Why are Republicans Wrong about Everything?

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rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Mar 11, 2013 - 09:44pm PT
The latino produce pickers live in poverty and work their asses off while working for slave wages...I find it disgusting that Americans think this is an acceptable plight based on the fact that these temporary workers are latino...Studies have found that paying these workers a living wage won't kill the sales of produce...It's the same conservative scare tactic that raising the minimum wage will hurt the economy....Boo!
Norton

Social climber
the Wastelands
Mar 11, 2013 - 09:46pm PT
"So what happens to the next 10 million that enter illegally after the "amnesties"..?"


probably the same thing that happened when Republican Reagan gave amnesty to 15 million illegals

the majority of them did not bother to go through the long and expensive process of becoming US citizens

same thing will happen this time

oh, by the way, "Hispanics" have a very poor record of turning out for elections
so the concept that 10 million illegals will go through the process, become eligible to vote, and then actually vote is not a rationally derived conclusion

philo

Trad climber
Is that light the end of the tunnel or a train?
Mar 11, 2013 - 09:49pm PT
^^^ No but it's funny to scare the little baby Jebus out of repulican'ts and TEAhadists by saying it.
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 11, 2013 - 09:51pm PT
Who will it hurt if 10 million people become new American citizens???

Not me
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 11, 2013 - 10:01pm PT
Dave
you have to call those Gov.s Communist, not Socialist

Communism is a type of socialism that has had good and bad results

No Communist nation would call them selves socialists, they are called Communists.

Communism is as old as Human civilization, it works great for small tribes and villages, communal living, work together as a society! what a novelty!

The 3 examples you use were ruled by extremist Authoritarian leaders, and most often categorized as Far Right Wing tyrannical despots.
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 11, 2013 - 10:21pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 11, 2013 - 10:30pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 11, 2013 - 10:31pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.

The Party of Whiners
http://www.addictinginfo.org/2013/03/10/republicans-crying-in-their-beer-how-the-grand-old-party-became-the-pity-me-party/

Ronald Reagan took and built upon mistrust of the government, which set in after the Watergate scandal forced Richard Nixon out of office. He made it OK to ridicule public service. Government workers, after all, were just crooks looking for a way to take money out of your pockets. He envisioned an America where it was OK to have ice cream for dinner. Taking more money out of the tip jar than you put in? That was just setting things right and getting your fair share even if it took away from others. In Reagan’s America, people were homeless or jobless because they wanted to be and deserved no help from their fellow Americans.

But then Reagan took that distrust and aimed it in another direction. It wasn’t just government that was the problem, it was the Democrats. It wasn’t the party of Nixon, but the party which stood in opposition to Nixon which was the problem. He used the power of the bully pulpit to hammer the idea into people’s heads, without ever saying so, that Republicans were the “responsible” party, and Democrats were weaklings, unable to govern effectively. The Democratic party, being the actual party of responsibility, ignored this and kept working to keep this nation afloat, even as – enter stage right – came the Gingrich Revolution. By assuring people they were the victim and letting them wallow in “woe is me,” Reagan in turn created the foundation upon which Newt Gingrich built, and now we have a Republican party which does not govern, but instead sits in wallowing self-pity. Nothing is their fault; it is the fault of government, lazy people on welfare, or people on an unemployment vacation. The party of “personal responsibility” wants to take no responsibility for their own actions, or results.

So, when they find themselves on the losing side of any debate, they are quick to throw about the blame. You will find them blaming losses on non-existent organizations like ACORN, the demands of the slut vote, and the fact that Obama promised “free crap.” At no point do they sit down and say, “what did I do wrong?” It is always someone else who gets the blame. Just recently, Marco Rubio‘s rebuttal to the State of the Union address offers some prime examples:


“In fact, a major cause of our recent downturn was a housing crisis created by reckless government policies.

We don’t have to raise taxes to avoid the President’s devastating cuts to our military.

And tonight, he even criticized us for refusing to raise taxes to delay military cuts – cuts that were his idea in the first place.

“The real cause of our debt is that our government has been spending 1 trillion dollars more than it takes in every year.”

