Patrick Edlinger

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ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Original Post - Nov 15, 2012 - 02:50am PT
Has there really ever been an equal? What is the deal with this guy? I hardly ever hear about him; don't know much at all, except when he climbs it's spellbinding. I don't think I've ever seen less hesitation into such committing sequences. And those high steps.

Check out the last 10 minutes or so of this video with the free-solo segment, my favorite ropeless footage, even today. There's just something about those exposed face moves. The one he did at Verdon barefoot with the opera music was always classic as well. I remember watching a competition finals against Wolfgang Gullich, who in the end, just could not keep up with Edlinger. That's unreal.

I'm clueless. Is he still around? Climbing? Didn't see much for earlier posts.

Cheers,
Arne

http://vimeo.com/21240223
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 15, 2012 - 03:30am PT
Once upon a time in America
Credit: Marlow
Patrick Oliver

Boulder climber
Fruita, Colorado
Nov 15, 2012 - 04:04am PT
Patrick remains a good friend. He is always climbing,
well known in his own country and more visible there, of
course. Yes he is a very fine climber. Some will remember
years ago how he handily won the Snowbird competition.
He stayed at my house for a month in '86. He's a bit vain, comically so,
and would walk through the house totally naked. My normally
shy girl friend, a concert pianist, would blush and say,
with a slight crack in her trembling voice, "I ... don't mind."
On that trip to America, Edlinger brought his own photographer
and cook. As compensation (not asked for by me) for staying at my house,
they cooked dinner virtually every night, and indeed that cook
was good!! They kept rolls of film in our refrigerator.
Patrick wanted me to give him the grand tour of the Gill boulders
at Fort Collins, and I did. He was by no means the measure of
John, but he made a strong show. One day he decided to repeat
Rainbow Wall in Eldorado. It was hot and humid, and when he
returned he kept saying to me, "Sleepy sleepy." I thought he meant he
was tired or had stayed up too late. He was trying to say, "Slippery
slippery." I will never forget when I was in England in '84, I
was looking for a pair of Patrick Edlinger shoes, but no store had
them. I don't know how he got wind that I was trying to find a pair,
but at the Buxton national climbers convention, someone simply
came up to me and said, "Patrick Edlinger gives you his regards." The
person handed me a brand new pair of those shoes. Patrick had made
it happen from a different country.
RyanD

climber
Squamish
Nov 15, 2012 - 04:23am PT
Very cool! I'll admit I didn't know much about him until now, but that soloing footage just blew my mind! Thanks for sharing, wow.
nutstory

climber
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Nov 15, 2012 - 05:48am PT
Patrick Edlinger has always been my climbing hero! A very awaited biography about this outstanding rock climber will be published in May 2013.
Photo Editions Guérin Chamonix
Photo Editions Guérin Chamonix
Credit: nutstory
Very early "Patrick Edlinger" rock shoes
Very early "Patrick Edlinger" rock shoes
Credit: nutstory
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Nov 15, 2012 - 08:24am PT
Life By The Fingertips blew me away.

Then, sitting next to Maria Cranor at Snowbird, I watched him walk up to the wall (last competitor), and by the time he was a third of the way up everybody could see he was cruising it easier than anyone before.
When he became the only person to reach the top the place went absolutely crazy.
A better finish to the competition I simply am unable to imagine.

I met him then, mostly with his friend Maurice translating.
He did not seem vain to me despite rumors and I had great respect for his discipline and skill.

We last crossed paths 20 years ago while I was with Jello and Catherine and brother Greg doing a climbing video in Taylor Canyon.
As I recall Patrick and Maurice were on Primrose, and the next evening they treated me to mexican in Moab.


To my mind Edlinger is truly one of the great climbing pioneers, and personable as well.
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Nov 15, 2012 - 08:38am PT
i had no personal experience to accompany the word delirium till he pulled to the top at snowbird.
Blakey

Trad climber
Sierra Vista
Nov 15, 2012 - 08:58am PT
I believe he runs a climbers Gite in La Palud, some friends stayed at 'Edgeclingers' a couple of years ago.

Steve
Rivet hanger

Trad climber
Barcelona
Nov 15, 2012 - 09:17am PT
Edlinger made people in Europe discover free-climbing together with Patrick Berhault. See "Opera vertical" or "La vie au bout du doigts"...
They were very close friends, but since my point of view Patrick Berhault was the man. They both took part of the free-climbing boom in France and Europe by the end of 70's, but when Berhault found out that free-climbing had became just a matter of competition and sponsors, he left that world and began alpinism (what Destivelle did some years later). He was a very good free climber in addition of a great alpinist and guide. He died in 2004 in Switzerland when trying to chain the 82 summits of the Alps higher than 4.000 meters in 82 days in winter.
"Sur le fil des 4000" or "La cordée de rêve" are very good film to see!
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 15, 2012 - 10:09am PT
Wow guys, thanks! Went to bed late last night and woke to this treat. Nice story Patrick A.
And Rivet; I'll have to check out your other Patrick (must be the name) whom I'm embarrassed to not know of. Ron-always a good first hand story.

Is it just me or were his and Henry's style somewhat similar, with the legs hiked way up high, body close to the wall, remaining down in an almost defensive position until he stands up on both legs reaching with the other long limbs into those huge moves?

Anybody know what grades he achieves now at 52 years or so?

Arne
hossjulia

Trad climber
Where the Hoback and the mighty Snake River meet
Nov 15, 2012 - 10:33am PT
Spellbinding for sure. Loved watching him climb, but never had the chance to see it in person.

Great stories Patrick & Ron, thanks so much. "That" would have been a treat.
nutstory

climber
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Nov 15, 2012 - 11:21am PT
Second generaton "PE" rock shoes
Second generaton "PE" rock shoes
Credit: nutstory
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 15, 2012 - 02:29pm PT
From one of the books mentioned by Ron - Verdon Opera Verticale 1983
As I remember it, the names on everybodies lips when I started climbing 20-25 years ago were Lynn Hill, Catherine Destivelle and Patrick Edlinger. They are legends while still alive all three of them.

Forte Di Exilles 2002
Credit: Guy Delahaye
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Nov 15, 2012 - 03:33pm PT
I climbed with Patrick back in the 80s at the Monument.
My photo is even in one of his books that he did about his tour here in the US in the 80s.

Credit: Cosmiccragsman
Credit: Cosmiccragsman

I saw him lead More Monkey than Funky,downclimb and clean it, and then turn around and solo it, up and Down!

It's a wonder you don't hear much about him anymore.
bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA
Nov 15, 2012 - 04:14pm PT
In the late 80's when I was living in Boulder and Patrick was on a visit I beat him out for the cover shot of an issue of Rocky Mountain Sports and Fitness magazine. First and last time I ever wore lycra for a climb. While I was climbing well that year, my guess is that the reason they chose me over Patrick is that he wanted to get paid :-)
Patrick Oliver

Boulder climber
Fruita, Colorado
Nov 15, 2012 - 08:48pm PT
As I hope was clear, Patrick is and was a good man, and generous.
The "vain" reference has to do with inhibitions. He was a bit
uninhibited, in terms of being unafraid to walk naked through an apartment
with strangers. Maybe a French thing. Who knows?
I did not mean it to refer to some kind of huge ego,
though most who knew him at all would say he did have that, but not
in a very offensive way. I have mostly only good things to say about
my friend.
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 15, 2012 - 08:56pm PT
If I could climb like that and knew it, I'd be a bit vain myself. No worries Patrick A.
nutstory

climber
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Nov 16, 2012 - 05:44am PT
Our "Bible" in the eighties.
Our "Bible" in the eighties.
Credit: nutstory
Patrick Oliver

Boulder climber
Fruita, Colorado
Nov 16, 2012 - 06:08am PT
I think that was the name of his cook/photographer, Gerard Kosicki...
And that photo upthread of the shoes, yes, those were the ones
he gave me. I climbed in them until they literally fell off my feet.
I loved them.
nutstory

climber
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Nov 16, 2012 - 07:44am PT
Pat, it still would be a great privilege to get the design details and, maybe, some photos of the wooden active camming nut, the Clapper, made by David Rearick...
mountainlion

Trad climber
California
Nov 16, 2012 - 09:59am PT
check out this video must be early to mid 80's http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kxpYNwakOU&feature=watch-vrec

badass he hangs under roofs at two separate spots with one hand after climbing about 10 min on the first hang and 20 min on the second after sustained continous movement!
Fogarty

climber
BITD
Nov 16, 2012 - 11:16am PT
AKA, The Cat, I like the one arm pinky finger pull up in the Vidio.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 16, 2012 - 12:02pm PT
Vive Le Blond!

