StoneMaster Stories (Part III) continued onward

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WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Original Post - Feb 20, 2006 - 11:53pm PT
This is a splinter of the Part II massive and bloated thread.

Post new addendums to the original thread here on Part III.

Here is the link to the Part II thread for background:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=150211&f=0&b=0

Wonder

climber
WA
Feb 21, 2006 - 12:07am PT
so where was i, oh yeah, Peter Minks pissing on the flag. After that we had the great rendition of O'Rileiy's Daughter.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 21, 2006 - 12:08am PT
Thanks for flakin' out some more rope for us Werner.
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Feb 21, 2006 - 12:15am PT
John,
Didn't you say this might be for an upcoming book? Just
wondering if everyone who contributes and gets a story printed gets some royalties???? Yer brilliant bro, yer gettin enough material to do AT LEAST one book, and everyone else is doing the work!!!
"Choa Babe!" (john long)
Peace
henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 21, 2006 - 12:22am PT
KNUCKLEHEADS? INDEED! "Hohoho, Man!"

Roy, man, I haven't seen you in ages dude. Last time I think it was in the Meadows. Yes, you got the second part of the handle right. Fortunately, in my opinion, the "Penny" usually gets dropped. There is of course a story to the name. But KP can probably recount that much better than I.

How about the Smooth Sole? Maybe the routes were Blown Out, Drown Out, Pink Royd, Ultimatium, Last Dance, and Down and Out?

I am about 100% positive that I remember the exact afternoon.

When I said in my initial post that the Stonemaster legacy would live on through the climbing of the people they influenced I wasn't kidding. Others like John, Ricky, and Mike had helped to get me kick-started. They did it for me, I was supposed to do it for others. Quite simple. So we see their influence twice removed. And you've probably done it for someone else. Three times removed. And so it goes on...

See what I mean? Is this stuff killer, or what?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 21, 2006 - 12:34am PT
D Hensel,
I hope you are well.

I think Blown Out was the topper- 'had a sort of short headwall crux with a high step-dropover maneuver, moving a bit right to an edge you had to catch with the right foot.

They'll probably pull that shred out of my brain with other baby bootie stuff when I get my re-juve

29 years ago-

So lets hear the Minksy debacle someone...
henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 21, 2006 - 01:30am PT
Alright Gramicci, let's see if you remember this. Bobby and I used to go weekly to the local climbing store, at that time I believe it was directly across from the old Chart House, just to look at the book where people were hand writing their first ascents. We saw the write up of Seasons End, and within one week we were back up to do it. But the one I really remember being psyched about was when we saw New Gen in the book. I don't remember how long it took us to get ready for that route, but it wasn't too long. We also came up on a week day. I led the first pitch and remember that it seemed hard. It seemed a little more spooky than Valhalla. Bobby led the second pitch, he only took a few falls on it before sending it. Man we were so totally psyched! We thought we had absolutely arrived. We just sat at the second belay for a long time, basking in the moment. We weren't really that concerned about the third pitch at that point so we didn't feel that we needed to hurry. Finally we top out and start hiking down late in the day. Only to meet you coming up the trail at the dime tree (remember the tree with the coins stuck in it? one had to offer a token dime sacrifice to that tree sooner or later or the "dime" Gods wouldn't smile on your Suicide efforts). You and Tobin had been in Humber Park and seen us on route, and were wondering who it could be. Since we were taking so long to top out you had hiked up just to find out. When you saw us, you didn't ask any questions, you simply said "So it was you guys." I think you then told us that we had just done the third overall ascent, the second continuous ascent of all three pitches, and the first EB ascent. That just absolutely capped our day. It made us feel that we too had become part of the new generation.

And for what it's worth, I always liked the name.

This talk of New Gen makes me remember the time KP and I were at the base of it and Tobin... Guess I'll have to tell that story one of these days.

Anybody remember this Powell-ism? "Hohoho man, there I was! Couldn't go up. Couldn't go down. Didn't know what I was gonna do!"

Ricky: Dude, let's get together and crank some rads (5.9 for me). Maybe we'll even get Powell to come along for entertainment! What a scream that'll be!

henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 21, 2006 - 01:56am PT
But Largo... If you would've been thinner/smaller like us, then you wouldn't have been the "Big Man". Nor would you have been able to be bigger than life. Now don't go blowin' my minds eye image of you. It just doesn't seem right when you only weigh in at 150 lbs.

No, things were just right.

Wonder

climber
WA
Feb 21, 2006 - 01:56am PT
so do you remember the name of the guy who owned the climbing shop? we were talking about Jay Smith. him and i used to teach climbing out of Clifford's shop. Clifford attempted a one day solo assent up the north face of Mt San Jacinto. had to bivy right below the top.





healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Feb 21, 2006 - 03:16am PT
"...just to look at the book where people were hand writing their first ascents."

Anyone know if that book survived...? Sounds like a real treasure and part of history if it did...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:10am PT
The shop was Mountain People?- or did that come later.

Was Bullwinkle snappin' frames when the core group was out and up on things?

An action photo of each of the prime actors would be cool, to ground the whole thing and round out the thread before it closes out.

I know that puts a lot of goods right out on the table, as Ron Gomez mentioned. I think its all public domain unless copyrighted. But that was Largo's request to begin with; for all to step forward and start to get something rolling for a published project. This thread is a harvesting mission, a teaser, the initial PR.

Maybe each of you, already listed in the informal roll call, could throw something up, without spilling the best candy in the lobby?

Tobin did an interview, I think in Mountain, describing his transition. It was at once revealing and a bit heartbreaking- he spoke of consolidating his rock skills, with a fast ascent of Astroman, maybe Tales, I think all on nuts. He spoke of an emptiness, the bible smuggling as a path to more conviction. That also would help to flesh out the guy who seems to be the esteemed poster child and one of the more colorful core activists.

Thanks Rob Muir for your earlier pics.
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:36am PT
Little Roy, how ya doing. Good to see you join the ST ranks.

Here's one of those oldish Bullwinkle shots you wanted to see.

So, who is this flying monkey?


and a bonus beer for those who can name what he's jumping off of. Of course you have to see me to collect it.
Sewellymon

climber
.....in a single wide......
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:42am PT
Pat- is that formation called the "Up 40"? ..or Up 30?

it's over near Turtle Rocks. I recall there is a sweet-but-too short 5.10d fingercrack hidden in the shadows on the formation on the left (ferget the name of the route...

if it IS the up 30, it's a jb highball, so maybe that is an airborne Johhny Rock?

or- i coud be all wrong
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:47am PT
Tarbuster,
NOT serious about the royalty thing, just yankin John. This is a great place to be reading all these great stories, I hope something does come of it, it would be great to have and if nothing else, it brings back many great memories of a bunch of great people all into the same thing at the same time! Keep the contributions coming!
Peace
Pat, them shorts look like something Bachar or Mike Paul would be wearing? What he is jumping off of? A ROCK (send the beer)
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 21, 2006 - 11:13am PT
Darrell, I totally remember that day! I was very stoked with people doing that route. You two were like still water running deep. We definitely watched you and Bobby all the time probability in hopes of learning something. And that Tree wow, I completely forgot about it.

The mountain people shop, the first one (at the junction, top of town) was pretty cool. The guy had set up all these commercial sewing machines and let me make my first belay seat there, the one with the big yellow Lighting bolt. Those guys were so ahead of there time on pack making. I watched the owner hand sketch a tear drop pack pattern in less than fifteen minutes, a great influence to me. Ricky, I still have one of those light alpine models I did later too.

Jay’s shop was different it was down the road wasn’t it called desert sun or something?

“Was Bullwinkle snappin' frames when the core group was out and up on things?”

Not yet but I snapped this one of him on the fallen ponderosa










Roy, I have an interview of Tobin from a mag in Australia, don’t know if it’s the one your thinking of? if there is another I would like to track it down. Anyone?

I'll post a link soon to the interview...

can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 11:16am PT
Jeff and Ron, you're both right, in that it's jb in the photo. You're both right as to what he's jumping off of (I knew it was too easy). Ron, yes it's a rock all right, but it has a name too. And I think you have it sort of right Jeff. I have always known it as the Molar, but I think in the guide it says it is also called Up 40 (Randy?).
Here's how he got up there, but it's 11b and not 10d Jeff.
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 11:20am PT
and since I seem to be on a Bullwinkle-Bachar theme, here's one from the same time.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 21, 2006 - 12:00pm PT
Now worries Ron-
I recall we met through Mike Paul, so howdy.
Largo does have a way of getting others to pony up!

