Why are Republicans Wrong about Everything?

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Bharata

Mountain climber
Pune
Jun 10, 2013 - 10:22pm PT
Washington Scandals. Every day a new shocker!

10-June-2013

Probing Prostitutes At The State Department While High On Drugs.

reporters suppress laughter when State Department spokeswoman
said, "The notion that we would not vigorously pursue criminal misconduct
in any case is preposterous".











http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/06/10/another-scandal-report-claims-state-dept-may-have-covered-up-staffers-prostitution-drug-activity/

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/state-department-prostitution-probe/2013/06/10/id/509113

http://nation.foxnews.com/2013/06/10/cbs-state-department-covered-prostitution-sex-assault-drug-scandal

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/state-department-investigating-how-misconduct-allegations-were-handled/2013/06/10/1730be3c-d216-11e2-a73e-826d299ff459_story.html
rSin

Trad climber
calif
Jun 10, 2013 - 10:33pm PT
guess your mom wont need that ride to work
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 11, 2013 - 05:28pm PT
Well the truth has been exposed, finally

What is the problem?

Bush privatized the National Security Administration to his right wing cronies, and it couldn't be stopped-since it was created by the Bush Congress and re enacted every couple years since.

since there weren't enough wars for him, he funneled extra billions into the New "Military Industrial Complex" money hole, DATA MINING by private firms that can give anyone "top security" clearance with a wink and a nod

Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 11, 2013 - 07:39pm PT
Private Contractors Are In Charge Of National Security And They’re In It For The Profits

Author: Deborah Montesano

One of the loudest alarms set off by the National Security Agency leaks, at the hands of whistleblower Edward Snowden, was well articulated by Danielle Brian, executive director of a nonprofit group called the Project on Government Oversight. She told the New York Times:


The national security apparatus has been more and more privatized and turned over to contractors. This is something the public is largely unaware of, how more than a million private contractors are cleared to handle highly sensitive matters.




Ms. Brian added that even the nation’s security clearances are often taken care of by private contractors. Snowden’s employer, Booz Allen Hamilton, is just one of many that provide services to the national security apparatus, but they have 25,000 employees, nearly half of whom have top secret security clearances. The company received 98% of its income in the last fiscal year from the government.

Booz Allen’s top officials have close connections with both this administration and that of George W. Bush. Bush’s chief intelligence official, John M. McConnell, currently holds a position with Booz Allen.

As of October 1, 2012, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence reported that the number of people with security clearances was over 4.9 million, with about 1.4 million of them being ‘top security’ clearances. That’s a staggering number. As the number of clearances rise, so do the risks. One of Snowden’s main points was that there are too many people like him–a low-level systems technician–who have access to extremely sensitive information with the potential for abuse. James Fallows of The Atlantic put it well when, in defending Snowden’s actions, he wrote:


Among the strongest arguments against a surveillance state is that it depends on the subjective judgment of its millions of employees (a) to be applied without over-reach or abuse, or (b) to exist at all. One 29-year-old has just demonstrated the second point. Edward Snowden didn’t like the way the system worked, and so he has effectively blown it up. The bigger problem may be with the first point, option (a) — people who think there should be more intrusiveness or prying. The Founders’ fundamental concern, often distilled as ‘If men were angels…,’ was to avoid giving anyone powers that, in the wrong hands, could be abused. The surveillance state is giving too many people too much power — either to destroy its workings, as Snowden has tried to do, or to abuse and extend them.

Many current and past intelligence officials are questioning the system of farming out national security to private companies, a dialog that Snowden hoped for. Stewart Baker, formerly with both the NSA and the Department of Homeland Security, said:


We do need to take another, closer look at how we control information and how good we are at identifying what people are doing with that information.

According to the news site Quartz, the director of the Federation of America Scientists’ Project on Government Secrecy, Steven Aftergood, wants to know how Snowden had access to the most sensitive of documents, “a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court order and a presidential directive ordering up an overseas target list for cyber-attacks.” He told Quartz:


We’re really waiting to learn more of the facts of this case. How was he vetted? Was his access typical or was it the Hawaii [where Snowden lived] version of standard security procedures?

If someone in Snowden’s position could access that kind of information, what do the other 1.4 million people with top secret security clearances have access to? How many people out of that 1.4 million might be unscrupulous enough to take advantage of the information they come across–whether at the highest levels or the lowest?

In his brilliant article “Why Privacy Matters Even If You have ‘Nothing To Hide’ “, author Daniel J. Solove quotes Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn:


Everyone is guilty of something or has something to conceal. All one has to do is look hard enough to find what it is.

