Underwater Bolts?

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Messages 1 - 13 of total 13 in this topic
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 14, 2014 - 12:04pm PT
I placed four TR anchors last week on a small crag that's seasonally underwater in Kaweah Lake. They were 3/8 x 3" and the bolts and hangers were both 316 stainless steel.

I thought they'd be fine but I just read that corrosion article in Climbing Magazine and it made me all paranoid! Did I waste like $50 and make time bombs or are they good?

Expert or uneducated random guesses are welcome.
Greg Barnes

climber
Mar 14, 2014 - 12:13pm PT
Fine. Not saltwater, not limestone, not tropical.
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2014 - 12:36pm PT
Awesome! When I saw you in the article I posted here hoping you would see it. Mission accomplished.

Thanks for the reply and double thanks for all the work you do!
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Mar 14, 2014 - 12:47pm PT
Yer gunnna.....











































get wet!
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Mar 14, 2014 - 01:35pm PT
I think you're TBD.

Not saltwater but some salt but...total immersion?

Any electro-chemical differences in your metals...along with residual stresses?

Wet..you have nothing to inhibit the free love those ions are gonna have.

Not normal. I wouldn't expect the corrosion situation to be normal.

Interesting to look at it from a testing standpoint...

Lack of cycling?

Etc.
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2014 - 03:12pm PT
That's the stuff I was worrying about ^^^^

I'll test it with my body weight in the Fall
Greg Barnes

climber
Mar 14, 2014 - 04:12pm PT
Fresh water = insufficient electrolytes for galvanic or stress corrosion corrosion. Both bolt & hanger are marine grade stainless (so galvanic not an issue anyway). You're fine.

I suppose if algae were growing straight on the bolt as the rock was drying and you were getting tons of drying cycles in the hot sun then you might in theory get some corrosion (assuming algae like this even exist in Sierra lakes) - but with 316 ss it'll be super unlikely.

Good on you for using best quality stainless!
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2014 - 04:18pm PT
Thanks

I don't place many bolts so I can handle the price difference for now.
micronut

Trad climber
Fresno/Clovis, ca
Mar 14, 2014 - 07:44pm PT
Crab,

How tall are the routes. I can hold my breath just over four minutes (great party trick) and I say we go have a run at those routes when the water comes up. I'd like to have a go at the first underwater ascent. Call me. I'll bring speedos for both of us.

Scott
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 16, 2014 - 11:01pm PT
About 20-25 feet and the water is starting to reach the base. I'll bring the weight belts to make things interesting. Shallow water soloing until then!
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
Mar 17, 2014 - 12:37am PT
Is the route named "Boat Anchor"?


bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA/Boulder, CO
Mar 17, 2014 - 01:43am PT
Unless you are near an area with lots of salt or salt water or very wet all year long (which rules out about 95+% of all climbing areas) galvinic corrosion is not a problem. Galvinic corrosion is one of the most misunderstood phenomenons in the climbing community. Sure you should try to use stainless anchors whenever possible, but most mixed metal anchors aren't the ticking time bombs that many people fear.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
Mar 17, 2014 - 02:37am PT
very wet all year long

seasonally underwater

:)
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