I still have that BD poster of him tucked, taut and poised on cream-colored quarrystone. I almost sent that poster with Mimi to hang in her office but it would just make the guys grumble and pout. LOL

I bet he is still groovin' to Songs in the Key of Life. It floated him to victory at Snowbird. A Wonderful spirit he has always been and a pleasure to watch move through the air.
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 16, 2012 - 12:16pm PT
MountainLion. Yeah, that is pretty exciting when he hangs. Pretty sure that's the same video from the first post.

But I liked it just as much.
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 16, 2012 - 12:20pm PT
Here's the one from SnoBird. The movie was edited so that it looks like he's climbing side by side against Wolfgang. That really gives it some perspective I believe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaBuNFl1mJM

Arne
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 16, 2012 - 12:23pm PT
And if you haven't seen this one, take the time. The opera music while he climbs barefoot. Nice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B21ZD8Q_uJE
BruceAnderson

Social climber
Los Angeles currently St. Antonin, France
Nov 16, 2012 - 12:49pm PT
Coz I could say the same thing about you, Those early films of Edlinger were life changing. Took me years, but now I live in the south of France.
wbw

Trad climber
'cross the great divide
Nov 16, 2012 - 01:15pm PT
I agree with Coz. I met Patrick in Eldorado one day, after a day of cragging with Derek Hersey. Derek and Patrick were old friends, if memory serves from previous visits of Patrick to the USA. Patrick was not speaking English, but through his traveling campanion he said that Eldorado was one of his favorite places to climb in the world.

He was friendly, enthusiastic, and very approachable. I found it very down to earth on his part that a Euro limestone superhero would travel to Boulder to climb in Eldo. Had there been a trace of arrogance, Derek would have picked up on it and razzed him somehow. As it stood, it was obvious that there was a lot of mutual respect between the two.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Nov 16, 2012 - 01:16pm PT
Nice to see those videos again!

For those of us hitting it in the late 70s and early/mid/late 80s he was a phenomenal player. On that trip which Ron speaks of in the early 90s, he was waiting for camera to get into position on Sphinx Crack and passed the time by lay backing up and down the thing!

His buddy Maurice, "Momo", is a hoot.

Those original, first generation Dolomite Edelinger rock shoes were stiff as boards out of the box; designed specifically for pocket poking. I could edge in them but little else. I can see how they'd be good for Eldorado after some break-in.

I asked Lynn about him not too long ago and while not disparaging, the report wasn't super great, although it sounds like he is still climbing when he wants to.

He effected a huge influence in world free climbing.
It's good to be young: long live the heroes of all generations!
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Nov 16, 2012 - 01:19pm PT
Verdon Opera Vertical 1983
Verdon Opera Vertical 1983
Credit: Brian in SLC
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 16, 2012 - 01:36pm PT
For some years during the late part of the 90ies Edlinger was the editor of Roc'n Wall.
Credit: Marlow

More about "La vie au bout des doigts", the book from Editions Guerin Chamonix that nutstory posted.
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Nov 16, 2012 - 02:07pm PT
He definitely has style.
Another blast from the past is Ron Fawcett.
I once climbed with a guy who had climbed with Fawcett in Yosemite. He said that Ron's real strength was to be able to adjust to the rock in a new area and be climbing at the highest standard in just a few days.
Do these guys climb much these days?
Vertikal

climber
Nov 16, 2012 - 03:56pm PT
http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?n=527623
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:09pm PT
http://www.ledauphine.com/france-monde/2012/11/16/escalade-patrick-edlinger-est-mort

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Edlinger
rick d

climber
ol pueblo, az
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:09pm PT
hey guys, do me a favor and don't talk about me. Once it pops on the taco you end up dead like PE!

shiat man, RIP
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:15pm PT
WTF?

From the 'net:

We learned today of the death Friday night of Patrick Edlinger at the age of 52 years. Thirty years ago, his film "Life at your fingertips" had returned climbing, including his solo in full the Gorges du Verdon in the history of the Mountain. He had to participate in meetings of the film Grenoble Thursday. The causes of death are not yet known.

The "Blonde." We were told this week his passion for climbing he practiced every day. "I am a free man" he told us Wednesday, "I have no regrets of my career."


Mungeclimber

Trad climber
the crowd MUST BE MOCKED...Mocked I tell you.
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:38pm PT
He was an inspiration of strength, balance and agility.

1989 Snowbird!

Alan Rubin

climber
Amherst,MA.
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:39pm PT
Damn, that sucks!!!! RIP to a great climber and an inspiration to many. Condolences to his loved ones.
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:42pm PT
This a sad piece of news.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:53pm PT
Credit: Archives Le DL

Nous avons appris ce vendredi soir le décès aujourd'hui de Patrick Edlinger à l'âge de 52 ans. Il y a trente ans, son film "La vie au bout des doigts" avait fait rentrer l’escalade, et notamment son solo intégral dans les gorges du Verdon, dans l’histoire de la Montagne. Il devait participer aux rencontres du cinéma de Grenoble jeudi prochain. Les causes de son décès ne sont pas encore connues.

Patrick Edlinger est mort
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Nov 16, 2012 - 04:55pm PT
Snowbird's first comp, which both the men's and women's first place finishes were French, was in 1988.

1989 was the "North American Invitational" or some such.

Be great if the footage from the '88 comp was available. Saw a clip of it. Great being there for both comp's.
all in jim

climber
Nov 16, 2012 - 05:00pm PT
Oh Man this makes me sad.

Patrick was the greatest rock climber of his generation and a super nice guy. There are places in the south of france you just can't go without thinking of him: Ceuse, Verdon, Volx. He was the John Bachar of Europe. I had the luck to spend a few days bouldering with him in Hueco in 1996 or so. He loved it there and ran a 23-page photo spread in his magazine, Rock n Wall. He was so passionate about traveling and trying different areas and new styles.

So sad he passed away so young.
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Nov 16, 2012 - 05:04pm PT
Derek and Patrick were old friends, if memory serves from previous visits of Patrick to the USA.
It could also be that they knew each other from Derek's early trips to Verdon. I climbed with Derek when he first visited the Valley in 1980. I was 16 yr. old there for the first time, as Derek didn't know anyone and was just dirt bagging. A couple of years later I met another climber in Camp 4 from the Manchester area, Mark Davies, who knew Derek from home and climbed with him at the Verdon. When I later visited Mark in the UK, he showed me some old photos of him and Derek hanging with some French locals. Who knows...?

Also, didn't Patrick dedicate his win at Snowbird to Henry Barber, who was sitting in the stands? The story I always heard was that when he was lowered off, he flashed Henry a double thumbs up and said "for you."
AKDOG

Mountain climber
Anchorage, AK
Nov 16, 2012 - 05:44pm PT
RIP, sad news
Thought I would share something Michael Kennedy wrote in the 1989 AAJ about the snowbird comp.

