Why are Republicans Wrong about Everything?

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Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 10, 2012 - 05:03pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 10, 2012 - 05:06pm PT
There are two types of Republicans:
1) Those on the inside, and profiting from their racket.
2) Those too stupid to know that they are just brain washed collateral damage
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Dec 10, 2012 - 05:13pm PT
So Barry borrows money from the Chinese,

to build a company at a loss

to then sell it to the Chinese.

http://hotair.com/archives/2012/12/10/yep-bankrupt-obama-stimulus-recipient-goes-to-the-highest-bidder-the-highest-bidder-being-china/

Doin' a great job there Baracky!




jghedge

climber
Dec 10, 2012 - 06:08pm PT
"So Barry borrows money from the Chinese,

to build a company at a loss

to then sell it to the Chinese."


Boy TGT, you seem to get stupider with every post


The company spent $132 million of its stimulus money

The Chinese bought it for...$256 million

Profit of $124 million to US Gov't

Over 1,000 American jobs created which will be staying in Michigan

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/chinese-company-buys-battery-maker-that-got-recovery-funds/2012/12/09/9f35a4fc-4240-11e2-8061-253bccfc7532_story_1.html

From the reader comments:

"Might want to note that a big investor in that Chinese company is good old Bain Capitol and the offerings that contain the funding are based out of the Cayman Islands to avoid paying US taxes. In fact good old Mitt has several million tied up in those offerings."



Hahahahaha, once again, the facts you use to prove your point disprove you - probably your most embarrassing post in recent memory

And once again, you're too dumb to realize it.

jghedge

climber
Dec 10, 2012 - 06:18pm PT
And why would ultra-right Sen. Marsha Blackburn be opposing the sale if the company was "failed"?

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/10/business/global/auction-for-a123-systems-won-by-wanxiang-group-of-china.html


One member of Congress, Marsha Blackburn, Republican of Tennessee, wrote in a blog, “The Hill,” on Friday that any sale of A123 to the Chinese had “significant implications” for American national interests.

At least two dozen other members of Congress have also opposed the deal, along with the Strategic Materials Advisory Council, a group of former American military and industry leaders.

“The writing is on the wall,” Ms. Blackburn wrote. “The administration must review and then reject any deal involving Wanxiang.”

Why would the sale to the Chinese of a "failed" battery maker, for double the US investment, have potential national security implications?


Hahahahaha, don't worry TGT, we know you're too stupid to understand, let alone respond.

By the way, a little basic business and economics for you - most companies are built "at a loss", it takes years to recoup the initial investment

Selling it for double the stimulus funds used to build it? Sorry, wingnut, that's not a loss.

It is one spectacularly stupid post though - congrats!
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Dec 10, 2012 - 06:26pm PT
From that Marxist rag Forbes:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/frederickallen/2011/12/21/germany-builds-twice-as-many-cars-as-the-u-s-while-paying-its-auto-workers-twice-as-much/

In 2010, Germany produced more than 5.5 million automobiles; the U.S produced 2.7 million. At the same time, the average auto worker in Germany made $67.14 per hour in salary in benefits; the average one in the U.S. made $33.77 per hour. Yet Germany’s big three car companies—BMW, Daimler (Mercedes-Benz), and Volkswagen—are very profitable.

How can that be? The question is explored in a new article from Remapping Debate, a public policy e-journal. Its author, Kevin C. Brown, writes that “the salient difference is that, in Germany, the automakers operate within an environment that precludes a race to the bottom; in the U.S., they operate within an environment that encourages such a race.”
jghedge

climber
Dec 10, 2012 - 06:29pm PT
"At the same time, the average auto worker in Germany made $67.14 per hour in salary in benefits; the average one in the U.S. made $33.77 per hour."

"How can that be?"

Exchange rate? A dollar is worth .77 cents in Germany.

Plus they have socialized health care, so cars are cheaper to produce

Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 10, 2012 - 06:55pm PT
Five Facts About America's Pathological Wealth Distribution

by Paul Buchheit
Published on Monday, December 3, 2012 by Common Dreams
http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/12/03

Most people associate inequality with the income gap. As distorted as the distribution of income may be, our wealth distribution is even more extreme. Americans are beginning to realize that years of preferential tax treatment for the rich, under the guise of "supply-side job creation" nonsense, have bloated the fortunes of the super-rich to a level that would make Rockefeller and Carnegie envious.(Photo by ItzaFineDay)

1. We're close to being the most unequal country in the world.

Among countries with at least a quarter-million adults, only Russia, Ukraine, and Lebanon are more unequal, according to the most recent figures from Credit Suisse Research.


