Stonemaster Stories; Part 7-More of the same, only different

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rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 21, 2006 - 09:37am PT
This here is the continuing saga of Old Dads spinning yarns and toughening their few remaining calluses on their burley keyboards... (Memory is such a tragic thing.)


The original Stonemaster Stories thread by John (Largo) Long started here:
[url="http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=145850&f=0&b=0"] http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=145850&f=0&b=0[/url] (208)

JL: Anyone out there with old (before, say, 1975) Stonemaster stories, I'd love to hear them as I'm slowly trying to put something together. Hearing other perspectives might help trigger some long lost memories. The Stonemasters were always as much a frame of mind as anything else, but what folks remember--especially in terms of anecdotes, or what they thought the Stonemasters actually were, or stood for--might help give some little shape to what feels like a very amorphous subject.



Stonemaster Stories (Part II) can be retraced here:
[url="http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=150211&f=0&b=0"] http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=150211&f=0&b=0[/url] (171)



Stonemaster Stories Part III can be retraced here (Many nice photos in this part):
[url="http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=155821&f=0&b=0"] http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=155821&f=0&b=0[/url] (129)



It was requested to continue onward here from Part III. It was getting
too long again (very rapidly actually). Stonemaster Stories Part IV:
[url="http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=157408&f=0&b=0"] http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=157408&f=0&b=0[/url] (125)



We continue onward with the epic saga "Stonemaster Stories" (Part V):
[url="http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=161148&f=0&b=0"] http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=161148&f=0&b=0[/url] (150)



We continue further onward with the epic saga "Stonemaster Stories" (Part 6):
[url="http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=164782&f=0&b=0"] http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=164782&f=0&b=0[/url] (126)



And when we last visited our heros, the slander so eloquently spewed was:

bvb: yeah, those knuckleheads keeping that mussy thread alive are a pretty competative bunch, i tell ya. "hey man, lets drag race the stonemasters thread...!" buncha crackhead post whores is what they are. shameless, indeed. no respect whatsoever for sacred bandwidth.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 21, 2006 - 02:15pm PT
Now, in some other forum threads there has been discussion about those little-done classics and some of the other Idyllwild hotties. All, which used to really get our hearts racing!

I think it all comes down to aura. And, I'm not talking the faint dayglo haze that surrounded some that were habitually dipping into the D-kit. (Remember that?)

No, the aura thing hung over quite a few of the routes to which we aspired. For me, those routes were the fearsome, then unrepeated routes by Callis, Raymond, Couch, Higgins, Kamps & Powell, etc. The REALLY old dads. I'm thinking about stuff like Chingadera, Jonah, and of course, in the early Seventies, THE aura route, Valhalla.

When we were sneeking peeks around the base of those aura routes--wondering if we could measure-up--very little was known. I remember that Hoagland and I pretty-clearly felt that to play on the big routes, we should work up to 'em. Find the lower-rated hard dudes, and progress up through the ranks.

I honestly don't remember a thing about it now, but one of the "easier" test pieces for us to tick-off first on the Sunshine Wall was The Iron Cross. Valhalla wasn't even mentioned until we had bagged a few on the progression upwards. In 1971, the Cross was still a mixed route, but the crux was reputedly very hard. When Hoagland and I slinked over there, we got slapped pretty hard the first time.

So, "training" time back at Rubidoux... We imagined how the Iron Cross sequence would go, and we were SURE that there was some improbable iron-cross move. So, Jim found this dime problem over on the North side of Rubidoux that would be EXACTLY like the move we'd need to do. And we bouldered that problem for weeks, before we eventually could drop that Raymond/Callis route in the sack. And, of course, we never did find the supposed iron-cross move on that route! (Still can't figure that name.)

And, slowly, the aura started to break down on the other lines too.

I'm pretty sure that that "Iron Cross" boulder problem was too obscure to have even made it into any guidebook. Still, I can't help but remember that solution everytime I've walked along the road above Rubidoux's Far North...


G_Gnome

Social climber
Tendonitis City
Mar 21, 2006 - 02:58pm PT
I kind of came at it from the other end I guess. I started bouldering at Stoney (with Mr. Kamps) and never even did a real climb till I could climb 5.10. At the time I had no idea that Kamps, Wilson, Bachar, etc. were anything other than my bouldering buddies (well, we knew Bachar was different). So, we went to the crags and just did routes. I didn't even know that Valhalla was an entrance exam until after I had led it. I think we (Mike Waugh and I) did New Gen a couple weeks later and wondered what all the hoopla was about. Us outsiders were evidently just not well informed on the traditions at the time. I think the fact that I was a dedicated college student and didn't work in a climbing store kept me from being as involved in the scene as some of the rest of you.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 21, 2006 - 03:16pm PT
I have a question about SoCal climbing history and I'm sure the answer varies by crag/area. Giant City in SoIll was a small hollow and there was a small group of us that put up the routes there. The chronological order of FA development unfurled as we developed the ability to both perceive and do routes. To those of us that put them up, that order seemed the "natural" order in which someone should learn them in. But that knowledge was lost when we left and on visits it would be interesting, and sometimes comical, to see what order routes folks had been choosing to jump on given in our "natural order" each climb had something to teach you for the next.

So my question - These SoCal crags seems like they had lots of independent development going on and I'm wondering if anyone really even knows the true chronology of routes at most of these areas. I can imagine it's more likely at someplace like Stoney Point than at JTree. Also, given there was an established "scene" and routes - was there any commonly held ordering of routes someone new should tackle?
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 21, 2006 - 03:49pm PT
Not sure if I really understand your question, but routes at Tahquitz and Suicide Rocks were very well chronicled, even from the get go. The first guide was done in 1937. What I think Robs and Jan were relating is that there was not as much communication between the different generations of climbers which lead to holding (or not) the prior generation of developers in a rather exhalted position. Hence the routes were often the subject of some reverence as well.

Joshua Tree had a pretty well recorded history from about 1967 onward, but there was a huge disconnect with climbers who developed many of the climbs in the Park from 1949 to the late 1950s. In fact, many of the routes done in the 1950s as free climbs were later "first climbed" again in the middle and late 1960s, sometimes on aid, then later "freed" a second time.