“You Americans are selling out too easily,” an English friend told me on the eve of the finals at the International Sport Climbing Championship, held last June at Snowbird, Utah. He elaborated in earnest on how competitions, with their big media hype and big purses, would inevitably destroy the spirit of climbing.
My English friend was not the only skeptic in Snowbird that weekend. I was a bit doubtful myself; to be honest, I’d rather have taken the time off to go climbing. A broad range of people did show up, curious about how the first European-style climbing competition to be held in the United States would turn out. Climbing industry leaders and outdoor journalists, trendsetters and hangers-on, American Alpine Club representatives and weekend climbers-well wondered what we were in for.
Attitudes changed rapidly as the weekend progressed. It soon became obvious that these climbers weren’t just good-they were really good. The artificial wall on which the competition took place looked very difficult, and it was both exciting and inspirational to see such superb athletes perform at close range.
There were problems as well: disagreements about the rules and their interpretation, technical difficulties with the wall, and a few petulant tantrums when competitors didn’t climb as well as they wanted to. But while both organizers and competitors took a serious approach to the game-after all, prize money, sponsorships and reputations were at stake-the weekend felt more like
a community celebration than a no-holds-barred contest.
Wednesday and Thursday had been devoted to open qualification rounds, which allowed climbers not on the invitation list a chance to vie for six spots in Saturday’s semi-finals. (The event’s organizers had invited the majority of the competitors based on previous contest results.) Canadian Dave Lanman and veteran American climbers Merrill Bitter, Pat Adams and Dan Michael qualified for the men’s semi-final, and Lieija Painkiner and Melissa Quigley for the women’s.
Meanwhile, the international superstars had trickled in, even as contest organizers finalized the wall for the weekend’s event. After a late start on Saturday morning, the first of thirty-nine climbers was led to the wall, cheered on by a modest but enthusiastic crowd; nine hours later, ten men and six women advanced to Sunday’s final. Along the way were some brilliant performances.
The French men all seemed to do well, perhaps not surprisingly considering their success on the international circuit, but Americans Christian Griffith, Jason Stem, Scott Franklin and Ron Kauk gave them a run for their money. Among the American women, Lynn Hill was predictably strong, as were Catherine Destivelle and Isabelle Pkissier of France; American Mari Gingery’s effort was as good as any, although having touched out-of-bounds well before falling, her results didn’t reflect the high point she actually reached.
Sunday morning dawned cool and cloudy, forcing the first few competitors to warm their hands frequently while climbing. I shared a photographer’s balcony that day with Henry Barber, one of the most influential rock climbers of the 1970s. We discussed our changing perceptions, how our guarded skepticism had given way to qualified approval, and eventually to unbridled enthusiasm. We even began to speculate about the potential competition in a Masters’ division!
For two of the old guard, it seemed particularly interesting that the standard of excellence in competition is a traditional one: the on-sight lead.
We saw some superb climbing as competitor after competitor cranked by just a few feet away. But even the best efforts were stymied by a hard section below the roof at two-thirds height. Tension mounted as the afternoon wore on; had the organizers made the wall too difficult? The women, in particular, had a rough time on the route’s long, technical reaches, and none of the men even came close to getting to the roof. Eventually, only two contestants had yet to climb, but what a pair: Patrick Edlinger and Catherine Destivelle, both from France and both well-known for their competitive prowess.
As Edlinger prepared for his climb, Henry recounted a conversation with the French superstar the previous evening. Steeped in European climbing tradition, Edlinger first visited the United States in 1977 as an impressionable 17-year-old. During that trip, he had seen a film in which Barber soloed a number of difficult English sea-cliff routes, and here at Snowbird he told Henry how much it had impressed him. Indeed, Edlinger said that Barber’s films, and watching Ron
Kauk boulder in Yosemite that same year had inspired his climbing from that day on. Soon, Edlinger stepped up to the wall. His performance was nothing short of astounding as he danced past all the previous competitors’ high-points, climbing like a super-flexible spider. Pulling over the lip of the roof as the sun broke through the overcast, he was lost from our sight on the slab above. The rope inched upwards with agonizing slowness as we gauged his progress by the reaction of the crowd below.
Suddenly, pandemonium broke loose; he had completed the route and clipped the top anchors. As he was lowered down, Edlinger glanced over at our balcony. Seeing Henry there, he flashed him a thumbs-up and shouted an exuberant, “For you!” It was a moving gesture of respect from one generation of climbers to another, and for me; at least, it helped bring the whole weekend into focus.”
WBraun

climber
Nov 16, 2012 - 05:53pm PT
Patrick Edlinger did clean onsight leads.

He would not watch someone else on a lead to get "beta".

Did someone up thread say he died free soloing?
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 16, 2012 - 06:05pm PT
Extremely tragic news.

At fifty-two years young now beyond mortality.

I hope some solid news about the circumstances is forthcoming because I really can't believe that he is gone...Damn
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Nov 16, 2012 - 06:06pm PT
"Les causes de son décès ne sont pas encore connues."


Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 16, 2012 - 06:10pm PT
"The causes of his death are not yet known."
splitter

Trad climber
da'Raven / Cali Hodad, surfing the galactic plane
Nov 16, 2012 - 06:29pm PT
Dang! So sudden and so sad, especially after reading that last quote of his from just a couple days ago (Wednesday, i believe) and his positive attitude and outlook. He was one of my favorite euro climbers to follow and read about during the 80's! Had a lot of influence and was great inspiration to me.

edit: it may sound kinda silly, but, PE was the person i attempted to emulate/envision whenever i went bouldering, toproping, climbing or soloing back then! a smooth operator! Watching those vids of him soloing in Verdon was like watching water flowing over stone!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 16, 2012 - 08:02pm PT
Very sad news. As it's now late at night in Europe, there may not be much more news before Saturday.
o-man

Social climber
Paia,Maui,HI
Nov 16, 2012 - 09:20pm PT
Patrick's passing is truly sad news!
I remember him when he came to Colorado many years ago.
He stayed at my friend Steve Morris's house for a while.
I just mentioned the news to my friend Frank Sabb (who is also a climber from our generation) at the beach a while ago and we shared our own Patrick stories for a bit while we watched giant waves breaking here on the north shore.
He was a true super star in my eyes!
Aloha Patrick Edlinger
E

Social climber
Tujunga CA.
Nov 16, 2012 - 09:32pm PT
the valkaries ride again
Mimi

climber
Nov 17, 2012 - 12:16am PT
Very sorry to hear of Patrick's sudden passing today. The fact that an ST thread started about him two days ago is cosmic to say the least. What a shining star he was.

I was fortunate to have watched him from above free solo the Beaver Wall (in Josh) one fine sunny day in 1985. He cruised it in fine style and reversed the crux and climbed through it again. Just like Wolfie, he was a very nice guy. Sincere condolences to his family and friends.

Vive Le Blonde!
gonzo chemist

climber
Fort Collins, CO
Nov 17, 2012 - 12:20am PT
wait...WTF? seriously? I had somehow heard of him when I started climbing (not all that long ago) and looked up some info on him. I watched some videos of him training on Bachar ladders and soloing in Verdon, and all I could think was, "holy sh#t...this guy was a game-changer."


sad day for the climbing world...


hossjulia

Trad climber
Where the Hoback and the mighty Snake River meet
Nov 17, 2012 - 01:12am PT
I'm stunned. This thread shows up and now he's gone? Some mystic shee there.

RIP Patreek
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2012 - 02:04am PT
I am speechless. I don't know how this can be. Tuesday, my birthday I was feeling sorry for my aging self and Patrick E. came into my mind as I knew we were about the same age. I wondered how he was climbing these days. Couldn't shake the thought till the next day it brought me to post. I never post man, this is really stinks bad. Broken hearts for all I'm sure.