2. Wealth accumulation has been rigged for the rich.

The richest quintile of Americans owns 93% of non-home wealth. For Americans with incomes over $10 million, nearly half of their income comes from capital gains and dividends, on most of which they pay only a 15% tax. From 2002 to 2007, two-thirds of all income went to the richest 1%. Then, in the first year after the recession, a startling 93% of all new income went to the richest 1%.

Massive wealth holdings have accumulated for the richest Americans not only because of their appropriation of income, but also because of their manipulation of the tax code. The 15% capital gains tax is their proudest accomplishment. Other ploys include carried interest, performance-related pay, stock options, and deferred compensation.

The imaginary 'work' of financial gain gets taxed at a much lower rate than real work. Through the years, as the rich have fattened up on stocks and other financial assets, the stock market has grown three times faster than the GDP. Yet American workers have not benefited from their own productivity. Their wages have flatlined while the fruits of their labor have gone to investors.

3. As tax rates have gone down, income for the rich has gone up.

A Business Insider chart depicts the remarkable - yet reasonable - negative correlation between tax rates and the wealth of the super-rich. Over the past hundred years, every time tax rates have been decreased, the income percentage of the richest .01% has increased, and vice versa. Other sources confirm that changes in the tax rate have little to do with economic growth, and that the top tax rate can - and should - be much higher, up to 83%.

The Reagan-era myth of "higher taxes, less revenue" has been debunked. It's enough to convince any thinking American outside of Congress that our budget problems are rooted in an extraordinary degree of tax avoidance at the top.

4. "We should all cheer for the stock market" is a big scam.

The mainstream media would have us believe that the whole country depends on a rising stock market. But the lowest-earning three-fifths of Americans -- 60% of the population -- own just .2% (one-fifth of one percent) of all wealth outside the home.

The Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute claim that wealth inequality has remained steady over the past century, even in the last 30 years. Both organizations cite a paper by Kopczuk and Saez, which shows that the share of wealth owned by the top 1% has decreased from the early 1900s to the early 2000s, possibly because the "democratization of stock ownership...now spreads stock market gains and losses much more widely than in the past."

While it's true that the percentages of net worth and financial wealth for the top 1% barely budged from 1983 to 2007, the percentages for the rest of the richest 5% increased by almost 20%. And the percentages for the poorest 80% of the population DECREASED by almost 20%.

In other words, the share of wealth owned by the top 1% leveled off because the "democratization of stock ownership" spread the wealth among just 5% of the population, those earning an average of $500,000 per year. A few people -- 5 out of 100 -- got very rich, but everyone else lost ground.

5. Debt has masked wealth inequality for 30 years

The authors of the Global Wealth Report state: "Rising household debt...began around 1975. Before this date, the ratio of household debt to annual disposable income within countries remained fairly stable over time and rarely rose above 75%." Today, Americans are burdened with over $11 trillion in consumer debt, including mortgages, student loans, and credit card liabilities. As the very rich have accumulated income and wealth, the middle class has kept up appearances by taking out loans.

However, that's only half the story. Private debt appears to be more manageable when public debt is low. Denmark has the highest household debt to wealth ratio in the world, but its government debt amounts to just 3% of the financial wealth of Danish households. The U.S. is at 32%. And our government debt as a percentage of GDP is 103%, one of the highest percentages in the world.

Conclusion: Where is all the wealth coming from?

According to the authors of the Global Wealth Report, the world's wealth has doubled in ten years, from $113 trillion to $223 trillion, and is expected to reach $330 trillion by 2017.

The UN definition of wealth includes (1) natural capital: land, forests, fossil fuels, and minerals; (2) physical capital: buildings and infrastructure; and (3) human capital: the population's education and skills.

We need to add a 4th category: the magical creation of wealth by the financial industry.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Dec 10, 2012 - 07:04pm PT
How can that be? The question is explored in a new article from Remapping Debate, a public policy e-journal. Its author, Kevin C. Brown, writes that “the salient difference is that, in Germany, the automakers operate within an environment that precludes a race to the bottom; in the U.S., they operate within an environment that encourages such a race.”

