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Messages 41 - 60 of total 98 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
zBrown

Ice climber
Chula Vista, CA
Mar 18, 2012 - 11:45pm PT
That's a pretty wood burner. Mine in Mammoth was a 55 gallon drum with a little face plate cut into the front. It did have an electric fan that would pump all the heat off it and heat up the place really fast and a little burner on top to boil water in to help with humidity. I wonder where my photo of that thing went? I love splitting wood with those steel wedges and I mostly love the things you say in your posts.

Kinda like this. Kinda like all the rituals too.



Edit: Don't want to get into the rates of decay, carbon ... but maybe the world is generating too many people and not enough peopleness.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Mar 18, 2012 - 11:59pm PT
I've been wanting one of those for a while, but I can't find a barrel for a reasonable price. ( seems like I used to see them dumped all over the place, until I started looking for one. )

I dig splitting wood too! All the way into kindling. It's relaxing.
bergbryce

Mountain climber
South Lake Tahoe, CA
Mar 19, 2012 - 12:35am PT
This stuff people burn in most western states is a bit of a cruel joke. I grew up with hardwoods.
I love splittin' and stackin' wood. Give me a pile of rounds and a maul and I'm good for a fall afternoon.
I remember when my dad got a splitter, I thought he was a quitter or something. Turns out he had reached the point where the time spent splitting + wear on his body equation made getting the splitter worth it.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Mar 19, 2012 - 12:45am PT
Go far enough west, and you'll find people burning eucalyptus. I like eucalyptus. That's our hard wood. That, and orange wood. I don't like orange wood, though. It doesn't split well.

I just had some guys cut down my big pecan tree. THAT will be some good wood, when it dries. I'll probably have to get a smoker to take full advantage of it.
JOEY.F

Gym climber
It's not rocket surgery
Mar 19, 2012 - 12:54am PT
Maybe it's already been said.
Caveman TV.
Yay. Ek@.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Mar 19, 2012 - 02:11am PT
It's a four-dog-night here tonight.



39* outside was tops for today, but 400lbs of dogs is enough to keep the Kite Office a nice, toasty 60 degrees above zero.

TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Mar 19, 2012 - 02:28am PT
Credit: TomCochrane

view of my yard from the bedroom window

my forest of redwoods, oaks, and madrones is guaranteed to burn some day

the dead wood and understory gets burned in my fireplace to heat the house

postponing a cataclysmic fire such has burned out many of my neighbors
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Mar 19, 2012 - 03:48am PT
chaz-

those are four fine puppies. there is a lot of wealth right there.

two dogs could care less, two are looking at you thinking "what is that dumb ass doing now"
Tobia

Social climber
GA
Mar 19, 2012 - 10:12am PT
Beetle would isn't good for much other than burning; but it doesn't put out much heat. I leave the dead beetle trees (yellow pine) standing; so other insects and de-composers can feast. It is basically the same thing as putting bird feed out.

The beetles are long gone by the time you see any signs of damage. The beetle eggs can lay dormant in a tree for 10 years, so until entomology discovers a safe, natural remedy for pine beetles the environment is going to suffer. Pine Beetles have been a big problem in the south for decades. (We even have a local band called the Pine Beetles).

I harvest all of my wood from storm damage on my land and adjacent farms. I sell most of the oaks and keep the hickory for myself. Gathering of firewood is good, productive exercise; but I gave up the ax, maul and wedge 20 years ago due to rotator cuff problems. A low end mechanical splitter is much more efficient than a maul and wedge; but it takes some of the nostalgia away. (I don't look at my chainsaws that way).

Here is an amazing log splitter, not meant for a home user but someone who processes a lot of firewood. I am not sure how trouble free this is but it sure is cool.
http://www.wimp.com/woodsplitter/
manzanita man

Social climber
somerset, ca.
Mar 19, 2012 - 10:50am PT
Quot I was told once by a taco whose word I trust implicitly, that because of an endangerd (?) beetle or something that lives in Manzanita, it is against the law to burn Manzanita in California. e Here

jaybro: you have been mis-informed.there are over 100 species of manzanita and only a few are endangered and none because of a beetle.