Arne
Gregg Olson

Boulder climber
Moorpark, Ca
Nov 17, 2012 - 04:41am PT
I saw this thread late Thursday night and I stayed up tell 4am watching all the vids posted here several times each.They brought back very specific memories of when I first started climbing in the early 80's... The dreams of moving like Patrick did, of training like he did, of living a life free and expressive as he did. I was mesmerized by his flow and confidence on the stone... something I gained, and have since lost. For a few hours last night while watching these vids I was transported back to those times, the feelings of what climbing meant to me, of what it was to put your intire being into a succession of moves and unlock the microcosms of flow and kinesthetic awareness, to dance on the vertical. It became clear that seeing Patrick climb back when I found the sport literally formed my perception of what it was to be a rock climber. Yetserday In those early Friday morning hours all the failures, all the successes, trips, friends, lovers etc.. were erased and I was brought back to that moment as a 14 year old kid when I saw these same videos and knew in my soul that I had found something that would forever change my life. I came back tonight for another dose and got this sad news. R.I.P. Patrick.
Degaine

climber
Nov 17, 2012 - 05:11am PT
WTF!?!

RIP Patrick.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 17, 2012 - 09:58am PT
Adieu Patrick Edlinger!

http://www.planetmountain.com/english/News/shownews1.lasso?l=2&keyid=40295

Trento 2009 interview: http://vimeo.com/53738286
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Nov 17, 2012 - 10:43am PT
Well this just sucks.

I was talking about him 2 days ago!
Spoke with Jeff last night, wonder if he knows.
Vulcan

Sport climber
Nov 17, 2012 - 12:51pm PT
bump
Double D

climber
Nov 17, 2012 - 01:35pm PT
Sad indeed. He was a game changer for sure. Eery that it happened just a few days after this thread. My sincere condolences to his family and friends. Hopefully he's in a much better place.
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2012 - 02:07pm PT
hey guys, do me a favor and don't talk about me. Once it pops on the taco you end up dead like PE!

Rick D-I really wish you hadn't said that but now, yeah, I'm preparing an appreciation thread just for you.

I don't have anything more to add here so I hope those of you who knew Mr. Edlinger will turn this into a memorial thread.

Arne
Ihateplastic

Trad climber
It ain't El Cap, Oregon
Nov 17, 2012 - 03:20pm PT
Ego? Who cares? The lad could climb!

Credit: Ihateplastic

o-man

Social climber
Paia,Maui,HI
Nov 17, 2012 - 05:13pm PT
http://vimeo.com/53738286#
zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Nov 17, 2012 - 05:21pm PT
hearsay, but is was said:

The Frenchman, nicknamed "Le Blond" due to his thick blond hair held in place by a bandana, was found dead at his home in La Palud in the Verdon region, Provence. The cause of death is as yet unknown although his biographer wrote that he had an alcohol problem

jogill

climber
Colorado
Nov 17, 2012 - 05:29pm PT
So sad when two of the most brilliant climbers of that era pass away in their early 50s.
steve s

Trad climber
eldo
Nov 17, 2012 - 06:38pm PT
This is truly sad news.Patrick was the most gifted,smooth,and natural climber I ever had the privlage of tying in with. He was also a fun person to climb with as well as do a wee bit of partying with to boot. I had the good fortune of hangin with him in Boulder and Yosemite. I remember we often would go out to some bars in Boulder after climbing and shoot endless games of pool with him and Maurice.After one late nite session he gave me his Petzl harness because he thought mine was too big and heavy(it was a Frog Harness). He was always ready to offer advice to improve your climbing,such as telling me to splay my hips in order to get my weight more in over my feet on a certain 5.12 we were doing. Or in Yosemite once when we were bouldering and he had his eye on trying Midnight lightning he pronouced he would try it right along with me.One time climbing with him sticks out in my mind the most.....We went up to a steep route in the flatirons called The Guardian 5.12c ? Bob H. went first and Patrick made sure he did not watch so as to get the true on sight(I think we distracted him by smoking something funny) Then when patrick climbed it he made it look like 5.7,but when he got to the anchors he did not have a draw to clip in with(Bob had mistakenly threaded it and removed the draws at the anchor) So Patrick just shrugs his shoulders and proceeds to down climb the entire route removing the draws as he climbed back to the belay....once again making it look like 5.7 He truly loved to climb and it showed!!!
R.I.P. Patrick Edlinger (say hi to Derek for us) Peace.
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Nov 17, 2012 - 06:52pm PT
Nice storys Steve S. thanks for sharing.

"But Patrick Edlinger also had demons. According to the writer Jean-Michel Asselin, who is working on a biography of the climber, it suffered from alcoholism. ..."

Wow, 52 years old. Way too young.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 17, 2012 - 07:11pm PT
Le Monde reports that he died at home, of unknown causes.
http://www.lemonde.fr/sport/article/2012/11/17/escalade-patrick-edlinger-est-mort_1792174_3242.html
kennyt

climber
Woodfords,California
Nov 17, 2012 - 07:40pm PT
Why are you posting these links that are in french?
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Nov 17, 2012 - 08:12pm PT
Kenny, Hiker is only trying to help. Patrick died at home in the Verdon, you know. You can always use Google Translate, you know, or many different plugins or desktop tools if you don't read french. Most of the news results are in french so far. This is giant news, although at this point, mostly just abroad. Climbing has never really "taken off' here as it has in France and western Europe. As Gill just upthread implies, Edlinger and Bachar were similar grand masters and their departure is really effing depressing.

Again, what a loss, and how very sad such a great light should come to such an end.
klk

Trad climber
cali
Nov 17, 2012 - 08:32pm PT
So sad when two of the most brilliant climbers of that era pass away in their early 50s


make it three-- that's patrick berhault belaying in the lead pic in the dauphine article--
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 17, 2012 - 09:12pm PT
The OP was not an announcer's hex.

Nobody ever wants to think it, but we are a superstitious lot, many of us. It's just weird, ain't it, about the timing.

Un moment de silence pour Patrick. RIP.

My condolences to you guys who climbed with and knew him.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Nov 17, 2012 - 09:28pm PT
Hoh man!

Just back from delicate arch hike. I read this thread the other night
And thought about watching him at snowbird ... Quel drag!
go-B

climber
Hebrews 1:3
Nov 17, 2012 - 09:33pm PT
Sad news.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Nov 17, 2012 - 09:35pm PT
Why are you posting these links that are in french?

While this might be predominantly an English speakers site, not everyone here is immune to speaking other languages.........


Patrick Edlinger R I P
kennyt

climber
Woodfords,California
Nov 17, 2012 - 09:44pm PT
I guess I should takes some vitamins to help boost my immune system. Not all of us are immune to arrogance as well. Sorry Professor...
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Nov 17, 2012 - 10:13pm PT
I just got the news. Planning and operating the Snowbird '88 event was a huge risk for me, personally. We made the whole thing happen in the short span of February to June. I didn't get the invites out to the climbers until late March or maybe even April. I was extremely gratified that virtually all the top climbers came at such short notice. I took their comittment as a vote of confidence. I had never before organized any kind of event I had never designed a climbing wall and this one had to be designed with the architect of the Cliff Lodge so as to enhance the design, rather than detract from it. I also had to work out the details of the major features, including the relative friction of the climbing surface and the strength and rigidity of the whole wall, its' anchorage to the concrete walls of the Lodge. On and on, really...So it felt good to be validated by the climbers, who trusted me enough to take the big leap with me.

Most of the climbers were respectful of all the effort and money behind the show, with a few glaring exceptions. But the biggest star, Patrick Edlinger, was also the most gracious and thankful of all, Patrick let me know that he understood the risk and work behind the show and let me also know that he trusted my vision and passion as a climber, to do things well.