All of these, of course, are Republican ideas now being blamed on the President. The spending cuts, the deregulation push resulting in economic collapse, and most of all, the budget, with all that spending and deficit that Rubio is complaining about, have been created by the Republican controlled House of Representatives. By blaming the President, Republicans are attempting to shift blame which they rightfully deserve. And this is but a single speech given by a single member of the Republican Party. You find other examples in Paul Ryan blaming Obama for Medicare cuts he proposed, how the Democrats are to blame for gun violence, not the NRA, or even how Democrats are buying votes. They call the President a con man, a bully, and far, far worse. They seek to blame the President, when their own policies and programs are the ones at fault.

The problem is that the GOP image was built on the illusion of being “the strong ones.” Recall the attacks against Democratic candidates as being soft on crime/terror/communism/fill-in-the-blank. They presented themselves as tough as nails, the cowboys. Now they are the crybabies, unable to handle not getting their own way. In fact, it comes down to a much more basic concept, something every 3rd grader understands. The Republicans are nothing but a bunch of bullies.

Fact is, they never were tough; they never had workable ideas. They just puffed themselves up and went after what they viewed as a weaker opponent in order to try to mask how fragile they actually were. Ever since Richard Nixon destroyed whatever progress the Republicans had made in this country, they have been puffing themselves up to appear bigger, stronger and more confident. In reality, they had not a clue what they were doing. And now, the bullies got a scratch and are running home to mommy.

They had control of all three branches of government, which they’d claimed would herald in a conservative utopia. Instead, we had two recessions in a single presidential administration. We had the housing market collapse. We had banking institutions relying on government handouts simply to function. Our entire economy ground to a halt. We had a lost decade. Despite their promises, they could not deliver. And what do they do? They blame everyone but themselves, even now.

Right-wing windbag Rush Limbaugh, as ever, can’t grasp what is going on, believing that Obama is some mad genius strategist. But not only that, he’s a mad king, a tyrant with absolute power. Limbaugh fails to grasp that the only thing Obama is doing is acting in the same manner an adult does when a child is throwing a tantrum. He is standing there, and letting the tantrum work itself out, not lifting a finger in any way, shape or form.

The Republican Party is at the point where they either grow up or be relegated to the dustbin of history. Their fairy tale, that they can have their cake and eat it too, is over.
philo

Trad climber
Is that light the end of the tunnel or a train?
Mar 11, 2013 - 10:36pm PT
Excellent post good Doctor.
HighDesertDJ

Trad climber
Mar 11, 2013 - 10:59pm PT
In Reagan's defense, his "government is the problem" speech specifically (and in the same breath) cited "this moment" as when government was "not the solution to our problems." Reaganites seem to forget that.
philo

Trad climber
Is that light the end of the tunnel or a train?
Mar 12, 2013 - 11:01am PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#293824
bookworm

Social climber
Falls Church, VA
Mar 12, 2013 - 12:37pm PT
we're from the government and we're here to help (animal cruelty division):

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/03/12/animal-torture-abuse-called-regular-practice-within-federal-wildlife-agency/

bookworm

Social climber
Falls Church, VA
Mar 12, 2013 - 12:51pm PT
your government at work:

Credit: bookworm


a mere 800 pages of new regulations...in ONE DAY!

total obamacare pages to date (even before full implementation)?


20,000 pages
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Mar 12, 2013 - 12:57pm PT
The entire CRF isn't much more than the picture bookworm posted.
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Mar 12, 2013 - 01:09pm PT
The entire CRF isn't much more than the picture bookworm posted.

True, if bound and printed. If printed out from the internet on one side of the page, it's a different story. The Dodd-Frank legislation, bereft of resulting regulations, is almost four inches high on my credenza. When all the regs are issued, it will probably look like bookworm's posts.

John
Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Mar 12, 2013 - 01:10pm PT


Rand Paul masks his true worldview

By Michael Gerson, Published: March 11

Since arriving in the Senate in 2011, Rand Paul has been probing here and there for issues of populist resonance. Audit the secretive, sinister Federal Reserve. Rein in those TSA screeners patting down little girls. In each instance, Paul (R-Ky.) has evoked the fear of oppressive government without tipping over into the paranoia of his father’s most dedicated supporters. It has been a diluted, domesticated, decaffeinated version of the ideology that motivated Ron Paul’s presidential races.