The difference was two fold: Tahquitz had a long series of guidebooks from its earliest days and a pretty regular contingent of "local" climbers. Joshua Tree had no real guidebook until 1971, no real "locals" [people who took the area seriously] until the mid 1960s, and little communication between the prior and later generations. By the early 1970s, that all changed.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 21, 2006 - 03:57pm PT
I guess part of my question was that you folks all seem to have entered and merged into an existing scene and routes and I'm curious how you knew what to tackle first and then next. Was it haphazard or was there some accepted order everyone agreed you should learn them in.
G_Gnome

Social climber
Tendonitis City
Mar 21, 2006 - 04:56pm PT
I put a few routes up at Joshua Tree during the 70's, 80's and 90's so maybe I can answer some of that.

A. Josh now has over 8000 routes. There are so many routes and choices at each grade that there is no 'set' path to take from grade to grade. Obviously there are very popular routes but no one works their way up the grades by doing a set sort of progression. Most of the people who put the routes up were the top climbers of the day so if a 5.8 got put up it was probably done by 5.10/5.11 climbers. I have put routes up anywhere from 5.8 to 12c.

B. When we came up, most of the older climbers were either no longer climbing, or were not associating with us radical young hippies. There were some exceptions, but this means that there wasn't as much tradition handed down as you would think. We did mentor new climbers into the sport but the good ones usually got a trial by fire deal and the weak ones were weeded out.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 21, 2006 - 05:14pm PT
ShortTimer, thanks for the post. I was thinking more of back when you guys started rather than now though I think you answered that as well. When we first ventured forth from our little hollow to Boulder/Eldo in '75 we were just blown away by how amazingly established, "serious", and structured the whole "scene" was. On top of that the only folks we could get to go climbing with us and get high while we were at it were climbers from the Gunks (not to out anyone, but hi Hardy Truesdale if you ever lurk) and Seneca. Sounds like SoCal was yet a different deal altogether, interesting - particularly the generational spreads/issues...
John Vawter

Social climber
San Diego
Mar 21, 2006 - 05:19pm PT
I think many of us who started to climb at Tahquitz in 70-71 were in awe of the FA'ists, and we were too deferent to their concept of what was difficult. I learned to climb with one older guy who said he was content to be able to climb 5.9!

Chuck Wilts, who cut his teeth in the 1940's (I think) and who wrote the Tahquitz guides we first bought, reluctantly put Valhalla in a supplement with the tentative grade of 5.11, like it was an affront to the established order, not really legitimate, and subject to withdrawal later. It was as if an open ended grade system would knock the earth off its axis.

Then these young turks came along who did not bother to climb and master every lower grade. They just went for it. The harder the better. And some of these guys were extremely bold. Rick Accomazzo, just to name one, inspired admiration for his willingness to run it out, fall, and go back up until he made it or was too tired to try. They were at the vanguard of a major paradigm shift.

Very quickly the game shifted from repeating the old test pieces, to freeing aid routes, then out onto unclimbed faces. By the mid-70s they'd raised the bar from hard .10 to hard .11 (ground up hand-drilling), and made the place their own. The next guide nearly doubled in size, and voila, Brave New World.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Mar 21, 2006 - 06:12pm PT
well put, john. that pretty much summed up my exprience and my perceptions at the time.

i'd also add that, at least with the san diego crew, as soon as we started ticking the hard routes of the preceeding generation (the original stonemasters, in our case) we felt liberated to try anything.

there was a day -- "big wednesday", we later called it -- early in '77, when watusi and i went up to woodson with nothing but water, e.b's, and chalkbags, and just worked our way up the hill ticking all the hards. we'd done them all at least once, but this was the first time we enchained them all, ropeless, with little effort.

after that, we had the same mojo going that the stonemaster crew must of had after doing valhalla -- we felt like we could climb anything. it was a magic time. and so it goes, from generation to generation.....to everything, turn, turn, turn....
John Vawter

Social climber
San Diego
Mar 21, 2006 - 08:13pm PT
Indeed, world turnin'. Now you're influencing me. I've done more pull ups . . . and drank more scotch . . . in the last two weeks than all last year! I swear you could sell those pics of the bottles. Toasted you last night with the last of my Laphroaig. Cheers graybeard!
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 21, 2006 - 09:40pm PT
bvb: "i'd also add that, at least with the san diego crew, as soon as we started ticking the hard routes of the preceeding generation (the original stonemasters, in our case) we felt liberated to try anything."

It was similar for us, only it wasn't just a matter of being liberated to try anything so much as we had literally done all the existing routes. We were either doomed to endlessly repeat them or cluelessly shuffle into the unknown on our own. Given our impaired capacity for rational thought we opted for the latter and plunged drug-first into the void. Much hilarity ensued before we got it all more or less sorted out.

Thanks again for these remarkable threads. I suspect you're all pretty damn lucky to still have so many of you around and that a couple of you were so prolific taking photos back then - none of us were and so next to no photo evidence exists of that period for us.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 21, 2006 - 11:21pm PT
Healyje,
I think you've pointed to an interesting facet of the group dynamic aspect of any growing sport. My sense is, there's an eb and flux to the usefulness or poignancy of a "standard progression" with which up and comers reconcile there grit.

You were asking specifically after that reconciliation with a standard progression in terms of the Stone Masters time frame. My sense is, there are periods where breakthrough in gear or movement skills, perhaps most importantly coupled with an unusualy strong cadre of actors, allows a bold jump. At these times, the griddle is hot and people don't have time to go through standards- they just get after it and wild things happen. Standards get pushed, not consolidated. Often, to do that, you need to pay your dues and usually that's the case to a greater or lesser degree, yes. But coming up on their heels, I felt that the Stonemasters set standards more than they followed them.

I was learning when the StoneMasters were burning brightest, so I don't know how they leaped. But my two cents says, they made a big shift and romped over standards to do it. I felt that the the next generation (late 70's/early 80's) was consolidating and for us there was more of that type of thing happening. So, we did these 5.9's, then those 10's, 11's and so on. It was really like that in the Yos Valley. Astroman and all that cool stuff, all the way to Tales of power had been done by '77. Breaking new ground, without hangdogging, was a tall order. Bachar did by soloing- few could follow.