Before the event, I picked Patrick as the winner-on a different spiritual plane from the rest,

I'm glad to have known him.

 JelloRemembers
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Nov 17, 2012 - 10:24pm PT
hey there say, jello... thank you for the nice note, on patrick...

i never knew or know, so many of you all...
i just got to know about patrick now...

and to ionlyski:

you see--you had a gut feeling to post about someone very special...
someone whose friends and family, as well, would agree, would LOVE
sharing and reading all this...

you gave him a wonderful salute...

only god (as in how i see it) or powers that be (as others see it)
knew that his time was short and near to end:

thus--you were the one that was 'nudged' to do a very special honor
to a very special climber, before he passed....



for that, ionlyski, be humbled and honored, and please do not
feel bad or troubled...


you were part of a deeper picture here, that was due to come to
pass, anyway...




god bless to you for posting...
and god bless and condolence to the family of patrick edlinger...
:(

and--i am glad for to know him, through this history, and through the joy
of the thread, just before his passing...

:)
Seamstress

Trad climber
Yacolt, WA
Nov 17, 2012 - 11:11pm PT
Inspirational. It's tragic for one so young and gifted to go, and it doesn't matter if it was a fall or at home. I watched the Snowbird VHS tape until it would no longer play.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Nov 18, 2012 - 12:10am PT
Here's the article from Paris-Match:

Patrick Edlinger a effectué l'ultime ascension. Âgé de 52 ans, il a été retrouvé sans vie à son domicile de La Palud-sur-Verdon, dans les Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, selon les informations du «Dauphiné Libéré». Le héros blond de «La vie au bout des doigts» a durablement marqué le monde de l'escalade. Dans ce film de Jean-Paul Janssen sorti en 1982, la France a découvert le style époustouflant de cet adepte de l'escalade libre. Le quotidien local ajoute que le sportif, qui devait participer à un festival de cinéma prochainement, confiait encore en début de semaine se définir comme «un homme libre».

Véritable artiste de la discipline, Patrick Edlinger avait continué de documenter ses exploits, notamment dans «Opéra Vertical», où on le voit évoluer pieds et mains nues à des dizaines de mètres au dessus du sol dans les majestueuses gorges du Verdon, qu'il s'était choisies pour voisines.

Mais Patrick Edlinger avait aussi des démons. Selon l'écrivain Jean-Michel Asselin, qui travaille à une biographie du grimpeur, celui-ci souffrait d'alcoolisme. Patrick Edlinger s'était confié à l'auteur: «Tu sais, je suis seul à pouvoir trouver une solution, c'est le combat le plus dur que j'ai jamais mené, comme un solo impossible, mais je vais m'en sortir».


My translation, loosely based on the Google Translate result:

Patrick Edlinger has made his final ascent. Aged 52, he was found dead at his home in La Palud-sur-Verdon in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, according to information from Dauphiné Libéré. The blond hero of the film Fingertip Life made a lasting mark in the world of climbing. In this film by Jean-Paul Janssen, released in 1982, France discovered the amazing style of this free-climbing master. The local newspaper adds that this athlete, who was about to attend a film festival, had earlier in the week defined himself as "a free man." (Note: although not mentioned in the Paris-Match article, the rest of that quote, from the Dauphiné Libéré, is "I have no regrets about the path I've taken.")

A true artist of the discipline, Patrick Edlinger had continued to document his exploits, notably in The Vertical Opera, where we see him flowing, hands and feet bare, tens of meters above the ground in the majestic Gorges de Verdon, which he had chosen to live near.

But Patrick Edlinger also had demons. According to the writer Jean-Michel Asselin, who is working on a biography of the climber, he suffered from alcoholism. Patrick Edlinger had confided in the author: "You know, I'm alone in trying to find a solution, this is the hardest battle I've ever fought, like an impossible free solo, but I'll top out. "

Rest in peace, Patrick.
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Nov 18, 2012 - 12:15am PT
So sad to hear of the passing of a legend, and younger even than me.

I remember him winning at Snowbird, back in the infancy of climbing comps, and how the sunshine caught him as he pulled the final overhang.

His movie La Vie au bout des doigts was captivating, and I particularly remember the seemingly gratutitous nudie scene and thinking, "Too funny! He's so French."

So when Pat Ament writes of Patrick Edlinger walking around his place naked in front of him and his girlfriend, I just had to laugh!

Rest in peace, Patrick Edlinger. You were an inspiration. I'm sorry I never had the opportunity to meet you.

Cheers,
Pete
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 18, 2012 - 12:21am PT
**please do not
feel bad or troubled...**

Well you are insightful and kind as always Neebee. Yes, I have asked myself why. We all have our own ways of explaining that which we don't understand.

Yet this is and always was about Patrick and now his loved ones and friends too. I never met Edlinger, not even close but I feel I know a little of his fine spirit now.

Rest In Peace Sir.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Nov 18, 2012 - 02:19am PT
Why are you posting these links that are in french?

Perhaps better than no link at all. A fair number of people here have at some French, plus there's google translate.

As for my occasional lapses into Norwegian...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 18, 2012 - 03:04am PT
From Panetmountain for those who want English:

"On Friday 16 November 2012 Patrick Edlinger died aged 52. The Frenchman was one of the early pioneers and absolute legends of sport climbing.

It seems almost impossible, but the news has been confirmed by French newspaper Le Dauphine which stated that on Friday 16 November Patrick Edlinger passed away aged 52. It's superfluous to say that the news of his death has profoundly shaken the sport climbing community which recognised the Frenchman as being one of the greatest of this sport.

Born on 15 June 1960, Edlinger began climbing aged 13 and right from the outset it was clear that climbing would take over his life, become his raison d’être. After having repeated all the hardest routes close to home, the youngster didn't think twice, abandoned his studies and hitchhiked to the South of France where he was awaited by that famous, infinite sea of limestone and a sport which still needed inventing.

It was at the famous Luberon crag Buoux that Edlinger first began to leave his indelible mark, climbing numerous routes up to 7a solo (such as the exposed Pilier des Fourmis), succeeding 30 years ago in the world's first 7b on-sight (Captain crochet) and then, in that magic 1982 and still at Buoux, managing to on-sight the world's first 7c, La polka des ringards. These extraordinary performances were repeated in other exceptional crags such as Cimai (were he carried out the audacious free solo of Orange Mécanique 8a in 1989) and obviously also the Verdon Gorge which would then become his second home.

In those starting years Edlinger also took part in numerous competitions and he won the first official sport climbing events, Sport Roccia at Bardonecchia and Arco in both 1985 and 1986. Thanks to this immense talent Edlinger succeeded in first ascending and repeating cutting edge sport climbs, which include Les Specialistes in the Verdon. A route for which he put forward the first-ever 8c grade and which over the years has become a total reference point, a line that all the strongest in the world wish to repeat. Even if the time wasn't perhaps sufficiently ripe for this enormous step forward (the route was soon downgraded to 8b+), Edlinger didn't lose heart and repeated the incredible horizontal roof Le Plafond (also known as Maginot Line) at Volx (by discovering a heel-hook which "sweetened" the grade from 8c to 8b+) as well as Azincourt, the monstrously powerful 8c pocket climb at Buoux.

But apart from these albeit important details, Edlinger will be remembered for another, immeasurable contribution to climbing: the development of one of the most beautiful cliffs in the world, Ceuse. Towards the end of the '80's this band of perfect grey limestone split in two by its famous waterfall captivated the climber, so much so that for numerous seasons it became his "secret garden" where he imposed a style of ascending new routes - extremely severe but always completely loyal - which was copied worldwide and which rendered sport climbing far more than just a simple execution of athletic moves.