What we don’t want others to know is all in our records somewhere–our phone calls, our bank accounts, our emails, our health records. Don’t we all need to be worried about the alarm bells Edward Snowden has rung?


Read more: http://www.addictinginfo.org/2013/06/11/what-you-need-to-know-about-whistleblowing-and-the-privatization-of-national-security/#ixzz2VxwQ1X50
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 11, 2013 - 08:27pm PT

The Secret History of NSA Contractors


By RUSSELL GOLDMAN (@GoldmanRussell)

June 10, 2013
http://abcnews.go.com/US/secret-history-nsa-contractors/story?id=19366914#.UbfqR77n_IU


When a light was beamed into the shadowy corners of the NSA, the United States' largest and perhaps least understood secret intelligence agency, the public did not see James Bond smiling back with a martini in hand. Instead, they saw a 29-year-old high school dropout, a security guard turned freelancer at consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton entrusted with the nation's most guarded secrets.

Ed Snowden, a government contractor, who last week blew the whistle on the secret data mining operation known as PRISM, is today in hiding. His last known whereabouts were a Hong Kong hotel.

Before anyone knew Snowden was the source of the leak, the documents he provided The Guardian newspaper, were headline making. He provided the paper with warrants issued by a secret federal court allowing for the wholesale collection of communications data, mined from countless telephone calls and emails by U.S. citizens.

His leak opened the door on a vast secret agency many Americans have never heard of, but his resume made them further wonder who is minding the store.

The National Security Agency is the largest of the major intelligence agencies, bigger than the FBI or CIA.

"The NSA has two missions," said James Lewis, the director of the Technology and Public Policy Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. "They collect signal intelligence and they defend U.S. government computer systems from attack."

Basically, they are computer nerds. NSA agents crack codes, which allow the government to intercept and read communications, and create codes to protect U.S. secrets.

The agency's precursor was a World War I group of naval intelligence officers called the "Black Chamber" charged with intercepting diplomatic telegrams. In 1929, then Secretary of State Henry Stimson shut down the office of code breakers, famously saying "Gentlemen don't read other gentlemen's mail."

By World War II, the agency was up and running and by the 1970s, U.S. spies had perfected the science of intercepting a few hundred foreign messages annually, each read by a human analyst, Lewis said.

Digital technology changed everything, exponentially adding to the data that needed to be reviewed. The threat from non-state actors, like terrorist groups, only added to the burden.

In the wake of 9/11, the NSA expanded the scope of the communications it would collect and review. The agency is completing a $1.2 billion data farm located in the Utah desert in which thousands of computers will collect information from billions of pieces of communication, according to government reports.

All of the intelligence agencies, including the NSA, also began hiring contractors, like Snowden, to help carry some of that new load.

Like contracted mercenaries hired to fight the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, intelligence contractors were given access to government information and resources.

"There are millions of contractors inside the nation's intelligence agencies," said Angela Canterbury, director of public policy at the Project on Government Oversight. "The U.S. intelligence community is rife with outsourcing."

A 2010 Washington Post report found "close to 30 percent of the workforce in the intelligence agencies is contractors."

Some 5 million people hold a government security clearance, according to a 2012 report by the Director of National Intelligence. About 1.4 million people have top-secret clearance, and half of those are the employees of private businesses.

Some 480,000 contractors held top-secret credentials as of last year, and 2,000 companies supply contractors to the intelligence agencies.

Among the largest of those companies is Booz Allen Hamilton, a privately owned consulting company located in Virginia.

The company has deep roots and many connections to the intelligence community.

The current director of national intelligence James Clapper is a former Booz Allen executive. The company's current vice chairman Mike McConnell, was the DNI in the George W Bush administration.

According to the Washington Post, as of 2010, the company contracted more than 23,000 people to the government to do intelligence work at 23 agencies in 15 areas of expertise including technological intelligence, intelligence analysis, and counter intelligence.

The company is estimated to be worth $5 billion annually.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jun 11, 2013 - 08:31pm PT


Hey!

I hired em' to watch you!
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jun 11, 2013 - 08:34pm PT
Snowden = Hero : Has let the public know about what they have suspected for some time now. The genie of secrecy is out of the bottle that the republitard (mostly) and demotards (possibly no less so) have a been keeping capped up since pre-Nixontard.

Again I ask…. Is business, accountable to no one, really the best answer to all our social problems? If we look far enough into this foxhole we will see that the government is not government at all….. It's business… And to me that is facist in nature plain and simple.

So if I am understanding correctly, the republitards want less government and want business to thrive and will stop at nothing to see this occur…. Demotards are never willing to stop them for taking that course.

