What Is the Blues?

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Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 25, 2013 - 11:39pm PT
RIP


http://www.latimes.com/news/obituaries/la-me-bobby-blue-bland-20130625,0,1913221.story
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 11, 2013 - 12:40am PT
Captain Beefheart is the blues:
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Oct 17, 2013 - 03:55pm PT
The Waterboys - Red Army Blues
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 4, 2013 - 02:36pm PT

Leon Russell - It Takes a Lot To Laugh, It Takes a Train To Cry
tornado

climber
lawrence kansas
Nov 4, 2013 - 03:10pm PT
LIke jazz, something that old/middle age white people are into these days.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 4, 2013 - 03:56pm PT

Come on in mothafukk!

Burn In Hell...
Ward Trotter

Trad climber
Nov 4, 2013 - 03:57pm PT
The blues is something only poor people from a certain bygone time in the American south really understand and know.
People from other regions and other times know it only through recorded media or concerts. Even that generation is now passing into the history books.

Will the Blues survive as a cherished musical form into the foreseeable future?
Yes. Because it has a depth and power that steadily calls across the years, with a clear,wailing voice --- long after the times and the people that created the Blues have become a vanishing memory.

Long live the BLUES!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 4, 2013 - 03:58pm PT
Amen!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 19, 2013 - 01:26pm PT

"I'd Rather Go Blind" - Gov't Mule (Etta James Cover)
FRUMY

Trad climber
Bishop,CA
Nov 19, 2013 - 04:46pm PT
The blues is when the shop you are trying to get built, that should have been finished in August still ain't done. The Lathes, Mills, & Welding gear you need are still in L.A. taking up space in a building you need to sell & somewhere in that building are my Lightning Hopkins tapes. & all would be bearable if I could find those tapes & the rest of my blues & jazz tapes, but they are stuffed in there somewhere behind tons of metal.

THE BLUES ARE UNIVERSAL & something anyone can understand.
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Nov 19, 2013 - 08:45pm PT
Gary, with the Beefheart!!!

Marlow, with the Leon and the Mule!!


The blues is where my wife will be tomorrow night in Alexandria, VA with my man Robert. I used to see Robert in the bars in Spokane, when we were both young!!!

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 21, 2013 - 03:15am PT


http://harrysmusic.wordpress.com/2008/11/05/high-john-de-conquer/

High John de Conquer
By Bob7261

I was surprised to hear mention made in Robert Muggeís Deep Blues of the charm called John de Conquer because Iíd only run across references to that talisman twice before.
John de Conquer, or sometimes High John de Conquer, is a dried root believers say has magic properties. It can bring luck in love or gambling. In Deep Blues the owner of the Memphis music store Mugge visits expounds on it and another charm before he even begins talking about recordings.
Since I started researching this subject Iíve found the charm cited in blues lyrics by Muddy Waters, Willie Dixon, Bo Diddley and Dr. John.
High John de Conquer is also mentioned in Ralph Ellisonís Invisible Man.
My own introduction to the legend came in an October 1943 essay in American Mercury magazine by Zora Neale Hurston. In that essay, called High John de Conquer, Ms Hurston described what she said was a legend brought from Africa by transplanted slaves. The legend described a will-of-the-wisp who could not be shackled by the power of the slave owners.
ďFirst off he was a whisper, a will to hope,Ē Ms Hurston wrote. ďThen the whisper put on flesh . . . The sign of the man was a laugh . . . sure to be heard where the work was hardest and the lot most cruel . . . Maybe he was in Texas when the lash fell on a slave in Alabama, but before the blood was dry on the back he was there . . . Somebody in the saddest quarters would feel like laughing and say, ĎNow High John de Conquer, Old Massa couldnít get the best of him . . .íĒ
Old Massa couldnít get the best of him because he didnít know High John existed. The legendary figure was the slavesí secret.
In Invisible Man High John de Conquer plays the same role. His existence isnít mentioned until the narrator turns his back on the cruelty and platitudes of the white world and begins to explore the invisible life of blacks in the Harlem ghetto. The riches of that life arenít known to the whites because, like High John de Conquer, the secret hasnít been shared.
The clue High John de Conquer offers about a hidden life intrigues me because it speaks, as much of the music we are listening to speaks, of a hidden community with its own delights and its own quirks and its own peculiarities.
The community in Invisible Man is a black one, but I suspect there are similar communities to which belong anyone powerless, anyone disenfranchised, anyone under the lash that Ms Hurston speaks of.
Significantly, the hero of those communities is not a hero of strength but a hero of wiliness. Heís like Brer Rabbit, and thereís no shame for him in telling lies or being shiftless or devious or crafty. Those are tools he needs for his psychic survival.
Most adults donít like to think of themselves as employing those tools and it would be hard for us to imagine ourselves into a world in which they were prized, except that we werenít always adults. We once were children, and as children we had our own secret life of powerlessness with its own songs and chants and taunts and superstitions.
And Iím only going on my own experience here but I have to suspect we didnít shy from being dishonest, crafty, shifty and devious either.
Iíd have to strain to make a connection between the world of blues and the world of children, but when we are looking at the blues in particular and this music in general it might do us well to remember the powerless and sly six-year-olds we used to be.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 21, 2013 - 09:55am PT

Captain Beefheart & Magic Band - Sure 'nuff 'n Yes I do - Midem Festival Cannes, France 1-27-68


Jr Kimbrough - Done Got Old
splitter

Trad climber
SoCal Hodad, surfing the galactic plane
Nov 21, 2013 - 10:15am PT
i think some peoples are just done born with the blues. ain't no way around it...

BJ Sharp ~ Never Felt No Blues
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Nov 21, 2013 - 01:18pm PT
Always loved this one.

Kinda hard to pin the blues on it, but for my money...
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Nov 21, 2013 - 01:51pm PT
Whenever I think of the Blues, I can't help but think (non-musically) of a poem in the Vulgarian Digest entitled "The Blues" that went something like this:

You put your gear in the car at the end of the summer and
Clunk! The summer's over.

John
splitter

Trad climber
SoCal Hodad, surfing the galactic plane
Nov 21, 2013 - 02:54pm PT
Magic Slim & The Teardrops ~ Bad Boy

You wuz a Badazz Boy Slim, RIP!

edit: 1937-2013!
splitter

Trad climber
SoCal Hodad, surfing the galactic plane
Nov 21, 2013 - 05:07pm PT
Even whiteboys get the blues sometimes, eh?

PG certainly has had his share...

Peter Green ~ Leaving Town Blues
locker

Social climber
Some Rehab in Bolivia
Nov 21, 2013 - 09:32pm PT


LESLIE WEST 08 When a Man Loves a Woman featuring Jonny Lang...

...
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 21, 2013 - 09:38pm PT
I saw Leslie West, the dude IS a mountain. He made that guitar look like a uke.
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