Yes, climbing for Edlinger represented the search for an innate beauty applied to faultless technique, often described as a vertical ballet and if one thinks about it, "Le blond" was destined right from the outset to become much more than just a climbing rock star. His roles in the films "La Vie Au Bout Des Doigts (Life at Your Fingertips) and the unforgettable Opéra Vertical, both by filmmaker Jean-Paul Janssen, shot him to stardom not only in France but also throughout the rest of Europe. These timeless classic were followed by a series of other films as well as books which taught and fuelled the dreams of entire generations.

Dreams. Perhaps this is the key to understanding the legend called Edlinger. Ever since childhood Patrick knew how to live out his dreams and perhaps it is because of this that, for those of us who started to climb by imitating his technique, he is an absolute Legend. One of those with a capital L, just like his great friend and partner of a thousand other adventures, the other climbing Patrick, Patrick Berhault. This is why we like to remember Edlinger as he was when we met him at Trento three years ago, when he wanted to talk about his friend who had died prematurely, about Ceuse, about those daring early years and about his climbing. Yes, an authentic dream."

Trento 2009 interview (texted in English): http://vimeo.com/53738286

My RSPCT to Jello as organiser of Snowbird '88. There are stories within stories within stories that should be told.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 18, 2012 - 03:14am PT
Patrick Edlinger and Patrick Berhault on "Il Pesce"/"Fish" (Marmolada, Dolomites) - the route mentioned in the interview.
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Nov 18, 2012 - 04:06am PT
He made it look easy.

R.I.P. Patrick.
climber bob

Social climber
maine
Nov 18, 2012 - 07:52am PT
a true master at his craft..and a beautiful spirit, R.I.P http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sz3KVYeiCm8
jopay

climber
so.il
Nov 18, 2012 - 09:20am PT
He obviously touched a lot of our lives, when he spoke of the small things in life that he savored after a solo, like a drink of water I understood, climbing, and especially soloing can distill life and make us appreciate even the most minute aspects of life. In his recent interview it was evident he still held climbing in a special place in his life. I wanted to emulate him, to just live and climb, abandoning the constrains of life to do so, but alas I like most of us just couldn't make that commitment but Patrick I understood and admired and I hope your spirit is forever in your beloved Verdon.
Conrad

climber
Nov 18, 2012 - 11:17am PT
Rest in Peace our friend, condolences to his family & close friends and thanks up upping the standard.


Credit: Conrad
sunnyside

Big Wall climber
earth
Nov 18, 2012 - 12:05pm PT
Sad news to here of Patricks passing, but his spirit lives on in those he inspired and the climbing world at large.
I was fortunate enough to climb and get to know him when he and his team came to the states during the 1980s. Although there was a language barrier at first, we some how communicated very well, mostly through the common passion to climb. Watching him climb was inspirational to say the least, and the memories of climbing in the Flatirons, Eldorado and Boulder Canyons as well as our apres-climb gatherings on Pearl Street here in Boulder still remain. The good times and fond memories are to numerous to detail, but rest asure we all had the time of our life back in those days. He motivated me to go to Europe and climb in magnificent areas like Gorge du Verdon, Buoux, Les Calanques, etc, My french speaking also became more fluent, although is surely out of practice today. Last time I saw him, was a random encounter while bouldering in Hueco Tanks, he was with Fred Nicole and we had a bouldering session together, he was in top form then. I could go on and on, but the forum has done a good job[photo[photo[photo
Patrick instantly adapting to gear placement and strenuous crack climb...
Patrick instantly adapting to gear placement and strenuous crack climbing, flashing Blues Power in Eldorado Canyon. 80s.
Credit: sunnyside
id=274361]id=274360]id=274356] exposing his persona and greatness.
sunnyside

Big Wall climber
earth
Nov 18, 2012 - 12:25pm PT
For My Friend Patrick E., Your Spirit Lives On!
Inspirational Spirit!
Inspirational Spirit!
Credit: sunnyside
jstan

climber
Nov 18, 2012 - 12:50pm PT
Patrick's story really does not end here. In a sense we who remain will carry it forward.



A really fine, I think, discussion of free soloing by a youngster. Very well put in human terms.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OgB0uRz6RQ&feature=player_embedded

I wound up at it from a link here so I hope it will not be thought off topic.

Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Nov 18, 2012 - 04:17pm PT
That is a beautiful piece of art, sunnyside.


I don't normally imbibe at lunch but a couple of hours ago I skinned a few chicken thighs (bone in, french style) and put them in a baking dish with potatoes, onions, carrots, squash, fresh ground white pepper, lots of butter, a bit of coriander and salt, and baked at 400 covered by sprigs of rosemary.
A real southern France traditional fare.
The house is now filled with the aroma of the spices.
So I just opened up a 15 year old french vin ordinaire that turns out to have aged quite well (one little piece of cork fished out).


Lunch is just about on the table, and I drink a toast to the most graceful climber that I have ever had the privilege to see.

Here is to your inspiration Patrick.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 18, 2012 - 04:18pm PT
Credit: Guy Delahaye
gf

climber
Nov 18, 2012 - 06:51pm PT

Ron -great memorial post -i'm sure many of us could ask for no finer when our time comes.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Nov 18, 2012 - 08:02pm PT
Thanks John, just above. Very good little video monologue of Hans Jorge Auer's. One gets a good picture what it could be like, finding oneself in such a dream .
Loomis

climber
Peklo
Nov 19, 2012 - 01:16pm PT
A crude translation of the German Yahoo article:


All sports - climbing icon: Died At stairs fall?
Shock to the growing community of climbing: A legend of the Free Climbings died. At the age of 52 years was Patrick Edlinger was at his home in southern France, La Palud-sur-Verdon dead Frenchman aufgefunden.Der a pioneer of free climbing and in 1982 also on expert panels also known by two films of his incredible achievements in the light public engaged:

In "La Vie au bout des doigts" and "Opera vertical" can still amazed at how he climbs about unsecured by the Verdon gorges.

Until 1995, when, after a heavy fall suffered a cardiac arrest, climbed the "Le Blond" called exceptional talents continue at the top level, then he moved increasingly into private life. Of the birth of his daughter in 2002 he renounced risky solo trips.

He was supposed to be a few days ago at a Mountain Film Festival. A documentary film about his life was also in the works, such as a biography of the year 2013 - it had the dark side of an extraordinary way of life found their place.

Because Edlinger struggled for years with severe depression and was therefore become alcoholics - "my most difficult fight," as he has recently been quoted in the local newspaper "Dauphine Libere".

Reports that he died in a fall from a stairway in his house have not been confirmed to date. For now, the cause of death remains unexplained.
Jobee

Social climber
El Portal Ca.
Nov 20, 2012 - 11:05am PT
RIP Dear Patrick.

Thank you for shining your glorious expression of self.

Wow .. what a life, thank you!

You will be remembered.

Love,

Jo

Credit: Jobee

Brunosafari

Boulder climber
OR
Nov 20, 2012 - 12:20pm PT


Did anyone so make climbing as music? We loved you Patrick.
7ableau

climber
Nov 20, 2012 - 01:27pm PT
Fontainebleau - JA Martin L'etrave (7b) opened by P.E.
Fontainebleau - JA Martin L'etrave (7b) opened by P.E.
Credit: 7ableau - Photo Gerard Kosicki
Credit: 7ableau
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Nov 20, 2012 - 03:14pm PT





That translation upthread, that he died falling down the stairs, has to be someones idea of a joke. IE
"Reports that he died in a fall from a stairway in his house have not been confirmed to date..."