On drones, Rand Paul finally hit pay dirt. Thanks to his filibuster, Americans can now feel safe that if they are “typing e-mails in a cafe,” they will not be “summarily executed” by a Hellfire missile. This has admittedly not been a large problem since 9/11. Paul is careful to point out that he is concerned about the possible abuses of some future, Hitler-like president. (Though one imagines the advent of a Hitler-like president would present problems other than drone policy.)

Seeking an unobjectionable assurance, Paul was aided by a bungling Obama administration, at first incapable of effectively articulating its own policy. The Justice Department memo on drone strikes leaked last month said that a target must present an imminent threat of violence; capture must not be feasible; and the operation must comply with the rules of war. Offing a noncombatant at a Starbucks in Pittsburgh is not an option. But it took some time for the attorney general to say this plainly.

In the interval, Paul gathered the sudden, unexpected, Internet-driven momentum of a varied coalition. There were, of course, paleoconservatives who believe a tyrannical dystopia has already arrived. Paul feeds their fears on talk radio: “I am worried about them doing surveillance without warrants, flying over my farm, watching where I hunt, things like that.” It is bad enough to be killed in a cafe. But warrantless hunting surveillance? Will they stop at nothing?

But this group was joined by partisan Republicans who enjoyed watching the Obama administration squirm and yield. And by some, on the left and right, who believe that the drone program has inadequate oversight, or that U.S. security policy is overly reliant on targeted killings, or that the whole enterprise is ethically suspect.

It was Paul’s political genius to pick a ripe populist issue and drive home one narrow, uncontestable point. But in the course of a 13-hour filibuster, it becomes impossible to hide your deeper motivations. Paul employs the prospect of drone murders in an attempt to discredit the “perpetual war” in which “the whole world is a zone of war.” His actual target is the war on terrorism, which he regards as unconstitutional and counterproductive.

When Paul spoke at last summer’s “We Are the Future” rally in Tampa, he praised his father in particular for raising the issue of “blowback.” “Had he not talked about blowback,” said the younger Paul, “I don’t think anyone ever would have.” This, in the Paulite milieu, is the idea that U.S. policies of aggression and empire provoke terrorist attacks. In his own speech at that rally, Ron Paul claimed that if his non-interventionism had been in force, the 3,000 people killed on 9/11 would still “be alive.”

In various settings, Rand Paul has described himself as a foreign policy “realist.” But this is not the ideology of Chuck Hagel or others skeptical of democracy promotion and nation-building. Paul’s “constitutional foreign policy” denies the legal basis for the war on terror, would place severe constraints on the executive in defending the nation and hints at the existence of an oppressive national security state.

These views are not new. They were central to Ron Paul’s presidential runs. But now they have an advocate who is more skilled, picks his fights better and possesses a larger platform. If the younger Paul runs for president in 2016, it will set up a lively debate on foreign policy fundamentals.

On the other side of that debate are two administrations and the majority of members of Congress from both parties who, since 9/11, have found the threat of terrorism both real and unappeasable. In this period, the American government, with congressional authorization, has destroyed terrorist training camps; undermined terrorist communications, fundraising and planning; targeted terrorist leaders; and disrupted at least 40 plots aimed at U.S. targets.

Far from perpetrating imaginary terrors on Americans, the government has protected them from real ones. Which is the reason that ­Republicans, in the end, cannot ­#StandWithRand.

Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Mar 12, 2013 - 01:11pm PT
RAND PAUL FOR PRESIDENT!

Comrade climbers, join me in promoting Comrade Rand!

The future of the GOP!!
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Mar 12, 2013 - 01:16pm PT
Ayn Rand Rand Paul Rand Paul Ayn Rand

Paul Ayn Rand Ayn Paul....hmmmmmm
Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Mar 12, 2013 - 01:17pm PT
http://international.ucla.edu/burkle/news/article.asp?parentid=130551

Daniel Pearl Memorial Lecture with Condoleezza Rice, former U.S. Secretary of State and National Security Advisor to President George W. Bush

This was the lecture I attended at UCLA. Very good talk, I thought.
Norton

Social climber
the Wastelands
Mar 12, 2013 - 01:18pm PT
I hope that Rand Paul declares as an Independent in 2016 and runs for President.

I figure he will take some 15 million votes away from whomever the Republican nominee will be.

In fact, I would gladly donate to Rand's campaign.

I mean, anyone who would vote against the Civil Rights Act is my kind of guy.
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