away from the ground
Jun 14, 2017 - 09:57pm PT


Brian Kimball

Sport climber
Westminster, CO.

Apr 12, 2008 - 03:23pm PT
The problem is that a solo attempt of Free Rider would be COMPLETELY "dangerous and over the top" for anyone to try, it really doesn't matter WHO you are. It is not the difficulty of the climbing that is the problem it’s the nature and quality of the rock. I am SURE that soloing 5.12+ is really NO PROBLEM for a 5.14b/V12 rock climber. Just like I am sure the thought of falling off the 12+ "locker fingers crux" of Moonlight Buttress was laughable to Mr. Honnold we can all count on that.
The difference is that ONE of the 5.12+ cruxes of El Cap is ANYTHING BUT LOCKER! The feet are miserable, the right hand MICRO crimper is NOT locker, then your forced to perch on a left foot smear nubbin that is just plain "SILLY SMALL, GIZ" rocking up on it to a HALF PAD GASTON UNDERCLING. Now your opposing the gaston/undercling and the miserable smear (your foot pops here you DIE)!!! It is FAR FROM OVER as you cross over 3' to the (bread loaf) your left hand exploding off, both feet cutting completely as you match this (choss loaf) applying several hundreds of pounds of pressure to a hold that is SURE to rip off the wall ANY DAY NOW!

The "Huber Boulder Pitch" is just that, a boulder pitch, clocking in at around V5/6. That hold is NOT SAFE and anyone that is even THINKING about trying to free solo this route might want to take a SERIOUS STEP BACK, re-evaluate what there motives are and consider the consequences of popping that left footer or ripping off that LOOSE, HOLLOW, bread loaf from the wall. Maybe the soloist could rap in and put some epoxy behind the loose, hollow loaf for his/her free solo attempt, then they could be the coolest cat in the Valley!

Someone else said there is no difference between soloing 5.12+ in J-tree and soloing 2,000+ feet off the deck and I have to strongly disagree here. For one the exposure is a HUGE factor for almost EVERYONE-unless your some mutant freak child laughing at death and all that air under your toes. The other factor is that any moron attempting to solo El Cap would most likely go for it in a one day push summiting or plummeting in under 12 hours. So the difference here now is that you have accumulated all of that fatigue from the 2,000+ feet of climbing making it (physically) SIGNIFICANTLY more difficult. 3,400' of hard rock climbing in under 12 hours is A LOT, this amount of fatigue tends to make stuff like the (cant use the hanging belay on free solo) Enduro Corner (5.12d) link into Roof Traverse (12a/b) 800' feet from the summit feel quite a bit harder and more insecure, feeling more like a 230' mid 5.13 pitch.

Forgive me for KEEPING IT REAL and KEEPING IT SAFE!

Real is.... It happened.
Crow pizza and knowitall beer for lunch?
F*#kin g armchair commentators are a dime a dozen.
Climbers with strength, soul and dedication are 1 in 1000.
snowhazed

Trad climber
Oaksterdam, CA
Jun 15, 2017 - 12:01pm PT
spectre nails it

the inspiration to just be your best person is infiltrating many from this happening

i'm overjoyed
micronut

Trad climber
Fresno/Clovis, ca
Jun 15, 2017 - 03:21pm PT
F,

I saw that post from B. Kimball a while back and chuckled. Spoken with such authority. If he's a cool dude he'll laugh at himself. I sure got a little snicker out of it.
drF

Trad climber
usa
Jun 15, 2017 - 03:33pm PT
The B. Kimball note was indeed entertaining

Alex's latest achievement does not surprise me one bit.

It was a logical progression. Moonlight, Phoenix, Sendero, etc....

Alex is a prodigy.

I do hope he does not up the ante ;-0
WBraun

climber
Jun 15, 2017 - 03:40pm PT
He'll keep going up like all intelligent class.

It's where the action is not like down here on the mundane plane.

One keeps going up until one floats.

Those who remain on the mundane material plane sink .......
drF

Trad climber
usa
Jun 15, 2017 - 05:21pm PT
He'll keep going up like all intelligent class.

It's where the action is not like down here on the mundane plane.

No doubt...well said
F

climber
away from the ground
Jun 15, 2017 - 06:05pm PT



SomebodyAnybody

Big Wall climber
Torrance

Jun 15, 2017 - 04:10pm PT
"F*#kin g armchair commentators are a dime a dozen.
Climbers with strength, soul and dedication are 1 in 1000."

Nice way to take a guy's 9 year old comments and try to play white knight for the Honnlove. I'm sure Alex appreciates the taint sniffer submen fanbois.

Here's what I know, Kimball was right-on with his assessment of the route. And from what I remember (I met Kimball that year in the Valley, chatted with him a few times around camp), he climbed the route free WITH Alex, in a day, on what was his first ever trip to the Valley and his first Grade VI.

So some mystery taint sniffer "F" sees fit to denigrate a guy that has climbed the route free, a feat beyond what this taint sniffer could do on their best day on this planet, WITH the guy in question as his partner? And HE'S the "armchair commentator"?!

Fukin A you can't make this sh#t up, you old guys are kinda pathetic.

Just a little FYI, I'm under 40 and have a ground up 1100 meter 5.12d FA in a day on the old tick list....
And I don't make a practice of telling people what is safe or real. I let them set their own personal definitions of that.
Jon Beck

Trad climber
Oceanside
Jun 18, 2017 - 05:47pm PT
I want Burt Bronson's take on all of this. Where is the ultimate hardman's sage voice on this pressing matter?