Both parties suck ass and business sucks ass too. At the base of it business if people, all looking out for themselves, taking from others to enrich themselves like a virus or sickness.

America is infected for sure.
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 11, 2013 - 08:35pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jun 11, 2013 - 08:36pm PT
So who pays you Jingy?

I thought he was going to fix it F.

Barry Dunham debates Barrack Obama



jghedge

climber
Jun 11, 2013 - 08:46pm PT

"Barry Dunham debates Barrack Obama"


So you're admitting to using the same bad judgment Obama did before he learned how national security actually works

Except he's man enough to accept it, and change

You? Hahahahaha.








Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 11, 2013 - 08:49pm PT
he needs more progressive liberals in Congress
all the Republicans are working against America and Obama, just to make sure his promises are never fulfilled.
it's treasonous

hence, we will suck until then
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
Jun 11, 2013 - 09:05pm PT
DrF.. the good cop bad cop routine has pulled the wool over your eyes.

There is only one solution. Gotta change the constitution.

We currently have a one party representative government.. It represents the donor due to the fact that we are idiots who let donors exist.

There is only one party in America. The Donorcratlicons.

Curt

climber
Gold Canyon, AZ
Jun 11, 2013 - 09:29pm PT
There is only one solution. Gotta change the constitution.

Repealing the second amendment would be an excellent start.

Curt
dirtbag

climber
Jun 11, 2013 - 09:32pm PT
Followed by repealing portions of the Bible.
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
Jun 11, 2013 - 09:37pm PT
^^
I thought the Bible already did that?
dirtbag

climber
Jun 11, 2013 - 09:40pm PT
It's been awhile, it needs to happen again.
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jun 12, 2013 - 07:46pm PT
TGT -
So who pays you Jingy?

 What's that matter? How about neither the military industrial nor national security apparati.

Am I a giant hypocrite for calling business no good solution for social ills? My contention that they cause a majority of social ills (jobs all gone to where it's cheapest - not really patriotic, just greedy… At the same time businesses call for less regulation they screw the public - either by way of dumping toxics or offering the fiction of the American Dream via money schemes, and all the while they fail to pay their taxes - How much did GE make in the last 10 years..? and how much have they paid into the American system? Not to mention every other American business who happens to be in the fortune 500…..


My point is the apple and TGT's point, seems to me, is the orange. As is the pattern for you so far…. Very nearly a Blueboob 2.0
Forrest B.

Trad climber
Appalacia
Jun 12, 2013 - 07:56pm PT
Fools!


Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 12, 2013 - 08:24pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 12, 2013 - 08:27pm PT

Yes, they are fools
If you can't see the difference, you must be blind or brainwashed.

What is your solution, revolution???, or wasting your vote on some third party that is even more whacked out.
Good luck with that

33 Quotes About Conservatives/ Republicans That Liberals Should Know About

Author: Stephen D. Foster Jr.



We all know what conservatives/Republicans are like. It’s just unfortunate that they don’t know it themselves. And if they do, that’s just sad. Many things have been said about conservatives, Republicans, and conservatism. Most of it, of course, is bad but true. Humorists, politicians, writers, journalists, comedians, and even US Presidents have left us with many quotes about the right wing. Here are just 33 of them. If you’re a liberal, these are well worth book marking. If you’re a conservative, the truth hurts, doesn’t it?

1. “Today’s so-called ‘conservatives’ don’t even know what the word means. They think I’ve turned liberal because I believe a woman has a right to an abortion. That’s a decision that’s up to the pregnant woman, not up to the pope or some do-gooders or the Religious Right. It’s not a conservative issue at all.”
~Barry Goldwater

2. “I cannot help fearing that men may reach a point where they look on every new theory as a danger, every innovation as a toilsome trouble, every social advance as a first step toward revolution, and that they may absolutely refuse to move at all.”
~Alexis de Tocqueville

3. “Conservatism is the blind and fear-filled worship of dead radicals.”
~Mark Twain

4. “Conservatism discards Prescription, shrinks from Principle, disavows Progress; having rejected all respect for antiquity, it offers no redress for the present, and makes no preparation for the future.”
~Benjamin Disraeli

5. “Have you ever wondered why Republicans are so interested in encouraging people to volunteer in their communities? It’s because volunteers work for no pay. Republicans have been trying to get people to work for no pay for a long time.”
~George Carlin