He's also no stranger to the standard artistic tactic of harvesting existing raw material to further his own synthesis; meaning we all have our influences.

I'll take a hackneyed crack at the Largo Wellspring:
Genghis Kahn/Jim Bridwell/John Milius/Buster Keaton/Phyllis Diller!?(my neck's out on that last one)

Gramicci- Mountain People made some burly stuff; a multi layered tie up swami with perlon gear loops was my buddy Doug's first tie in.

Also:I was lucky enough to be standing in your office in '82 when Lechlinski picked up his intial pair of Fire: I casually glanced at a pair on the floor next to your desk and said, "Jee, whose are those?" - a half size too big, I stuffed 2 wedges of 3/8" closed cell foam behind my heels and my range tripled, a bit ahead of the public's access. A great advance in footwear, we still called it survival edging when it came to appraising that aspect of their performance.

Hi Pat!

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 21, 2006 - 12:23pm PT
Gramicci-
There was also a good interview with you, (not sure if this has already been referenced), where you talked about the Aquarian drenching, Australia, experimenting with adrenalin shots for bouldering...
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 21, 2006 - 01:55pm PT
Today in 2006 I have a disclaimer that goes along with that interview. One shot was all I needed to know that wasn’t a good idea!

I'm collecting interviews, so then them my way.

That Aquarian drenching is a story in its self I might put on digital paper sometime.

You were with mike that day…I’m getting a clear picture now.

MG



WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 21, 2006 - 01:58pm PT
"I'm collecting interviews,so then them my way.

Hahahaha :-)
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 21, 2006 - 02:02pm PT
Werner, I have either “people” or the “national inquirer” signed up for you.

Tuesday next week, don’t hide from it. they’re talking about a cover piece too
WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 21, 2006 - 02:05pm PT
National Enquirer be the one ........

Local alien reveals all ........
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Feb 21, 2006 - 02:12pm PT
Tarbuster, ain't got a clue who you might be, met a few folks through the Vato, give me a clue or make it e.z. and tell me who's ya!
Peace
say hi to Mikey if you still see him
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 21, 2006 - 03:26pm PT
Ron,
Roy McClenahan here-
check your email
cheers
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 03:56pm PT
Here's just about the only Charles Cole photo I have from Them Days:



Taken from Mountain 65, Jan/Feb 1979, it also included the following writeup:

----------------------

At Suicide Rock some older ascents as yet unreported include the 5.11 Direct Finish to Season's End by Erick Erickson and Fred Zeal; it involves face climbing on some very small edges. Erickson has also established some free climbs on the South Face, for years the unclimbed challenge; no details are immediately available.

At Tahquitz, Jim Wilson and Pete Wilkinie climbed Ziggy Stardust (5.10c), a fistjamming traverse which takes some good crack climbing in the Royal's Arch/Bat Crack area. Mike Waugh, who made the free ascent of Magical Mystery Tour reprinted in Mountain 64, led what was possibly the 5th ascent of The Edge, infamous for its long runouts.

More recent developments atSuicide include Caliente (5.11) by John Bachar and Rick Accomazzo. This long standing face-climbing problem ranks as one of the most difficult of its kind in the area.

Small Affairis a previously unreported 5.9on the south side of Eagle Pinnacle, climbed by Mike Graham and Bill Antel; now Small Affair Direct has been added by John Long and Accomazzo. The Direct is rated 5.8, and both routes are said to be very enjoyable. Erickson and Accomazzo have freed The Reach (5.11), a steep Tahquitz classic.

John Long, Rob Muir and Mike Macklinski (sic) made the first free ascent of The Hangover (5.12); the difficulty is compared to that of a Colorado B1 standard. Long also freed Frightful Fright (5.11), doing some hard thin crack-climbing to bypass the old aid section.

Flying Circus (5.11, A4), by Rob Muir and Accomazzo (AND Charles Cole), lies on the overhanging blank bulge right of the Green Arch. The first pitch involves both 5.11 free climbing and very difficult aid climbing. The aid goes from bolts to a RURP, now fixed, to several consecutive hook moves; it is said that only hooks will be needed to repeat this section. After the aid, more 5.11 climbing leads to the belay. The second pitch has been dubbed the "Muir Trail". It involves some very sustained, very run-out free climbing directly off the belay. The first ascent required many long falls. Unrepeated, the climb is among the most formidable on Tahquitz. (See photos.)

Correspondents: Hawkins, Hildenbrand, Leavitt, Lewis, van Bruggen, Williams
----------------------


A few other names there... Why haven't we heard from Waugh, yet? Gibo? And where's Wild Jim?

And we'd still like to find the a##holes who chopped our fixed line that we left hanging from the first belay on Flying Circus, while it was still a project! ...came back the next weekend to find that the 9 mil was chopped about six feet from the ground, and the wind had blown it up onto a flake WAY HIGH up. Took us a LONG time to hook and free that jumar line... Bastards! ;o)

rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 04:50pm PT
Shouldn't be too hard to guess this action figure:



Photo by: Robs John Muir ©1978. (All rights reserved, Largo!)
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 04:55pm PT
cool pants...
Bart Fay

Social climber
Redlands, CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 05:00pm PT
Hey Robs, hows come Accomazzo looks to have three arms in
the pic ? WHF ? I never noticed before.

Oh, and thanks for the time that I bivied in the yard of
your cabin with Mr. Chicken & family.
Don't ask, don't tell.

-Bart

RE: Autopilot. We always figured it was named that cause you
would be unable to avoid a nose dive onto the road if you popped.
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 05:07pm PT
Hey, Bart. Are you seeing our old orange and blue boltkit bag (on a sling), maybe? If not, I can recommend a good optometrist... ;-p (Or a better class of drugs.)

Really. He doesn't have three arms. We have witnesses.
Murf

climber
Feb 21, 2006 - 05:11pm PT

RE: Molar 5.10.. I think the route refered to was the route on the left side of the corridor, where JB ends up on the jump. The name escapes me.

RE: the second can't say piccy. Cool shot of More Monkey! JB is facing the opposite the way I've seen most do it.

The stories are fantastic, keep 'em coming.

Murf
John Vawter

Social climber
San Diego
Feb 21, 2006 - 05:17pm PT
In the hope of stimulating your little gray cells and getting a few more stories, I will throw out a couple of route names with Stonemaster legends attached that loomed large for me back in the day. Void, at the Cookie (?) was supposed to have a baffling crux, but Mike and Tobin (?) solved it early on. Dynamo Hum, behind Camp 4. The Calf, on the Apron. And my favorite, Piece of Grass on Pywiack, a long pitch past only four bolts out of a hole with a tree that makes Golden Bars seem like a sport climb.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 21, 2006 - 06:43pm PT
now we're back on track!

but before I get back in the wings:

Mr Waugh(The Gran Wazoo I think) last seen performing one arm mantles for the ladies at Stony Point.

Eric Erickson(E) is actually too busy climbing to post.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 21, 2006 - 06:48pm PT
Yikes, Ricky! Nice air ball. I always knew that third arm gave you an edge for the face routes!

Boy John, you’re digging them up. I don’t remember Void being too baffling but Piece of grass is familiar think I might have had something to do with that one? my grey cells may be gone in that section I will defer that to others involved.

A great one on the cookie you missed was something I did with Largo. The original Valley boys had the Nabisco wall pretty sewn up with Henry Barber's help anyway. But JL had one last line eye balled a little variation off butter fingers. We called it “Lady Fingers” a tasty route!
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 21, 2006 - 07:00pm PT


ho man.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 21, 2006 - 07:15pm PT
hoooo maaaan. (note the low-cut e.b's, an innovation 10 years ahead of their time). extra style points awarded for the camel dimp.

bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 07:29pm PT
Name this ancient outdoor gym route...

rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 21, 2006 - 08:15pm PT
Up thread, Gramicci made some off-handed comment about "Rebolting"...

Man, I can barely remember that, Mike! Refresh my memory. I vaguely recall doing a very early ascent, fairly soon after Bender and company did it. Hard it was! And a really high step on the crux, right? Surprised to see that Vogel's got it rated 11b--thought it was 10+. And, now, I remember that WE did that. Like honeybees back returning to the hive, I now remember "dancing" those moves along with you, for the guys back at the 'Mart.