Blakey

Trad climber
Sierra Vista
Nov 20, 2012 - 05:49pm PT
Patrick Edlinger Leading Baiser Sanglant - Verdon (Old Skool 6b+)
Patrick Edlinger Leading Baiser Sanglant - Verdon (Old Skool 6b+)
Credit: Blakey
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Nov 20, 2012 - 06:05pm PT
qn.quotidiano.net/cronaca/2012/11/20/805224-morto-edlinger-
triste-destino-re-climber-arrampicata.shtml

"È caduto da una ripida scala di casa, battendo la testa e procurandosi una fatale emorragia"

(Google translation: He fell from a steep staircase of the house, hitting his head and by getting a fatal hemorrhage).
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Nov 20, 2012 - 07:10pm PT
At the video bar in Chamonix, they would constantly play tapes of Edlinger soloing really long routes in the Verdon.

He was super handsome and well built. If he had a good sex drive, those movies alone must have had him rolling in girls.

He was so smooth soloing. I bouldered with him one day at an area outside of Chamonix. He was really good, but not amazing. He could take a route to his absolute limit and drop the rope, though.

He was like Bachar. An amazing soloist. Damn, but the dude was handsome in his glory days.

RIP to a visionary. Nice fellow as well.
Erik

Trad climber
Nov 21, 2012 - 05:48pm PT
Patrick Edlinger was supposed to be at the mountain film festival happening in Grenoble now; instead, he will be honoured and remembered tomorrow evening at this same festival.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xub1nl_teaser-des-14emes-rencontres-du-cinema-de-montagne-de-grenoble_sport#.UKtBfNe8xNh.facebook
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Nov 21, 2012 - 06:42pm PT
I didn’t attend the Snowbird competition, but heard so much about it, from so many people, that it’s almost as if I were there. The best US climbers were just astounded by his performance. Here are two joking responses that stand out in my memory, but they convey the impact of Edlinger’s mastery that day.

Henry Barber: “I’m just glad they didn’t have competitions like that in my day.”

John Long to some younger climbers: “ We were the best free climbers in the world. I can’t believe you let the frogs beat you.”

Adieu, Monsieur Edlinger; sincere condolences to his family and friends.
Erik

Trad climber
Nov 21, 2012 - 07:23pm PT
I dig this: (from http://www.climbing.com/news/patrick-edlinger-reported-dead/);

"Edlinger also launched climbing development at the great crag above Ceüse, France, creating numerous spicy routes with widely spaced bolts. Asked years later why he didn’t put in more bolts, Edlinger said it was simply because he and his partners didn’t have enough money. They wanted to put up lots of routes, and thus they had to ration their bolts."

BrassNuts

Trad climber
Save your a_s, reach for the brass...
Nov 21, 2012 - 09:03pm PT
A tragic loss of a true visionary- RIP Patrick...
deuce4

climber
Hobart, Australia
Nov 22, 2012 - 02:52am PT
I was at Snowbird to see friends and to cheer on A5's only ever cash-sponsored climber (Yabo, whom we provided with a few bucks for travel and some t-shirts). I must say, I was a bit skeptical at the time, as a "trad" climber (before the distinction was coined), of the idea of climbing as competition--until I saw Edlinger pull off that final route--the suspense had been building and all comers had failed in the last few metres. As Edlinger approached the final stretch, suddenly everyone was awestuck--he floated it. The instantaneous reaction of the crowd was palpable, like a great magician pulling off his most amazing performance. It was then that I realised the times were a changin', and the focus on climbing as the advance of the technical, rather than of the bold, was the future.

Of course, Edlinger was also intensely respected prior to the comp for his grace on hard bold climbs and solos, as the French counterpart to Bachar.

Sad news, indeed.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Nov 22, 2012 - 03:05pm PT
I'm just so sad to know that Patrick is no longer with us on this side of eternity. He was a true inspiration.

I cherish my copy of Life by Fingetips. I first watched it while drinking a beer in the bar in Chamonix. I was stunned. His climbing is perfection. I wanted to free climb as smooth and as perfect as PE did. He turned climbing into art. No doubt he made the women turn and look again and again.

I'm sorry to hear that he suffered from depression, and alcoholism. So many do silently. I wish it weren't so. We need each other.

Hope to see PE again as well as many others that I admire and miss, on the other side of eternity some day. Not too soon though, Hashem Adonai Elohim willing. Have Yeshua HaMashaich's work to do.

I have a subtitled English version of this . . .

La vie aux bout des doigts [Patrick Edlinger]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDcaPJXQAFE





Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Nov 22, 2012 - 08:42pm PT
One of the problems with depression is that it screws with sleep patterns and
the shadows lengthen further. Often, just to get a good night sleep, people will drink copiously, which only compounds both the sleep disorder and the depression.

If it can beat an icon like PE down then the whole business needs to be dragged out into the open and reviewed. I can't tell you how many people I have known in the adventure world who have roughly followed the same tragic and debilitating cycle.

Celebrate his life and achievements, certainly, but keep an eye out for friends that might not see a way out and get crushed to dust by addictions and desperate attempts to self medicate. It's a killer - of even the best of us.

JL

wayne burleson

climber
Amherst, MA
Nov 22, 2012 - 10:49pm PT
Well said Largo, thanks
msiddens

Trad climber
Nov 23, 2012 - 11:03pm PT
Another hero gone. RIP
sunnyside

Big Wall climber
earth
Nov 24, 2012 - 05:08am PT
Into the Blue. Dr. Long
Climbing With PE In The Gorge!
Climbing With PE In The Gorge!
Credit: sunnyside
sunnyside

Big Wall climber
earth
Nov 24, 2012 - 11:15am PT
Gorge du Verdon
La Palud Backyard
La Palud Backyard
Credit: sunnyside
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 26, 2012 - 10:45am PT
The mind
http://www.lemonde.fr/sport/article/2012/11/23/l-enigme-patrick-edlinger-a-jamais-inviolee-par-hubert-ripoll_1795019_3242.html
ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 27, 2012 - 08:16pm PT
Sure wish I spoke French. Or at least could read it. My loss I'm sure.
Arne
The Lisa

Trad climber
Da Bronx, NY
Nov 28, 2012 - 10:17am PT
The NY Times published his obituary on Monday. My condolences to his family and friends on their loss.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/27/sports/patrick-edlinger-a-trendsetter-for-sport-climbing-dies-at-52.html
Blakey

Trad climber
Sierra Vista
Nov 28, 2012 - 10:53am PT

UKC have just posted this collection of memories.

Steve

http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=529025
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Nov 28, 2012 - 12:17pm PT
Thanks for that, Lisa.

Well written, "a blend of sport, spiritualism, philosophy and bravado".


Hope things post-Sandy are getting back to normal.
The Lisa

Trad climber
Da Bronx, NY
Nov 28, 2012 - 03:09pm PT
Thanks, Toke. The obit even explained sport vs trad climbing concisely!

I heard the term 'gained the Sandy Seven' for the first time today - people sat in the dark and ate all the time?
LaurenceGH

Sport climber
FRANCE
Nov 28, 2012 - 03:54pm PT
Very sad news....here a photo of Patrick while climbing in Hueco with Stevie, I think it was in 1993....
Credit: LaurenceGH
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Nov 28, 2012 - 10:08pm PT
Ditto for what Largo said.
HuecoRat

Trad climber
NJ
Nov 30, 2012 - 12:03pm PT
I met Patrick at Hueco in the late 80's. I was climbing with Todd Skinner that day, and Todd was showing Patrick around the park. I think it was Patrick's first visit to Hueco. Patrick was a lot of fun, and was amazing to watch. He had truly stunning flexibility and strength. He had a large group with him and they were doing some filming. Just before sunset SOme of us were TRing some lines on the back (tall) side of the Mushroom Boulder when Patrick came walking up with his crew. We offered him the rope and he started up. I had never seen anyone move like he did. No hestitation, just smooth moves and intricate cross-throughs without a pause in between. Near the top he stops and calls down to Todd "Where does ze line go?" Todd, being funny, yells up that there is a good foothold near his head. Patrick says, "Oh yes, I zee it," and calmly brings his right knee behind his arm and steps onto a hold about even with his shoulder. He stands up on it and everyone just gapes at what we had just seen. Then he says, "Good hold, but zis is easier" then he crabs himself around until he is sideways on the wall. Everyone is laughing as Patrick tops out. He lowers and says, "Good route. Zanks for a good day." He had made it look so easy. It was a different climb for all the rest of us.

all in jim

climber
Nov 30, 2012 - 12:35pm PT
The NY times article was poorly researched, suggesting that Patrick was primarily a sport climber.