So we entertained that kind of progressional thing that you asked after, then started finding other areas, doing bold runout stuff with drills in our hands, sometimes from stances, other times from hooks on steeper ground...


Over on that morass of silliness known as the Mussy thread, you asked after the west coast training focus. I took some time to answer that more thoughtfully, you might check it out. Aside from all the boozing and frollicking, I do find this sport, its evolution and it's syncretic aspects immensely intriguing.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 22, 2006 - 12:31am PT
Tar,

Thanks, for the posts in both threads. It's interesting to hear how it went down in waves in such an established place. We stood on some proud shoulders in SoIll, but fortunately we didn't have to claw our way up onto any as broad and tall as John's or the rest of the Stonemasters'. We made the same breakthroughs into the .12+ range in the mid-70's, though not on anything remotely as sustained as the stuff you folks got on in the Valley and my partner Tangen-Foster who did rings before coming to SoIll was as close as we got to a Bachar. Most of the training he and Doug Drewes did was on heavy gauge guitar strings learning to flatpick, though that was pretty effective.

All and all I now see I never really understood the depth of the SoCal / Valley relationship until these threads and overall it is an interesting contrast to what [little] I know of how Eldo / Longs developed. In some ways the SoCal scene sounds almost like it might have had more in common with what went down in the Gunks / Cannon - but I suppose parallels and contrasts can be found across the board in any two large areas.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 22, 2006 - 08:21am PT
HealyBra,
Hmmm, I've been in Boulder now since 1990 and have had occasion to meet and climb with a few of the seminal Eldo figures: Breashers, Ericcson(sp), Steve Mammen, Duncan, Weiss, Goss, Logan, Wilford, Lowe.

Logan still climbs 12+ and maybe even 13...

If you look at Godfrey and Cheltons B&W "Climb", (which really inspired me to run the rope among other things), and talk to those guys, I think It's fair to say a very similar ground shift-sea change-rennaissance was happening here in the 70's as well, replete with the training, brawling, way hip fun social dynamic as well.

So, to appreciate the nuance of your distinction, are you stipulating the Cali/Gunks parity as sharing a training/bouldering centered engine, as opposed to what was perhaps different in CO? One thing we know for sure, the Eldo Protagonists were super purists.

Again Healyje, my question abides your historical interests, which are mine as well- Any one else have a more directly informed comparative perspective?
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 22, 2006 - 09:15am PT
Speakin' of training. Though this may sound like an echo (or flashback) from an earlier post, and I'm sure you don't remember the day (due to massive resin blockage on the synapses), but Largo you and I did what you termed the "clean sweep" at Mt Roubidoux one day back in the mid to late 70's.

With only a little water, a bag of mid-grade pot, and out EBs, we started at the top of Mt. Roubidoux and bid every friggin problem we knew of til we were down in the barrios at the base of the mountain. Our bloodsugar levels had plummeted, our fingers shredded, our attitudes psyched, and egos bloated.

Remember?
WBraun

climber
Mar 22, 2006 - 09:21am PT
You guys still here? I thought you'd be dead by now?
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 22, 2006 - 09:42am PT
Tar,

I was thinking more of the history/cultural/generational (Vulgarians, et al) aspects of the LA / NY with a lot of contributors city-bound having to make do (Stoney Point, Indian Rock, Central Park, etc.) until they could get to the "real thing" and then yet another drive to get to the "big stone". Denver/Boulder on the otherhand had an embarassment of riches on their doorstep. That and the Colorado scene seemed somehow more "structured" back then, which is something I suspect CO in turn shared more with the Gunks than with SoCal. But again it could just be my impressions and I wish I had better words for the different "feel" I get from reading these threads versus the time I spent in CO back then. I do agree most places went through a sea change in thinking and abilities in the '70s and that Eldo/CO was one of the more amazing and pure ones. We were also fanatically LNT / no bolting / no dogging / pull the rope ourselves in SoIll; hell, we were even dead set against chalk on the beautiful river sandstone in the hollows. Anyway, as I said, the differences are probably more in my head and all three have no shortage of parallels. The CO folks need a history forum or thread like this on MountainProject, ditto for the Gunks - all would be fascinating reading.
G_Gnome

Social climber
Tendonitis City
Mar 22, 2006 - 09:47am PT
We're waiting for you to lead the way Werner, as usual.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 22, 2006 - 09:55am PT
Werner, we would be dead if we tried to do taht same sh#t now.

How's yer health?
WBraun

climber
Mar 22, 2006 - 09:58am PT
I can still push key board buttons. That must count for something?

hehehe
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 22, 2006 - 10:00am PT
Interesting how we are all trying to analyze this stuff that just happens.

An important motivation that’s overlooked most often is our need for understanding the unknown. A lot of us back then climbed routes based on the line. That alluring set of holds or soaring crack that makes a route possible or even acceptable. You would sometimes think they were put there just for this purpose, to climb. So regardless if the route had been done or not it was the line that caught your attention. Until you did it the unknown of just wondering if that aid line was possible to free climb was intriguing.

The difficulty was not the goal, it only came after. Placing a number on a route was to allow the next party some insight to what was in store for them. There was no systematic schedule for how to get to the next point in the evolution. Regarding New Gen, I think if there was any hoopla it was only created by the grown ups coining “No go Ledge” we were just kids at 16 and 17 and our only interest was finding those elusive holds to reveal a new route. As several have posted on this epic thread, they were so surprised how easy these routes like Valhalla and others were when they finally did them. This is a good thing, it shows the proper preparation everyone one took before attempting any of the routes that had now become a known quantity.

These skips in the evolution or the paradigm shifts happen when it’s the unknown you’re looking for again. You have trained yourself on the periods “test pieces” thus preparing you to further your own personal goals. This endeavor is so cool that it allows for everyone to make their mark in this world. This need for humans to be a part of something bigger than themselves is fulfilled.

For me I have always tried to think of and remember routes for their moves or even the situation, not their numbers. Sometimes the situation was a long run out or a difficult bolt placement making the route that much more exciting and perhaps a more memorable experience. You share these experiences with others when they repeat a route but you keep some for yourself when you step into the unknown.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 22, 2006 - 10:24am PT
We were definitely lured FA to FA when we could even detect the next one might exist in turn, and as you say, the numbers meant nothing to us at the time...
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 22, 2006 - 10:28am PT
Hey Mike,

To bounce off of your elequent analysis further, I would venture to say that my (our) time exploring routes, crags and the unknown was our way of testing the spiritual in our spiritually bankrupt culture.