I think it was when we were doing "Rebolting Development", that my (then) girl friend's ex-boyfriend (from Huntington Beach) wandered below the base. You and I were up at the first belay, and this guy has the cheek to ask if we'd cast down a top-rope for him. Turns out he was blazing on acid, if I remember correctly... Did most of the moves, he did, but I don't think that he could crank to crux.

Whew.

Hey, anybody else remember the MASSIVE hacky-sack sessions in Humber? Fifteen-, twenty-strong! Group hacks. Impolite to serve to yourself! Counting the number of hacks before the bag hit the ground... The loneliness of the long-distance hack!
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 21, 2006 - 09:22pm PT
Nice shot of JL on the Ripper


The off handed remark was referring to another hellaceous bender route. you took a wiper in the second pitch like Ricky’s above. I also remember your girl friend floating up the first pitch.

5.10+ used to encompass a broad range. Before Bridwells letter grade pretty much made it obsolete. Its interesting the way the grades expanded to fill the same space. IMO

I challenge that there are not many of these floating around. This is a wilts supplement with the forward dated 1965 it’s twelve pages note the 5.10+ routes listed. The aid is even graded like 6.7 for hard class 6 .








bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:28pm PT
i've got a 1962 issue of "summit" magazine with an article on recent developments on tahquitz, including pics of kamps on the f.a. of blankity blank. maybe i should scan 'em. i've also got the mountain magazine that reports caliente as a, uh, "5.11"...5.11??? mmmkay. yeah, sure, 5.11, yeah sure that's it!
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:33pm PT
Damm, that has got to be a jewel! Kamps on blanketty blank
WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 21, 2006 - 10:35pm PT
Hey keep it up bros, so vedy interesting

Some awesome photos there too .......
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:36pm PT
Nice shot of JL on the Ripper

my favorite thing about the pic is that gill took it! he was a natural talent as a photog. and as this pic demonstrates, he still has an eye for a pleasing image.



bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:38pm PT
Damm, that has got to be a jewel! Kamps on blanketty blank

off topic, but i'll dig the sucker up and post it.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 21, 2006 - 10:59pm PT
on topic: henny penny wrote earlier about how the stonemasters were the start of an unbroken chain of generations of climbers, and a way of approaching the sport, that was passed on through folklore and example and gestalt, something that continues in many quarters to this day...i know people in their teens and 20's who have never even heard of the stonemasters but emulate them in every way. it does my heart good.

well, if darrel considers himself second generation, i guess i'm third, even if i did do valhalla in '76 and new gen in '77. things were happening so fast back then, a year was a lifetime...

anyway, the first time i climbed with DH was at suicide in the spring of '77. i was up there with acouple of buddies, one of whom was guy andrews -- maybe some of you remember him, he died in '79 along with with chuck bloodworth on the summit of aconcagua after completing the first alpine-style ascent of the south face -- anyway, DH was up at suicide fishing for a belay and we hooked up with him. we sort of knew each other as mike paul had introduced me to KP the year before, and we'd been seeing one another around at the crags for a couple of years at that point.

anyway, i'd forgotten my shoes but luckily was wearing scats. i led pink royd, and hensel remarked that it was a "good lead". my head grew about 10 sizes. we decided since we had a ropegun on our hands we should do some routes that we'd never done, so darrel lead up up obscured by clouds, then seasons end with the direct finish. i only skidded once on season's end, in the scats, and on top DH expressed his amazement that i'd even gotten off first base on the thing.

point is...the baton of mutual encouragement, and just climbing to impress yourself first, and your freinds a close second, was in retrospect so palapable in those days that in retrospect i'm glad we were oblivious to it. it was truly such a wonderful time in our lives. there were so many good years to come, and even today i feel like i enjoy the best times of my life, but if i had to strip away all the veneer i'd have to say that '73 to '79, my core years in idylwild, were the years that defined the prson i would become today. and the stonemaster ethic, if we can call it that, was the template.

this thread brings back so many wonderful memories...
m.

Trad climber
UT
Feb 21, 2006 - 11:19pm PT
Wow. I've entered a timewarp! It is absolutely fabulous to read your posts, gentlemen- I've spent the last hour laughing my head off and enjoying my fond memories of just about every person who's posting on this thread...and, of course, of the terrific routes and magical areas (Valhalla, New Gen, Etude, Flower, the Prow, Mt. Rubidoux, Josh....) that drew us irrevocably into the climbing life. If any of youse guys visit Salt Lake, give me a ring. Largo, I too have some entertaining stories about you, for your collection.

warm regards to all,
mariah.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Feb 21, 2006 - 11:21pm PT
Man, you guys really have some archive shots. I never had a camera during all those routes, and only have a few pics. But that's okay since the memories are strong.

I can't remember how I came across the lowtop EB idea but soon as I did I never went back. They looked sort of cave since I cut the tops off with a steak knife, but I liked the results.

Dynamo Hum--I think--is a super thin crack behind Camp 4 that I did with Tobin. I think it's 11d, which ain't bad for the 70s. The crux is the start which would probably be 5.12 if it was not just off the ground. I remember having to use a face edge on the top, thin bit because I couldn't get my meat hooks in the seam.

The Calf--an ancient bolt ladder on the Apron--was one of my first 1st Free Ascents in the Valley. I first tried it with Henry Barber, who couldn't do any of it because it was so different than Gunks stuff (all dime cranking), plus his shoes were shot (RDs). I think I later did it all with Jim Wilson--but I can't remember. Gotta wonder how hard that thing really is--I have no idea.

I'd really like to see that old shot of Kamps on Blankety Blank. I remember doing that really early on with Richard--when we were just kids. The crux (by a bolt) seemed easy compared to the sketchy 5.10 down low on the first pitch. I rememeber Richard banging in tied-off pegs on that first bit. I think more than a few guys hit the ground working out the opening sequence. I later did a direct finish to that route (with Beverly Johnson, of all people)--no harder than the lower crux but it added a bit more hard climbing to it. Vogle got a good one with Fred, off to the left. Wilma, in the same area, is harder, but not nearly as good as the opening pitch of Fred, which as I recall is classic Tahquitz 11.a. Pisses me off I never saw that line befor RV did. I could bitch slap him for bagging that gem first.

Human Fright is another pretty good one I freed with Mike Lechlinski (SP??), just right of Blankety Blank. I think that one's close to 5.12 with a rusty old LA at the crux. I think Eric Erickson was with us. Back then he was so skinny we didn't drive him to Idylwild--we faxed him there.

Jesus, I haven't thought about any of this shite in ages . . .

Oh, yeah. How about the Hangover. Now that's one exciting off the deck boulder problem. Wonder how often that gets done? Had to make three trips on that one to get it in one go. First with Bear Squared; next with Wangh; finally go it with with Mari belaying. I think I might have even been up there with Rob and Mike L. You can tension over to the arete and crank it at 5.11, but doing that flying sideways mo to the arete, and sticking it, was the shiz-at. And I was really into that kind of climbing at the time ('78). Who knows how hard it is . . .

I think if we'd really fiddled around on that stuff between Chingadara and the X crack we would have been able to cook up some more routes, but back there there was no way to protect them on the lead. I do remember doing the first or second free ascent of The Reach and that one has a cranker 5.12a bit at the bottom. Very sequency and thin. Black Harlot's Layaway is to the left, first freed by Tobin and Gib, and is supposed to be real hard but I never tried it.

Paux de Deux (sp??--my French ain't so good) is also good.

Oh, and how about that huge whistler Tobin took on Unchaste. I followed that route in tennis shoes and screwed one of my fingers up. That was a jack ass thing to do. A lot of what I did back then was ridiculous, but fun.

Oh, Mariah, perhaps you remember the time out at Josh we got a dictionary and tried to find words neither of us had ever heard of before. If you'll remember, the word that totally got us was galamauphrey. I think I spelled it correctly--maybe not. I smoked a lot of rag weed back then but I still have a memory like an elephant--which is a good thing since I have no photos.

JL
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Feb 21, 2006 - 11:22pm PT
John Vawter- about Piece of Grass. Tobin, Gramicci and I did it in about ’74 (it’s left of the classic Dike Route on Pywiack). I can picture the unique, circular feature with bright green turf growing out of it that gave the route its name. I seem to remember that the climbing went pretty smoothly- few, if any, falls. I think that someone wanted to name it the “Grass Hole” but Tobin, always the puritan, vetoed that. Everything else is pretty opaque.