The man's Man has spoken:

LOOK BOYS. IT GOES. WHO'S NEXT? THAT BOY JUST EARNED THE REAL BURT BRONSON AWARD. SH*T.

https://www.facebook.com/burt.bronson.1





Mei

Trad climber
mxi2000.net
Jul 25, 2017 - 08:01pm PT
Here is a very comprehensive in-depth interview by the Enormocast: Episode 133: Alex Honnold – Kind of a Big Deal , where you'll learn that at one point in the middle of the amazing feat, he repeated this to himself.
Humility, Humility, Humility!

Want to know how he bailed off of his first attempt? Take a listen.

And I'm pasting below video here just to keep relevant stuff in the thread:
[Click to View YouTube Video]

For my own record, I have kept a compilation of the online resources, that I'm aware of, on this subject. Take a look if you are looking for more to read . I might have missed a few.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jul 26, 2017 - 02:41am PT
And you would be the mudworm, right?

Wherever did that come from?

Oh, and thanks.
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jul 26, 2017 - 05:50am PT
Thank you Mudworm.
clode

Trad climber
portland, or
Jul 26, 2017 - 11:33am PT
What's a mudworm?
Mei

Trad climber
mxi2000.net
Jul 26, 2017 - 11:46am PT
Guys, stay on topic, willya!

I can't wait to watch the movie Jimmy and Chai made featuring Alex Honnold. It'll probably be the first of its kind.

clode

Trad climber
portland, or
Jul 26, 2017 - 11:52am PT
So I get what an inchworm does, but still, what does a mudworm do?
snakefoot

climber
Nor Cal
Jul 26, 2017 - 12:18pm PT
if a mudworm falls while on free solo of el cap and nobody is around, does it make a sound?
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jul 27, 2017 - 11:58pm PT
The wide world of mighty hiking brings you:

https://marcomilanese.wordpress.com/2011/09/01/marmolada-la-via-attraverso-il-pesce/

GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Jul 28, 2017 - 12:25am PT
F*#kin g armchair commentators are a dime a dozen.

Pot meet kettle...
spectreman

Trad climber
Sep 17, 2017 - 05:05pm PT
bump

still blows me away that this happened in my lifetime.
no other climbing achievement even comes close.
trailridge127

Trad climber
Loveland, CO
Sep 18, 2017 - 07:18am PT
still blows me away that this happened in my lifetime.
no other climbing achievement even comes close.

While certainly an amazing accomplishment I do not think it is on the same level (in terms of ranking climbing achievements) as Nalle Hukkataival V16s
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Sep 18, 2017 - 07:56am PT
V16 requires tremendous athletic ability. Honnolds feat incorporates both athletic prowess, and until now unheard of, mind control. One has to also consider some historic alpine climbs that required many elements of climbing in harsh environments over long periods.

It's impossible, and really makes no sense, to try to compare feats in the disparate types of climbing. It's like trying to compare the 100 meter dash with the marathon.

Alex's climb stands alone and doesn't need comparison for validation.
Cragar

climber
MSLA - MT
Sep 18, 2017 - 08:27am PT
At some point when one learns to QUIT comparing, life as it IS can begin.
yanqui

climber
Balcarce, Argentina
Sep 18, 2017 - 01:00pm PT
I wonder, can you recall off the top of your head who did the first V13, anywhere? V14? V15?

Off the top of my head I would say Holloway (spelling? jgill would know this). Then Fred Nicole, and again, Fred Nicole. I could be wrong, but that's sincerely off the top of my head. I'll check after I post.

Don't get me wrong. I think Alex Honold's acheivement is one of the most amazing things ever done in climbing. First off, it was kind of a lifetime dream for him. Then he pulled it off with his usual style and verve. Personally, it could be that Honold's send does more for me than the next V grade in bouldering or the next letter grade in sport climbing but I definitely agree that it's apples and oranges. I appreciate and even admire the people who work to up the grade, but I guess I've never been overly enthusiastic about that aspect of the lifestyle. This could be partially due to laziness or a lack of ability on my part.


Edit to add: I nailed it! Although there is some question about whether or not Dreamtime should have been called V15, even before it was chipped.
bearbnz

Trad climber
East Side, California
Oct 3, 2017 - 01:50pm PT
This photo and story were in an email sent out this morning by Senator Ted Gaines...


the Fet

climber
Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La
Dec 8, 2017 - 05:39pm PT
Bump because, WTF, I'm still blown away.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 8, 2017 - 06:02pm PT
I'm with you, Fet.
http://www.climbing.co.za/2012/10/interview-alex-honnold/
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Dec 8, 2017 - 08:17pm PT
WTF is right!

WHERE THE FRICK IS THE MOVIE????????

I heard sumpin like Tom couldn't release his pics till after the movie showing? i got to see a few on his little laptop and can I be the first to say; Each one is a MonaLisa X 500!!!! i just can't wait to see them on my 60" 4K Visio tho, Yo!!


i mean DANG!!! This is among the grandest achievements in the evolution of mankind‼️
I see it as as high of an achievement as when Armstrong walked on the moon back in 68. How many decades did it take him since from the Wright bros showing him how to fly? Comparingly with what Harding started on the nose and Alex done did today, ,,yesterday,.thee other day
OMGOMGOMGO

i mean,,,, who would you scientist give the Gold 🥇Medal to???


Jon Beck

Trad climber
Oceanside
Dec 8, 2017 - 08:20pm PT
Tom could release the pictures if he wanted to, unless they made a deal with him ahead of time. Or Tom could be extending a courtesy to them.
Donny... the OHHH!- Riginal

Sport climber
C:porn
Dec 6, 2018 - 09:45am PT
Wow! I just heard the news! Congratulations Alex! When you told me a couple years ago on El Cap Spire you'd do this one day, I was all "You're totally full of sh#t, man." And you were all, "Why don't you shut up."
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