For me (and I'm sure for many others), walking through unknwon desert corridors, getting out on the lead, getting scared, hanging out with really good friends and staring up at the starry night sky was our way of experiencing that there is far more to this universe than consuming resources and the dog-eat-dog rat race back in town.

So I'm spiritual, but not religious. Thanks for being such great teachers Mike, Largo, Ricky, Tobin, etc....
TC

Social climber
No matter where you go, there you are.
Mar 22, 2006 - 11:01am PT
Have any of your children followed your path? Do any of them carry the torch with the passion that you do (did)?


Michael Muir gets a lesson, Whitney Portal.
steelmnkey

climber
Vision man...ya gotta have vision...
Mar 22, 2006 - 11:08am PT
"...our way of testing the spiritual in our
spiritually bankrupt culture."

Looking around today, I think we're still in the red on that account...


Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 22, 2006 - 12:39pm PT
Kids are fascinating to watch as they get involved with this and how they approach something totally uninhibited. My oldest son enjoyed dragging me up a few routes in San Luis Obispo while going to school there about 5 years back when I was in lesser shape than I am today. My oldest daughter loves the romance of climbing and always eager to go. My youngest son is becoming more intrigued by it. After following about four routes he sees the excitement he’s looking for is found on the sharp end. He really surprised me asking for the lead of this one route. After one short fall he quickly finds a good rest to get back on and looks down at me and apologizes for hanging on the rope. It was too cute. When he gets to the top he avoids the slew of lower off anchors and finds a tree to belay me up on. He has only watched all this happening he sees what is real and what is not. An individual quite a bit older than him had just battled his way up the same climb because he wanted to do a 5.10 not because the route was a good looking distinct line on a lone buttress. All the kids understand the personal value of a good effort. If he stays involved he will enjoy some great experiences. My youngest daughter probably the most intense will just stick with horses.

Ron Kauk told me a great story of his youngest son Lonnie asking him to try Midnight Lighting. Ron just smiles in a yeah sure kind of way, walks over to Columbia boulder and Lonnie proceeds to do it his third try! He knew it could be done, probably seen it done a few times too but none the less amazing. Definitely a paradigm shift waiting to happen here and in the cleanest way possible.

Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 22, 2006 - 12:44pm PT
Spencer, your right it could be very spiritual and to have a tight knit community that still thrives today lends a lot of power to it.
Rubidoux Wilson

Trad climber
Santa Maria, CA
Mar 22, 2006 - 03:19pm PT
Spencer told me about this forum a couple of days ago and I've been reading through what's transpired in the last two months of it. I haven't read every single posting, but many of them. It's amazing what we can remember when given the right stimulus.

You guys speak of climbing and the element of community and also of if being spiritual. I would have to agree. I have more to say, but since this is my first time here I'll keep this short.

Also, I've made a little list of things that stand out to me in the period of 1975 and earlier (since that was the initial request that John had). A lot of those fond memories center around the people I got to interact with and some of the relationships that were developed. Would you like to hear them?

rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 22, 2006 - 03:27pm PT
Jim, is that REALLY you!? Welcome aboard.

There are other lurkers too... I just got confirmation that Shockley has seen some of all of this.

Jim: A lot of those fond memories center around the people I got to interact with and some of the relationships that were developed. Would you like to hear them?

You bet cha... Post up!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 22, 2006 - 04:03pm PT
Gramicci & Spencer,
Nice words Bra.
The line is the thing!
And all these great folks coming out to share-

"Ropes, Racks, & The Shirts On Our Backs!"
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 22, 2006 - 05:17pm PT
Jim, we have been waiting for you!
Rubidoux Wilson

Trad climber
Santa Maria, CA
Mar 22, 2006 - 10:34pm PT
Here are some memories of mine...regarding Tobin.

I really enjoyed the time Bachar competed with Tobin to see who could "race walk" the fastest around the Humber Park loop up above Idlywild. At first it looked like Tobin was cheating during the last hundred feet of the race by not keeping the correct footwork. But in looking more closely, he was actually doing it right! The reason he was closing in on Bachar was because he was just jammin'. Tobin ended up winning.

Here's another Tobin story.
Once I was climbing on Suicide with Erik. We could hear people down at the Suicide parking lot and we could also hear a sound we had never heard before up there. We said: listen to Tobin, trying to sound like a coyote. This went on for fifteen minutes. After thirty minutes we felt: boy, he sure is persistnt,isn't he ever going to quit? After a full hour this coyote howling was still going on! It began to seem odd that we could no longer hear anybody else at the parking lot...and it was getting dark. Then we realized: Tobin wasn't down there acting like a coyote, these were real coyotes and now we're going to half to walk down in the dark right into the area where the sounds were coming from! We reallly wished it had been Tobin making those sounds! If we had known they were real coyotes, we would have gone down while it was still light.

You guys were talking about the Tobin incident of jumaring the "fixed" rope on The Shield and narrowed it down as to who he did it with. Interestingly enough, I met Bruce Adams in my first week at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in 1977 and he told me about doing The Shield with Tobin.

The fondest memory I have of Tobin is when I was told that he had become a Christian. I had talked to another person up in San Luis Obispo that had known him and had gone to his funeral. Did anyone in this Forum get to go?

Rubidoux Wilson

Trad climber
Santa Maria, CA
Mar 22, 2006 - 10:53pm PT
Rob,

When you worked at Ski & Sport in Riverside back in 1972, what was the make of bicycle you had that you would bring to work? That was the year I road raced and as I recall you had this cool road bike. I just can't remember who made it.