Gramicci, you can’t have forgotten that you and I happened to meet in Tuolumne in about ’79 or 80 and thought it might be fun to revisit the route. We ended up being completely baffled and neither of us could lead the first hard section. We retreated in disgrace, mumbling excuses about being out of shape, but having accomplished something rare: we had sandbagged ourselves.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 21, 2006 - 11:47pm PT
ok, can't find the older '63/'64 ish of summit right now, my archives are un uncatalogued disaster -- but check out this scan from the october '60 ish of summit -- the dolt, kamps, rearick, mark powell -- what more could one want???



hey mariah....what's up, girlfreind? still living in that ghetto? flagstaff, babe. it's where particular people congregate.

JL...you won't remember this, but i do. on your first free attempt of the hangover with bear squared, our two parties shared the ledge atop the crux pitch of el camino real for a few minutes. you mentioned that it used to be quite the enduro thing to hang in there and lead it on pins, and i remarked how "yeah, with nuts even us lightwieghts can lead it". which was true, but my partner felt i'd made such an egregious breach of etiquette by talking to you so casually he was mortified.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 22, 2006 - 12:17am PT
YYYYYes!
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Feb 22, 2006 - 12:35am PT
Rearick's hardwood nuts...

Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 22, 2006 - 12:52am PT
Rick, that day back on pywiack must be why those grey cells are gone. So true the ultimate sandbag. That first summer in Tuolumne with you and Tobin was special.

Bvb, great collection are those hand me downs? The Dolt photo of Rearick in what looks like Gi type pants. Also Higgins was all over the free ascent of those things with Kamps when they did them. I got to say these guys were into freeing their own routes before the French thought about it, like 15 years before. (I hope this doesn’t get me in trouble but its true)

Healyje, unbelievable nut collection!

what does that flapper one do?
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Feb 22, 2006 - 01:48am PT
Wider cracks if you can believe it...
todd-gordon

climber
Feb 22, 2006 - 03:42am PT
Here's a good Flying Circus story. We had heard the story and seen the pictures of The Flying Circus. Rob and Rick were, no doubt, two of the best climbers in the world, and we knew that Rob had taken a long fall or two on the infamous "Muir Trail" second pitch. We had also heard that Yaniro had tried the climb, and failed on the first pitch....something about blown hook placements that were now gone.....(Don't know if there is any truth to THAT , but that is what we had heard). Accamazo and Muir, bad-ass Mofo Stonemaster masters;...Yaniro probably the strongest climber on the planet.....us;....regular average Joes;....plain folk. Anyways, the team was assembled. Dave Evans was to lead the first pitch which had the A4 section, and Hensel was to lead the Muir Trail run-out second section.....then their was " The rest of the team"...along for the support, and, of course, the top rope from Evans and Hensel. We were psyched, surprisingly optimistic, and we were all nervous for Evans and Hensel, but back then, we pushed it quite often and nail biting and potentially dangerous leads at our limit was a fairly regular practice.....(Not to brag;...I didn't say we were SOLID on these climbs, ...but we WERE going for it!)..Anyways.....Evans has a secret weapon to get past the "blown" hook placements....an ingenous invention of his own;....a 20' tent pole with a sky hook duct-taped to the end!...(This "secret weapon" ended up being key to our success, and did create quite a stir as "cheating"....which I never did quite understand...the whole concept was terrifying to me....and took alot of brass, and calling THAT cheating wasn't all too fair, I thought..).. Dave climbed the aid line quickly until he got on some rurps, and then took out the weapon.....the whole rig was wobbley, dicey, and none of us knew if the thing would ever work.....Dave looked like a fisherman with the long pole reeling all over the place.....finally the pole stopped wiggling and Dave weighted it to "sink" the hook placement. Attatched to the pole were 2 aiders linked together...Dave started to climb up the aiders VERY gingerly; none of us knew if the blind hook placement was worth a sh#t. As Dave got near the top of the aiders, we ALL got very quiet, for a fall from where he was, onto the RURPs would probably mess him up fairly good. When he got eye-ball level with the hook, we asked up if the hook placement was good, I believe he said no, and we all got really gripped, but he was able to somehow re-place the hook so it was better, and eventually made it to the belay. Dave DID place a bolt next to a crappy 1/4 in. bolt AND we added another bolt to the double 1/4 inch bolts at the belay. These 2 added bolts created quite a stir, even though they did not change the climbing ONE BIT.......and I totally respect Dave for having the balls to lead this pitch, and I supported his decision to back up the crappy bolt and the really not so bomb-proof belay.....Anyways....the "monekys" jumared up the rope (That was myself, I believe Craig Fry, and Margie Floyd) and we were all ready for Hensel to "Do his thing." Hensel is "The Master" of the dime edges, and can climb anything, but let me tell you, he had his "game face" on for the Muir Trail. I was belaying him, and we got him all jacked up and psyched up like a prize fighter ready to step into the ring. I was ready to catch a 40 or 50 foot fall if need be.... reeling in as much slack as I could if he fell... He launched off the belay, and climbed slowly but at a steady pace. He didn't say anything, and neither did we, as he got farther and farther out from his last bolt. He didn't shake, whine, pray, or cry, which is proud, but he didn't say anything until he finally, at about 20 or 25 feet out, he said, "I got it", and we could feel his confidence soar and his apprehension leave immediately....He had latched a "big" crimper hold, and the Muir Trail was history. We all shouted a cheer and knew the climb was in the bag. As I followed the 2nd pitch free climbing, I was amazed at just how hard the climbing was WAY run out......it wasn't all THAT bad, but on run-out rock, WAY to scary for me to lead.... when I finally got to the "Thank God huge crimper" that Hensel had felt so relieved to get to , I gasped in horror, for I was expecting a huge jug that one would NEVER fall off of....instead in was just a plain ol' small dime edge....tiny and insecure for most, but for Hensel the "master" it was a bivy ledge. Even though I didn't do ANY of the leading , I was proud to be part of the 2nd ascent of the rad Stonemaster's Flying Circus, the baddest climb on Tahquitz, and even more proud of my rad friends Dave and Darryl, for having the sac to lead these pitches which we had so much fear and respect for. I don't know of anyone else who has done the climb, and I believe it has only had these 2 ascents....I would like to know if it's been done again after our ascent. Our hats were off to Rick and Rob, and the climb was a fantastic adventure for us plain folk....walking in the footsteps of The Stonemasters. (sorry this got so long....it was quite a memorable climb for me...)
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 09:04am PT
Ya know? I had to go back and edit my posts above regarding Flying Circus. It wasn't Gib Lewis but, instead, it was Charles "Chuck" Cole who was along with us on the FA.

I remember hearing that Gibo and Cole, later, went back and did a three-bolt variation to the right--five years later--that eventually met up with the first belay of The Circus. Called "New Wave" (Hmmm. Sounds familiar, Ricky?), I'm sure their route hasn't had more than a few ascents, either.

(And damn. This Old Dad's memory is really fading if I could mix up Gibo and Chuckles!)
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 09:19am PT
Ben Borsen used to sport a pair of PAs, back in 1972, that he had cut ALL the canvas out of and had folded and sown the back down to the heal counter. Just the red leather around the lace eyelets, up around the ankle and the strip down the heel was folded and sewn for a tug-on loop. The first low-cut boots I had ever seen. He even had a pair of which he sliced-off the toe cap! The first (and only) pair of open-toed Galibier climbing sandals. (More funky than monkey.)
henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 22, 2006 - 09:24am PT
This is rich indeed!

M: Queenie! The "Divine ms. M" weighs in!

bvb: Alright, sorry, I can't place a name. But now I gotta know. I vaugely remember the day you speak of. I more or less always felt late first / very early second generation because I was about one/two years behind the core group. Robs has mentioned years like '70, I started doing things in '72. Damn! And I never could catch those guys. Not that I wasn't accepted or anything at all negative like that. They certainly served as my mentors. Ricky in particular. John was too burly for me, but Ricky, now there was one to watch and emulate...