He was among the greatest free-soloists of all time and an accomplished trad climber to boot.

Simply put, he was a climber.
Gorn

Trad climber
las vegas, NV
Dec 4, 2012 - 11:52am PT
There are only a few indelible moments of awe and inspiration that I can recall in my life. At the top of the list was Patrick Edlinger's winning performance at the 1988 International Climbing Competition at Snowbird. I remember watching as climber after climber--the best in the world-- tried and failed on the route. The feeling was that it was just too hard, no one could do it, it was a mistake by the course setters. Then, Patrick Edlinger stepped up to the wall and made it look easy. All those who witnessed it were overcome with a myriad of emotions. As another poster said, it was palpable. It was special.

RIP Patrick, Thanks for the inspiration.
keribus69

Sport climber
Barcelona (Spain)
Dec 5, 2012 - 02:02pm PT
Hi,
saddely Patrick Edlinger died a week ago, at the age of 52.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/9709332/Patrick-Edlinger.html
K
BruceAnderson

Social climber
Los Angeles currently St. Antonin, France
Dec 5, 2012 - 02:17pm PT
Word over here in France seems to be he fell down the stairs in his house, which were reported to be sketchy enough there were mattresses at the bottom for crash pads. Supposedly he hit his head in a gap between the mattresses.
Keep in mind this is the unofficial account going around. No idea if he had been drinking,

Really, Patrick changed my life as much as anyone has. I mean it was seeing him climb that just created a vision of alternate realites, so much so that climbing became the main force in my life for over a decade, and years later I'm living in souther France and climbing more than ever,
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Dec 5, 2012 - 04:24pm PT
RIP Patrick

One of the problems with depression is that it screws with sleep patterns and
the shadows lengthen further. Often, just to get a good night sleep, people will drink copiously, which only compounds both the sleep disorder and the depression.

John, you are so correct on this issue, I know because I have first-hand experience with my fiancée.

I really never met him, just a couple of hellos (Bonjour, ça va ?) in C4.

As for the French language links, they don't bother me, I worked in France.

What an exceptional climber and inspiration.
eagle

Trad climber
new paltz, ny
Dec 5, 2012 - 07:18pm PT
i was at snowbird and one of the best ever weekend of my life. i was able to meet up with yabo and have a smoke and he seemed in good spirits and another great moment was being able to sit front row to watch what was one of the greatest free climbers with a cold one or 3 walk the wall of that building. rip patrick...you were a f*#king great rock climber
Huecool

Trad climber
Tucson, AZ
Dec 5, 2012 - 10:32pm PT
Patrick (paTREAK) was a hero to me to, even though we are the same age. I was fortunate to hang with him during his first visit to hueco prior to his Snowbird victory. His entourage include his stunning dark haired girlfriend (a mere 5.12 climber:) and Maurice, his (honest) cinematographer. I hung with the troop helping lug the 16mm film equipment around while Patrick ticked all the hard stuff at the time. My climbing story... At the end of a long climbing day Patrick wanted to top rope Hueco Cranks with me, at the time something I could barely claw up without falling. I let Patrick go first, no beta... and no falls! After topping out he asked to be lowered about halfway and he proceeded to climb a thin variant up to the left and flashed that too!!! What awed me most was how easily he breathed, all quiet and smooth. My turn I huffed and puffed up the thing and topped out before my head exploded. Looking down at Patrick belaying me he calmly said, "You breaz too hard!", WHILE SMOKING A WINSTON!!!!! And on top of all he was SUPER COOL!!!
rodrigo MUJICA

Mountain climber
chile
Dec 6, 2012 - 10:22am PT
My undersatnding is that he died a few weeks ago , something really dumb like falling down some stairs or so...met him several times in the early 80s while living in france...amazing guy, inspirational! never seen someone climb so graceful in my life! the guru of free climbing for sure!
he will be missed!
rodrigo MUJICA

Mountain climber
chile
Dec 6, 2012 - 10:23am PT
http://climbing.about.com/b/2012/11/17/french-superstar-climber-patrick-edlinger-dead-at-age-52.htm
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Dec 7, 2012 - 02:59pm PT
Hommage a Patrick Edlinger on Editions Guerin
http://blog.editionsguerin.com/bruits-de-couloirs-4/hommage-a-patrick-edlinger
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jan 4, 2013 - 01:35pm PT
Cool memories - from The United States.
Credit: Vertical 20 - 1989
Credit: Vertical 20
Credit: Vertical 20
Credit: Vertical 20
Credit: Vertical 20
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jun 26, 2013 - 01:08pm PT
Edlinger in America - Rock Games
Boulder Canyon - Castel Rock - Tourist Extravaganza
Boulder Canyon - Castel Rock - Tourist Extravaganza
Joshua Tree - Gun smoke - Cosmic cragsman in the red hat
Joshua Tree - Gun smoke - Cosmic cragsman in the red hat
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jun 26, 2013 - 02:20pm PT
That was my Japanese Banzai hat.
RyanD

climber
Squamish
Mar 23, 2014 - 11:44am PT
That was a nice hat cosmic, what ever happened to it??


Klimmer

Mountain climber
Jun 19, 2014 - 05:32am PT
Thinking about Patrick ...
then bumped into the latest R&I mag (July 2014), with the cover story on PE. Wish the title of the article was different. Not titled well. However, the article was very well written. Very important read.

Marriage, then divorce, then depression, then alcoholism, and then worse is a too familiar dark downward spiraling experience in the world. Got to help one another.

Miss you Patrick. You are an incredible inspiration. So smooth and easy. Pure elegance on rock.


New Biography on Patrick Edlinger in French:

http://www.editionsguerin.com/boutique_fr_article_366.html


Another good recent article:

http://www.rockandice.com/lates-news/tnb-an-encounter-with-patrick-edlinger
Randisi

Social climber
Dalian, Liaoning
Jun 19, 2014 - 09:32am PT
Falling down the stairs. What a way for a climber to go.

Someone could do him the favor of beefing up his English Wikipedia entry.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Edlinger

I don't know enough about him.

I did do so for Paul Preuss, who I do know something about.

Have at it!
o-man

Social climber
Paia,Maui,HI
Jun 19, 2014 - 09:28pm PT
Beware of familiar ground!
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Jun 19, 2014 - 09:37pm PT
I just read the Rock and Ice article. Despite the rather sensationalist title, I didn't think it sounded so outrageously tragic. The guy had a charmed period, then got down to wrestling with life like the rest of us. had some more bumps and grinds, ups and downs a serious down patch then an unfortunate stumble and its all over. If someone thinks thats spectacularly tragic then most of us are, minus the charmed period.

I've seen worse by a long shot.
Kalimon

Social climber
Ridgway, CO
Jun 19, 2014 - 10:00pm PT
If so I hope he finds the beautiful line with good pockets, with lots of exposure, and after the send; the company of friends, I know he will find many waiting in the night land.

Nice coz.

Edlinger BUMP.
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