Did you work there while Chis Robbins was working there? He and I were friends. We raced bikes together and we climbed together too. I still miss him whenever I think about him.
Wonder

climber
WA
Mar 22, 2006 - 11:23pm PT
Mike, one quiet day in camp I came around the corner of the boulder and there was Ron all chalked up ready to go. We had all seen john do it a few times, but i knew ron hadn't. he asked for a spot, and if i remember right, which i never do, it was iron cross, which was a long reach for him, pinch,hang,slap, mantle,and done. I was just as stoked watching him as he was doing it.
PS I think I rememder him saying it was the hardest boulder move he had ever done at the time.
I wish Ron would join in here sometimes, but thats just like him out front in the back ground all the time.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 23, 2006 - 07:40am PT
When I was in high school, most of the young lads that I knew from Indian Rock in Berkeley all had fine road bikes. Riden everywhere, taken everywhere (into banks and classrooms, etc.), they were far too valuable to leave chained to light standards on the Berkeley streets. Man, with all those pricey Colñagos, Masis and Paramounts, there were guys hoofing around with portable acetylene torches and full Campy tool kits waiting to strip a ride in a minute!

It was a regular thing to ride up to Indian Rock to boulder. I started doing some road races back then too. Borsen and I did a lot of riding when we came down to Riverside, and the Riverside Cycling Club, back then, was full of pretty hot cyclists.

Jim, my ride was a silver Cinelli. Still is. But it's been hanging in the garage for far too long. I remember that on our first trip to Europe, Rick and I took the day off while Gib went out and bought a nice custom road frame from some shop in England.

Say. Didn't some of the Newport lads make road rides up to Idyllwild? I remember a few guys doing that a few times. (A good, stiff century ride with the manly bits all in the last 20+ miles.)

Bachar scored a fine bike (a Masi, wasn't it John) that he had in the Valley (along with a shiney VW van) that he scored right after that (cough, cough) mysterious Airplane crash. He and I toured the Valley together a few times and rode up to Wawona. Cough, cough.

Bicycles and climbing seemed to go together, back then.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 23, 2006 - 07:47am PT
And speaking of Humber Park and its highly irregulars, I found this scribbled on the back of some old stationary that was mixed-in with my climbing mags:



Drawn by Gunnar Swanson, probably back in 1973 or '74 in Berkeley, during a Winter road trip we made to Tahoe (stayed with Bird and Bard) and then to Lee Vining for nice ice. Gunnar introduced me to ice-cold Aquavit.

Name the players.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 23, 2006 - 08:43am PT
Couldn't guess, but the Tart = Sybelle [corrected]
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 23, 2006 - 08:47am PT
Ooooh. You're good! (But with an "S" wasn't it?)
G_Gnome

Social climber
Tendonitis City
Mar 23, 2006 - 08:53am PT
Right hand two must be Largo and Bachar.
asioux

Trad climber
pasadena,ca
Mar 23, 2006 - 09:00am PT
Thank you guys for the great stories. Looks like good weather for Josh this weekend. Armando
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 23, 2006 - 09:29am PT
Robs is guy on the left? (or maybe its Tobin -- bowl haircut). The big one on right reminds me of a guy named Doyne Pedorski (sp?).
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 23, 2006 - 11:54am PT
Lets play "Guess the old people".



Waiting for the senior citizen bus.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 23, 2006 - 12:07pm PT
You're either on the Bus or off the Bus.


Escapin' through the lily fields
I came across an empty space
It trembled and exploded
Left a bus stop in its place
The bus came by and I got on
That's when it all began
There was cowboy Neal
At the wheel
Of a bus to never-ever land
-- "That's It For The Other One", lyrics by Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, and Bill Kreutzmann.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 23, 2006 - 12:15pm PT
The old guys are too easy, but my guess as to where that shot is taken is along the road near Frustration Creek? Or Tioga Pass Road?
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Mar 23, 2006 - 12:21pm PT
Hey Randy, that might be the road to the Whitney Portal? Too small for the tioga.
Peace
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Mar 23, 2006 - 12:45pm PT
My first thought was Whitney Portal
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 23, 2006 - 12:55pm PT
There's a 1955 USGS Bench Mark behind those piñon pines in the background. Someone should go check that out. That should settle it...
guyman

Trad climber
Moorpark, CA.
Mar 23, 2006 - 12:59pm PT
from right to left....R. Muir, Matt Cox, Sybelle, Phil Gleason. Tobin....Great stuff Rob.

How about this story. Humbler Park. One am while killing time, burning pipeloads, coffie etc.....Bacher gets Bullwinkle to ride on the top of his car, a Corvar, by hanging on to the roof rack. JB starts off sort of slowly but pretty soon he is really getting the car to slide sideways and he is probly getting it up to 50 or 60 on the straightaway....Bull is SCREAMING, PLEADING with JB to stop cause the rack is slowley starting to come unhinged!!!!! John sort of slows down and Bull gives out a great big..."oh thank you.. oh thank you ..thank you"...John almost comes to a stop where we are sitting, eating, smoking etc but before Bullwinkle can dismount...John flashes US that grin of his and floors it.....


looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 23, 2006 - 01:35pm PT
....R. Muir, Matt Cox, Sybelle, Phil Gleason. Tobin

Matt never sported a beard, and wasn't tall.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 23, 2006 - 01:40pm PT
I was thinking the guy on the right was either Graham or (better) Bachar...
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 23, 2006 - 02:20pm PT
Ummm, let's see, now hold on a minute, geez, I oughta know this... I think I live near it... Maybe it's... Hey wait... Whitney Portal, yeah. Yeah, that's it...

Great grandpa Muir and grandpa Waugh. And I think the bus has already come and gone. Maybe they fell off of it?

Old guys??? What, Bolton, like you're a spring chicken or something? Hey, wait a minute, that's what I am! OK, like you're some kind of babe in the woods or something?
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 23, 2006 - 02:22pm PT
More pictures of old people.
How 'bout some stories about the gentleman pictured below
in a recent beach photo op.




and Henny, do we have the photo of you. Just waiting for the prime
time to spring it. Dude, Lazarus looked better! And...Lazarus
was younger.
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 23, 2006 - 02:25pm PT
Oh, boy... That picture will scare ya. Same place, last year. Right?
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 23, 2006 - 02:29pm PT
Not quite, Henny. The Steers photo is at the true center of the universe, Tenaya beach. The photo of Granpa Robs and Grandma Mike
IS at the Portal. Is your medication adjusted ok? I'm worried.
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 23, 2006 - 02:35pm PT
Damn! I hate it when that happens. Thought it was by the fishing pond. Oh, well.