Gordo: Dude. I remember the "Circus" clear as can be. I used to have that picture of Ricky winging on the second pitch on my wall for a couple of years. (And I think he must have had three arms, how else can you explain how he stayed on stuff that was so thin?) We used to try and hit those seriously rad routes when we were in the middle of a roll. KP and I had just finished putting up some real run-out stuff in the Whitney Portal the previous weeks. So I felt heady enough to try Muir's statement. Remember? We did exactly the same thing when we did the Edge. How sweet that "Muir Trail" pitch was! I do clearly remember the point where I knew I was going to get away from it without sailing. The moves had thined down and there was a water polished bulge at the end of the run where the holds went sorta slopper. The kind of thing you could easily skate on with no hope of recovery. And the bulge was way out there. Wow. I remember finding an edge just over the bulge and thinking "Now I have it, because I'm back on positive holds". And Dave on the first. Yeah, that was grim alright. What was with that psycho first ascent party, anyway? Thanks for the blast from the past. What a great memory that one is.
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Feb 22, 2006 - 12:12pm PT
Rob, I was just about to correct that about Flying Circus. Charles Cole was with us, in fact he led a key section. The aid section at the bottom involved rurps, then hooking an overhanging blank section, until I was able to place a bolt where the angle lessened. That was enough for that day, and we fixed the rope to come back later. Charles took over the lead next time and jumared back up there. He hooked straight right on heinous placements and got another bolt in, 15 feet to the right. Here the holds looked like they could be free climbed, and I jumared back up and gave it a go. In the picture, you can see the aid slings at the end of the aid section, on the bolt that Charles placed. The fall in the picture took place on a tricky mantle, and the move spit me off several times as I tried to fully extend the mantle.If you didn’t balance just right, you tipped backwards off the mantle and that is why I was pitched away from the rock. I eventually got it, and put in two quarter inch bolts for the belay. In retrospect,it may have been better to put the belay at the end of the aid section, but it just seemed too short a pitch at the time.

Rob came up and started up the second pitch off the belay. He got way up there, looked solid, but came off just before reaching what appeared to be a good place to place a bolt. I shiver to think of the stress put on those bolts, since the fall was directly onto the belay. I had time to take in slack as he fell and shortened the fall somewhat. I asked Rob if he wanted to let me try it, since that fall would have blanched anyone, and I knew from close observation from the belay that it would go. But Rob dismissed this idea with scorn and insisted on getting right back on the horse. He cruised it the second time and the second pitch became the “Muir Trail.”
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 01:03pm PT
m. = Mariah! woah...how goes it? heh heh - jb
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 22, 2006 - 01:18pm PT
JB


"Name this ancient outdoor gym route..."

From far above in the thread, I will take a stab at it . . .

I think you are climbing on one of the outlying Aztec thrones at Teotihuacan, just outside Mexico City.

If that's not it, then I don't know what the hell I'm talking about.

It's been a while since I've been there. Went down with a friend to climb Popo in about '88 (before it came out of dormancy)and ended up soloing Popo. Would love to go back down there and fly my paraglider off all of them, and then go diving in Cozumel and the Cenotes of the Yucatan. Time to revisit the honeymoon with the wife in Cozumel. That would be the perfect vacation.
John Vawter

Social climber
San Diego
Feb 22, 2006 - 01:27pm PT
bvb-- well said.

Hello Mariah! I have some very fond memories of you. One in particular, a pleasant afternoon up on the Apron, probably that summer when Ambrose broke both legs on the RR on Half Dome. Hey, what ever happened to Michaelson?
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 01:41pm PT
Klimmer! ding ding...you got it.Teotihuacan, Pyramid of the sun (made up name but that's what "they" call it).

I got busted by the police right after this photo...I was off route!
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 01:57pm PT
With scorn? Naw, I hope not... But I remember being quite pissed at that somewhat greasy sloper that Darrell describes over left. The one JUST before you can grab the crimpers and can then step onto the stance where we placed the first bolt. Such good holds, in exactly the right places; a truly fine sequence problem.

...still vividly remember turning slightly counter-clockwise during the fall, to watch that I didn't snag the rope between the legs! (I did that once on Rebolting and I didn't want to endure those rope-burns on the legs again.) I do remember your eyes being somewhat saucer-like, once I righted myself. Damned if I'd let that pony throw me a second time!

Back on the stance, it did seem to take me a long time to drill and set that 1/4'' Rawl though. No point in doing another, what?, 40' or 50-footer again!

Later that evening, I discovered that I had two coin-sized bruises on my thigh precisely where two quarters--that had been in my pocket--got caught in the leg-loops of the Whillians harness.

So... Henny... You've dropped a few hints... Exactly WHEN did you guys repeat The Circus? (Hmmm. Long runouts at the Portal. Candlelight, maybe? No Pie ala Mode, perhaps? So, I'm guessing the early Nineties.) KP? Todd?
Ed Bannister

Mountain climber
Victorville, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 02:00pm PT
Gramicci-
I have one or perhaps two of that old Wilts guide.

But I have a yet more rare publication and in fact it is stonemaster stuff to boot!

The first, and I do mean the first commercially available bouldering guide to southern california...
Can You Say who wrote it??
It's about 3" x 4 1/2", funny publisher name too.
Ed Bannister

Mountain climber
Victorville, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 02:09pm PT
Speaking of Largo on Covers... does someone have a pic of that hang and swing gag on Kong boulder?
Trees growing at a strange angle in the background.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 22, 2006 - 02:29pm PT
Robs, sooo you do remember the whipper on Rebolting. That was a nasty rope burn!

Ed, haven’t got a clue. Unless its Vogel? Gil D. didn’t write did he?

Top this, I have the One and Only copy of a guide Johnny Woodard wrote for me of a secret area we had. Gave it to me for my birthday one year.


I wonder if M. is coming back ?

bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 22, 2006 - 02:31pm PT
AMAZING!!!!!!

Ed Bannister

Mountain climber
Victorville, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 03:07pm PT
AWESOME!
thanks bvb! made me laugh just about as hard as the first time I saw it! Largo, just how hard did you push off? quite an accomplishment in itself!
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 03:09pm PT
Gramicci: "Robs, sooo you do remember the whipper on Rebolting."

NOW I do, ya bastard! :o) I had actually forgotten (repressed) that fall, and this Stonemaster nostalgia fest has gone and dredged-up all this STUFF! (Actually, we should blame this all on Largo.)

Say, wanna go bouldering this weekend at Rubidoux?
pc

climber
Eastside
Feb 22, 2006 - 03:10pm PT
I don't get it. Is it a slab tilted and he's pushing off?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 22, 2006 - 03:12pm PT
Yes Bob!
Crash pads would've been AMAZINGLY worthless!

-To prevent the righteous rug burn hed've garnered from sliding down that slab had he missed the moe on that tilted gem of a pic!
Ed Bannister

Mountain climber
Victorville, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 03:23pm PT
pc- count yourself among those who believes the largoenhanced version of reality, tilted 40 (corrected) degrees or so.
Largo has always been nothing but good fun to read if you do not take him too seriously...and he is indeed a great storyteller. He is fond of borrowing ideas though, everything from ideas for Doogie Howser scripts, to titles for books like "Art of Leading" I laugh as I write but really, that is not even remotely close to "Art of Climbing" is it?

My favorite Largo story, well other than two first ascents of the same route:

I go to see Charles at the then humble digs of 5.10 on Lankershim.
Largo shows me "the new fabric for climbing shoes" acting in word and deed as if it were propriatary fabric. He handed me a sample when I looked back and commented immediately, trampoline mesh! great idea to use it in shoes, it will breathe, conform and wear well... Largo... was speechless.
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 04:03pm PT
Yeah. Tilt-foolery™ that is. (I just tried tilting it 40° counter-clockwise, and it STILL looks vertical!) Fifty degrees looks pretty close...

Now, mind you, I'm claiming NO responsibility for this photo. But Photoshop is pretty useful for this kinda stuff.

So, JL, who snapped the shot?
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 04:17pm PT
More old stuff...like me
Ed Bannister

Mountain climber
Victorville, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 04:19pm PT
I was writing 40 degrees and thought nahh, can't accuse him of that! whoa! thanks for fessing up! hence in my request for the pic, trees growing at odd angle!
pc

climber
Eastside
Feb 22, 2006 - 05:00pm PT
Funny stuff. I finally tilted my head and it all came clear ;)

Gives me some great ideas for "hero shots"
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
Feb 22, 2006 - 05:09pm PT
We climbed Flying Circus in May of 1986.........20 years ago this May!!!!....and I don't know of any other ascents.......Hensel, Evans, Floyd, Fry, Gordon.............it was rad.
Ed Bannister

Mountain climber
Victorville, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 05:28pm PT
Mike,
you are correct, bingo, ladies and gentlemen Graham-micci is right again.