" Rarity and endemics

Some manzanita species are among the rarest plants in the world. The endemic Arctostaphylos hookeri ravenii (Presidio manzanita) is the most endangered and restricted plant in the mainland United States. In 1987 only one specimen remained, at a secret location in the Presidio of San Francisco National Historic Landmark District in San Francisco, California. This plant has since been successfully cloned.[3] Arctostaphylos franciscana (Franciscan Manzanita), a species native to San Francisco, had not been seen growing wild since 1947 until it was spotted growing in the Presidio of San Francisco in October, 2009.[1] Caltrans transplanted this specimen on January 23, 2010, to make way for the Doyle Drive Replacement Project.[4]"


i have gone to Fire Safe Council meetings and have heard all the discussions. the Forest Service even issued me a permit to cut manzanita on Forest Service land. i dont think they would do that if it was against the law.
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 19, 2012 - 03:10pm PT
I love splitting wood with those steel wedges and I mostly love the things you say in your posts.

Nicest frikken thing anybody's said to me in a VERY LONG TIME!

THANKS!

xoxox

eK@
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Mar 19, 2012 - 03:12pm PT
until entomology discovers a safe, natural remedy for pine beetles

Two weeks of -40 every five years does it.
Bababata

Mountain climber
Utopia
Mar 19, 2012 - 03:25pm PT
Burning wood is considered carbon neutral - wood is just carbon, sequestered from the atmosphere by the tree as it grows. What goes in goes out, zero net effect.
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
Mar 19, 2012 - 03:50pm PT
Not. A. Dirty. Fuel. It's simply stoichiometry and mass balance.

Burning wood is considered carbon neutral - wood is just carbon, sequestered from the atmosphere by the tree as it grows. What goes in goes out, zero net effect.

Yes, burning wood is essentially carbon neutral, however it's very dirty in many ways.
When your stove is shut up to "simmer", high levels of carbon monoxide result. Hopefully not in your house. But CO running around loose in the atmosphere in small quantities isn't a problem.
A bigger problem is soot and particulate matter.
Known smog formers and carcinogens. Then there are the polyhyphenated aromatic hydrocarbons such as the alkenes, aldehydes etc. More nasties in the atmosphere. You've seen the creosote in your stove and chimney (you'd better clean your chimney yearly if you burn your stove a lot). This is the tar like residue of the aromatic hydrocarbons that didn't burn, nor go up in smoke.

Those of us who live in the forest or the urban-wildland interface do have to maintain our fire clearances. In California, it's The Law. So we have to clear trees and vegetation on a yearly basis (the durned things keep growing back). Chipping it and spreading it on the ground is the most ecological solution. At least where there's significant moisture in the air for most of the summer.

So it's a question of balance. I heat my office with well seasoned hardwood, mostly Black Oak, some Madrone and Live Oak. Never Doug Fir or Bay Laurel which don't burn cleanly. There's no other source of heat in the building.
Occasionally heat the house with the wood stove, like yesterday when it was snowing and we had friends over. Keep a supply of firewood for the house for power outages when it's our only heat.

Put in a propane forced air furnace a few years ago. So this is definitely NOT carbon neutral as it's burning sequestered hydrocarbons from hundreds of millions of years ago. But it's "clean" otherwise.

HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
Mar 19, 2012 - 03:51pm PT
eKat
what good is a pic of your woodpile if there's not a drift of snow outside your window?
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 19, 2012 - 03:53pm PT
what good is a pic of your woodpile if there's not a drift of snow outside your window?

That'd be flat out impossible. . . I ain't got no snow!

:-(

How RUDE is that!
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 19, 2012 - 04:21pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#241474

Here's what it SHOULD look like out there. . . but I'm really not complaining. . . it's kinda cool not having to shovel a lot. . . the surrounding peaks (Northern Rockies, et al) are plastered.
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 19, 2012 - 04:38pm PT
I made some funny comment on my Great niece's FB page and some of her friends asked WTF I was. . . the reply was. . ."Oh, just my GreatAuntKath. . . she lives in a log cabin in Montana. . . AND HEATS WITH WOOD!"

:-)

As normal as it seems to me, compared to TheNeimanMarcusLifeStyle, I must seem really, really strange!
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Mar 19, 2012 - 04:38pm PT
I've burned 3 cords of bristlecone pine this winter...The sh#t is well seasoned...RJ
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 19, 2012 - 04:41pm PT
Old fence posts, JWerd?

?

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