Don't do it Bolton, I'd be forced to kill ya. And anyway, Vogel is older than me.
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 23, 2006 - 02:45pm PT
No way, chicken. Nobody is older than you. Fred Beckey told me
about how he used to look up to you when he was a kid. I guess his
mom also told him to stay the hell away from you.
John Vawter

Social climber
San Diego
Mar 23, 2006 - 04:10pm PT
"from right to left....R. Muir, Matt Cox, Sybelle, Phil Gleason. Tobin."

So from left to right we have Tobin, Phil, Sibylle, Matt and Rob.
guyman

Trad climber
Moorpark, CA.
Mar 23, 2006 - 04:18pm PT
thats what I ment.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 23, 2006 - 04:28pm PT
"from right to left....R. Muir, Matt Cox, Sybelle, Phil Gleason. Tobin."

So from left to right we have Tobin, Phil, Sibylle, Matt and Rob.


Neither of these is correct.

I think so far it is: (1)Robs, (2) Unknown (certainly not Matt), (3)Sybelle, (4) Gleason? and (5) Bachar or Gramicci
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 23, 2006 - 04:46pm PT
I always admired Gunnar Swanson’s cartoons but never met him. Doubt he was drawing me. Rob, wasn’t your friend Jim quite tall with big ears? Time period puts it early in the game was Sybelle even around? Like the hairy legs though, guess that should be a give a way.

I couldn’t venture to guess anyone
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 23, 2006 - 05:15pm PT
Gramicci said: "I couldn’t venture to guess anyone."

Ouch! Re-reading your post, I'm not sure that "venture(ing) to guess" means what you think it means, Vizzini.

Yeah, Gunnar was definitely around during that era... In actuality, I think that most of his cartoons were caricatures and probably weren't portraits of any specific in-duh-vidual. Remember that that cartoon was drawn in Berkeley, after a few cups. And, let's face it... We were all archetypes, so he couldn't miss.

Here's another Swanson drawing, also made at the same time:



Yeah, maybe you're right. Tobin.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 24, 2006 - 09:42am PT
"spring chicken" indeed.

Henny, you're really going to need a whole mess o' ammo reloads to carry-out your retribution should the threatened photo ever surface. Ropegun™. Ho man!

Here's an Old Dad shot you can add to your bandolero:



(Muir, stepping right into the cross-fire.)
Tommy Tope Rope

Social climber
Telluride
Mar 24, 2006 - 02:00pm PT
Try again,
Hey Guys , guess who ? Graham you remember how cold it was that January in Jt. I followed Largo up my first solo of the damper . ? my hands were rattling no tape, had to mash em to stay in the crack. then I threw up at the top.


LARGO ALWAYS THE SAND BAGGER.
any guess's?

pc

climber
Eastside
Mar 24, 2006 - 02:05pm PT
Uh...Steve West?

;)

Cheated...
Tommy Tope Rope

Social climber
Telluride
Mar 24, 2006 - 02:13pm PT
Hey guys, is that U Peter? Trying to get Steve Sutton on board.
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 24, 2006 - 02:55pm PT
OK Muir, its on.
I thought these guys had to wear red hats.
And is this one named dopey, sleazy, or dummy?

Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 24, 2006 - 03:12pm PT
RM--

The photo of gent above looking through chicken-wing glasses. Don't know who it is, but the pillar in the background, man you are bringing my skeletons out of the closet . . .

Rather than me get all upset again, I'll just refer you to exhibit "U." U for me being really Upset. Just seeing that beautiful pillar again in the above said photo is sending me into fits once again. Maybe you can tell me who put the original 1/4" button head split shank, 3-bolt X route in? Armed with this info. I might be able to get over it and learn the truth of the matter.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=17754#msg17754

rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 24, 2006 - 04:28pm PT
Now, Klimmer, I've just spent a few minutes skimming that U thread...

It appears, for some reason, that you don't want to give away some big secret or summat. So... I'll just refer the curious to that so-called beautiful pillar behind Bolton as that area in the East, somewhere between Mississippi and Georgia, and South of Tennessee. OK?

Can't tell you much about the culprits, since the only copy of that sorry excuse for a guidebook to the area is sitting in our other library, in my Home Away from Home™. This bit of yellow journalism describes quite a few other similar hunks as well and was written by a one Mr. Michael Strassman. A gentleman with whom we have had an lengthy e-mail debate (years ago) in which he threatened to retro-bolt our exceedingly more-excellent area (by comparison) up the hill. ...claimed that our high-quality trad area--with many many bold and artistic lines mostly done ground-up, without inspections and hand-crafted with loving care--should be butchered by the insertion of many superfluous bolts (presumably placed by duffers of dubious distinction) so that the routes would be "accessible", safe and sporty! Tha bastard! (Apparently, he believes that climbing should be OSHA approved!) Fortunately, we managed to persuade (?) him to leave it the Hell out of his hunk guide.

[rant mode=soapbox]Damn. Wannabe guidebook authors should be required to butt-out until they've learned to respect the compositions crafted by the FA artists. If we wanted it "safe", we would've installed hand rails! Quality routes aren't written for the masses. Deal with it, and respect it.[/rant]

Get yourself a copy of that advertisement-ridden rag and inspect the Pillar stuff carefully. As I recall, he isn't too shy in naming names. Google can probably get you to their home addresses, if you need to make some house calls.

Now... Back to the discussions at hand. Where where we?
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 24, 2006 - 04:37pm PT
RM--

Thanks. I was hoping you knew the FA party that put up the original route on "Pillar of Light." Oh well.

Yes, I do have the said guide now, that was 3 years ago. I never contacted him. Not sure I want to. I'm still afraid of getting sued (he-he).
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 24, 2006 - 04:40pm PT
Or going to jail? ;-)
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Mar 24, 2006 - 05:07pm PT
Hahaha, I thought that looked like the base of the shar, errr, pillar of light. Had a fun day poking around there a couple years ago. Didja know that Strassman once wrote a guidebook to the midmountain area on Mt. Lemmon and included routes with names and ratings that hadn't even been put up yet?

Okay, here's your Stonemaster tie in: rumor has it Largo has taken up this hobby, practiced here nearby the Junior Birdman dude.

Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 24, 2006 - 05:13pm PT
West, you made it! That was damm cold in JT, I remember.