Only a lawyer would say that he couldn't say.

Mike, if you are a keeper of old guidebooks, you can have a bunch of mine... there is still a boxfull of old stuff from a bucnh of areas in wales and other wierdness sitting at the Harness Factory waiting for me to get the stuff out of there.

It might be 45 degrees.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 22, 2006 - 06:34pm PT
books, sure I'll take them, I did a lot of climbing in Wales.

Robs, All this talk of Rubidoux has shredded my tips. I could maybe meet you sorta half way at stoney???

We should talk largo into it
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 22, 2006 - 06:59pm PT
Robs,
I believe Brian Rennie was the shooter for a bunch of stuff in that Black Mtn Sequence which bvb propped up for us.

Probably the cover as well?
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 22, 2006 - 07:06pm PT
every pic in "pumping granite" was shot by BR.

and bachar, i always thought this was one of the more defining pics of you. shitty scan, but it's a classic snap.



edit: if you want, i can photoshop out the rope. heh.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Feb 22, 2006 - 07:15pm PT
Yeah, Brian shot all that stuff. One thing I was proud of (beyond the joke super tilt shot--something John Sherman and I debunked ages ago in his book--was never having used a rope at Black Mountain. That was very exciting working out some of those high problems with no line or crash pads. Not too many of them are all that hard but man you sure don't want to ping.

JL
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 22, 2006 - 07:24pm PT
buddy of mine broke his leg in half pitching off "the emperor's new rope" three years ago. and he landed in a nest of pads.

if some sport weenies found that thing in the 80's, there'd be three bolts on it.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 22, 2006 - 07:25pm PT
Largo,
Earlier you mentioned Gran Trono.
Then my Phyliss Diller crack reminded me of sticking the neck out, way out, as in Gran Giraffe; that lead to Burton & Sutton.

Colorful Characters-
Don't believe their angle has been equated yet in this thread?
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 22, 2006 - 07:36pm PT
another classic stonemaster moment -- rockamazzo pic of largo on the fa of paisano, 1974. luv the p.a.'s.

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 22, 2006 - 07:56pm PT
Phat!
Now we need to see the mitts.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 09:18pm PT
Bob - Nice catalog. I totally forgot about that one! EB's baby!
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 22, 2006 - 09:32pm PT
Grammi said: All this talk of Rubidoux has shredded my tips. I could maybe meet you sorta half way at stoney???

Just watched Fritz, and the weather this weekend looks to be absolutely killer! But, man, if we go to Stoney, Wazoo will show up and spank our sorry hineys silly. On the other hand, if we go to Rubidoux, that's within striking distance for the Hensel and then we're REALLY in trouble.

As it is, I've been to Stoney more recently that Rubidoux. Can you believe that? Kamps' memorial service... (Actually, Largo was there then too, so we're screwed either way!)
henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 22, 2006 - 10:55pm PT
Boy, did I have a bad morning or what. First I didn't recognize bvb, and then I said Ricky's fall on the second pitch of the Circus. My bads: sorry bvb, and it was the first pitch.

Robs, I am impressed. Yes, exact call on the Portal route just before the Circus, No Pie. And you also remembered exactly what I was talking about when I said slopers on the second of the Circus. It was the step left, then one more polished dicer to a good hold over the lip, and once your feet were up: bolt.
I remember right before the step left there was a largish diagonal hold to stand on. But because of the bulge it was awkward to stand there. Remember thinking that you might have drilled there if you would have been forced to. But no, you resisted the temptation (if the thought even occured to you). Great job. It gives the second pitch character to fit in with the first. Totally classic line.

Glad you remembered the date Todd. I'm not too great with some of the dates. Would have had to ask Powell when we did the Pie to figure it out.

The Circus would be a great candidate for replacement with beefy bolts. Especially knowing how poor quarter inchers can be from having done other replacements up there. Man, if one of those bolts failed on the aid...

My ears are burning. You know, I could swear I heard someone say "Rubidoux". ??? So what time are we meeting?


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 22, 2006 - 10:55pm PT
JL,
Not to draw the fire off the collective, which is what is being tributed here, it is clear to me and I'm fairly confident I speak for all of us:

With just one post on this neet ST forum, you have drawn a ton of people together who have shared their best.

Every post is a testament to the fact that you represent a tremendous cohesive force in our lives.


Thanks.
(gotta go make some more popcorn)

henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 22, 2006 - 11:04pm PT
I second that statement. (I prefer mine with butter, and light on the salt please...)
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 22, 2006 - 11:12pm PT
Ishi?
Knockin' on Heaven's Door?
henny

Social climber
The Past
Feb 23, 2006 - 12:21am PT
Ishi: Possily. Knockin': That was really a totally joint effort with KP. He was instrumental, so I think I would like for him to relate what went down there, if he can remember that far back. So I'll hold on that one. KP???

Robs: "and I didn't want to endure those rope-burns on the legs again" Yeah, nasty, nasty stuff. A similar thing happened to me when we were putting up Burning Down the House on the Sunkist Wall. I came off about 20' out and spun around. As I started down I remember looking at a bunch of loops of rope that I was falling through and seeing one of them around my leg. I knew I was screwed and and started trying to get it off. No chance. When I got arrested it flipped me completely around 360 degrees. Luckily, I bounced out away from the wall immediately before being caught. Otherwise I might have hit my head. Serious stuff. I had the rope burn from h#ll behind my left knee. I could barely walk for about three weeks. Of course, I think Powell wanted to name the route "Kentucky Fried Chicken" or something like that. With friends like that, who needs... I had to veto that route name. Yeap, serious stuff when you get tangled up in the rope.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Feb 23, 2006 - 12:37am PT
So far I think this is definitely one of the top two or three threads I've seen at ST so far. You guys definitely need to get a room - for a reunion - and somewhere near Stoney Point from the sound of it all. What great stories and pictures!!! I have no doubt it would make a great book if you guys all got together and put humpdy-dumpty back together again history-wise. Also, that climbing cover has always been my second favorite climbing photo of all time right after the #48 cover shot of Jim Adair.
Wonder

climber
WA
Feb 23, 2006 - 12:58am PT
tarbuster, i dont know who you are, but you are really bring it down, dog.
Burton & Sutton. when they first came down in the lincoln with suicide doors i never had so much fun. Yes they should be trown to the top of this pile.
todd-gordon

climber
Feb 23, 2006 - 01:18am PT
Here's another story about a classic Stonemaster climb... The Edge. Hensel wanted to climb all the routes on both Tahquitz and Suicide;...a big project, and one not many human's on earth could even do. Needless to say, that meant leading the infamous The Edge. (By the way, WHAT a GREAT name for a climb... THE EDGE;... THAT says it ALL). All of my friends were scared shitless of the climb, which was totally O K. For someone to say to you," Don't be a chicken, don't tell me you are afraid of THe Edge?"......people didn't talk that way ; EVERYONE ON PLANET EARTH was afraid of THE Edge, and I think Darryl Hensel was as scared of the climb as anyone on earth... maybe even more, because he KNEW he HAD to lead it someday. I NEVER had thoughts of EVER leading The Edge, NEVER.....As in NERVER IN A MILLION YEARS until HELL freezes over;... THAT kind of never. I was fortunate to be around when Hensel was ready to climb THe Edge. (I must be the ultimate top rope slut, for I got ANOTHER free ride on a classic dream climb......). Once again, we got Hensel so jacked up, that he had enough adreniline in his vains to run a 4 minute mile, or lift a car off a trapped child.....he had his wings, and needed not Red Bull. The actual crux is early, down low, and fairly well protected. All of us sent the 5.11- section without any problem. NONE of us was even REMOTELY concerned with the well-protected 5.11a move....big WOW; we could all do well-protected 5.11- at the time....it was the EDGE section, the run-out hand-slapping, chiseled arete of perfect god-like white granite that had us poopin'.......Hensel blew through the 5.11- crux like it was 5.7, and got to the Edge part. He chalked up, took a couple of deep breathes, and took off, and was he scared?.......as scared as any climber could ever be without exploding, but he keep it cool, and climbed with perfection, just like one has to on such a pitch. This is not the sort of pitch one climbs saying, "I think I can do this... or I hope I can do this...."......You don't hop on the thing without 100% conviction that you are GOING to SEND.....PERIOD......and Hensel did just that. It was awesome, and I don't believe any of us could have been much happier to be on such an outstanding, proud, wild, and committing climb....truly one of the highlights of our climbing careers..(And we ALL had fairly huge climbing resumes too....). When it was finally my turn, I found the climbing on the edge to be the trickiest just at the start of the steep edge section, ..... probably 5.10 something, ... then eased to maybe solid 5.9 liebacking and face climbing on the edge for MILES......no problem for anyone who has nerves of steel, but something I wish to never lead. Dave Evans took the 2nd pitch, which was surprisingly difficult and had some fairly hard moves above gear.....tricky, hard and scary climbing.....he climbed slowly, but confidently and we all made the summit;...nobody fell or hung on the rope. This climb probably says it all, as far as what the Stonemasters were all about......style, committment, balls, beauty of line, and quality of experience. Climbing The Edge was probably one of the greatest days in my life, and I was proud of my friends who , once again had the gym-bag to lead the thing and let me tag along on the follow. We did this climb in July of 1986, around the same time we did the Flying Circus.....(Henny was hot!). The Edge is one of the finest climbing experiences on earth, and I bet I won't have too may people arguing with me on that......
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Feb 23, 2006 - 10:10am PT
I heard a story once (totally unconfirmed of course)that someone was going into Alberta to solo the North Face sometime after Tobin's accident. At some point on the approach he found Tobin's lost wallet, flipped through it,took it as an omen and walked back to the car.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 23, 2006 - 11:06am PT
Radical, don’t worry about it , thanks for posting it.