6. “Republicans approve of the American farmer, but they are willing to help him go broke. They stand four-square for the American home–but not for housing. They are strong for labor–but they are stronger for restricting labor’s rights. They favor minimum wage–the smaller the minimum wage the better. They endorse educational opportunity for all–but they won’t spend money for teachers or for schools. They think modern medical care and hospitals are fine–for people who can afford them. They consider electrical power a great blessing–but only when the private power companies get their rake-off. They think American standard of living is a fine thing–so long as it doesn’t spread to all the people. And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.”
~Harry S. Truman

7. “Republicans are men of narrow vision, who are afraid of the future.”
~Jimmy Carter

8. “Latins for Republicans – it’s like roaches for Raid.”
~John Leguizamo

9. “A conservative is a man with two perfectly good legs who, however, has never learned to walk forward.”
~Franklin D. Roosevelt

10. “A conservative is a man who just sits and thinks, mostly sits.”
~Woodrow Wilson

11. “I like that about the Republicans; the evidence does not faze them, they are not bothered at all by the facts.”
~Bill Clinton

12. “A conservative is someone who makes no changes and consults his grandmother when in doubt.”
~Woodrow Wilson

13. “A Conservative Government is an organized hypocrisy.”
~Benjamin Disraeli

14. “A Conservative is a fellow who is standing athwart history yelling ‘Stop!’.”
~William F. Buckley, Jr.

15. “Although it is not true that all conservatives are stupid people, it is true that most stupid people are conservative.”
~John Stuart Mill

16. “Even as someone who’s labeled a conservative – I’m a Republican, I’m black, I’m heading up this organization in the Reagan administration – I can say that conservatives don’t exactly break their necks to tell blacks that they’re welcome.”
~Clarence Thomas

17. “In the United States I have always believed that there was a big difference between Conservative and stupid. Boy is it getting harder to prove that one by the minute.”
~Rick Mercer

18. “The modern conservative is engaged in one of man’s oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.”
~John Kenneth Galbraith

19. “When a nation’s young men are conservative, its funeral bell is already rung.”
~Henry Ward Beecher

20. “I wonder how many times you have to be hit on the head before you find out who’s hitting you? It’s about time that the people of America realized what the Republicans have been doing to them.”
~Harry Truman

21. “In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican.”
~H. L. Mencken

22. “A conservative is one who admires radicals centuries after they’re dead.”
~Leo Rosten

23. “Conservatives define themselves in terms of what they oppose.”
~George Will

24. “The Republicans are looking after the financial interests of the wealthiest individuals in this country.”
~Edward Kennedy

25. “Liberalism is trust of the people tempered by prudence. Conservatism is distrust of the people tempered by fear.”
~William E. Gladstone

26. “Republicans don’t like people who talk about depressions. You can hardly blame them for that. You remember the old saying: Don’t talk about rope in the house where somebody has been hanged.”
~Harry Truman

27. “You have to have been a Republican to know how good it is to be a Democrat.”
~Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

28. “Brains, you know, are suspect in the Republican Party.”
~Walter J. Lippmann

29. “Herbert Hoover once ran on the slogan, “Two cars in every garage”. Apparently, the Republican candidate this year is running on the slogan, “Two families in every garage”.”
~Harry Truman

30. “Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a Republican. But I repeat myself.”
~Harry Truman

31. “Democrats legislate; Republicans investigate.”
~Lyndon Johnson

32. “A gathering of Democrats is more sweaty, disorderly, offhand, and rowdy than a gathering of Republicans; it is also likely to be more cheerful, imaginative, tolerant of dissent, and skillful at the game of give-and-take. A gathering of Republicans is more respectable, sober, purposeful, and businesslike than a gathering of Democrats; it is also likely to be more self-righteous, pompous, cut-and-dried, and just plain boring.”
~Clinton Rossiter

33. “The Democrats are the party that says government will make you smarter, taller, richer, and remove the crabgrass on your lawn. The Republicans are the party that says government doesn’t work and then get elected and prove it.”
~P.J. O’Rourke

The typical conservative is one who opposes all progress. They are paranoid, enjoy using fear to control others, and in most cases have no clue what they are talking about. They hate facts, hate government, and do not believe in contributing to society. Conservatives cling to the failed policies and traditions of the past and are willing to use the threat of violence at times to return to them. Many of these quotes were meant to be funny, but it turns out the humorous quotes were quite accurate. The rest of the quotes were just bluntly truthful. In the spirit of this list, however, I’d like to add a quote of my own that describes today’s conservatives to a tee.

Conservatives remind me of Yosemite Sam, Wile E. Coyote, and Elmer Fudd. They bring the guns, the stupidity, and of course, the failure.

Sorry conservatives, it had to be said.


Read more: http://www.addictinginfo.org/2013/05/20/33-quotes/#ixzz2W3yW8RMQ
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