Tommy top rope? Haha… don’t take all the chauffeuring around stuff to heart.

Hey help me out here, when we first did Valhalla back in the dark ages what was Alan’s last name and any other recollections of that busy weekend.

I sent you a new link as well to the other inquiry; check your email (which was the giveaway by the way)
Tommy Tope Rope

Social climber
Telluride
Mar 24, 2006 - 06:00pm PT
RE: Vallhala, Tobin had just done what the third ascent with a 12 year old belay slave named Mikey? THAT got you fired up !! To hell with protocol and we jumped on the next day. Alan you mean skinny alan, I don't remeber yet, to much chivas..
steve
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 24, 2006 - 06:05pm PT
HaHaHa Steve,

You just called Darrell Hensel a 12 year old belay slave!

Priceless!
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 24, 2006 - 06:07pm PT
Go Muir, Go! Tell you what, maybe one of us can draw his fire and the other can sneak around behind him.

The guy with the stupid (oops, I meant stylish) glasses is none other than our own special rbolton.

Klimmer: Man, what a bunch of spew in the "U" thread!!!! I guess people just don't get it. Like Robs said, we're lucky that the non-sense didn't make it up the hill. We're still putting in execellent routes up there that aren't even for the masses. And we'll continue to do so. Could say much more about this, but I think I better get back on topic.

Steve: Tobin did the 5th with Bob Kessinger and myself. There was a post on this in the part 2 thread. I think I was older than 12 at the time....
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 24, 2006 - 06:10pm PT
Hilarious!!!
Tommy Tope Rope

Social climber
Telluride
Mar 24, 2006 - 06:15pm PT
Ok, then who the hell was Mikey ? Tobin was sitting at the base of smooth sole , and he had this little neighbor kid , what did they do that was HUGE?

Just catching up . that was a long time ago ?
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 24, 2006 - 06:19pm PT
West, I was hoping I could count on your memory here but I may need to rethink this after that post. Funny though, how Tobin never mentioned doing it with Henny and Bobby. It was cool for me to find out this info 33 years after the fact. He was pretty nonchalant about it I remember. Part of what fired me up, for sure.
Tommy Tope Rope

Social climber
Telluride
Mar 24, 2006 - 06:44pm PT
Ok ,, bobby, or mikey sounds the same..>>>>>>
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 24, 2006 - 07:33pm PT
Yeah, I'm into the Muni. In fact Mike Graham and I rode today in Santa Barbara (Mike was cooking on a mountain bike).

http://www.unicyclist.com/gallery/?g2_view=core.ShowItem&g2_itemId=164926&g2_navId=x85d7e4e0
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 24, 2006 - 07:44pm PT
Steve – Actually you’ll find your memory will improve the more you find yourself hanging around here.

Largo - before we leave the “cave” next time remind me to bring the camera. A shot of those drops you were doing with the wicked vertical gully exposure would send a few goose bumps across the www.
pc

climber
Eastside
Mar 24, 2006 - 07:53pm PT
ouch! Please tell me you didn't land that.

You know, that pose would be equally appropriate, and crazy, aboard a bull.

PBR goes PUR
Tom

Big Wall climber
San Luis Obispo CA
Mar 25, 2006 - 11:44pm PT
Tobin put up a route in San Luis Obispo that is still held in awe. It's not particularly difficult, at 5.10a, but is quite continuous with very few rests. It's rarely repeated. The description of Inner Sanctum goes about like this:

Climb 50 feet up a steep blank wall on thin holds (no pro) to a very short crack that takes bad pro. Continue another 100 feet up the blank wall (no pro) to the belay bolts.

Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 26, 2006 - 08:29am PT
Inner Sanctum – I looked at this about 5 years ago, not to do it but to remember the person. Did a few routes to the right thought it was a classic wall with some fine moves. Has that route always had all the lichen? It would add an exciting variable on top of the run-outs. Awe inspiring for sure, would love to do it someday.

Thanks for bringing it up.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 27, 2006 - 10:01am PT
...found an old slide that shows all those posh landings at Rubidoux, before the era of crash pads. The slide is so old that I can't read the date. Looks like it might read "Sep 1980", but the date is nearly illegible. We're in EBs, though. Is the date wrong, maybe? When did Fires hit the scene?



Joe Brown Boulder, Mt. Rubidoux. ...afternoon light, as the sun sets slowly into the smog.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 27, 2006 - 10:20am PT
Rob(s),

I believe I recognize the climber. The shirt, chalkbag and shorts look all too familiar.

I guess my mom tossed all that stuff out years ago.
Sewellymon

climber
.....in a single wide......
Mar 27, 2006 - 12:31pm PT
I climbed on Joe Brown boulder Saturday morning, as a matter of fact. Nary a Stonemaster in sight. They must all be over at the Quarry sport'n
G_Gnome

Social climber
Tendonitis City
Mar 27, 2006 - 01:10pm PT
Nah, we were all out at JT.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 27, 2006 - 01:15pm PT
Fire's and the first Sticky rubber came out in 1983
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 27, 2006 - 01:27pm PT
What was on EB's and PA's? We thought those were pretty "sticky" at the time...
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 27, 2006 - 02:04pm PT



A day at Suicide.
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 27, 2006 - 02:06pm PT
Identify the climber in the preceding photo.
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 27, 2006 - 02:08pm PT





Here are a couple more good ones.
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 27, 2006 - 02:10pm PT





OK, I can't resist, just a couple more!
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 27, 2006 - 02:15pm PT



Dimes, where were we headed?
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 27, 2006 - 02:33pm PT
#1 Looks like Rubidoux Jim Wilson on 1st pitch of New Gen?

#2 Solid Gold 1st pitch, climber?? Hair looks kinda like me, but I never wore socks, too skinny.

#3 I won't say since I took the photo -- but the photo is well known.

#4 Lynn Hill, EBGBs?

#5 Won't say, my photo.

#6 Richard Harrison on Dogleg?

#7 Tobin Sorenson on Bearded Cabbage?

#8 Heading up along the base of the Sunshine Face, but who, no way to tell (except one looks like Tim Powell -- white cap).
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 27, 2006 - 02:42pm PT
Sketchy, it is you on Solid Gold.
Bart Fay

Social climber
Redlands, CA
Mar 27, 2006 - 02:43pm PT

>>>#1 Looks like Rubidoux Jim Wilson on 1st pitch of New Gen?