It made me cry again...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 23, 2006 - 11:12am PT
Radical,
No disrespect at all, while some might think it morose or problematic to print the dry facts, I don't think much could be done to denude the impact of a great spirit like Tobin. That report fleshes out his accomplishments as well.

Todd- you got some good rythm- upthread Shockley maroon honda passing story is a Jewel.

The Edge Direct aka Turbo Flange- a name more eighties in derivation, drawn from a time when "Flange" was indicating something entirely different, and I'm not talking about the welt on a brogue or wing tip business man's shoe such as the ones bvb was known to climb Spider Line(JT)with- The Fish(RW), a guy who in the '80's seemingly broke the Stonemaster code through ascerbic wit and spot on humour alone, most likely prepped and heated up that "flange" term in JL's head.

But to my point: Wonder, while we are waiting for the "incept" stories framing Burton Sutton Hatten-

I met most of that Squamish crew, one rainy day top roping at the Y crack I believe, or some thing in the woods below Suicide at least: Hatten, + Too Tall, Igor, (positively hates that name, sorry)Fred East. This was a time when Augie Kline was around. 'Hope these names will Jar some memories and get others to post up- while not the pure bred S Masters, all these cats would fit the '75 date and were a factor.

My first chance to hang with JL & Burton together, probably with E as my shoe horn, bouldering at Sunrise Boulders (Grandstaff Find) & one other spot Bartlett had shown JL, I'm thinking cool 'get to hang with the big boyz- I'm wearing a faux rugby shirt wich my mom had washed (too judicious w/ fabric softner) and Burton say's man what's that smell? I shrunk down into my earth shoes ('member those bizarre drop heel things) about as far as I could go.

Next time I saw Burton he was ferrying JL out of that late '70's snow storm from HVC in Josh in his spankin new Maroon 4WD monster. Not much later,that truck was absolutely battered at this point but in classic Burton style, he shows up in Mammoth Lakes, where I was rooming with Clevenger(another figure doing hard face up N at the same period), Says "where's Vern" (all I ever heard during my tenure there). "Dunno Hugh, what?"- "Roy, 'need some help".

Cool, get to help my Icon Hugh- Short Story long, he's had this beat Datsun Sedan holed up out in wood cutting territory, needs me to help retrieve it- of course I get no detail. He guns that maroon beast's gas pedal with his vasque Muir Trails and we get to the Datsun. OK, no gas pedal, no license plate. Burton says, no prob, hands me a six pack of Coors Talls & a bag of Doritos, jumps the thing and follows me back to town, I'm accelerating via a cable coming out of the dash.

That rig ended up in Hatten's posession in the Valley, where he used it to PROUDLY shuttle back and forth between camp 4 and the Deli.

Hatten would do that, swilling constantly, his claim to the usefullness of the Datsun "Yeah Man, I just toss the empties in the back- as the spent cans fill the back seat and start tumbling into the cockpit, that's when I take 'em in for the canning money".

Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Feb 23, 2006 - 11:50am PT
Wonder where we might get hold of Tobin's diary. Never even knew he kept one.

I've got a bunch of Burton stories--probably the best one is our trip to Baja for the 1st ascent of the Gran Giraffe. Burton was one of the best wall climbers on the planet at that time ('75), and he showed it.

I'm up for a reunion, but it would have to be at Roubidoux. That's like going back to the cradle for me. I literally grew up out there.

And who remembers the Roubidoux goat? Now that's a story . . .

JL
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 23, 2006 - 12:18pm PT
Ho Man! The Goat! Tell us a story, Largo... Often seen down around the Accomazzo Boulders... And, I do remember being QUITE worried about those horns on that free-range mutton!

What I miss the most about the modern Rubidoux experience? DRIVING up to the top! Every time. Fast, in the old Fiat and later in the MG...
guyman

Trad climber
Moorpark, CA.
Feb 23, 2006 - 01:36pm PT
The report on TS.....Got me thinking about him.... :>)I don't cry anymore when I think of him caus I just remember all the good times...

I recall the time Mike G and TS were rescued off the prow...
The very next day, after a great pancake breakfast, Tobin was up to go jump on the VOID....He could not do it cause his fingers were still a bit numb from the days out in the snow but that didn't stop him from taking about 10 wipers. We finaly get him to stop....I know there are photos of that try cause DF was snapping away. Thinking of DF....has he jumped in on this yet?
He has the shots of many of the "deeds". I remember a super 8mm film he has of JB soloing the "circut" in HVCG... the one where he snaps his fingers and disapears.
guyman

Trad climber
Moorpark, CA.
Feb 23, 2006 - 01:38pm PT
And to TAR....You light off any more forest fires latley?
Kofi Donny Annan

climber
darkest of africa
Feb 23, 2006 - 01:48pm PT
TAR- yea what Guyzo said. i never asked you if things were as grizzly as that story Gaines write in R&I? or was that Burly doing a literary "Largo"?
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 23, 2006 - 01:55pm PT
Hmmm... So all this talk about Rubidoux triggered some old brain-cells.

Let's see how the ST Forums handle an animated GIF:



Photos by Robert Bolton.© (Must be the mid '90s, since there's a crashpad down there.)
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 23, 2006 - 01:58pm PT
DF is down in Patagonia with The huber Bros. I think with this thread he would post up if he were here.

The goat was ornery sometimes if you weren’t careful

Edit: Robs, that has to be a first, at least with the animation.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Feb 23, 2006 - 02:37pm PT
Richard actually managed to lasso said goat with a shank of goldline and it dragged him roughshod over half the mountain before the goat actually bit through the line.

We always wonderd what the goat did for water, since it was always seen--as Rob said--kicking around the Accomazzo boulders, which are dry as Death Valley. The goat simply vanished around 1973.

JL
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 23, 2006 - 02:54pm PT
Stonemasters,

Mike "Gramicci" Graham, thank you for your reply to my email, that really meant a lot to me.

Largo,

I have laughed and cried through the years reading your short stories.

I'm going out on a real limb here with no belay. If you are serious about a reunion at Mt. Rubidoux, I'm pretty sure I could talk to (convince) my farther-in-law and ask if we could (my family and father-in-law) host a party at his house. Reunion Bouldering on Mt. Rubidoux, and a party hosted at his home afterwards. He has a big house with a large backyard, big trees, right near the base of Mt. Rubidoux on Glenwood Drive. I think he would really enjoy something like that. He likes a good party. My mother-in-law just passed away this last year, and he's a retired AF Colonel, but stays active managing/owning several Fastastic Sam's in Riverside, and traveling world-wide.

I've been bouldering off and on at Mt. Rubidoux since meeting my wife in 1989. She was running around Mt. Rubidoux with her brothers playing fort, when you guys were bouldering on Rubidoux in the early '70s. She remembers wild people getting very personal with the rock as she was growing up.