Yep!

Here they pull this crap

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/chrysler-forced-to-take-back-13-union-workers-caught-drinking-seemingly-getting-high-during-lunch/
Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Dec 10, 2012 - 07:13pm PT
Better to cut them off from the Red State Socialism that is the only thing keeping them from devolving into Haiti, and give them what they're really voting for.


Hedge, you gave me an idea. Let's spread the concept of red states withdrawing from the Union.....in terms of support.

Refusing Food Stamps.
Refusing Medicaid
Refusing Highway funds
Refusing Earmarks
Refusing FEMA

Becoming INDEPENDENT of the US!

Let's give them the idea of cutting themselves off!
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 10, 2012 - 07:15pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.
40 more posts til 40,000
I will just chill the F out,
because I know we got this

so I'm checking out for the night, and will be back tomorrow evening

40 grand, yes
go for it boys
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Dec 10, 2012 - 07:21pm PT
Once upon a time, the Baker's union got a fellow his job back, after he was busted for drinking. The company bitched. The union said, hey, it's our job to represent this guy as best we can. The union said, it was you that hired him. Let us do the hiring. The company said no way.
jghedge

climber
Dec 10, 2012 - 07:21pm PT
"Hedge, you gave me an idea. Let's spread the concept of red states withdrawing from the Union.....in terms of support."

Better yet, a constitutional amendment: No state shall receive more in federal support than it pays in. No More Red State Socialism. Let's see the if Red States have the courage of their convictions (which we already know they don't), and support such an amendment.

Those supporting secession have a perfectly constitutional alternative as well: they can renounce their citizenship, which would have the same effect as seceding - unless they're dumb enough to think that they can secede and still keep their US citizenship (which, considering the level of intelligence involved, is not improbable).



Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Dec 10, 2012 - 07:24pm PT
Facts

$10.55
How much the federal minimum wage would be if it had kept up with inflation over the past 40 years. Instead, it’s $7.25. Learn More

$15,080
The annual income for a full-time employee working the entire year at the federal minimum wage.

0
The number of states where a minimum wage worker can afford a two-bedroom apartment working a 40-hour week. Learn More

3
The number of times Congress passed legislation to increase the minimum wage in the last 30 years.

19
The number of states (including the District of Columbia) which have raised their minimum wage above the federal level of $7.25.

10
The number of states that annually increase their state minimum to keep up with the rising cost of living.

67
The percentage of Americans that support gradually raising the minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to at least $10.00 an hour, according to an October 2010 poll.

64 in 100 vs. 4 in 100
What are the chances an adult minimum wage worker is a woman vs. the chances a Fortune 500 CEO is a woman? Learn More

76
The percentage of Missouri voters that voted to increase and index the Misourri minimum wage in the 2006 ballot initiative.

$2.13
The federal minimum wage for tipped employees, such as waiters and waitresses, nail salon workers, or parking attendants.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Dec 10, 2012 - 07:30pm PT
Barry, NOW and the"Sisterhood" will remain silent.

http://www.voanews.com/content/attacks-kill-afghan-police-chief-womens-affairs-official/1561746.html
John M

climber
Dec 10, 2012 - 07:37pm PT
Barry, NOW and the"Sisterhood" will remain silent.

Could you explain what you think Obama should and could do?
jghedge

climber
Dec 10, 2012 - 07:48pm PT
"Barry, NOW and the"Sisterhood" will remain silent."

As will you, when it comes time to actually stand up for your posts

Apparently even you aren't dumb enough to try to back up such infantile gibberish

Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Dec 10, 2012 - 10:34pm PT

Republicans must wise up

By Eugene Robinson, Monday, December 10, 4:58 PM
The biggest problem the Republican Party faces is not uninspiring candidates or unsound tactics. It is unpopular ideas.

This reality was brought home in last month’s election. It’s playing out in the struggle over how to avoid the “fiscal cliff.” And we’ll see it again in coming fights over immigration, entitlements, inequality and a host of other issues. Here’s the sad thing: Republicans get this stuff so wrong that Democrats aren’t even forced to go to the trouble of getting it right.