That's not bachelorette #4 on New Gen ?


>>>#4 Linn Hill, EBGBs?

Yum Yum Yum.


>>>#5 Won't say, my photo.

I'm sure I'm wrong, but if that's Insomnia, where the hell did you
take the foto from ?!

jeff leads

Sport climber
ca
Mar 27, 2006 - 03:11pm PT
I don't know about the rest of this group, but I am having a great time reading theses stone master stories. In fact somneone with a little talent should write a book about these exploits! While most are still alive and have their memories intact.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 27, 2006 - 03:17pm PT
That's not bachelorette #4 on ? New Gen ?

You know, now that you mention it it does have a passing resemblance to Ms. Hill.

#5 Yep, it is Insomnia. Check out the old style (non-poly sided) hexes. Now that is a burly lead. No Go Ledge is where I think I took the photo.

#2 The home-style drilled hex looked familiar and the jeans, but socks? And what is with the terminal pencilitis?

Note the way we clipped into bolts back then. Who had ever heard of quickdraws.
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 27, 2006 - 03:24pm PT
Yes, that was the day we watched Lynn fall one inch from the top of EBGB's and go 40-50 feet!

Also, that drilled (I drilled it)hex (#8) was later turned into a pipe and used with a thimble bowl for years. I still have it.
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 27, 2006 - 04:12pm PT
Sketchy,

From the same archives as the Hunk Guide.
You had great promise in graphic design, man.
I think you dropped the ball by going into law.


looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 27, 2006 - 04:32pm PT
Bob, that is priceless. I'd completely forgotten about the packaged chalk venture -- another of my hair-brained schemes -- amazing a bag/label has survived.
Rubidoux Wilson

Trad climber
Santa Maria, CA
Mar 27, 2006 - 04:39pm PT
Randy,

You're right on photo #1. It's me. 1974
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 27, 2006 - 04:44pm PT
Randy said: Note the way we clipped into bolts back then.

What I wanna know is... How come you've got the rope clipped into one of my oval 'biners?! Hunh? (That's my tape on the gate. I can tell from the color. And it's a Bedeyan too.) Give it back!
Tom

Big Wall climber
San Luis Obispo CA
Mar 27, 2006 - 04:47pm PT
Gramicci -

Yes, Inner Sanctum has always had all that lichen on it.

Wait. No. That's not right.

Before Tobin skated it all off during the FA, there was even MORE lichen. That whole wall is like that, and the only clean spots are where the heavy traffic is. The far right side of the wall is the unclimbed Garden O' Weedin'.

That Shadow Wall is classic face climbing stuff, though. The peak is a volcanic core, and the rock has all kinds of bubbly holes and stuff in it. You're going up, and suddenly there's a little pocket. They aren't everywhere. The just sorta come out of nowhere to surprise you.

Maybe Tobin tapped into the Volcano Gods and they led him from pocket to pocket to pocket to . . . . . .
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 27, 2006 - 05:29pm PT
Dave,

The guy on Insomnia may be Matt. Check the hair...
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 27, 2006 - 05:42pm PT
Matt wasn't the only guy with hair like that. Right, Randy?
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 27, 2006 - 06:49pm PT
That's Rick A. on Insomnia.

JL
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 27, 2006 - 06:52pm PT
I know Robs and now I'm thinkin' it was Grippy Rockammazo.

The fellow on the roof was matt though, I'm sure.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Mar 27, 2006 - 07:21pm PT
damn, exactly how many people saw lynn take that monster whipper that day? was every climber in soCal watching? me and neil kunomi and guy andrews were walking back from echo cove and stopped to watch her lead it. when she pitched, i remember she fell pretty much to the bottom of the route, almost to the mantle, and then got thrown to the right and swung around the buttress. we were speechless. it was at the time the longest fall i'd ever seen anyone take at josh.

epic. much respect.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 28, 2006 - 08:40am PT
Found another old slide... This Stonemaster photo taken on a different continent:



Taken July, 1977. Rick Accomazzo on our first ascent of Vielle Vogue ("Old Wave") (vielle ecole IV 5.10a), West Face of l'Aiguille de Blaitiere, Pilier Rouge, Chamonix, France.
Swung leads for maybe twenty pitches or so... Wrote the whole route as an FA in the book at the French Alpine Club center in town, only to discover that a later-edition guide to the area gave credit to a French team, five years after the fact. Figures. Rick even wrote a letter of protest; which fell on deaf ears. (Probably since it was written in English!)
G_Gnome

Social climber
Tendonitis City
Mar 28, 2006 - 11:37am PT
In that there weren't more than 30 of us at Josh back then, I do think everyone watched Lynn pitch off EBGBs. Also it was kind of a step up for her and we all wanted to see her send.
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 28, 2006 - 11:56am PT
Yes, good call you guys.
Ricky on Insomnia and Matt on the Grit Roof.
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 28, 2006 - 11:59am PT





Here are a couple more for identification!
Sorry about the fuzziness on the last one, I'm borrowing a scanner soon.
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 28, 2006 - 12:23pm PT


One more since Jim Wilson called me last night and reminded me of the time he led The Trough (at Bigrock) without hands and we all followed in the same style!!
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 28, 2006 - 12:26pm PT
Dave, the middle picture is of Jim Dutzi. And, which ascent of The Green Arch is that? (If it's the FFA, that photo is freaking historic!) I, too, remember mass ascents of the Trough at Big Rock. Didn't a bunch of us do that no-hands also. Wait... Maybe I got a slide here... (rummage, rummage) Nope. I think I gave that slide to Gramicci... I'm guessing that he's got it stored along with Exhibit R!
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 29, 2006 - 09:37am PT
Once again, it's time to move along...

This thread is getting too long, and we'll continue with Stonemaster Stories, Part 8 that can be found here:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=173337&f=0&b=0

Please don't post below. Instead, continue posting in Stonemaster Stories, Part 8.
dogtown

climber
Cheyenne,Wyoming
Feb 23, 2009 - 12:40am PT
Best thread ever!
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Nov 5, 2012 - 08:18pm PT
bump
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:15pm PT
bump
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