I'm a Poway Boy wanabe, getting serious into climbing/bouldering at Mt. Woodson in '75 onward while at Poway HS. My HS climbing buds and I, often ran into and sometimes bouldered with Rick Piggot, Mike Paul, Keith Brueckner et al in those days. Good times for sure. I’m thinking I might post in jpg the Credits and Table of Contents pages from the “Crags and Boulders of San Diego County” by Doug White when I scan it in later. Perhaps even the first ascents credits for more history from down San Diego way. We need some feedback in this thread from some of the Poway Boys, some of whom might be considered Stonemasters at large.

Robbins, TM H., Frost, Chouinard, Rowell were legends, but the Stonemasters were heroes to all of us. It would be a privilege and honor to meet all of you and to provide a venue for it to happen close to Rubidoux.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 23, 2006 - 03:57pm PT
TAR- yea what Guyzo said. i never asked you if things were as grizzly as that story Gaines write in R&I? or was that Burly doing a literary "Largo"?

you talkin' 'bout that "wall of voodoo" article where roy leans back on a ledge with a satisfied smile on his face after having gotten his "fix?"
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 23, 2006 - 05:29pm PT
bvb, 'kof, guyman:

Most of that story concerning the line across from Trono (Wall of Voodo -Moonflower Butress, credit goes to Tusi for the initial recon) most, is to the letter, bona fide true, even if Largo did ghost write the piece.

'Cept for the forest fire: I bivie like a champ, still sleep like a dead man every night, so I wasn't needing any fire + I was 20' above their squat in my own hole. (Bivied in "The Maw" on the Pan Am with/E & Zeal, I slept great in my hammock, waking up periodically to scarf M&M's and jive those tossy/turners- I can be such an arse). On that particular outing with Gaines and MP, those bone heads really did get a bush alight, they did kick off the mess due to its encroachment on their slim stance. Smoke actually drifted up most of the next day. No melting ropes, no real forest fire, but I was pissed because the smoke made some of my pictures look hazy.

After topping out, we were all quite relieved not to have to go all the way down the gully and put out the fire which had run its course.

Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 23, 2006 - 07:20pm PT
Klimmer, GS – Thanks for the offer. There are a few get together in the works. It’s looking like our rendezvous at Rubidoux is a little too impromptu for such a festive gathering. Don’t know what your father in-law’s neighbors would think of the invasion. Let alone all the tents and bags laying around the yard after everyone’s too drunk to drive of fly home.I’m protecting you here, You don’t know what you’re getting yourself into, houses have been known to burn to the ground.

All part of the ritual.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 23, 2006 - 08:11pm PT
8am Nov 1, 2004 Globe AZ-
oops got the date mixed up with some halloween thing down there.
well, it'l have to do.

I awake from repping duty at the Phoenix Bloobering (no real 'tude there, 'just felt good to say it)contest(or the halloween thing "Phlapper Fest") and I'm scatzing away for an event, due same night 13-15 hrs north, and I see Kamps' scraggly backside -"Hey yer Bob Kamps!"

He turns around, smiles, askes me to breakfast at the diner, which is exactly at the end of the driveway where our motel is.

"no man, thanx gotta bolt for coloredo"
Damn.
shite.
weazels shuda' ript my flesh.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 23, 2006 - 08:41pm PT
i can't resist dusting off this old chestnut. if for no other reason than to underscore the power of largo's myth, which was already carved in granite by the mid-70's, and pay tribute to the guy who ignited this thread:

1975. we're hanging out down at the ski mart on garnet ave, where largo works. there was a primitive bouldering wall carved into the brick wall upstairs. so we're hanging out there one night and JL is holding court. me and my buddy doug are talking to him about climbing and new routes and the life well-lived, and at one point -- i swear to god i'm not making this up -- he gets quiet, gazes off into space for a few moments, then murmurs as if to himself, "you gotta have vision, man. you gotta have vision."

me and my buddy were so starstruck we used that quote as the frontispiece to this horrific little supplement to the mission gorge guide that we hacked together a few months later, the immortal scumbag digest:



about which RV had this to say:



and here's the quote, in all it's published glory:



a tip of the hat to you, JL. like it or not, you were the center of gravity for SoCal climbing in those days, and despite what t.s. eliot wrote, in your case the center could hold.

and that's all i'm gonna say about that.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 23, 2006 - 08:54pm PT
MG -

ROTFLMO . . .

Too funny. Thanks for putting me back on belay and saving my ass. What the hell was I thinking?

Hey Stonemasters -

Don't go and burn down Rubidoux after the impromptu reunion bouldering OK?. That mountain has burned too many times. Hey, you guys wouldn't know about that would you???
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 23, 2006 - 10:17pm PT
BVB -

You know sometimes the light just all of a sudden turns on.

BVB = Bob VanBelle. Why didn't I not put that together before?

Mt. Woodson --- "Premium Miniatures"

We don't know each other personally, but I know we ran into each other on Woodson on several occasions from the mid '70s to 1980 when I left CA for a short while (came back to San Diego in '84). Me- tall, skinny, lanky, shoulder length read-head, Poway HS kid with buddies of mine in tow. Most often I was wearing shorts, or US Army issue olive drab loose pants, EBs with uppers covered in leather, Forrest harness, and T-shirt. Serious YEShead. Ok, maybe that doesn't help. I think I just described every Joe no-body climber in the mid '70s. Ok, maybe not everyone was into YES like I was. I will try to drum-up a photo.

I think you'll appreciate this . . . (gonna try to post a jpg of the "Crags and Boulders of San Diego County" Credits and Contents page; first time for me posting a photo at ST. I'm gonna say a little prayer now):



Hope this rescale is better.

Nope that didn't work. I'm deleteing until I get it worked out.

Thanks for all the advice. In edit mode in photobucket it was a snap to do. Hey, you learn something new everyday.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 23, 2006 - 10:25pm PT
Damm. check out the lightning bolt in that logo!

Who's got the bar over their eyes?
WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2006 - 10:31pm PT
Man you guys are on a roll, this thing will go to 400. Super!
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Feb 23, 2006 - 11:05pm PT
yeah grammici -- we concocted the "scumbags" as a san diego take-off on the "stonemasters".....complete with the ripped-off lightning bolt...following a drunken, pot smoking, bouldering binge...hey, we were in high school. shite happens. heh.
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 23, 2006 - 11:11pm PT
Hey, Klimmer.

Any chance you can edit that most recent guidebook scan to a somewhat smaller
size?

Even for those of us with decent-sized laptop screens (1280x864), it makes this
forum VERY hard to read. Seems that ST forces the default width of the page to
accommodate the widest image posted. (At least, for my browser it does...)

Anybody else seeing the same behavior?

(Yes... You in the back there. Is that Werner?)


Yes, Mr. Braun, IMO that's a bug, and not a feature. (And now you've all got a good
hint about how to clobber other ST Forum threads, right? But of course, that
wouldn't apply to these Stonemaster strands... No sir re bob.)
WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2006 - 11:16pm PT
It's happening rmuir, it's oversized
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 23, 2006 - 11:28pm PT
Yea, sorry about that. Do I have to rescan it and scale it down, or is there a way I can do it in photobucket without rescanning from scratch?

If you want a good easy to read scan of it I would copy and save it now. At worst I will delete it, rescan and rescale it then repost to photobucket. But I would like to do it the easiest way. Any advice?
rmuir

Social climber
Claremont, CA
Feb 23, 2006 - 11:31pm PT
Rescale the image using software (no need to rescan) and then post it back up to
your server. You could even change the file name, if you'd like. Then just edit your
post and modify the URL to reflect the new filename. Probably shoot for a target size
that doesn't exceed 600x800; smaller would be better.

And, in the meantime, you could edit and then delete the link in your post until
you get the new image done...
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 24, 2006 - 12:13am PT
Klimmer, in photobucket album use the edit button then reduce to say 25%

yeah, but it didn't did it

I don't mind i have duel 20" monitors
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 24, 2006 - 12:19am PT
Hey Bob,

I liked it (your logo) book says you’re the illustrator, you do it?
WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 24, 2006 - 12:33am PT
Gramicci

Show your logo ...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 24, 2006 - 12:34am PT
Starship Troopers!
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Feb 24, 2006 - 12:38am PT


I changed it to this
for fun
WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 24, 2006 - 12:50am PT
Please go to Part 4 now, thank you

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=157408&f=0&b=0
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Nov 5, 2012 - 11:17pm PT
bump
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Mar 16, 2013 - 01:13am PT
bump
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