There will be those who doubt the sincerity of my advice to the GOP, since my standing as a conservative is — justifiably — less than zero. But I’ve always believed in competition, if only to prevent liberals from becoming lazy and unimaginative. One could argue that this is already happening.

Take the question of what to do about undocumented immigrants. The Republican Party takes an uncompromising line against anything that could be construed as amnesty — any solution that provides “illegal” immigrants with a path to citizenship. Much has been made of the impact the immigration issue had in the election, as Latinos voted for President Obama over Mitt Romney by nearly 3-1.

It is obvious to sentient Republicans why the party cannot afford to so thoroughly alienate the nation’s largest minority group. What the GOP seems not to grasp is that the party’s “send ’em all home” stance is way out of line with much of the rest of the electorate as well.

A Politico-George Washington University poll released Monday asked voters whether they favored “an immigration reform proposal that allows illegal or undocumented immigrants to earn citizenship over a period of several years.” That would be amnesty, pure and simple — and a whopping 62 percent said they were in favor, compared to 35 percent who said they were opposed.

You might expect Democrats, then, to be pushing hard for a straightforward amnesty bill. But they don’t have to. Because Republicans are so far out in right field on the issue, Democrats haven’t actually had to do anything to reap substantial political benefits. They’ve just had to sound more reasonable, and less hostile, than Republicans, which has not required breaking a sweat.

On the central fiscal-cliff question, the GOP is similarly out of step. The Politico poll found that 60 percent of respondents favor raising income taxes on households that earn more than $250,000 a year. The Republican Party says no — and thus allows itself to be portrayed as willing to sink the economic recovery, if necessary, to ensure that tycoons can keep their pantries stocked with caviar.

Where is the incentive for Democrats to get serious about fiscal matters? As long as the GOP remains adamant on what many Americans see as a no-brainer question of basic fairness, those who believe in progressive solutions get a pass.

The truth is that raising top marginal rates for the wealthy is probably as far as we should go on the tax front right now, given the fragility of the recovery. The best thing we could do for the country’s long-term fiscal health is spur the economy into faster growth, which will shrink deficits and the debt as a percentage of gross domestic product.

That said, it’s hard to imagine long-term solutions that don’t eventually require more tax revenue from the middle class as well as the rich. But why should Democrats mention this inconvenient fact when Republicans, out of ideological stubbornness, are keeping the focus on the upper crust?

The same basic dynamic plays out in the question of reforming entitlements. Republicans proposed turning Medicare into a voucher program; polls show that voters disagree. The GOP seems to be falling back to the position that the eligibility age for the program should be raised. Trust me, voters aren’t going to like that, either.

Nor, for that matter, do voters like the GOP’s solution for the millions of Americans who lack health insurance, which Romney summarized as, essentially, go to the emergency room. A smart Republican Party would stop focusing exclusively on how government can pay less for health care and, instead, begin to seriously explore ways to reduce health-care costs. A smart GOP would acknowledge the fact that Americans simply don’t want to privatize everything, which means we need new ideas about how to pay for what we want.

Faced with an opposition that verges on self-parody, progressive thinkers are mostly just phoning it in. This won’t change until somebody defibrillates the GOP, and we detect a pulse.

Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Dec 10, 2012 - 10:38pm PT
In Robinson's editorial, he touches on the issue of immigration.

How about a path to citizenship, that requires:

1. public service consisting of military service, peace corps, other designated service. AND

2. Completion of 2 years of college.
Karl Baba

Trad climber
Yosemite, Ca
Dec 11, 2012 - 01:53am PT
Well done Joe!

The company spent $132 million of its stimulus money

The Chinese bought it for...$256 million

Profit of $124 million to US Gov't

Over 1,000 American jobs created which will be staying in Michigan

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/chinese-company-buys-battery-maker-that-got-recovery-funds/2012/12/09/9f35a4fc-4240-11e2-8061-253bccfc7532_story_1.html

From the reader comments:

"Might want to note that a big investor in that Chinese company is good old Bain Capitol and the offerings that contain the funding are based out of the Cayman Islands to avoid paying US taxes. In fact good old Mitt has several million tied up in those offerings."



Hahahahaha, once again, the facts you use to prove your point disprove you - probably your most embarrassing post in recent memory
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